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Protecting Client Data at Microsoft with System Center Data Protection Manager 2010

Technical White Paper

Published: June 2011 | Updated May 2013

The following content may no longer reflect Microsoft’s current position or infrastructure. This content should be viewed as reference documentation only, to inform IT business decisions within your own company or organization.

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Situation

Solution

Benefits

Products & Technology

Microsoft employees had two available methods to back up PC data: Microsoft IntelliMirror and external storage devices. Each method had limitations. Microsoft IT needed an effective data backup solution for end users that integrated into their existing infrastructure, offered greater flexibility, and provided automated backups for roaming PCs that were disconnected from the corporate network.

Microsoft IT deployed System Center DPM 2010 client to 3,000 end users as of June 2011, and expects to add up to 40,000 users worldwide by June 2014.

The intuitive and customizable backup solution provides users with an easy and automated way to back up critical business information that resides on their personal computers—even when they are away from the office.

  • Reduced costs. DPM 2010 will save Microsoft $3.2 million US over the next three years by reducing dispatches for backup, restore, and recovery services, and by reducing the need for external backup storage devices.
  • Improved user satisfaction. With an intuitive interface that is purpose-built for the IT generalist, DPM 2010 client makes it easy for users to configure their backup processes.
  • Online and offline data protection. Not only does DPM 2010 client automatically back up data when PCs are connected to the corporate network, but it can also store backup files on a roaming PC's local hard drive and then automatically synchronize the hard drive with the DPM 2010 server when re-connected.
  • Microsoft System Center Data Protection Manager 2010
  • Microsoft System Center Data Protection Manager 2010 Client
  • Microsoft IntelliMirror

arrow Executive Summary

arrow Introduction

arrow Planning and Implementation

arrow Best Practices and Lessons Learned

arrow Benefits

arrow Conclusion

arrow For More Information

Executive Summary

Information is the lifeblood of today's businesses. Yet with up to 60% of an organization's user data residing on PCs outside of an organization's managed network, IT administrators are struggling to protect business-critical information that employees store on their PCs. Although the effort to design and manage a backup process for servers and other systems permanently stationed within the corporate network can be significant, an even greater challenge is determining a way to regularly back up roaming laptops that are temporarily disconnected from the corporate network.

As part of an ongoing effort to provide a comprehensive end user data management strategy for the company, Microsoft Information Technology (Microsoft IT) worked closely with the System Center Data Protection Manager (DPM) 2010 product team on a five-month pilot deployment of the DPM 2010 client. The success of the pilot led to Microsoft IT's adoption of the DPM 2010 client as a supported backup and restore solution. DPM has become part of Microsoft IT's Client Corporate Data Management service portfolios. When combined with Microsoft IntelliMirror Folder Redirection, Windows User State Virtualization, and virtual file share storage, this solution offers the company a robust and highly tuned backup and restore environment that caters to both servers and PCs.

This paper is written for enterprise technical decision makers, technical architects, and deployment managers who are considering deploying the DPM 2010 client as part of their centralized backup and restore solution. It briefly discusses:

  • The evolution of backup and restore scenarios at Microsoft IT

  • The current Microsoft IT end user backup and restore strategy that utilizes the DPM 2010 client

  • The deployment phases and best practices that Microsoft IT developed to protect PC data for systems within the corporate network as well as those that occasionally disconnect from the corporate network

The information provided in this paper is based on Microsoft IT's experience; it is not intended to serve as a deployment roadmap. Each enterprise environment has its own unique requirements that should be considered when planning any data backup solution for end users. Therefore, each organization should adapt the plans and activities described in this paper to meet its specific needs and use this information along with the guidance provided in the DPM 2010 Client section on Microsoft TechNet at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff399697.aspx.

Note: For security reasons, the sample names of domains, internal resources, and organizations used in this paper do not represent real resource names used within Microsoft and are for illustrative purposes only.

Introduction

Microsoft IT's primary role is to support the technology infrastructure across the Microsoft enterprise, including providing data protection services for thousands of systems around the world. One of the most critical aspects of data protection is to ensure that important information is backed up regularly for the company's servers and for employee PCs.

As illustrated in Figure 1, before availability of the DPM 2010 client-based data protection solution, end users had essentially two options:

  1. Microsoft IntelliMirror. IntelliMirror is a high-end, Windows client/server data synchronization solution, including virtual machines and data mirroring across physical environments. Due to its focus on data synchronization, IntelliMirror is configured and managed by Microsoft IT through Group Policy. IntelliMirror does not have any end user customization capabilities. Although IntelliMirror works very well for some power users, it provides fewer backup options for people who want the ability to choose the data they want to protect with a simple interface. In addition, IntelliMirror's real-time synchronization requires a significant investment in hardware and would be severely limited by size restrictions if Microsoft IT were to use it to support all client systems.

  2. External storage device. Employees could request an external hard drive to use for backing up their data. However, an external hard drive is not a robust data protection solution, even when encrypted with BitLocker To Go®, because the external hard drive could fail, or could be lost or stolen. Furthermore, the manual effort required to back up critical files commonly resulted in infrequent and haphazard backup efforts by end users. The nature of an external hard drive made it impossible for Microsoft IT to enforce data protection policies.

Figure 1. Previous client-based data protection solutions

Figure 1. Previous client-based data protection solutions

Since neither of these backup models was optimal for end users, Microsoft IT needed to implement a new solution that would support end-user needs while addressing Microsoft IT's backup/restore requirements.

Microsoft IT's Personal Computer Backup and Restore Requirements

Microsoft IT wanted to provide a backup and restore solution tailored to the end user. The new solution had to offer greater flexibility and customization for users, provide more storage than IntelliMirror's relatively limited storage capacity, and transparently support laptops and other machines that are removed temporarily from the corporate network (roaming systems).

Specifically, Microsoft IT's data protection objectives for the new backup and restore solution for end users included:

  • Reduce costs

  • Enforce administrator-defined policies and restrictions

  • Support backups on roaming systems

  • Provide a simplified interface and customizable backup settings

  • Enable end users to restore their backup data using the DPM 2010 client tool without involving backup administrators

Mapping DPM 2010 Client Capabilities to Microsoft IT's Backup and Restore Requirements

Microsoft IT decided to centralize their data protection services around DPM 2010. Part of the System Center family of management products from Microsoft, DPM 2010 delivers unified data protection for Windows servers such as Microsoft SQL Server®, Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft SharePoint® Server, and virtualization and file servers.

DPM 2010 also includes an intuitive and customizable DPM 2010 client that end users can install on their PCs to obtain robust backup and restore capabilities.

Reduce Costs

Microsoft IT estimates the current backup and restore costs for 2011 to be near $2 million US. Primary costs include dispatching technical support personnel for backup and restore activities and data recovery. Other costs include the purchase of external hard drives for use as a backup source. By incorporating the DPM 2010 client into their backup and restore solution, Microsoft IT saw two means by which DPM 2010 could help to reduce costs:

  • Leverage and consolidate existing backup server infrastructure. Improved scalability of the DPM 2010 servers (which can support up to 3,000 clients per server) would enable Microsoft IT to reduce the total number of DPM 2010 servers required to support PC backup and restore compared to the previous data protection solution.

  • Reduce backup administration and support workloads. Microsoft IT wanted to provide end users with an intuitive PC backup and restore solution that they could configure and manage themselves, thereby reducing the time Microsoft IT would otherwise have to spend managing or supporting end users.

Enforce Administrator-Defined Policies and Restrictions

To stay compliant with a corporate retention policy, Microsoft IT administrators can define how often an online backup must occur (for example, no more than 14 days between backups). If any Windows client fails to synchronize to the DPM server during the defined period of time, the local DPM 2010 client notifies the user that they need to connect to the corporate network to back up the selected data. Figure 2 shows a DPM sync dialog box.

Figure 2. Administrators can use corporate policies to enforce backup periods or mandate specific folders to include in backups.

Figure 2. Administrators can use corporate policies to enforce backup periods or mandate specific folders to include in backups.

Administrators can also define a corporate policy to enforce backup of certain folders such as "My Documents" and "Desktop" for protection. The ability for end users to customize their backup settings can be enabled or disabled through policies.

Support Backups on Roaming PCs

An important difference between corporate servers and users' personal systems is mobility. Because so much business information resides on users' PCs, a critical requirement for Microsoft IT's new data protection service is the ability to maintain data protection for roaming laptops and other systems that are temporarily disconnected from the corporate network. The DPM 2010 client software provides offline protection by allocating a small portion of the local laptop hard drive to store the block-level changes between scheduled backups.

For example, if a disconnected PC is set to synchronize data at 7 AM and noon each day, the DPM 2010 client will continue to capture file changes twice per day and store them on the local drive. Because the modified files are typically Microsoft Office and other documents, the changes do not usually consume much space. The moment that the PC is reconnected to the network, the files are synchronized with the DPM 2010 servers.

In addition, the DPM 2010 client's ability to transmit incremental file changes efficiently enables PCs to continue synchronizing with DPM 2010 servers even when they use VPNs or other slow connections to the corporate network.

Figure 3. DPM 2010 client synchronizes with the DPM 2010 server when PC reconnects

Figure 3. DPM 2010 client synchronizes with the DPM 2010 server when PC reconnects

In addition to the scheduled backups, users who are about to leave on a trip can use the DPM 2010 client's Synchronize Now feature to start a backup manually. This ensures that they have a network backup of the latest versions of their files.

Provide a Simplified Interface and Customizable Backup Settings

Microsoft IT identified the need for a simple, intuitive end user tool that IT generalists could use easily. The DPM 2010 client provides wizards and workflows to simplify how users define what data should be protected, and even modify the default four-hour backup synchronization schedule.

In addition to folder locations, the DPM 2010 client allows users to select which file types (such as MP3 or WMV) to exclude from protection. After the user selects the kinds of data that they want to protect, the DPM 2010 client locates the specific directories on each PC for protection.

Figure 4. DPM 2010 client makes it easy for users to select which items to back up

Figure 4. DPM 2010 client makes it easy for users to select which items to back up

Planning and Implementation

After reviewing end user backup and restore needs and mapping those needs to the DPM 2010 client capabilities, Microsoft IT designed a pilot program to test and validate the DPM 2010 client before expanding to a larger-scale deployment. This section of the paper describes the planning and implementation efforts for the initial pilot, as well as the ongoing adoption of the DPM 2010 client that has been underway since the close of the pilot.

Pilot Program

The five-month DPM 2010 client pilot program began in early August 2010 and finished at the end of December 2010. The pilot's objectives were as follows:

  • Enlist at least 500 participating users during the pilot period

  • Validate DPM 2010 client functionality, including:

    • Product feature set and ease of use for IT generalists

    • Reliability

    • Scalability

    • Performance

  • Determine whether the technology was ready for larger-scale deployment and ready to adopt as a Microsoft IT-supported backup solution

Pilot Topology

As depicted in Figure 5, Microsoft IT installed a single DPM 2010 server and allocated storage space for backups from a Storage Area Network (SAN) pool in North America. DPM 2010 client systems in the same domain, as well as other clients in South America, Europe and the Middle East, Asia, and the South Pacific all utilized this single server during the pilot.

Figure 5: Topology of DPM 2010 client pilot program

Figure 5: Topology of DPM 2010 client pilot program

Pilot Implementation

Microsoft IT used the following steps to implement the DPM 2010 client:

  1. Microsoft IT loaded a DPM 2010 server in a Hyper-V® virtual machine (VM) onto an existing Windows Server® 2008 R2 server in North America. An initial six terabytes (TB) of data storage were allocated from a SAN pool.

  2. The support path was defined in order to assist pilot participants. Microsoft IT initially estimated that the incident rate for supporting the DPM 2010 client would be approximately 6%, meaning an estimated 6% of participants would contact Microsoft IT support once per month for a DPM 2010 client-related issue.

  3. In order to obtain a representative mixture of users, Microsoft IT emailed approximately 1,000 "opt-in" invitations to individuals with a variety of roles, backgrounds, and backup/restore needs.

    1. The email provided a link to an announcement page on an internal web site for people to learn more about the pilot effort. The site also provided a link to download the client software and instructions for installation.

    2. The announcement page described the pilot program's support policy and explained how participants could obtain support.

  4. Participants downloaded the DPM 2010 client installer from the internal web site onto their local machines and installed the application.

  5. As participants joined the pilot, administrators added their PCs to the appropriate protection group, based on the participants' locations and their expected cumulative size of backed-up materials.

  6. Throughout the pilot, administrators monitored the client systems via the DPM 2010 Administration console. In particular, Microsoft IT collected the following information:

    1. Performance. Due to the single DPM 2010 server, Microsoft IT was interested in the synchronization performance of clients in remote regions (e.g., not in North America). Any time the connection latency was greater than 80 milliseconds, it was flagged as a slow connection.

    2. Reliability. The pilot administrators tracked users' ability to properly perform the initial complete backup, and then perform subsequent backups based on incremental changes to flagged folders and/or file types. They also monitored DPM 2010 client's ability to continue its backup process on roaming PCs and automatically synchronize with the DPM 2010 server once the PC was reconnected to the corporate network.

    3. Scalability. Test DPM 2010's ability to create a variety of protection groups with different data quotas, and confirm that different clients that were allocated different quotas behaved as expected.

  7. As more participants joined the pilot program, additional space demands were accommodated by raising the allocated data storage from 6 TB to 15 TB.

  8. At the end of pilot, Microsoft IT sent out a survey to capture participant feedback.

Pilot Results

The results from the five-month pilot are as follows:

  • The pilot ultimately involved 812 client systems, spanning five continents. Figure 6 shows the distribution and number of pilot client systems.

    Figure 6: Distribution and number of pilot client systems

    Figure 6: Distribution and number of pilot client systems

  • User satisfaction was extremely high. 48% of respondents said they were very satisfied; an additional 33% were satisfied.

  • 66% of respondents requested a storage quota of 10–15 GB.

  • Microsoft IT also obtained the following results by monitoring the DPM 2010 client:

  • Performance

    • Corporate-attached and remote users in North America regularly connected to the DPM 2010 server within 35 milliseconds.

    • Regions outside North America occasionally experienced latencies (connections that took longer than 80 milliseconds) when connecting to the DPM 2010 server in North America. Microsoft IT recommended adding regional DPM 2010 servers to support each regional set of clients.

    • Pilot participants' initial synchronizations required reasonable bandwidth in order to transmit complete data sets. As a result, Microsoft IT recommends users have a maximum 35 millisecond network connection latency for initial data synchronization, and no more than a 60 millisecond latency for subsequent incremental backups.

    • DPM 2010 clients engaged in backup synchronizations had minimal impact on end users' PC performances. Less than 1% of service requests were related to CPU memory usage during the course of the pilot.

  • Reliability

    • Microsoft IT confirmed that the clients operated as expected on both roaming PCs and those connected to the corporate network, performing initial complete backups of identified/protected folders and file types. Subsequent client operations indicated that incremental changes synchronized to the DPM 2010 servers properly.

    • The pilot's incident support rate was 3.2%—only half of the initially estimated 6%.

    • A total of twelve restore service requests were sent to pilot support concerning how a restore is effected. Of these twelve service requests, nine users restored their data on their own; pilot administrators assisted the other three users with their restore effort.

  • Scalability

    • Microsoft IT successfully deployed four different protection groups, with data quotas ranging from 5 GB to 20 GB per user's business requirements.

    • Pilot administrators also validated that a single DPM 2010 server could host all pilot client systems.

Post-Pilot Adoption

With the successful completion of the pilot program in December 2010, Microsoft IT expanded use of the DPM 2010 client and had adopted the technology as a supported backup solution for Windows 7 clients.  This adoption of the DPM Client technology commenced soon after the close of the pilot program and continued through the Windows 7 client deployment.  When Windows 8 released with its own client data backup feature (File History), Microsoft IT has been replacing the DPM Client deployments with File History since Win8 RTM.  Microsoft still supports DPM Client on Windows 7, however Microsoft IT is planning to convert them all over to File History by FY13 Q4.

Post-Pilot Topology

Microsoft IT added DPM 2010 servers to regional data centers in order to mitigate the regional network latency issues that were identified during the pilot. Figure 7 illustrates the deployment topology that is current as of June 2011.

Figure 7: Microsoft's DPM 2010 client topology as of June 2011

Figure 7: Microsoft's DPM 2010 client topology as of June 2011

Post-Pilot Implementation

Microsoft IT took the following steps to expand the DPM 2010 deployment:

  1. Similar to the pilot program's web page, Microsoft IT added an internal self-service help site to assist users with basic DPM 2010 client questions. Microsoft IT also created a distribution list for users to use to contact Microsoft IT DPM administration support.

  2. A second DPM 2010 server was installed in a Hyper-V VM and added to the single pilot server running Windows Server 2008 R2 to support the growing number of users in North America. The second server was configured to act as the first server's disaster recovery (DR) rotation point, and vice-versa.

    1. In addition to the pilot program's 15 TB of storage space, another 15 TB of storage was allocated to support approximately 2,000 users in North America.

    2. A separate 15 TB of storage was allocated to support the DR process.

  3. Two DPM 2010 servers were installed in Hyper-V VMs in different data centers in Europe to support regional clients in their domains. Each server was configured to act as the other server's DR rotation point.

    1. 20 TB of storage was allocated in the regional data center to support user backups.

    2. An additional 16 TB of storage was allocated to support the DR process.

  4. Two DPM 2010 servers were installed in Hyper-V VMs in Asia to support regional clients in their domains. Each server was configured to act as the other server's DR rotation point.

    1. 20 TB of storage was allocated in the data center to support user backups.

    2. An additional 16 TB of storage was allocated to support the DR process.

  5. One DPM 2010 server was installed in a Hyper-V VM in the South Pacific to support regional clients in their domains. The Asia servers were set to act as the South Pacific server's DR rotation point.

    1. 10 TB of storage was allocated in the data center to support user backups.

    2. No DR storage was allocated to this server, as it does not currently act as any other server's DR rotation point.

  6. One DPM 2010 server was installed in a Hyper-V VM in South America to support regional clients in that domain. The North America servers were set to act as the South America server's DR rotation point.

    1. 10 TB of storage was allocated in the regional data center to support user backups.

    2. No DR storage was allocated to this server, as it does not currently act as any other server's DR rotation point.

  7. Microsoft internal support teams were informed of availability so they could guide users with PC-based backup/restore issues to use the DPM 2010 client backup service.

  8. Microsoft IT announced the availability of the DPM 2010 client backup/restore status through a variety of communications, including:

    1. A notice on an internal corporate page that is reserved for announcing product and service availability

    2. Email

    3. Field IT managers were briefed on system/service availability and communicated the DPM 2010 client availability to their local site users.

Current DPM 2010 Client Status

The following list summarizes the status of Microsoft IT's DPM 2010 client adoption as of June 2011.

  • To date, Microsoft IT has deployed the DPM client to over 3,000 systems worldwide. Figure 8 shows the distribution and number of clients.

    Figure 8: Distribution and number of people using DPM 2010 client as of June 2011

    Figure 8: Distribution and number of people using DPM 2010 client as of June 2011

  • Eight DPM 2010 servers currently support the worldwide user network. Regional monitoring of client systems confirms that average connection latency to each regional DPM 2010 server is no more than 35 milliseconds.

  • Microsoft IT has enough servers in place to support a significant amount of client expansion. The average DPM 2010 server supports 1,000–3,000 DPM 2010 clients. Microsoft IT foresees the ability to support a total of 8,000–15,000 DPM 2010 clients with no additional DPM 2010 servers required.

  • Note: If Microsoft IT deployed stand-alone DR servers, the DPM 2010 servers could support an even greater number of clients.

  • As illustrated in Figure 9, the monthly support incident rate for DPM 2010 client has continued to drop. As of June 2011, the rate is approximately 1.3%.

    Figure 9: Incident rate for DPM 2010 client support calls

    Figure 9: Incident rate for DPM 2010 client support calls

Best Practices and Lessons Learned

In the course of working with DPM 2010 to design, implement, and operate the new DPM 2010 client-based backup and restore service for PCs, Microsoft IT developed the following best practices:

  • Determine the optimal type of client deployment for the organization. DPM 2010 offers a variety of means for client deployment, including:

    • Manually download, install, and configure the client for opt-in users

    • Use Active Directory® to push the application to targeted client systems

    • For high-end deployments, use System Center Configuration Manager or System Center Essentials to push the application to client systems

    • Configure DPM 2010 servers to push the application out to identified client systems

    • Use Sysprep images to include the DPM 2010 client application

  • Identify a representative mix of users for any pilot program. When engaging in a pilot program with a select group of participants, make sure that the pilot includes people with different roles, skill sets, and backup requirements in order to best reflect the company's overall needs.

  • Check distributed locations for network latency. If there are distributed workers in remote locations who need to access a DPM 2010 server, test network demands to determine whether it is best to group the servers in a single location or to install servers regionally. Microsoft IT determined that there was a significant benefit to deploying regional DPM 2010 servers, as it provided the best method of improving communication latency issues.

  • Use surveys and monitor space usage to determine optimal per-system space quota limits. Different people and roles can have significantly different backup storage requirements. Microsoft IT received requested data quotas by pilot participants at the start of the pilot program, but also monitored actual data usage throughout the program to confirm optimal quotas.

  • Consider configuring pairs of DPM 2010 servers to act as each other�s disaster recovery rotation points. In environments where regions or numbers of PCs necessitate multiple DPM 2010 servers, consider setting reciprocated DR on pairs or groups of servers.

  • Create an appropriate communication plan to educate users on service availability. Users need to know about the DPM 2010 service, how to access the application, and the support processes that are in place to help them if they need assistance. Leverage existing intranet resources such as IT notification sites, wikis, and blogs in addition to email to maximize coverage.

  • Ensure that any backup/restore operations are in line with corporate policies. If it is necessary to ensure that specific file types or PC folder locations are backed up, make sure to set the appropriate administration protection policy to enforce user's systems to comply. In addition, define a set of protection policies with different retention times, backup frequencies, and quota allotments in order to support a variety of user business requirements.

Benefits

Microsoft IT gained the following benefits by adopting DPM 2010 client.

  • Reduced costs. By reducing the costs associated with dispatching technical support personnel for backup and restore activities and for data recovery, and by reducing costs associated with purchasing external hard drives for use as a backup source, Microsoft IT estimates it will save $3.2 million over the next three years.

  • Improved user satisfaction. DPM 2010 client presents a simple graphical user interface and wizards that simplify the configuration process and help promote regular PC backups. A significant majority of the pilot participants responded with high satisfaction marks. Microsoft IT has also seen a continuous increase in the numbers of users adopting the PC backup and restore service.

  • Reduced end user backup and restore support requests. By implementing DPM 2010 client, Microsoft IT is able to provide employees with a self-service backup and restore solution that enables users to restore lost data on their own. Not only does this improve user satisfaction, but it reduces the amount of time and effort Microsoft IT support spends on recovery operations.

  • Improved productivity. With more and more users adopting the DPM 2010 client as their backup and restore solution, Microsoft IT expects to see an increase in end user productivity as instances of PC-based data loss are reduced.

  • Improved data protection. The DPM 2010 client backs up important data on PCs when they are not connected to the corporate network. By storing backup files on the local hard drive, DPM 2010 client provides a viable means to protect data on roaming PCs.

  • Greater flexibility for end users. The DPM 2010 client enables users to customize their backup settings, specifying particular folders and/or file types that they want to include in their backups.

  • Enforce administrator-defined policies and restrictions. By deploying DPM 2010 client, Microsoft IT can enforce corporate retention policies for required backups of specific folders, files, or file types, and specified backup frequencies.

Conclusion

Microsoft IT needed to find a user-friendly backup and restore solution for employees' personal computers. As the company's first and best customer, Microsoft IT worked with the DPM 2010 product team on a five-month pilot program to test the new DPM 2010 client. This pilot involved more than 800 participants, spanned five continents, and was designed to validate the client's feature set, performance, reliability, and scalability. Pilot administrators monitored the system's ability to perform full and incremental backups, and confirmed the system's ability to store backups on roaming PCs that immediately synchronize with the DPM 2010 servers when the PCs reconnect to the corporate network.

Participant feedback at the end of the pilot was extremely positive, with 81% of users responding that they were very satisfied or satisfied. The actual monthly support incident rate for the pilot program was only 3.2%, which was half of what Microsoft IT initially expected. These results prompted Microsoft IT to immediately transition from a pilot project into a larger-scale adoption of the technology as a fully supported backup and restore solution for corporate PCs.

By incorporating the DPM 2010 client into their existing data synchronization and backup/restore solution, Microsoft IT has been able to provide a highly customizable, automated backup service that enables users to back up critical business information that resides on their personal computers—even when they are away from the office.

Since the close of the pilot, Microsoft IT has deployed seven additional DPM 2010 servers in regional data centers to ensure minimal network latency. Support requests relating to the DPM 2010 client have continued to drop. As of June 2011, the monthly incident rate is 1.3%. Microsoft IT expects the rate will ultimately fall to 1%.

Microsoft IT expects to see increased adoption of the DPM 2010 client, with approximately 10,000 users planned by June 2012, 25,000 users by June 2013, and 40,000 users by June 2014. Over the next three years, DPM will save Microsoft $3.2 million US by reducing dispatches for backup, restore, and recovery services, and by reducing the need for external backup storage devices.

For More Information

For more information about Microsoft products or services, call the Microsoft Sales Information Center at (800) 426-9400. In Canada, call the Microsoft Canada information Centre at (800) 563-9048. Outside the 50 United States and Canada, please contact your local Microsoft subsidiary. To access information through the World Wide Web, go to:

http://www.microsoft.com

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/itshowcase

http://www.microsoft.com/dpm

The information contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation on the issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information presented after the date of publication.

This White Paper is for informational purposes only. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT.

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