(0) exportieren Drucken
Alle erweitern

IPv6 Tools and Settings

Letzte Aktualisierung: März 2003

Betrifft: Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2

IPv6 Tools and Settings

IPv6 Tools

The following tools are associated with Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6).

IPv6-aware TCP/IP Tools

 

Tool Description

Ftp

Use to communicate with remote computers.

Ipconfig

Display current TCP/IP and IPv6 network configuration values, update or release Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) allocated leases, and display, register, or flush Domain Name System (DNS) names.

Ipsec6.exe

Use to configure Internet Protocol security (IPSec) policies and security associations between two IPv6 hosts.

Netsh

Provides 13 sets of commands for performing network configuration tasks. Windows Server 2003 adds a new context for managing IPv6 to the netsh command set.

Netstat

Display statistics for current TCP/IP connections. Windows Server 2003 adds IPv6 parameters to the netstat command.

Pathping

Trace a path to a remote system and report packet losses at each router along the way. Windows Server 2003 adds IPv6 parameters to the pathping command.

Ping

Send Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) Echo Requests to verify that TCP/IP is configured correctly and that a remote TCP/IP computer is available. Windows Server 2003 adds IPv6 parameters to the ping command.

Route

Display the IP routing table, and add or delete IPv6 routes.

Tracert

Trace a path to a remote system. Windows Server 2003 adds IPv6 parameters to the tracert command.

FTP

The FTP connectivity tool included with Microsoft TCP/IP can be used to communicate with remote computers.

Category

The IPv6-aware version of this tool is included on the Windows Server 2003 product CD.

Version compatibility

You can run this command on computers running Windows XP or Windows Server 2003.

You can use the FTP tool to transfer files to and from a host running an FTP server service, such as the FTP component of Internet Information Services (IIS). The File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a protocol that defines how to transfer files from one computer to another over a TCP/IP network, such as the Internet or a company intranet.

Note

  • The FTP service is a component of IIS. However, when you enable IIS on a server, FTP is not enabled unless you explicitly enable it. If you install IIS without FTP, you can use Add or Remove Windows Components in Add or Remove Programs in the Control Panel to install FTP later.

For more information about TCP/IP, see “TCP/IP Technical Reference.”

Ipconfig

Category

The IPv6-aware version of this tool is included on the Windows Server 2003 product CD.

Version compatibility

You can run this command on computers running Windows XP or Windows Server 2003.

You can use the Ipconfig command-line tool to display the current configuration of the installed IP stack on a networked computer and to refresh DCHP and DNS settings. The ipconfig command is often one of the first commands you use to check the status of the connection when you experience communication problems on a TCP/IP network. Ipconfig is most useful for managing computers that obtain an IP address automatically, such as by using DHCP or Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA).

When called with no parameters, Ipconfig displays the Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) address, subnet mask, and default gateway for all adapters on a computer. If the computer has an IPv6 address, Ipconfig also displays the IPv6 address information.

Ipsec6.exe

Category

The Ipsec6.exe tool is included on the Windows Server 2003 product CD.

Version compatibility

You can run Ipsec6.exe on computers running Windows Server 2003 and use Ipsec6.exe to target computers running versions of Windows that support IPv6 (Windows XP Service Pack 1 [SP1] and later and Windows Server 2003).

You can use Ipsec6.exe to configure IPSec policies and security associations between two IPv6 hosts. This configuration creates an IPSec security association (SA) between two hosts on the same subnet. The SA performs authentication by using the Authentication Header (AH) and either the Message Digest 5 (MD5) or Secure Hash Algorithm 1 (SHA1) hashed message authentication code (HMAC) algorithms. This configuration provides data origin authentication and data integrity for all traffic between two IPv6 hosts. Ipsec6.exe has multiple commands, each with its own set of parameters:

ipsec6 sp [Interface]

Displays the active security policies. Alternatively, displays the active security policies for a specific interface.

ipsec6 sa

Displays the active security associations.

ipsec6 | FileNameWithNoExtension

Loads the security policies from FileName.spd and the security associations from FileName.sad.

ipsec6 s | FileNameWithNoExtension

Saves the current security policies to FileName.spd and the current security associations to FileName.sad. You can use this command to create files that are used to configure security policy and security associations. When there are no security policies or security associations, this command creates FileName.spd for security policies and FileName.sad for security associations. You can use these files as templates to configure the desired security policies or security associations by modifying them with a text editor.

ipsec6 d [{sp | sa}] [Index]

Deletes the security policies (using the sp parameter) or security associations (using the sa parameter) from the list of active security policies and security associations, as specified by index number. You can use ipsec6 sp or ipsec6 sa to display the index number.

ipsec6 m [{on | off}]

Specifies whether binding updates that are used for mobile IPv6 are protected by IPSec. This is enabled by default.

Note

  • This implementation of IPSec for IPv6 is not recommended for use in a production environment because it relies on static keying and has no provisions for updating keys upon sequence number reuse.

  • When you manually configure Security Parameters Indexes (SPIs), always use random numbers. Do not use sequential numbers for SPIs, or you will compromise the security of your IPSec for IPv6 policies.

  • The IPv6 protocol for the Windows Server 2003 family supports the use of IPSec Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) with NULL encryption.

Netsh Commands for Interface IPv6

Category

Netsh commands for Interface IPv6 are included on the Windows Server 2003 product CD.

Version compatibility

You can run Netsh commands for Interface IPv6 on computers running Windows Server 2003 and use Netsh commands for Interface IPv6 to target computers running versions of Windows that support IPv6 (Windows XP SP1 and later and Windows Server 2003).

The Netsh commands for Interface IPv6 provide a command-line tool that you can use to query and configure IPv6 interfaces, address, caches, and routes.

The Interface IPv6 context of netsh has a subcontext for 6to4, a transition technology described in the HowIPv6 Works section of this Technical Reference, that allows communication between IPv6/IPv4 nodes across the IPv4 Internet. You can use the commands in the netsh interface IPv6 6to4 context to configure or display the configuration of the IPv6 Helper service on either a 6to4 host or a 6to4 router. In addition, the Interface IPv6 context of netsh has a subcontext for Intra-Site Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP). ISATAP is an address assignment and tunneling mechanism for communication between IPv6/IPv4 nodes within an IPv4 intranet. You can use the commands in the nesth interface ipv6 isatap context to configure the IPv4 address of the ISATAP router.

You can run these commands from the command prompt in the Windows Server 2003 family of products, or from the command prompt for the netsh interface IPv6 context. For these commands to work at the Windows Server 2003 family command prompt, you must type netsh interface ipv6 before typing commands and parameters as they appear in the following reference.

6to4

Specifies that the 6to4 context of netsh interface IPv6 6to4 is used.

Syntax

                6to4
              

add6over4tunnel

Creates a 6over4 interface using the specified IPv4 address.

Syntax

                add 6over4tunnel [[interface=]String] [localaddress=]IPv4Address [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[localaddress=]IPv4Address

Required. Specifies the IPv4 address that is encapsulated.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command creates a 6over4 interface using the IPv4 address 10.1.1.1 on the interface named “Private.”

add 6over4tunnel “Private” 10.1.1.1

add address

Adds an IPv6 address to a specified interface. Time values can be expressed in days (d), hours (h), minutes (m), and seconds (s). For example, 2d represents two days.

Syntax

                add address [[interface=]String] [address=]IPv6Address [[type=]{unicast | anycast}] [[validlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}] [[preferredlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[address=]IPv6Address

Required. Specifies the IPv6 address to add.

[[type=]{unicast | anycast}]

Specifies whether a unicast address (unicast) or an anycast address (anycast) is added. The default selection is unicast.

[[validlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}]

Specifies the lifetime over which the address is valid. The default value is infinite.

[[preferredlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}]

Specifies the lifetime over which the address is preferred. The default value is infinite.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command adds the IPv6 address FE80::2 to the interface named “Private.”

add address "Private" FE80::2

add dns

Adds a new DNS server IP address to the statically-configured list of DNS servers for the specified interface.

Syntax

                add dns [interface=]String [address=]IPAddress [[index=]Integer]
Parameters

[interface=]String

Required. Specifies, by name, which interface will have a DNS server IP address added to its list of DNS server IP addresses.

[address=]IPAddress

Required. Specifies the IPv6 address of the DNS server to add to the list.

[[index=]Integer]

Specifies the position on the statically-configured list in which to place the DNS server IP address specified in address. By default, the DNS server IP address is added to the end of the list.

Remarks

If an index is specified, the DNS server is placed in that position in the list.

Examples

In the first example command, a DNS server with the IPv6 address FEC0:0:0:FFFF::1 is added to the list of DNS server IP addresses for the interface named “Local Area Connection.” In the second example, a DNS server with the IPv6 address FEC0:0:0:FFFF::2 is added at index 2 as the second server on the list of servers for the interface named “Local Area Connection.”

add dns “Local Area Connection” FEC0:0:0:FFFF::1

add dns “Local Area Connection” FEC0:0:0:FFFF::2 index=2

add prefixpolicy

Adds a source and destination address selection policy for a specified prefix.

Syntax

                add prefixpolicy [prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer [precedence=]Integer [label=]Integer [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer

Required. Specifies the prefix for which to add a policy in the policy table. Integer specifies the prefix length.

[precedence=]Integer

Required. Specifies the precedence value used for sorting destination addresses in the policy table.

[label=]Integer

Required. Specifies the label value that allows for policies that require a specific source address prefix for use with a destination address prefix.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command adds a prefix policy for prefix ::/96, with a precedence value of 3 and a label value of 4.

add prefixpolicy ::/96 3 4

add route

Adds a route for a specified prefix. Time values can be expressed in days (d), hours (h), minutes (m), and seconds (s). For example, 2d represents two days.

Syntax

                add route [prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer [[interface=]String] [[nexthop=]IPv6Address] [[siteprefixlength=]Integer] [[metric=]Integer] [[publish=]{no | yes | immortal}] [[validlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}] [[preferredlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer

Required. Specifies the prefix for which to add a route. Integer specifies the prefix length.

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[nexthop=]IPv6Address]

Specifies the gateway address, if the prefix is not on-link.

[[siteprefixlength=]Integer]

Specifies the prefix length for the entire site, if the prefix is not on-link.

[[metric=]Integer]

Specifies the route metric.

[[publish=]{no | yes | immortal}]

Specifies whether routes are advertised (yes), advertised with an infinite lifetime (immortal), or not advertised (no) in Route Advertisements. The default selection is no.

[[validlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}]

Specifies the lifetime over which the route is valid. The default value is infinite.

[[preferredlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}]

Specifies the lifetime over which the route is preferred. The default value is infinite.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command adds a route on the interface named “Internet” with a prefix of 3FFE:: and a prefix length of 16 bits (3FFE::/16). The nexthop value is FE80::1.

add route 3FFE::/16 "Internet" FE80::1

add v6v4tunnel

Creates an IPv6-in-IPv4 tunnel.

Syntax

                add v6v4tunnel [[interface=]String] [localaddress=]IPv4Address [remoteaddress=]IPv4Address [[neighbordiscovery=]{enabled | disabled}] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[localaddress=]IPv4Address

Required. Specifies the IPv4 address of the local tunnel endpoint.

[remoteaddress=]IPv4Address

Required. Specifies the IPv4 address of the remote tunnel endpoint.

[[neighbordiscovery=]{enabled | disabled}]

Specifies whether Neighbor Discovery is enabled (enabled) or disabled (disabled) on the interface. The default selection is disabled.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command creates an IPv6-in-IPv4 tunnel between the local address 10.0.0.1 and the remote address 192.168.1.1 on the interface “Private.”

add v6v4tunnel “Private” 10.0.0.1 192.168.1.1

delete address

Modifies an IPv6 address on a specified interface.

Syntax

                delete address [[interface=]String] [address=]IPv6Address [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[address=]IPv6Address

Required. Specifies the IPv6 address to delete.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the deletion lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command deletes the address FE80::2 from the interface named “Private.”

delete address "Private" FE80::2

delete destinationcache

Clears the destination cache. If an interface is specified, clears the cache only on that interface. If an address is also specified, deletes only that destination cache entry.

Syntax

                delete destinationcache [[interface=]String] [[address=]IPv6Address]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[address=]IPv6Address]

Specifies the address of the destination.

Remarks

When no parameters are specified, all entries in the destination caches for all interfaces are deleted.

Example

This example command deletes the destination cache for the interface named “Private.”

delete destinationcache "Private"

delete dns

Deletes statically-configured DNS server IPv6 addresses for a specific interface.

Syntax

                delete dns [interface=]String [[address=]{IPv6Address | all}]
Parameters

[interface=]String

Required. Specifies the interface, by name, for which you want to remove a DNS server from the list of DNS servers.

[[address=]{IPv6Address | all}]

Specifies the DNS server IPv6 address to delete. If all is specified, all DNS server IPv6 addresses on the list for the interface are deleted.

Examples

In the first example command, the DNS server IPv6 address FEC0:0:0:FFFF::1 is deleted from the list of addresses for the connection named “Local Area Connection.” In the second example command, all DNS server IPv6 addresses are deleted for the connection named “Local Area Connection.”

delete dns “Local Area Connection” FEC0:0:0:FFFF::1

delete dns “Local Area Connection” all

delete interface

Deletes a specified interface from the IPv6 stack.

Syntax

                delete interface [[interface=]String] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the deletion lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Examples

This example command deletes the interface named “Private.”

delete interface "Private"

delete neighbors

Specifies that all entries in the neighbor cache are deleted. If an interface is specified, clears the cache only on that interface. If an address is also specified, deletes only that neighbor cache entry.

Syntax

                delete neighbors [[interface=]String] [[address=]IPv6Address]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[address=]IPv6Address]

Specifies the address of the neighbor.

Example

This example command removes all entries from the neighbor cache on the interface named “Private.”

delete neighbors “Private”

delete prefixpolicy

Deletes the source and destination address selection policy for a specified prefix.

Syntax

                delete prefixpolicy [prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer

Required. Specifies the prefix (IPv6Address) and prefix length (Integer) to delete from the policy table.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the deletion lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command deletes the prefix ::/96 from the policy table.

delete prefixpolicy ::/96

delete route

Deletes an IPv6 route.

Syntax

                delete route [prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer [[interface=]String] [[nexthop=]IPv6Address] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer

Required. Specifies the prefix of the route to delete.

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[nexthop=]IPv6Address]

Specifies the gateway address, if the prefix is not on-link.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the deletion lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command deletes the route with the prefix 3FFE::/16 and the gateway FE80::1 from the interface named “Internet.”

delete route 3FFE::/16 “Internet” FE80::1

dump

Dumps the network adapter IPv6 configuration to the command prompt window when run within the netsh context. When used in a batch file or script, output can be saved in a text file.

Syntax

                netsh interface ipv6 dump > [
                PathAndFileName
                ]
              
Parameters

[PathAndFileName]

Specifies both the location to which to save the file and the name of the destination file to which the configuration is saved.

Remarks

After file output is obtained, you can use the netsh exec command to either configure another computer with the same IPv6 configuration or to restore the original configuration on the same computer.

All IPv6 configuration information is saved with the dump command. For example, if an ISATAP or a 6to4 configuration is defined on an interface, the dump command saves these settings in the text file.

Examples

In the first example, the command is run manually at the netsh interface ipv6 context of a command prompt. The IPv6 configuration is displayed in the command prompt window, and can be copied and pasted into a text file. In the second example, the dump command is run in a batch file, and the configuration is saved to a text file named Ipv6_conf.txt at the location C:\Temp.

dump

netsh interface ipv6 dump > C:\temp\ipv6_conf.txt

install

Installs IPv6.

Syntax

                install
              

isatap

Specifies that the isatap context of netsh interface IPv6 isatap is used.

Syntax

                isatap
              
Remarks

ISATAP is used for communication between IPv6 and IPv4 nodes within an IPv4 site. It is described in the Internet draft titled “Intra-Site Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP).”

renew

Restarts IPv6 interfaces.

Syntax

                renew [[interface=]String]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

Example

renew "Private"

reset

Resets the IPv6 configuration state.

Syntax

                reset
              

set address

Modifies an IPv6 address on a specified interface. Time values can be expressed in days (d), hours (h), minutes (m), and seconds (s). For example, 2d represents two days.

Syntax

                set address [[interface=]String] [address=]IPv6Address [[type=]{unicast | anycast}] [[validlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}] [[preferredlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[address=]IPv6Address

Required. Specifies the IPv6 address to modify.

[[type=]{unicast | anycast}]

Specifies whether the address is marked as a unicast address (unicast) or as an anycast address (anycast). The default selection is unicast.

[[validlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}]

Specifies the lifetime over which the address is valid. The default value is infinite.

[[preferredlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}]

Specifies the lifetime over which the address is preferred. The default value is infinite.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command sets the address FE80::2 on the interface named “Private” as an anycast address.

set address "Private" FE80::2 anycast

set global

Modifies global configuration parameters.

Syntax

                set global [[defaultcurhoplimit=]Integer] [neighborcachelimit=]Integer [[routecachelimit=]Integer] [[reassemblylimit=]Integer] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[defaultcurhoplimit=]Integer]

Specifies the default hop limit of packets sent.

[neighborcachelimit=]Integer

Required. Specifies the maximum number of neighbor cache entries.

[[routecachelimit=]Integer]

Specifies the maximum number of route cache entries.

[[reassemblylimit=]Integer]

Specifies the maximum size of the reassembly buffer.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command sets global parameters for all IPv6-enabled interfaces on the computer. The default hop limit is set to 32, the maximum number of neighbor cache entries is set to 100, and the maximum number of route cache entries is 100,000.

set global 32 100 100000

set interface

Modifies interface configuration parameters.

Syntax

                set interface [[interface=]String] [[forwarding=]{enabled | disabled}] [[advertise=]{enabled | disabled}] [[mtu=]Integer] [[siteid=]Integer] [[metric=]Integer] [[firewall=]{enabled | disabled}] [[siteprefixlength=]Integer] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[forwarding=]{enabled | disabled}]

Specifies whether packets arriving on this interface can be forwarded to other interfaces. The default selection is disabled.

[[advertise=]{enabled | disabled}]

Specifies whether Router Advertisements are sent on this interface. The default selection is disabled.

[[mtu=]Integer]

Specifies the MTU of this interface. The default MTU is the natural MTU of the link.

[[siteid=]Integer]

Specifies the site scope zone identifier.

[[metric=]Integer]

Specifies the interface metric, which is added to route metrics for all routes over the interface.

[[firewall=]{enabled | disabled}]

Specifies whether to operate in firewall mode.

[[siteprefixlength=]Integer]

Specifies the default length of the global prefix for the entire site.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command sets the interface with the name “Private,” with a siteid of 2 and a metric of 2. All other parameter values are left at the default values.

set interface "Private" siteid=2 metric=2

set mobility

Modifies mobility configuration parameters.

Syntax

                set mobility [[security=]{enabled | disabled}] [[bindingcachelimit=]Integer] [[correspondentnode=]enabled | disabled] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[security=]{enabled | disabled}]

Specifies whether binding updates must be secured.

[[bindingcachelimit=]Integer]

Specifies the maximum number of binding cache entries.

[[correspondentnode=]enabled | disabled]

Specifies whether Correspondent Node functionality is set to enabled or the default of disabled.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

set mobility security=disabled bindingcachelimit=1000 corr=enabled

set prefixpolicy

Modifies a source and destination address selection policy for a specified prefix.

Syntax

                set prefixpolicy [prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer [precedence=]Integer [label=]Integer [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer

Required. Specifies the prefix for which to add a policy in the policy table. Integer specifies the prefix length.

[precedence=]Integer

Required. Specifies the precedence value used for sorting destination addresses in the policy table.

[label=]Integer

Required. Specifies the label value that allows for policies that require a specific source address prefix for use with a destination address prefix.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command sets a policy in the policy table for the prefix ::/96, with a precedence value of 3 and a label value of 4.

set prefixpolicy ::/96 3 4

set privacy

Modifies parameters related to temporary address generation. If randomtime= is specified, maxrandomtime= is not used. Time values can be expressed in days (d), hours (h), minutes (m), and seconds (s). For example, 2d represents two days.

Syntax

                set privacy [[state=]{enabled | disabled}] [[maxdadattempts=]Integer] [[maxvalidlifetime=]Integer] [[maxpreferredlifetime=]Integer] [[regeneratetime=]Integer] [[maxrandomtime=]Integer] [[randomtime=]Integer] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[state=]{enabled | disabled}]

Specifies whether temporary addresses are enabled.

[[maxdadattempts=]Integer]

Specifies the number of duplicate address detection attempts made. The default value is 5.

[[maxvalidlifetime=]Integer]

Specifies the maximum lifetime over which a temporary address is valid. The default value is 7d (seven days).

[[maxpreferredlifetime=]Integer]

Specifies the maximum lifetime over which an anonymous address is preferred. The default value is 1d (one day).

[[regeneratetime=]Integer]

Specifies the duration of time that elapses when a new address is generated prior to deprecating a temporary address. The default value is 5s (five seconds).

[[maxrandomtime=]Integer]

Specifies the upper limit to use when computing a random delay at boot. The default value is 10m (ten minutes).

[[randomtime=]Integer]

Specifies a time value to use, instead of a value generated at boot.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

set route

Modifies route parameters. Time values can be expressed in days (d), hours (h), minutes (m), and seconds (s). For example, 2d represents two days.

Syntax

                set route [prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer [[interface=]String] [[nexthop=]IPv6Address] [[siteprefixlength=]Integer] [[metric=]Integer] [publish=]{no | yes | immortal}] [[validlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}] [[preferredlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[prefix=]IPv6Address/Integer

Required. Specifies the prefix (IPv6Address) and prefix length (Integer) of the route to modify.

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[nexthop=]IPv6Address]

Specifies the gateway address, if the prefix is not on-link.

[[siteprefixlength=]Integer]

Specifies the prefix length for the entire site, if the prefix is not on-link.

[[metric=]Integer]

Specifies the route metric.

[[publish=]{no | yes | immortal}]

Specifies whether routes are advertised (yes), advertised with an infinite lifetime (immortal), or not advertised (no) in Route Advertisements. The default selection is no.

[[validlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}]

Specifies the lifetime over which the route is valid. The default value is infinite.

[[preferredlifetime=]{Integer | infinite}]

Specifies the lifetime over which the route is preferred. The default value is infinite.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether the change lasts only until the next boot (active) or is persistent (persistent). The default selection is persistent.

Example

This example command sets a route on the interface named “Internet.” The route prefix is 3FFE::, and has a length of 16 bits. The gateway address, defined by the nexthop parameter, is FE80::1.

set route 3FFE::/16 "Internet" FE80::1

set state

Enables or disables IPv4 compatibility. The default value for all parameters is disabled.

Syntax

                set state [[v4compat=](enabled | disabled | default)]
Parameters

[[v4compat=](enabled | disabled | default)]

Specifies whether IPv4 compatible interfaces are created. To both disable and delete IPv4 compatible interfaces, specify default. To disable IPv4 compatible interfaces without deleting them, specify disabled.

Examples

In the first example command, IPv4-compatible addresses are disabled, and any previously existing interfaces are deleted. In the second example command, IPv4-compatible addresses are enabled.

set state default

set state v4compat=enabled

show address

Displays all IPv6 addresses, or all addresses on a specified interface.

Syntax

                show address [[interface=]String] [[level=]{normal | verbose}] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[level=]{normal | verbose}]

Specifies whether one line per interface is displayed (normal) or additional information is displayed for each interface (verbose). When no interface is specified, the default selection is normal. When an interface is specified, the default selection is verbose.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether active (active) or persistent (persistent) addresses are displayed. The default selection is active.

show bindingcacheentries

Displays all binding cache entries.

Syntax

                show bindingcacheentries
              

show destinationcache

Displays destination cache entries. If an interface is specified, displays the cache only on that interface. If an address is also specified, displays only that destination cache entry.

Syntax

                show destinationcache [[interface=]String] [[address=]IPv6Address]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[address=]IPv6Address]

Specifies the address of the destination.

show dns

Displays the DNS server configuration for a specific interface or interfaces.

Syntax

                show dns [[interface=]String]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies the interface, by name, for which you want to display configured DNS server IPv6 addresses. If no interface is specified, servers for all interfaces are displayed.

Example

In this example command, DNS server IPv6 addresses configured on the “Local Area Connection” interface are displayed.

show dns "Local Area Connection"

show global

Displays global configuration parameters.

Syntax

                show global [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether active (active) or persistent (persistent) information is displayed. The default selection is active.

show interface

Displays information about all interfaces, or about a specified interface.

Syntax

                show interface [[interface=]String] [[level=]{normal | verbose}] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[level=]{normal | verbose}]

Specifies whether one line per interface is displayed (normal) or additional information is displayed for each interface (verbose). When no interface is specified, the default selection is normal. When an interface is specified, the default selection is verbose.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether active (active) or persistent (persistent) interfaces are displayed. The default selection is active.

show joins

Displays all IPv6 multicast addresses, or all multicast addresses on a specified interface.

Syntax

                show joins [[interface=]String] [[level=]{normal | verbose}]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[level=]{normal | verbose}]

Specifies whether one line per interface is displayed (normal) or additional information is displayed for each interface (verbose). When no interface is specified, the default selection is normal. When an interface is specified, the default selection is verbose.

show mobility

Displays mobility configuration parameters.

Syntax

                show mobility [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether active (active) or persistent (persistent) information is displayed. The default selection is active.

show neighbors

Displays neighbor cache entries. If an interface is specified, displays only the cache on that interface. If an address is also specified, displays only that neighbor cache entry.

Syntax
show neighbors [[interface=]String] [[address=]IPv6Address]
Parameters

[[interface=]String]

Specifies an interface name or index.

[[address=]IPv6Address]

Specifies the address of the neighbor.

show prefixpolicy

Displays prefix policy table entries used in source and destination address selection.

Syntax

                show prefixpolicy [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether active (active) or persistent (persistent) information is displayed. The default selection is active.

show privacy

Displays privacy configuration parameters.

Syntax

                show privacy [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether active (active) or persistent (persistent) information is displayed. The default selection is active.

show routes

Displays route table entries.

Syntax

                show routes [[level=]{normal | verbose}] [[store=]{active | persistent}]
Parameters

[[level=]{normal | verbose}]

Specifies whether only normal routes (normal) or routes used for loopback (verbose) are displayed. The default selection is normal.

[[store=]{active | persistent}]

Specifies whether active (active) or persistent (persistent) routes are displayed. The default selection is active.

show siteprefixes

Displays the site prefix table.

Syntax

                show siteprefixes
              

uninstall

Uninstalls IPv6.

Syntax

                uninstall
              

Netsh Interface IPv6 6to4

You can use the following commands in the netsh interface IPv6 6to4 context to display the configuration of or configure the 6to4 service on either a 6to4 host or a 6to4 router.

set interface

Configures the 6to4 service on an interface.

Syntax

                set interface [name=] InterfaceName [[routing=] {enabled | disabled | default}]
Parameters

[name=] InterfaceName

Required. Specifies the name of the interface for which you want to set 6to4 service configuration. InterfaceName must match the name of the interface specified in Network Connections. If InterfaceName contains any spaces, it must be enclosed in quotes.

[[routing=] {enabled | disabled | default}]

Specifies whether the forwarding of 6to4 packets received on the interface is enabled, disabled, or set to its default value.

Remarks

This command enables, disables, or sets to default the routing behavior of the 6to4 service on a specified interface.

The default setting for the routing parameter is enabled, which enables routing on private interfaces if Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) is used.

show interface

Displays the 6to4 service routing configuration on all interfaces, or on a specified interface.

Syntax

                show interface [[name=] InterfaceName]
Parameters

[[name=] InterfaceName]

Specifies the name of the interface for which you want to display the 6to4 service configuration. InterfaceName must match the name of the interface specified in Network Connections. If InterfaceName contains any spaces, it must be enclosed in quotes.

Remarks

If an interface name is not specified, the 6to4 configuration for all interfaces is displayed.

set relay

Configures the name of the 6to4 relay router for the 6to4 service. Additionally, specifies how often the name is resolved and the state of the relay component for the 6to4 service.

Syntax

                set relay [[name=] {RelayDNSName | default}] [[state=] {enabled | disabled | automatic | default}] [[interval=] {ResInterval | default}]
Parameters

[[name=] {RelayDNSName | default}]

Specifies either the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of a 6to4 relay router on the IPv4 Internet (RelayDNSName), or sets the relay name to its default value of 6to4.ipv6.microsoft.com (default).

[[state=] {enabled | disabled | automatic | default}]

Specifies whether the state of the relay component for the 6to4 service is enabled, disabled, automatically enabled if a public IPv4 address is configured, or set to its default value.

[[interval=] {ResInterval | default}]

Specifies how often the name of the relay router is resolved in minutes (ResInterval) or sets the resolution interval to its default value of 1440 minutes (default).

Remarks

The 6to4 relay router is a router that provides an access point between the IPv4 Internet and the 6bone (the native IPv6 portion of the Internet). To access 6bone resources from a 6to4 router, the 6to4 router encapsulates 6to4 traffic with an IPv4 header and sends it to the IPv4 address of the 6to4 relay router. The 6to4 relay router removes the IPv4 header and forwards the traffic to the 6bone. For return traffic, the 6to4 relay router encapsulates IPv6 traffic and sends it to the 6to4 router at the 6to4 host’s site.

The default name of the 6to4 relay router is 6to4.ipv6.microsoft.com.

The default state is automatic, which enables the forwarding of native IPv6 traffic to a relay router when a public IPv4 address is assigned to any interface.

The default resolution interval is 1440 minutes (once each day).

show relay

Displays the relay router configuration for the 6to4 service.

Syntax

                show relay
              

set routing

Sets both the state of routing and the inclusion of site-local address prefixes in Router Advertisements that are sent by the 6to4 router.

Syntax

                set routing [[routing=] {enabled | disabled | automatic | default}] [[sitelocals=] {enabled | disabled | default}]
Parameters

[[routing=] {enabled | disabled | automatic | default}]

Specifies whether the state of routing on a 6to4 router is enabled, disabled, automatically enabled if ICS is enabled, or set to its default value.

[[sitelocals=] {enabled | disabled | default}]

Specifies whether the advertising of site-local address prefixes, in addition to 6to4 address prefixes, is enabled, disabled, or set to its default value.

Remarks

The default setting for the routing parameter is automatic, which enables routing on private interfaces when ICS is used.

The default setting for the sitelocals parameter is enabled, which enables the advertising of site-local prefixes when site-local addresses are configured on private interfaces.

show routing

Displays the routing configuration of the 6to4 service.

Syntax

                show routing
              

set state

Configures the state of the 6to4 service.

Syntax

                set state [[state=] {enabled | disabled | default}] [[undoonstop=] {enabled | disabled | default}] [[6over4=] {enabled | disabled | default}]
Parameters

[[state=] {enabled | disabled | default}]

Specifies whether the state of the 6to4 service is enabled, disabled, or set to its default value.

[[undoonstop=] {enabled | disabled | default}]

Specifies whether the reversal of all automatic configuration that has been performed by the 6to4 service occurs when the service stops is enabled, disabled, or set to its default value.

Remarks

The default setting for the state parameter is enabled, which enables the 6to4 service.

The default setting for the undoonstop parameter is enabled, which reverses all automatic configuration performed by the 6to4 service when the service is stopped.

show state

Displays the state of the 6to4 service.

Syntax

                show state
              

reset

Resets the 6to4 service.

Syntax

                reset
              

Netsh Interface IPv6 ISATAP

You can use the following commands to configure the ISATAP router.

set router

Specifies the ISATAP router information, including router name, state, and resolution interval.

Syntax

                set router [[name=]{String | default}] [[state=]{Enabled | Disabled | Default}] [[interval]=Integer]
Parameters

[[name=]{String | default}]

Specifies whether the router is named with a string. If default is specified, the system reverts to using the default name.

[[state=]{Enabled | Disabled | Default}]

Specifies whether the ISATAP router relays packets between subnets.

[[interval]=Integer]

Specifies the router resolution interval, in minutes. The default interval is 1440 (24 hours).

Example

The following example command sets the router name to isatap, enables the router, and sets the resolution interval to 120 minutes:

set router isatap enabled 120

show router

Displays configuration information for the ISATAP router.

Syntax

                show router
              
Remarks

This command displays the router name, the relay state, and the resolution interval.

Netstat

Category

The IPv6-aware version of this tool is included on the Windows Server 2003 product CD.

Version compatibility

You can run this command on computers running Windows XP or Windows Server 2003.

You can use the Netstat command-line tool to display active TCP/IP connections, ports on which the computer is listening, Ethernet statistics, the IP routing table, IPv4 statistics (for the IP, ICMP, TCP, and User Datagram Protocol [UDP]), and IPv6 statistics (for the IPv6, ICMPv6, TCP over IPv6, and UDP over IPv6 protocols).

Pathping

Category

The IPv6-aware version of this tool is included on the Windows Server 2003 product CD.

Version compatibility

You can run this command on computers running Windows XP or Windows Server 2003.

You can use Pathping, an IP packet route-tracing command-line tool that combines features of Ping and Tracert, to obtain additional information that neither of those tools provides. Specifically, you can use Pathping to discover the route to a remote host; it then pings the remote host for a period of time and collects and reports statistics. Pathping path information includes information about the intermediate routers visited on the path, the Round-Trip Time (RTT) value, and link-loss information.

Ping

Category

The IPv6-aware version of this tool is included on the Windows Server 2003 product CD.

Version compatibility

You can run this command on computers running Windows XP or Windows Server 2003.

You can use the Ping command-line tool as your primary tool for troubleshooting IP-level connectivity between two TCP/IP computers. Ping sends ICMP Echo Request or ICMPv6 messages to perform network diagnostics and to test reachability for a specific destination. By default, Ping queries for both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses and uses the addresses returned by the operating system.

Ping lets you specify the size of packets to use (the default is 32 bytes), how many to send, whether to record the route used, which Time-To-Live (TTL) value to use, and so on.

Route

Category

The IPv6-aware version of this tool is included on the Windows Server 2003 product CD.

Version compatibility

You can run this command on computers running Windows XP or Windows Server 2003.

You can use the Route command-line tool to view and modify the local IP routing table.

For two hosts to exchange IP datagrams, they must both have a route to each other, or they must use a default gateway that knows a route between the two. Typically, routers exchange information using a protocol such as Routing Information Protocol (RIP) or Open Shortest Path First (OSPF). RIP Listening service is available for Microsoft Windows XP Professional, and full routing protocols are supported by Windows Server 2003 in the Routing and Remote Access service.

Tracert

Category

The IPv6-aware version of this tool is included on the Windows Server 2003 product CD.

Version compatibility

You can run this command on computers running Windows XP or Windows Server 2003.

You can use the Tracert command-line route-tracing tool to display the path between the sending host and a destination.

The path that Tracert displays is a list of near-side router interfaces of the routers in the path between the source host and destination. Tracert uses the IP TTL field in ICMP Echo Requests and ICMP Time Exceeded messages to determine the path from a source to a destination through an IP internetwork.

Some routers silently drop packets with expired TTLs. These routers do not appear in the Tracert display.

Tracert works by incrementing the TTL value by one for each ICMP Echo Request it sends, and then waiting for an ICMP Time Exceeded message. The TTL values of the Tracert packets start with an initial value of one; the TTL of each trace after the first is incremented by one. A packet sent out by Tracert travels one hop further on each successive trip.

Note

  • The UNIX version of Tracert performs the same function as the Windows version, except that the IP payload is a UDP packet addressed to a (presumably) unknown destination UDP port. Intermediate routers send back ICMP Time Expired messages recording the route taken, and the final destination sends back an ICMP Destination Unreachable-Port Unreachable message.

  • The UDP payload from the UNIX Tracert tool can cross routers and firewalls, whereas the ICMP Echo Request messages might not due to ICMP filtering. To avoid this problem in Windows Sever 2003, turn off packet filtering and then try using Tracert again.

Related Information

The following resources contain additional information that is relevant to this section:

Fanden Sie dies hilfreich?
(1500 verbleibende Zeichen)
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.

Community-Beiträge

HINZUFÜGEN
Microsoft führt eine Onlineumfrage durch, um Ihre Meinung zur MSDN-Website zu erfahren. Wenn Sie sich zur Teilnahme entscheiden, wird Ihnen die Onlineumfrage angezeigt, sobald Sie die MSDN-Website verlassen.

Möchten Sie an der Umfrage teilnehmen?
Anzeigen:
© 2014 Microsoft