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Using AD FS claims-based authentication with Outlook Web App and EAC

 

Topic Last Modified: 2014-09-02

For on-premises Exchange 2013 Service Pack 1 (SP1) deployments, installing and configuring Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) means you can now use AD FS claims-based authentication to connect to Outlook Web App and EAC. You can integrate AD FS and claims-based authentication with Exchange 2013 SP1, but you can’t when you have a deployment that includes Exchange 2007, Exchange 2010, or even Exchange 2013 RTM servers. Using claims-based authentication replaces traditional authentication methods, including the following:

  • Windows authentication

  • Forms authentication

  • Digest authentication

  • Basic authentication

  • Active Directory client certificate authentication

Authentication is the process of confirming the identity of a user. Authentication validates that the user is who he or she claims to be. Claims-based identity is another approach to authentication. Claims-based authentication removes the management of authentication from the application—in this case, Outlook Web App and EAC—to make it easier to manage accounts by centralizing authentication. Outlook Web App and EAC aren’t responsible for authenticating users, storing user accounts and passwords, looking up user identity details, or integrating with other identity systems. Centralizing authentication helps make it easier to upgrade to authentication methods in the future.

NoteNote:
OWA for Devices doesn’t support AD FS claims-based authentication.

Exchange 2013 SP1 can be installed on servers running Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, and Windows Server 2012 R2. There are multiple versions of AD FS that can be used, as summarized by the following table.

 

Windows Serverversion Installation AD FS version

Windows Server 2008 R2

Download and install AD FS 2.0, which is an add-on Windows component.

AD FS 2.0

Windows Server 2012

Install the built-in AD FS server role.

AD FS 2.1

Windows Server 2012 R2

Install the built-in AD FS server role.

AD FS 3.0

The tasks that you will perform here are based on Windows Server 2012 R2 that includes the AD FS role service.

Overview of the required steps

Step 1 - Review the certificate requirements for AD FS

Step 2 - Install and configure Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS)

Step 3 - Create a relying party trust for Outlook Web App and EAC

Step 4 - Add AD FS claim rules for Outlook Web App and EAC

Step 5 - Install the Web Application Proxy role service

Step 6 - Configure the Web Application Proxy role service

Step 7 - Publish Outlook Web App and EAC using Web Application Proxy

Step 8 - Configure Exchange 2013 to use AD FS authentication

Step 9 - Enable AD FS authentication on the OWA and ECP virtual directories

Step 10 - Restart or recycle Internet Information Services (IIS)

Additional information you might want to know

  • At a minimum, you need to install separate Windows Server 2012 R2 servers: one as a domain controller that uses Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), an Exchange 2013 server, a Web Application Proxy server, and an Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) server. Verify that all updates are installed.

  • Install AD DS on the appropriate number of Windows Server 2012 R2 servers in your organization. You can also use Notifications in Server Manager > Dashboard to Promote this server to a domain controller.

  • Install the appropriate number of Client Access and Mailbox servers for your organization. Verify that all updates are installed, including SP1, on all Exchange 2013 servers in your organization. To download SP1, see Updates for Exchange 2013.

  • Deploying Web Application Proxy on a server requires local administrator permissions. You must deploy AD FS on a server running Windows Server 2012 R2 in your organization before you can deploy Web Application Proxy.

  • Install and configure the AD FS role and create relying party trusts and claim rules on Windows Server 2012 R2. To do this, you need to log on with a user account that is a member of the Domain Admins, Enterprise Admins, or local Administrators group.

  • Determine the required permissions for Exchange 2013 by seeing Feature permissions.

  • You need to be assigned permissions for managing Outlook Web App. To see what permissions you need, see the "Outlook Web App permissions" entry in the Clients and mobile devices permissions topic.

  • You need to be assigned permissions for managing EAC. To see what permissions you need, see the "Exchange Administration Center connectivity" entry in the Exchange and Shell infrastructure permissions topic.

  • You might be able to use only the Shell to perform some procedures. To learn how to open the Shell in your on-premises Exchange organization, see Open the Shell.

  • For information about keyboard shortcuts that may apply to the procedures in this topic, see Keyboard shortcuts in the Exchange admin center.

TipTip:
Having problems? Ask for help in the Exchange forums. Visit the forums at: Exchange Server, Exchange Online, or Exchange Online Protection.

Certificates play a critical role in securing communications between Exchange 2013 SP1 servers; web clients such as Outlook Web App; and EAC, Windows Server 2012 R2 servers, including Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) servers and Web Application Proxy servers. The requirements for certificates vary depending on whether you are setting up an AD FS server, AD FS Proxy, or Web Application Proxy server. The certificates that are used for AD FS services including the SSL and token signing certificates must be imported into the Trust Root Certification Authorities store on all of your Exchange, AD FS and Web Application Proxy servers. The thumbprint for the certificate that is imported is also used on the Exchange 2013 SP1 servers when you use the Set-OrganizationConfig cmdlet.

In any AD FS design, various certificates must be used to secure communication between users on the Internet and AD FS servers. Each federation server must have a service communication certificate or Secure Socket Layer (SSL) certificate and a token-signing certificate before AD FS servers, Active Directory domain controllers, and Exchange 2013 servers can communicate and authenticate. Depending on your security and budget requirements, carefully consider which of your certificates will be obtained by a public CA or an Enterprise CA. If you want to install and configure an Enterprise Root or Subordinate CA, you can use Active Directory Certificate Services (AD CS). If you want to know more about AD CS, see Active Directory Certificate Services Overview.

Although AD FS doesn’t require certificates be issued by a CA, the SSL certificate (the SSL certificate that is also used by default as the service communications certificate) must be trusted by the AD FS clients. We recommend that you don’t use self-signed certificates. Federation servers use an SSL certificate to secure web services traffic for SSL communication with web clients and with federation server proxies. Because the SSL certificate must be trusted by client computers, we recommend that you use a certificate that is signed by a trusted CA. All certificates that you select must have a corresponding private key. After you receive a certificate from a CA (Enterprise or public), make sure that all certificates are imported into the Trust Root Certification Authorities store on all servers. You can import certificates into the store with the Certificates MMC snap-in or distribute the certificates by using Active Directory Certificate Services. It’s important that if the certificate that you imported expires, you manually import another valid certificate.

ImportantImportant:
If you use the self-signed token signing certificate from AD FS, you must import this certificate into the Trust Root Certification Authorities store on all of your Exchange 2013 servers. If the self-signed token signing certificate isn’t used and Web Application Proxy is deployed, then you must update the public key in the Web Application Proxy configuration and all AD FS relying party trusts.

When you are setting up Exchange 2013 SP1, AD FS, and Web Application Proxy, follow these certificate recommendations:

  • Mailbox servers   The certificates that are used on the Mailbox servers are self-signed certificates are they are created when Exchange 2013 is installed. Because all clients connect to an Exchange 2013 Mailbox server through an Exchange 2013 Client Access server, the only certificates that you need to manage are those on the Client Access servers.

  • Client Access servers   An SSL certificate used for service communications is required. If your existing SSL certificate already includes the FQDN you are using to set up the relying party trust endpoint, no additional certificates are required.

  • AD FS   Two types of certificates are required by AD FS:

    • SSL certificate used for service communications

      • Subject name: adfs.contoso.com (AD FS deployment name)

      • Subject Alternative Name (SAN): None

    • Token signing certificate

      • Subject name: tokensigning.contoso.com

      • Subject Alternative Name (SAN): None

      NoteNote:
      When you are replacing the token signing certificate on AD FS any existing relying party trusts must be updated to use the new token-signing certificate.
  • Web Application Proxy

    • SSL certificate used for service communications

      • Subject name: owa.contoso.com

      • Subject Alternative Name (SAN): None

      NoteNote:
      If your Web Application Proxy External URL is the same as your internal URL, you can reuse Exchange’s SSL certificate here.
    • AD FS Proxy SSL certificate

      • Subject name: adfs.contoso.com (AD FS deployment name)

      • Subject Alternative Name (SAN): None

    • Token signing certificate - This will be copied over from AD FS automatically as part of the steps below. If this certificate is used, it must be trusted by the Exchange 2013 servers in your organization.

See the certificate requirements section in Review the requirements for deploying AD FS for more information about certificates.

NoteNote:
An SSL encryption certificate is still needed for Outlook Web App and EAC even if you have an SSL certificate for AD FS. The SSL certificate is used on the OWA and ECP virtual directories.

AD FS in Windows Server 2012 R2 provides simplified, secured identity federation and web single sign-on (SSO) capabilities. AD FS includes a federation service that enables browser-based web SSO, multifactor, and claims-based authentication. AD FS simplifies access to systems and applications by using a claims-based authentication and access authorization mechanism to maintain application security.

To install AD FS on Windows Server 2012 R2:

  1. Open Server Manager on the Start screen or Server Manager on the taskbar on the desktop. Click Add Roles and Features on the Manage menu.

  2. On the Before You Begin page, click Next.

  3. On the Select Installation Type page, click Role-based or Feature-based installation, and then click Next.

  4. On the Select Destination Server page, click Select a server from the server pool, verify that the local computer is selected, and then click Next.

  5. On the Select Server Roles page, click Active Directory Federation Services, and then click Next.

    On the Select Features page, click Next. The required prerequisites or features are already selected for you. You do not need to select any other features.

  6. On the Active Directory Federation Service (AD FS) page, click Next.

  7. On the Confirm Installation Selections page, check Restart the destination server automatically if required, and then click Install.

    NoteNote:
    Do not close the wizard during the installation process.

After you install the required AD FS servers and generate the required certificates, you must configure AD FS and then test that AD FS is working correctly. You can also use the checklist here to help you in setting up and configuring AD FS: Checklist: Setting Up a Federation Server.

To configure Active Directory Federation Services:

  1. On the Installation Progress page, in the window under Active Directory Federation Services, click Configure the federation service on this server. The Active Directory Federation Service Configuration Wizard opens.

  2. On the Welcome page, click Create the first federation server in a federation server farm, and then click Next.

  3. On the Connect to AD DS page, specify an account with domain administrator rights for the correct Active Directory domain that this computer is joined to, and then click Next. If you need to select a different user, click Change.

  4. On the Specify Service Properties page, do the following, and then click Next:

    • Import the SSL certificate that you obtained earlier from AD CS or a public CA. This certificate is the required service authentication certificate. Browse to the location of your SSL certificate. For details on creating and importing SSL certificates, see Server Certificates.

    • Enter a name for your federation service—for example, type adfs.contoso.com.

    • To provide a display name for your federation service, type the name of your organization—for example, Contoso, Ltd..

  5. On the Specify Service Account page, select Use an existing domain user account or group Managed Service Account, and then specify the GMSA account (FsGmsa) that you created when you created the domain controller. Include the account password, and then click Next.

    NoteNote:
    Globally Managed Service Account (GMSA) is an account that must be created when you configure a domain controller. The GMSA account is required during the AD FS installation and configuration. If you haven’t created this account yet, run the following Windows PowerShell command. It creates the account for the contoso.com domain and the AD FS server:
  6. Add-KdsRootKey -EffectiveTime (Get-Date).AddHours(-10)
    
    
  7. 
    New-ADServiceAccount FsGmsa -DNSHostName adfs.contoso.com -ServicePrincipalNames http/adfs.contoso.com
    
    
  8. On the Specify Configuration Database page, select Create a database on this server using Windows Internal Database, and then click Next.

  9. On the Review Options page, verify your configuration selections. You can optionally use the View Script button to automate additional AD FS installations. Click Next.

  10. On the Prerequisite Checks page, verify that all the prerequisite checks were successfully completed, and then click Configure.

  11. On the Installation progress page, verify that everything installed correctly, and then click Close.

  12. On the Results page, review the results, check whether the configuration completed successfully, and then click Next steps required for completing your federation service deployment.

The following Windows PowerShell cmdlet does the same thing as the preceding steps.

Import-Module ADFS

Install-AdfsFarm `-CertificateThumbprint:"0E0C205D252002D535F6D32026B6AB074FB840E7"` -FederationServiceDisplayName:"Contoso Corporation" `-FederationServiceName:"adfs.contoso.com" `-GroupServiceAccountIdentifier:"contoso\FSgmsa$"

For details and syntax, see Install-AdfsFarm.

To verify the installation: On the AD FS server, open your web browser, and then browse to the URL of the federation metadata—for example, https://adfs.contoso.com/federationmetadata/2007-06/federationmetadata.xml.

For all applications and services that you want to publish through Web Application Proxy, you must configure a relying party on the AD FS server. For deployments with multiple Active Directory sites that use separate namespaces, a relying party trust for Outlook Web App and EAC must be added for each namespace.

NoteNote:
EAC uses the ECP virtual directory. You can view or configure settings for EAC by using the Get-EcpVirtualDirectory and the Set-EcpVirtualDirectory cmdlets. To access EAC, you must use a web browser and go to http://server1.contoso.com/ecp.

For Outlook Web App, to create relying party trusts by using the AD FS Management snap-in in Windows Server 2012 R2:

  1. In Server Manager, click Tools, and then select AD FS Management.

  2. In AD FS snap-in, under AD FS\Trust Relationships, right-click Relying Party Trusts, and then click Add Relying Party Trust to open the Add Relying Party Trust wizard.

  3. On the Welcome page, click Start.

  4. On the Select Data Source page, click Enter data about the relying party manually, and then click Next.

  5. On the Specify Display Name page, in the Display Name box, type Outlook Web App, and then under Notes, type a description for this relying party trust (such as This is a trust for https://mail.contoso.com/owa) and then click Next.

  6. On the Choose Profile page, click AD FS profile, and then click Next.

  7. On the Configure Certificate page, click Next.

  8. On the Configure URL page, click Enable support for the WS-Federation Passive protocol, and then under Relying party WS-Federation Passive protocol URL, type https://mail.contoso.com/owa, and then click Next.

  9. On the Configure Identifiers page, specify one or more identifiers for this relying party, click Add to add them to the list, and then click Next.

  10. On the Configure Multi-factor Authentication Now? page, select Configure multi-factor authentication settings for this relying party trust.

  11. On the Configure Multi-factor Authentication page, verify that I do not want to configure multi-factor authentication settings for this relying party trust at this time is selected, and then click Next.

  12. On the Choose Issuance Authorization Rules page, select Permit all users to access this relying party, and then click Next.

  13. On the Ready to Add Trust page, review the settings, and then click Next to save your relying party trust information.

  14. On the Finish page, verify that Open the Edit Claim Rules dialog for this relying party trust when the wizard closes isn’t selected, and then click Close.

To create a relying party trust for EAC, you must do these steps again and create a second relying party trust, but instead of putting in Outlook Web App for the display name, enter EAC. For the description, enter This is a trust for the Exchange Admin Center, and the Relying party WS-Federation Passive protocol URL is https://mail.contoso.com/ecp.

If you are creating the relying party trusts and claim rules for Outlook Web App and EAC, you need to do the following by using Windows PowerShell:

  1. Create the two .txt files IssuanceAuthorizationRules.txt and IssuanceTransformRules.txt.

  2. Import their content into two variables.

  3. Run the following two cmdlets to create the relying party trusts. In this example, this will also configure the claim rules.

IssuanceAuthorizationRules.txt contains:

@RuleTemplate = "AllowAllAuthzRule"

=> issue(Type = "http://schemas.microsoft.com/authorization/claims/permit",
Value = "true");

IssuanceTransformRules.txt contains:

@RuleName = "ActiveDirectoryUserSID"
c:[Type == "http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/windowsaccountname", Issuer == "AD AUTHORITY"]

=> issue(store = "Active Directory", types = ("http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/primarysid"), query = ";objectSID;{0}", param = c.Value); 

@RuleName = "ActiveDirectoryGroupSID"
c:[Type == "http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/windowsaccountname", Issuer == "AD AUTHORITY"] 

=> issue(store = "Active Directory", types = ("http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/groupsid"), query = ";tokenGroups(SID);{0}", param = c.Value); 

@RuleName = "ActiveDirectoryUPN"
c:[Type == "http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/windowsaccountname", Issuer == "AD AUTHORITY"] 

=> issue(store = "Active Directory", types = ("http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/05/identity/claims/upn"), query = ";userPrincipalName;{0}", param = c.Value);

Run the following cmdlets:

[string]$IssuanceAuthorizationRules=Get-Content -Path C:\IssuanceAuthorizationRules.txt

[string]$IssuanceTransformRules=Get-Content -Path c:\IssuanceTransformRules.txt

Add-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust -Name "Outlook Web App" -Enabled $true -Notes "This is a trust for https://mail.contoso.com/owa" -WSFedEndpoint https://mail.contoso.com/owa -Identifier https://mail.contoso.com/owa -IssuanceTransformRules $IssuanceTransformRules -IssuanceAuthorizationRules $IssuanceAuthorizationRules

Add-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust -Name "Exchange Admin Center (EAC)" -Enabled $true -Notes "This is a trust for https://mail.contoso.com/ecp" -WSFedEndpoint https://mail.contoso.com/ecp -Identifier https://mail.contoso.com/ecp -IssuanceTransformRules $IssuanceTransformRules -IssuanceAuthorizationRules $IssuanceAuthorizationRules

In a claims-based identity model, the function of Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) as a federation service is to issue a token that contains a set of claims. Claims rules govern the decisions in regard to claims that AD FS issues. Claim rules and all server configuration data are stored in the AD FS configuration database.

It’s required that you create three claim rules:

  • Active Directory user SID

  • Active Directory group SID

  • Active Directory UPN

To add the required claims:

  1. In Server Manager, click Tools, and then click AD FS Management.

  2. In the console tree, under AD FS\Trust Relationships, click either Claims Provider Trusts or Relying Party Trusts, and then click the relying party trust for Outlook Web App.

  3. In the Relying Party Trusts window, right-click the Outlook Web App trust, and then click Edit Claim Rules.

  4. In the Edit Claim Rules window, on the Issuance Transform Rules tab, click Add Rule to start the Add Transform Claim Rule Wizard.

  5. On the Select Rule Template page, under Claim rule template, select Send Claims Using a Custom Rule in the list, and then click Next.

  6. On the Configure Rule page, in the Choose Rule Type step, under Claim rule name, enter the name for the claim rule. Use a descriptive name for the claim rule—for example, ActiveDirectoryUserSID. Under Custom rule, enter the following claim rule language syntax for this rule:

    c:[Type == "http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/windowsaccountname", Issuer == "AD AUTHORITY"]
    
    => issue(store = "Active Directory", types = ("http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/primarysid"), query = ";objectSID;{0}", param = c.Value);
    
  7. On the Configure Rule page, click Finish.

  8. In the Edit Claim Rules window, on the Issuance Transform Rules tab, click Add Rule to start the Add Transform Claim Rule Wizard.

  9. On the Select Rule Template page, under Claim rule template, select Send Claims Using a Custom Rule in the list, and then click Next.

  10. On the Configure Rule page, on the Choose Rule Type step, under Claim rule name, enter the name for the claim rule. Use a descriptive name for the claim rule—for example, ActiveDirectoryGroupSID. Under Custom rule, enter the following claim rule language syntax for this rule:

    c:[Type == "http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/windowsaccountname", Issuer == "AD AUTHORITY"]
    
    => issue(store = "Active Directory", types = ("http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/groupsid"), query = ";tokenGroups(SID);{0}", param = c.Value);
    
  11. On the Configure Rule page, click Finish.

  12. In the Edit Claim Rules window, on the Issuance Transform Rules tab, click Add Rule to start the Add Transform Claim Rule Wizard.

  13. On the Select Rule Template page, under Claim rule template, select Send Claims Using a Custom Rule in the list, and then click Next.

  14. On the Configure Rule page, on the Choose Rule Type step, under Claim rule name, enter the name for the claim rule. Use a descriptive name for the claim rule—for example, ActiveDirectoryUPN. Under Custom rule, enter the following claim rule language syntax for this rule:

    c:[Type == "http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/windowsaccountname", Issuer == "AD AUTHORITY"]
    
    => issue(store = "Active Directory", types = ("http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/05/identity/claims/upn"), query = ";userPrincipalName;{0}", param = c.Value);
    
  15. Click Finish.

  16. In the Edit Claim Rules window, click Apply, and then OK.

To test the AD FS claims for Outlook Web App:

  1. In your web browser, sign in to Outlook Web App—for example, https://mail.contoso.com/owa

  2. In the browser window, if you get a certificate error, just continue on to the Outlook Web App website.

  3. In the browser window, type your user name (domain\user) and password, and then click Sign in.

  4. Outlook Web App should load in the window.

To test the AD FS claims for EAC:

  1. In your web browser, go to https://mail.contoso.com/ecp.

  2. In the browser window, if you get a certificate error, just continue on to the ECP website.

  3. In the browser window, type your user name (domain\user) and password, and then click Sign in.

  4. EAC should load in the window.

Web Application Proxy is a new Remote Access role service in Windows Server 2012 R2. Web Application Proxy provides reverse proxy functionality for web applications inside your corporate network to allow users on many devices to access them from outside the corporate network. Web Application Proxy preauthenticates access to web applications by using Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) and also functions as an AD FS proxy. Although Web Application Proxy isn’t required, it is recommended when AD FS is accessible to external clients. However, offline access in Outlook Web App isn’t supported when using AD FS authentication through Web Application Proxy. You can find more information about integrating with Web Application Proxy by seeing Installing and Configuring Web Application Proxy for Publishing Internal Applications

WarningWarning:
You can’t install Web Application Proxy on the same server with AD FS installed.

To deploy Web Application Proxy, you must install the Remote Access server role with the Web Application Proxy role service on a server that will act as the Web Application Proxy server. To install the Web Application Proxy role service:

  1. On the Web Application Proxy server, in Server Manager, click Manage, and then click Add Roles and Features.

  2. In the Add Roles and Features Wizard, click Next three times to get to the Server Roles page.

  3. On the Server Roles page, select Remote Access in the list, and then click Next.

  4. On the Features page, click Next.

  5. On the Remote Access page, read the information, and then click Next.

  6. On the Role Services page, select Web Application Proxy. Then in the Add Roles and Features Wizard window, click Add Features, and then click Next.

  7. In the Confirmation window, click Install. You can also check Restart the destination server automatically if required.

  8. In the Installation progress dialog box, verify that the installation was successful, and then click Close.

The following Windows PowerShell cmdlet does the same thing as the preceding steps.

Install-WindowsFeature Web-Application-Proxy -IncludeManagementTools

You must configure Web Application Proxy to connect to the AD FS server. Repeat this procedure for all of the servers that you want to deploy as Web Application Proxy servers.

To configure the Web Application role service:

  1. On the Web Application Proxy server, in Server Manager, click Tools, and then click Remote Access Management.

  2. In the Configuration pane, click Web Application Proxy.

  3. In the Remote Access Management console, in the middle pane, click Run the Web Application Proxy Configuration Wizard.

  4. In the Web Application Proxy Configuration Wizard, in the Welcome dialog box, click Next.

  5. On the Federation Server page, do the following, and then click Next:

    • In the Federation service name box, enter the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the AD FS server—for example, adfs.contoso.com.

    • In the User name and Password boxes, type the credentials of a local administrator account on the AD FS servers.

  6. In the AD FS Proxy Certificate dialog box, in the list of certificates currently installed on the Web Application Proxy server, select the certificate to be used by Web Application Proxy for AD FS proxy functionality, and then click Next. The certificate you choose here should be the one whose subject is the Federation Service name—for example, adfs.contoso.com.

  7. In the Confirmation dialog box, review the settings. If required, you can copy the Windows PowerShell cmdlet to automate additional installations. Click Configure.

  8. In the Results dialog box, verify that the configuration was successful, and then click Close.

The following Windows PowerShell cmdlet does the same thing as the preceding steps.

Install-WebApplicationProxy -CertificateThumprint '1a2b3c4d5e6f1a2b3c4d5e6f1a2b3c4d5e6f1a2b' -FederationServiceName adfs.contoso.com

In step 4, you created claims for Outlook Web App and EAC, and you now need to publish both of these applications. But before you do this, verify that a relying party trust for them was created, and verify that you have a certificate on the Web Application Proxy server that is suitable for Outlook Web App and EAC. For all the AD FS endpoints that you require to be published by Web Application Proxy, in the AD FS Management console, you must set the endpoint to be Proxy Enabled.

Follow the steps to publish Outlook Web App by using Web Application Proxy. For EAC, you repeat these steps. When you publish EAC, you need to change the name, external URL, external certificate, and back-end URL.

To publish Outlook Web App and EAC by using Web Application Proxy:

  1. On the Web Application Proxy server, in the Remote Access Management console, in the Navigation pane, click Web Application Proxy, and then in the Tasks pane, click Publish.

  2. In the Publish New Application Wizard, on the Welcome page, click Next.

  3. On the Preauthentication page, click Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS), and then click Next.

  4. On the Relying Party page, in the list of relying parties, select the relying party for the application that you want to publish, and then click Next.

  5. On the Publishing Settings page, do the following, and then click Next:

    1. In the Name box, enter a friendly name for the application. This name is used only in the list of published applications in the Remote Access Management console. You can use OWA and EAC for the names.

    2. In the External URL box, enter the external URL for this application—for example, https://external.contoso.com/owa for Outlook Web App and https://external.contoso.com/ecp for EAC.

    3. In the External certificate list, select a certificate whose subject name matches the host name of the external URL.

    4. In the Backend server URL box, enter the URL of the back-end server. Note that this value is automatically entered when you enter the external URL, and you should change it only if the back-end server URL is different—for example, https://mail.contoso.com/owa for Outlook Web App and https://mail.contoso.com/ecp for EAC.

    NoteNote:
    Web Application Proxy can translate host names in URLs but cannot translate paths. Therefore, you can enter different host names, but you must enter the same path. For example, you can enter an external URL of https://external.contoso.com/app1/ and a back-end server URL of https://mail.contoso.com/app1/. However, you cannot enter an external URL of https://external.contoso.com/app1/ and a back-end server URL of https://mail.contoso.com/internal-app1/.
  6. On the Confirmation page, review the settings, and then click Publish. You can copy the Windows PowerShell command to set up additional published applications.

  7. On the Results page, make sure that the application published successfully, and then click Close.

The following Windows PowerShell cmdlet performs the same tasks as the preceding procedure for Outlook Web App.

Add-WebApplicationProxyApplication -BackendServerUrl 'https://mail.contoso.com/owa/' -ExternalCertificateThumbprint 'E9D5F6CDEA243E6E62090B96EC6DE873AF821983' -ExternalUrl 'https://external.contoso.com/owa/' -Name 'OWA' -ExternalPreAuthentication ADFS -ADFSRelyingPartyName 'Outlook Web App'

The following Windows PowerShell cmdlet performs the same tasks as the preceding procedure for EAC.

Add-WebApplicationProxyApplication -BackendServerUrl 'https://mail.contoso.com/ecp/' -ExternalCertificateThumbprint 'E9D5F6CDEA243E6E62090B96EC6DE873AF821983' -ExternalUrl 'https://external.contoso.com/ecp/' -Name 'EAC' -ExternalPreAuthentication ADFS -ADFSRelyingPartyName 'Exchange Admin Center'

When you are configuring AD FS to be used for claims-based authentication with Outlook Web App and EAC in Exchange 2013, you must enable AD FS for your Exchange organization. You must use the Set-OrganizationConfig cmdlet to configure AD FS settings for your organization:

  • Set the AD FS issuer to https://adfs.contoso.com/adfs/ls.

  • Set the AD FS URIs to https://mail.contoso.com/owa and https://mail.contoso.com/ecp.

  • Find the AD FS token signing certificate thumbprint by using Windows PowerShell on the AD FS server and entering Get-ADFSCertificate -CertificateType "Token-signing". Then, assign the token-signing certificate thumbprint that you found. If the AD FS token-signing certificate has expired, the thumbprint from the new AD FS token-signing certificate must be updated by using the Set-OrganizationConfig cmdlet.

Using the Exchange Management Shell, enter the following code.

$uris = @(" https://mail.contoso.com/owa","https://mail.contoso.com/ecp")
Set-OrganizationConfig -AdfsIssuer "https://adfs.contoso.com/adfs/ls/" -AdfsAudienceUris $uris -AdfsSignCertificateThumbprints"88970C64278A15D642934DC2961D9CCA5E28DA6B"
NoteNote:
The -AdfsEncryptCertificateThumbprint parameter isn’t supported for these scenarios.

For details and syntax, see Set-OrganizationConfig and Get-ADFSCertificate.

For the OWA and ECP virtual directories, enable AD FS authentication as the only authentication method and disable all other forms of authentication.

CautionCaution:
You must configure the ECP virtual directory before you configure the OWA virtual directory.

Configure the ECP virtual directory by using the Exchange Management Shell. In the Shell window, enter the following code.

Get-EcpVirtualDirectory | Set-EcpVirtualDirectory -AdfsAuthentication $true -BasicAuthentication $false -DigestAuthentication $false -FormsAuthentication $false -WindowsAuthentication $false

Configure the OWA virtual directory by using the Exchange Management Shell. In the Shell window, enter the following code.

Get-OwaVirtualDirectory | Set-OwaVirtualDirectory -AdfsAuthentication $true -BasicAuthentication $false -DigestAuthentication $false -FormsAuthentication $false -WindowsAuthentication $false OAuthAuthentication $false
NoteNote:
The preceding Exchange Management Shell commands configure the OWA and ECP virtual directories on every Client Access server in your organization. If you don’t want to apply these settings to all Client Access servers, use the –Identity parameter and specify the Client Access server. It’s likely you will want to apply these settings only to the Client Access servers in your organization that are Internet facing.

For details and syntax, see Get-OwaVirtualDirectory and Set-OwaVirtualDirectory or Get-EcpVirtualDirectory and Set-EcpVirtualDirectory.

After you have completed all of the required steps, including making changes to Exchange virtual directories, you need to restart Internet Information Services. To do this, you can use one of the following methods:

  • Using Windows PowerShell:

    Restart-Service W3SVC,WAS -noforce
    
  • Using a command line: Click Start, click Run, type IISReset /noforce, and then click OK.

  • Using Internet Information Servers (IIS) Manager: In Server Manager > IIS, click Tools, and then click Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager. In the Internet Information Servers (IIS) Manager window, in the action pane under Manage Server, click Restart.

Multifactor authentication

For on-premises Exchange 2013 SP1 deployments, deploying and configuring Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) 2.0 by using claims means that Outlook Web App and EAC in Exchange 2013 SP1 can support multifactor authentication methods, such as certificate-based authentication, authentication or security tokens, and fingerprint authentication. Two-factor authentication is often confused with other forms of authentication. Multifactor authentication requires the use of two of the three authentication factors. These factors are:

  • Something only the user knows (for example, the password, PIN, or pattern)

  • Something only the user has (for example, an ATM card, security token, smart card, or mobile phone)

  • Something only the user is (for example, a biometric characteristic, such as a fingerprint)

For details on multifactor authentication in Windows Server 2012 R2, see Overview: Manage Risk with Additional Multi-Factor Authentication for Sensitive Applications and Walkthrough Guide: Manage Risk with Additional Multi-Factor Authentication for Sensitive Applications.

In the Windows Server 2012 R2 AD FS role service, the federation service functions as a security token service, provides the security tokens that are used with claims, and gives you the ability to support multifactor authentication. The federation service issues tokens based on the credentials that are presented. After the account store verifies a user's credentials, the claims for the user are generated according to the rules of the trust policy and then added to a security token that is issued to the client. For more information about claims, see Understanding Claims.

 
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