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BizTalk Adapter Pack: Connecting LOB Systems and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server

Published: February 2009

Authors: Kumar Vivek, Hai Ning

Other contributors: Tapas Nayak, Anjan Das

Applies to: Microsoft® BizTalk® Adapter Pack 1.0; Microsoft Office SharePoint® Server

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To download a copy of this document and related samples, go to http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=132586.

This article demonstrates how easily, quickly, and securely you can design an information system to share business data from your line-of-business (LOB) systems with your business partners, remote employees, and end users. By using Microsoft BizTalk Adapter Pack and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server along with your LOB systems, you can build and deploy a robust, secure enterprise information system without having to write a single piece of code!

The target audience for this article is:

  • Solution architects/solution developers who will create a Web service from the LOB systems/artifacts. These users must be experienced working with Visual Studio 2005, .NET Framework 3.0 and later, Extensible Markup Language (XML), and service-oriented architecture (SOA) concepts.

  • IT Professionals who will configure an information system such that it consumes the Web service to securely display the required data to the end users. These users must have a working knowledge of Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 including information about the Business Data Catalog feature, Web Parts, Enterprise Single Sign-On (SSO), and experience with creating/configuring SharePoint portals.

  • Business decision makers who need to provide quick and easy access to their business data in LOB systems.

Businesses are constantly changing to keep pace with end user requirements. No matter what the size is, enterprises need to provide an infrastructure that can allow their business partners, remote employees, and end users of their applications to connect. The most critical aspect of any enterprise is to effectively manage its business data (such as intellectual property, mission-critical code, and customer data) and to provide access to the clients (business partners, remote employees, and end users) in the most secure way. The fact that the clients can be spread all over the world, and will be using secured as well as unsecured networks to access the data 24/7, makes the task challenging! Designing an enterprise information system to address these business needs is a demanding task because:

  • Data is stored in various LOB systems, such as SAP and Siebel.

  • LOB systems are available on various platforms.

  • Technology options to bridge the gap between LOB systems and end users are limited and expensive.

  • Existing technologies are not flexible enough to meet the prospective business demands.

While there are many ways to work around these issues, a definitive solution is to use a middle-tier application based on service-oriented architecture (SOA), which exposes the interfaces and functionalities of the various LOB systems as a group of services. Because these services are loosely coupled with the programming languages, operating systems, and other development technologies used for the underlying LOB systems, they can interoperate locally or remotely. Later, these services can be consumed by other client applications to help securely present data to the end users depending on their access privileges.

However, this approach has its own challenges. Exposing interfaces and functionalities of an LOB system as a service requires LOB subject matter experts who can create services for the required business functionality. Another major challenge is the security of the data exposed as a service. This is because the underlying security model implemented by the LOB systems might not apply to the artifacts that are exposed as a service. Data security needs to be implemented both by the application that exposes the artifacts as a service as well as by the client application that will be consuming the service to display data to end users.

Taking a real-world business case, this article walks you through a solution to effectively address your enterprise information system needs. Using the example of a demo Flight Booking Application in the SAP NetWeaver ABAP system, this article demonstrates how easily you can create an information system to securely access the data in the Flight Booking Application from anywhere by using Microsoft technologies.

This section presents a scenario involving an enterprise and its business environment, as well as the challenges that the enterprise faces in terms of business data access. Following this section, you will see how you can address these challenges by using BizTalk Adapter Pack and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server.

Business Scenario

Consider a large enterprise that deals in high-end client-server products. The enterprise stores its business data on an LOB system that is located in various geographically-distributed data centers. The enterprise has a huge sales team that is spread all over the globe. They meet the prospective clients to showcase the company’s products, and try to bring in more business. While at it, the sales people need to present a demo of their applications to the end users, and use a Web-based client to connect to the servers in the LOB system. The sales people also need to browse through the business data to churn out important reports that contain information such as the company’s revenues, sales, existing clientele, and performance data. This is again done by using a Web-based application that stores data in the LOB system. Because the sales people are on the move, they use various public networks (secured as well as unsecured) to connect to the company’s network and resources.

As their business grew over a period of time, they diversified into various fields, and had businesses catering to various verticals. Their business data grew by leaps and bounds, and it was time for them to consider upgrading/redesigning the way they stored, managed, and shared data across their branch offices, and among their business partners, remote employees, and end users of their products.

The Challenges

There are various challenges that the IT department of this enterprise faces in setting up the infrastructure to manage the sales operations. For instance, they must:

  • Ensure high-availability of data.

  • Design Web-based interfaces that can connect to LOB systems to ensure remote data access.

  • Help make data access secure by ensuring that only authorized people can access the relevant data.

  • Ensure that the solution is scalable to accommodate future business needs.

While IT departments in enterprises have solutions to securely manage the data in the form of LOB systems (SAP, Siebel, and Oracle), there is an ongoing effort to quickly, continuously, and most important securely provide access to the business data to the clients who might be sitting on the edge of the enterprise network. Because these remote clients are outside the corporate security umbrella, IT departments need to design solutions that implement various security measures.

Additional Requirements of a Possible SOA-Based Solution

The company decides to use the SAP system to store and manage the business data. However, they are still not sure how to put together an enterprise information system that allows their remote clients to easily and securely access the data. Because remote clients will access the data, the company wants to have a Web-based front end. They also want this solution to be highly scalable to meet the growing business needs of their company. Lastly, they want a solution that is easy to adapt, and allows their staff to quickly build the enterprise information system.

If the company chooses to leverage the benefits of SOA-based solution, it involves the following:

  • The SAP SMEs must expose the required artifacts in the SAP system as a Web service.

  • A middle-tier application must consume the Web service to create objects and methods.

  • An enterprise application must use the objects and methods to create an infrastructure to:

    • Query data from the SAP system.

    • Implement strict security measures to ensure secure access of the data.

    • Use a Web-based interface, which is accessible to the clients from anywhere, to present the business data from the SAP system.

The company chose BizTalk Adapter Pack and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to build an enterprise information system to quickly, easily, and securely access the business data in their SAP system. They chose BizTalk Adapter Pack over other products because the current adapters in the BizTalk Adapter Pack are built using a common framework. Furthermore, Microsoft will continue to use the same framework or an upgraded version of the framework for adding more adapters in the BizTalk Adapter Pack in the future. This way the company only has to invest once in terms of selecting an integration adapter solution, and training its staff to use a set of adapters built on a common framework. This eliminates the trouble of using another vendor’s integration solution, and eventually retraining the staff to use the new adapters built using a different technology, in case the company eventually decides to switch to or add a different LOB system. And the most obvious reason is that these products are offered by Microsoft; a company that continuously delivers cutting-edge technology and provides excellent technical support to help make your business a success, and eventually achieve a higher return on investment (ROI).

BizTalk Adapter Pack 1.0 contains three integration adapters (Microsoft BizTalk Adapter for mySAP Business Suite, Microsoft BizTalk Adapter for Siebel eBusiness Applications, and Microsoft BizTalk Adapter for Oracle Database) that connect three LOB systems (SAP, Siebel, and Oracle) and a variety of clients (such as Microsoft Office, BizTalk Server, and custom .NET applications). The adapters in the BizTalk Adapter Pack are built on top of the Microsoft Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) Line of Business (LOB) Adapter SDK, and leverage the benefits of Windows® Communication Foundation (WCF). WCF, a component of .NET Framework 3.0 and later, is a programming model to build service-oriented applications that facilitates distributed computing and broad interoperability. WCF supports cross-vendor interoperability, including reliability, security, and transactions. Even though the BizTalk Adapter Pack is part of the BizTalk Server product family, it can be utilized independently without setting up the BizTalk Server environment. This article demonstrates how the SAP adapter, a WCF-based adapter in the BizTalk Adapter Pack, enables you to connect SAP systems and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server. The SAP adapter allows you to publish SAP artifacts as WCF service. For more information about the SAP adapter, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=130973.

Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 is an industry leading enterprise application that simplifies how people find and share information across boundaries. It is built on top of Windows SharePoint Services, and tightly integrates with Microsoft Office. Microsoft Office SharePoint Server enables you to easily create, manage, and build your own SharePoint sites that can be accessed by different people in the organization. It helps the teams to stay connected and productive by having easy access to the documents, resources, and information needed to make important business decisions and accomplish tasks. For detailed information about Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=130977. In this article, the Business Data Catalog feature in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 will be used to easily integrate business data from back-end server applications, such as SAP or Siebel, within Office SharePoint Server 2007, without writing any code. The Business Data Catalog Definition Editor will be used to create objects and methods from the WCF service generated by the SAP adapter, and store it in an application definition file. This application definition file is consumed by the Business Data Web Part in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to display data from the SAP system on a portal. For more information about the Business Data Catalog, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=131405.

The following diagram gives an overview of how LOB systems, BizTalk Adapter Pack, and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server work together:

Architecture diagram

As this article demonstrates, by using the SAP adapter along with the Business Data Catalog feature in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, you can quickly and easily display business data from SAP systems to your clients by using a SharePoint portal. This article walks you through a sample application, where data from a demo flight application in the SAP NetWeaver ABAP 7.0 server will be published to a SharePoint portal. You will also see how to use the SSO feature to set up user authentication in the SharePoint portal based on system logon credentials.

What enables communication between the cross-vendor products (LOB systems and BizTalk Adapter Pack), and then between the WCF service and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server? What is the underlying technology that makes this communication happen? The following sections will give you a better understanding.

Communication between LOB Systems and BizTalk Adapter Pack

As mentioned earlier, the BizTalk Adapter Pack is built on top of the WCF LOB Adapter SDK, which is a collection of tools and components that provides a standard framework for building adapters for LOB systems that can be consumed by a WCF-capable client. When you install the WCF LOB Adapter SDK, it installs the Add Adapter Service Reference Visual Studio Plug-in in Microsoft Visual Studio® 2005. When developers use this plug-in in Visual Studio 2005, they are presented with the WCF Adapter Service Development Wizard that takes them through the WCF service creation process. By using the BizTalk Adapter Pack, any LOB system can be exposed as a WCF service, and consumed by any WCF client application. For detailed information about WCF LOB Adapter SDK, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=131555.

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You will see an example of using the WCF Adapter Service Development Wizard later in this article, through a sample application that demonstrates how to expose an SAP system as a WCF service.

Communication between BizTalk Adapter Pack and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server

The WCF service created by the BizTalk Adapter Pack uses basicHttpPBinding as the binding. The “binding” element is one of the three sections in the configuration scheme in the WCF services, and defines the transport (such as HTTP and TCP) and protocols (security, reliability, and transaction flows) for an endpoint. For information about the elements in the WCF configuration scheme, see “Major Sections” in Configuring Bindings for Windows Communication Foundation Services. BasicHttPBinding is used to configure and expose endpoints that are able to communicate with ASMX-based Web services and clients, and other services that conform to the WS-* specifications. Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 can communicate with a Web service only if it is an ASMX-based Web service. The Business Data Catalog Definition Editor consumes the WCF service to create a definition file (.xml) that is required by the Business Data Web Part in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to display LOB data.

It is possible to set up a distributed environment for deploying BizTalk Adapter Pack and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server. This section discusses who does what and various deployment scenarios.

Who Does What?

Before beginning with the deployment of BizTalk Adapter Pack and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, take a look at the role of each application in the solution that Microsoft offers, and at who is responsible for doing what. The following table provides the required information.

UsersUse…To consume…And generate…

Developers/Subject matter experts

BizTalk Adapter Pack

LOB systems/artifacts

WCF Service

IT Professionals

Business Data Catalog Definition Editor

WCF Service

Application Definition File

IT Professionals

Microsoft Office SharePoint Server

Application Definition File

Web Portals

Deployment Scenarios

It is possible to have all the required applications on a single computer or have a distributed setup. This section shows two deployment scenarios: deploying on a single computer and deploying on four computers. Along with these two scenarios, the section also provides information about a couple of alternative deployment scenarios to try.

Deploying On a Single Computer

You need a computer running Windows Server 2003 to deploy the solution. However, if your LOB system does not support a Windows environment, it can be present on another computer. The assumption is that you have already installed the LOB system, and now want to install the BizTalk Adapter Pack and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server. Make sure you have all the prerequisite applications installed on the computer as specified in the BizTalk Adapter Pack Installation Guide. The installation guide is available at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=106952. At the minimum, you must install the following applications on this computer:

  • Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0, .NET Framework 3.5

  • Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) 6.0 or IIS 7.0

  • Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 (SP1)

  • The WCF LOB Adapter SDK SP1. You can download the WCF LOB Adapter SDK SP1 from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=106906. This will install the Visual Studio template for the WCF Adapter Service Development Wizard.

  • BizTalk Adapter Pack

  • LOB application client versions and other supporting DLLs. For information about the supported application client versions and DLLs, see “Supported Enterprise Application Versions” in the BizTalk Adapter Pack Installation Guide.

  • Microsoft Office Servers Infrastructure Update. You can download this from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=128344.

  • Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 Software Development Kit (SDK). You can download this from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=104130. This will install the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor.

Deploying on Multiple Computers

In this section, different computers are allocated for performing different tasks. The assumption is that the prerequisites are already in place as specified in the BizTalk Adapter Pack Installation Guide, and that you have already installed your LOB system on a networked computer. Four computers running Windows Server 2003 will be used to deploy the applications. The following table provides information about the applications that you need to install on each computer.

Where the WCF service is created
(Computer A)
Where the WCF service is published
(Computer B)
Where the application definition file is created
(Computer C)
Where Microsoft Office SharePoint Server is used to display data on a Web portal
(Computer D)
  • Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0, .NET Framework 3.5

  • Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 (SP1)

  • The WCF LOB Adapter SDK SP1. You can download the WCF LOB Adapter SDK SP1 from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=106906. This will install the Visual Studio template for the WCF Adapter Service Development Wizard.

  • BizTalk Adapter Pack

  • LOB application client versions and other supporting DLLs. For information about the supported application client versions and DLLs, see “Supported Enterprise Application Versions” in the BizTalk Adapter Pack Installation Guide.

  • Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0, .NET Framework 3.5

  • IIS 6.0 or 7.0

  • Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 SP1

  • The WCF LOB Adapter SDK SP1. You can download the WCF LOB Adapter SDK SP1 from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=106906. This will install the Visual Studio template for the WCF Adapter Service Development Wizard.

  • BizTalk Adapter Pack

  • LOB application client versions and other supporting DLLs. For information about the supported application client versions and DLLs, see “Supported Enterprise Application Versions” in the BizTalk Adapter Pack Installation Guide.

Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 Software Development Kit (SDK). You can download this from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=104130. This will install the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor.

Microsoft Office Servers Infrastructure Update. You can download this from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=128344.

You can decrease the number of computers for deploying the solution depending on your business need. For example, you can:

  • Decrease the number of computers to three by choosing to install IIS on the first computer (Computer A) where the WCF service is created, so that you can create and publish the WCF service on the same computer.

  • Further decrease the number of computers to two by installing Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 Software Development Kit (SDK) and Microsoft Office Servers Infrastructure Update on the same computer. This will enable you to generate an application definition file as well as consume that application definition file in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server on the same computer.

The following diagram illustrates a distributed deployment scenario for BizTalk Adapter Pack and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server.

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Securely Deploying the Solution

Because you are sharing your business data with people within and outside the organization, you must make sure that you have deployed the solution in a secure way. You might consider doing the following things:

  • Identify the users who will be performing a certain task, and assign/revoke the privileges as per the requirement. For example, the user credentials to log onto your LOB systems should not be known to many developers, and should be changed by a system administrator after the user has created/tested the WCF service.

  • Determine how you will be passing on the LOB credentials to the client to access the data in the LOB systems. You can choose from either of the following options:

    • Use a fixed credential to access data in the LOB systems. In this case, the LOB credential is specified as part of the WCF service configuration, and is stored in the <endpoint address> element in the web.config file. The web.config file should be secured by storing it on a firewalled Windows Server with restricted access. For more information about the web.config file, see 1.2: Modify the web.config file.

    • Use different credentials for different users. In this case, the LOB credential is passed from Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to the WCF service, and is not stored in the web.config file. You must use Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) to encrypt the communication of the LOB credentials between the WCF service and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server. To do so, ensure that SSL is enabled for IIS, and the WCF service is published to an SSL-enabled location, that is, to an address starting with “https://”. Additionally, in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, configure the SSO settings to map each user in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to a user in the LOB system, so that when a user logs on to Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, the credentials are passed on to the LOB system without prompting the user to enter the user name and password. For more information about SSO settings, see 4.1: Configure SSO settings.

  • Before deploying the solution to share the “real” business data in a production environment, you must thoroughly test the solution in a development/test environment.

  • The LOB system, WCF service, and the Web servers should be adequately protected. You can do this by keeping them in the confines of the corporate security network and using a firewall to prevent malicious users and intruders from interfering with your network and stealing/destroying your data.

The following sample demonstrates how you can use the SAP adapter in the BizTalk Adapter Pack and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to present data from an existing SAP application (airline flight booking application) on a SharePoint portal. Using this sample, end users can use the SharePoint portal to:

  • Query for flights based on departure city, departure date, arrival city, and arrival date.

  • Select a flight from the list of flights returned as a result of the query, and view the flight details such as capacity, occupancy, and ticket price.

During the creation of this sample application, a set of tasks will be performed. The following table provides a map that helps you navigate to a step or sub-step performed during a task.

S. No.TaskStep to do the taskSub-steps, if any

1.

Create and publish the WCF service

Step 1: Use the SAP adapter to create and publish a WCF service

1.1: Create a WCF service out of the Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS Operations

1.2: Modify the web.config file

1.3: Modify the .cs file

1.4: Publish the WCF service

2.

Create an application definition file based on the WCF service

Step 2: Use the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor to create an application definition file based on the WCF Service

2.1: Connect to the WCF Service, and create methods and entities

2.2: Specify user name and password headers for the methods

2.3: Create filters for the FlightList entity, and map it to appropriate parameters

2.4: Create a Finder method instance for the Z_FLIGHT_LIST method

2.5: Create identifiers for the FlightList entity

2.6: Map the identifiers of the FlightList entity to the appropriate parameters

2.7: Create an Association method instance for the Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS method

2.8: Test the Finder and the Association method instances

2.9: Set up Single Sign-On for Connecting to the SAP NetWeaver ABAP System

2.10: Export the Application Definition to a File

3.

Import the application definition file in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server

Step 3: Import the application definition file in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server

-

4.

Display the data in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server

Step 4: Configure Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to display the data

4.1: Configure SSO settings

4.2: Create Business Data Web Parts

4.3: View SAP data on the SharePoint Portal

Prerequisites

Before you begin with creating the sample application, ensure that you:

  • Meet the minimum system requirements to run the Microsoft BizTalk Adapter for mySAP Business Suite with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server. The system requirements are available in the BizTalk Adapter Pack Installation Guide, and the document is available at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=106952.

  • Download the SAP NetWeaver 7.0 ABAP Trial Version from the SAP Web site. It comes with a Flight Booking demo application that will be used in the sample application.

Configure the SAP NetWeaver 7.0 ABAP Trial Version

The FLIGHT_LIST and FLIGHT_DETAILS function modules in the Flight Booking demo application in SAP NetWeaver 7.0 ABAP Trial Version are used for this sample application. These function modules have been modified in the following ways, so that they can be accessed remotely as Remote Function Calls (RFCs):

  • FLIGHT_LIST is renamed to Z_FLIGHT_LIST, and takes the following four parameters: CITYFROM, CITYTO, DATEFROM, and DATETO. It returns a list of flights.

    Z_FLIGHT_LIST Parameters
  • FLIGHT_DETAILS is renamed to Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS, and takes the following three input parameters: CARRID, CONNID, and FLDATE, which can all be found in the list returned by Z_FLIGHT_LIST function. It returns the detailed information about the selected flight, including capacity, occupancy, and ticket price.

    Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS Parameters

Step 1: Use the SAP adapter to create and publish a WCF service

The first step is to create a WCF service that can send data to query the Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS RFCs in the SAP application server. This can be accomplished using the WCF LOB Adapter Service Development Wizard in Visual Studio 2005 to generate a WCF service that can be hosted in IIS.

1.1: Create a WCF service out of the Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS Operations

  1. Start Visual Studio 2005, and then create a Web site (File > New > Web Site).

  2. In the New Web Site dialog box:

    1. From the Templates pane, select WCF Adapter Service. The WCF Adapter Service template is installed by BizTalk Adapter Pack.

    2. In the Location list, click File System, specify the location to save the service, and then click OK. The WCF Adapter Service Development Wizard starts.

      Dd442475.Important(en-US,BTS.10).gifImportant
      The SAP adapter supports only those Web sites that are created on the file system.

  3. On the Welcome page, click Next.

  4. On the Choose Operations page, specify a connection string to connect to the SAP system. To do so:

    1. In the Select a binding list, click sapBinding, and then click Configure.

    2. In the Configure Adapter dialog box, click the Security tab.

    3. In the Client credential type list, select Username, and then type the SAP user name and password that you used to connect to the SAP NetWeaver server.

    4. Click the URI Properties tab, and then type the SAP server name in the Application Server Host field and also the SAP Client ID under Login Information.

    5. Click the Binding Properties tab, and under the Metadata category, set the EnableSafeTyping binding property to True.

    6. Click OK to close the Configure Adapter dialog box, and then click Connect.

      After Visual Studio successfully establishes a connection with SAP NetWeaver, the connection status is shown as Connected. You can also see the SAP NetWeaver metadata being displayed in the Choose Operation page.

  5. In the Select a category box, click the RFC node, and then type Z_FLIGHT_* in the Search in category box. Click Search.

  6. The search result will display the Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS operations in the Available categories and operation box. Add both the RFCs by selecting them and clicking Add.

  7. The Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS operations will move to the Added Categories and Operations box. Click Next.

    Search and add the RFCs
  8. On the Configure Service and Endpoint Behaviors page, specify values to configure the service and endpoint behavior.

    1. In the Service Behavior Configuration box, specify values for the following properties:

      • EnableMetadataExchange: Set this to True to specify that this WCF service will expose metadata so that the client can consume the metadata and build proxies.

      • IncludeExceptionDetailsinFault: Set this to True to include fault information and send back to the client.

      • Name: Type a name for the service behavior configuration. In this case, type customServiceBehavior.

      • UseServiceCertificate: Set this to False to specify that a certificate will not be used to authenticate the client.

    2. In the Endpoint Behavior Configuration box, specify values for the following properties:

      • AuthenticationType: Set this to HTTPUsernamePassword to enable clients to specify user name and password as part of the HTTP header.

      • Name: Type a name for the endpoint behavior configuration. In this case, type customEndpointBehavior.

      • UsernameHeader: Name for the user name header. In this case, type SAPUsername.

      • PasswordHeader: Name for the password header. In this case, type SAPPassword, and then click Next.

    Service and Endpoint behaviors
  9. On the Configure Service Endpoint Binding and Address page, the Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS operations are displayed. Click Apply to ensure that all the configurations done in the previous step are applied to the contract Rfc and Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS.

    Configure Service Endpoint Binding and Address
  10. On the Configure Service Endpoint Binding and Address page, click Next. The Summary page lists a tree structure of the SAP artifacts and, under that, the operations selected for each artifact. Click Finish.

    The wizard creates a WCF service, and adds the following files to the Visual Studio project:

    • .cs file. This file contains the code for the WCF service.

    • .svc file. This is the WCF service file.

    • web.config file. This file contains the WCF configuration scheme.

1.2: Modify the web.config file

After you have created the WCF service successfully, you need to edit the web.config file to make the following two changes:

  • Under the <bindings> element, in the sapBinding section, set the value of acceptCredentialsInUri to “true.” Even though you specified the authentication type as HTTPUsernamePassword in step 8.b in the WCF LOB Adapter Service Development Wizard, the wizard still takes a defensive programming approach and disables the credential being passed in the HTTP header. Although it is not a safe practice to pass your SAP user name and password in clear text in the HTTP header, in the sample, this issue will be mitigated by using SSL (covered in Step 1.4: Publish the WCF service).

  • For development/testing purposes, specify your SAP NetWeaver user name and password in the endpoint address. This is to use the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor to test the application definition file (covered in Step 2.8: Test the Finder and the Association method instances). After the test is done, these two fields can be removed from the endpoint address before deployment. To specify the SAP NetWeaver user name and password in the endpoint address, locate the <client> element in the web.config file, and specify the required information in <endpoint address>:

    <client>
         <endpoint address="sap://user=[SAP_NetWeaver_USER_NAME];passwd=[SAP_NetWeaver_PASSWORD];CLIENT=800;LANG=EN;@a/[SAP_NetWeaver_SERVER_NAME]/00?RfcSdkTrace=False&amp;AbapDebug=False" binding="sapBinding" bindingConfiguration="SAPBinding" contract="Rfc" name="SAPBinding_Rfc" />
    </client>
    
    

1.3: Modify the .cs file

If the input or output parameter is of type int in SAP, the WCF LOB Adapter Service Development Wizard automatically creates a System.Nullable<int> field as well as a bool field with the same name but with a “Specified” suffix. The same thing happens for the decimal and byte parameters. However, if the value returned by SAP is null, and your .NET code only knows how to handle int, it will throw an exception. Using System.Nullable generic type can deftly avoid this problem. You can also test the “[abc]Specified” bool field before reading the int value. However, in this particular case, this data will be consumed in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, and unfortunately Microsoft Office SharePoint Server cannot handle the System.Nullable type.

Therefore, all “System.Nullable<int>” must be replaced with “int” in the .cs file, and the same must be done for the decimal and byte parameters. An underlying assumption is that the values returned by SAP system will never be NULL; otherwise Microsoft Office SharePoint Server throws an exception.

1.4: Publish the WCF service

Make sure that SSL is enabled for IIS. To publish the WCF service:

  1. Right-click the project in Solution Explorer, and then click Publish Web Site.

  2. In the Publish Web Site dialog box, specify a URL for the WCF service, and then click OK. For example:

    https://<computer_name>/SAPTest/
    
    Dd442475.note(en-US,BTS.10).gifNote
    You must publish the WCF service to a SSL-enabled location. In other words, the value in the Target Location box must start with “https://”. Because the user credentials are passed in the HTTP header, the wizard automatically configured the adapter’s binding behavior to use “Transport” as the security mode, which implies SSL encryption. You can of course go back, and edit the web.config file to change the value of the <security mode> parameter, but using SSL is always a better option when you have sensitive information transported in clear text in the HTTP header.

    Publish Web Site dialog box
Dd442475.note(en-US,BTS.10).gifNote
If you encounter errors while publishing the Web site, make sure you have the server certificate installed on the Web server, and that the SSL is properly configured.

After the Web site is published successfully, ensure that the ASP.NET version of the Web site is set to 2.0 or later. To do so:.

  1. Open the Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager window (Start > Run > inetmgr).

  2. Locate your Web site ([computer_name] > Web Sites > [Web_Site_Name]), and right-click the Web site, and then click Properties in the shortcut menu.

  3. In the properties dialog box of the Web site, click the ASP.NET tab, and then select the ASP.NET version field.

Step 2: Use the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor to create an application definition file based on the WCF Service

The Business Data Catalog Definition Editor, available with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 SDK, is used to build an application definition file (.xml file) based on the WCF service created in Step 1: Use the SAP adapter to create and publish a WCF service. Later, Microsoft Office SharePoint Server can consume the application definition file to display data on a SharePoint portal (covered in Step 4: Configure Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to display the data). The Business Data Catalog Definition Editor provides a GUI-based interface to create an .xml file, so that you do not need to manually create the file in an XML editor.

2.1: Connect to the WCF Service, and create methods and entities

You must connect to the WCF service to extract the Web Services Description Language (WSDL) for the service. From the WSDL, the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor extracts the methods. These methods can be used to create entities.

  1. Start the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor. On the Start menu, click Microsoft Business Data Catalog Definition Editor.

  2. On the toolbar, click Add LOB System.

  3. In the Add LOB System window, click Connect to Webservice.

  4. In the URL box, type the URL for the WCF service that you published in Step 1.4: Publish the WCF service. Note that you need to point to the “Rfc.svc” file to grab the metadata of the service. Click Connect.

    Connecting to WCF service
  5. To see the operations you selected in the WCF Adapter Service Development Wizard in Step 1: Use the SAP adapter to create and publish a WCF service, click the Add Web Method tab. You will see the following methods: Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS. Drag the methods to the Design Surface. Make sure you drag both operations to the different entities.

  6. To close the Add LOB System dialog box, click OK.

  7. In the Enter the name for the LOB System dialog box, type a name in the LOB System Name box. For this example, call it FlightBookingSystem, and then click OK.

  8. In the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor, the two entities are listed as Entity0 and Entity1. Rename Entity0 to “FlightList” and Entity1 to “FlightDetails.” Perform the following steps to rename the entities:

    1. Expand the FlightBookingSystem node, and then expand the Entities node.

    2. Select the Entity0 node.

    3. In the Properties pane, type FlightList in the Name box.

    4. Select the Entity1 node.

    5. In the Properties pane, type FlightDetails in the Name box.

2.2: Specify user name and password headers for the methods

When creating the WCF service for Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS in “1.1: Create a WCF service out of the Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS Operations,” you specified user name and password headers as part of the endpoint behavior configuration. You must specify the same values for both the Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS methods in the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor.

To do so:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane of the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor, expand the Entities node, and then expand the FlightList node.

  2. Expand the Methods node, click the Z_FLIGHT_LIST node, and in the Properties pane click the ellipsis (…) button against the Properties box.

  3. In the PropertyView Collection Editor window, click Add, and in the Property pane, type HttpHeaderUserName for the Name box. Similarly, type SAPUsername for the PropertyValue box. Select System.String for the Type box.

  4. Again, click Add, and in the Property pane, type HttpHeaderPassword for the Name box. Similarly, type SAPPassword for the PropertyValue box. Select System.String for the Type box, and then click OK.

    Username and Password Headers
  5. Repeat steps 1-5 for the “Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS” method, which is available under the “FlightDetails” entity.

2.3: Create filters for the FlightList entity, and map it to appropriate parameters

Four filters will be created for the FlightList entity, and mapped to the appropriate parameters in the underlying operation in the WCF service (Z_FLIGHT_LIST). The following table provides the mapping information for the filters and the parameters:

Filter Parameter that it is mapped to

DepartureCity

CITYFROM

DepartureDate

DATEFROM

ArrivalCity

CITYTO

ArrivalDate

DATETO

The mapping is done to specify the parameter that will be passed from the client application SharePoint portal to the Flight booking system on the SAP NetWeaver server. For example, the user will send a DepartureCity parameter from the SharePoint portal, which should be mapped to the CITYFROM field in the underlying Z_FLIGHT_LIST operation in the WCF service.

To create filters for the FlightList entity:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane of the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor, expand the FlightList node, and then expand the Methods node.

  2. Expand the Z_FLIGHT_LIST method, right-click Filters, and then click Add Filter.

  3. In the Properties pane, type DepartureCity in the Name box.

  4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for creating the DepartureDate, ArrivalCity, and ArrivalDate filters.

    The filters will be displayed under the Filters node.

    Dd442475.6f213c07-e05f-4b8b-821d-a949c7aa2375(en-US,BTS.10).gif

To map the filters of the FlightList entity to the appropriate parameters:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane of the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor, expand the FlightList node, and then expand the Methods node.

  2. Expand the Z_FLIGHT_LIST method, and then expand the Parameters node.

  3. Expand the CITYFROM parameter, and then click the CITYFROM child node.

  4. In the Properties pane, select DepartureCity in the FilterDescriptor list.

  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for the DATEFROM, CITYTO, and DATETO parameters, and select DepartureDate, ArrivalCity, and ArrivalDate respectively in the FilterDescriptor list in Step 4: Configure Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to display the data.

2.4: Create a Finder method instance for the Z_FLIGHT_LIST method

A Finder method instance lets you supply a set of parameters and return a list of values, which is what the Z_FLIGHT_LIST method does.

To create a Finder method instance for the Z_FLIGHT_LIST method:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane, expand the Z_FLIGHT_LIST node, right-click Instances, and then click Add Method Instance to open the Create Method Instance window.

  2. In the Create Method Instance window, click Finder for Method Instance Type. Select FLIGHT_LIST for Return TypeDescriptor.

    Create Method Instance window
  3. To create the instance, click OK.

  4. In the Properties pane:

    1. Type ListFlights in the Name box.

    2. Specify the default values in the DefaultValues box to the four filters set up in the previous step. In this case, the following values are used: “*” for CITYFROM, “*” for CITYTO, “20060707” for DATEFROM, and “20060707” for DATETO. If the client does not supply value for any of these filters, the WCF call will use these default values instead.

      Default values for the method instance

2.5: Create identifiers for the FlightList entity

To uniquely identify an individual flight, and then query for the flight details, create identifiers for the FlightList entity. Three identifiers are created: CarrierId, ConnectionId, and FlightDate. These are the three input parameters required by Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS.

To create identifiers for the FlightList entity:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane, expand the Entities node, and then expand the FlightList node.

  2. Right-click the Identifiers node, and then select Add Identifier.

  3. In the Properties pane, type CarrierId in the Name box.

  4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for creating the ConnectionId and FlightDate identifiers.

    Identifiers for the FlightList entity

2.6: Map the identifiers of the FlightList entity to the appropriate parameters

After you have created the identifiers for the FlightList entity, you need to associate the identifiers with the appropriate parameters in the FlightList and FlightDetails entities.

To map the identifiers to the appropriate parameters in the FlightList entity:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane, expand the Entities node, and then expand the FlightList node.

  2. Expand the Methods node, and then expand the Z_FLIGHT_LIST node.

  3. Expand the Parameters node, and then expand the FLIGHT_LIST parameter.

  4. Expand the child FLIGHT_LIST node, and then expand the Item node.

  5. Select CONNID, and in the Properties pane, select ConnectionID[FlightList] from the Identifier list.

    Mapping identifiers with appropriate parameters
  6. Repeat step 5 for the CARRID and FLDATE parameters to map them to the CarrierId[FlightList] and FlightDate[FlightList] identifiers respectively.

To map the identifiers to the appropriate parameters in the FlightDetails entity:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane, expand the Entities node, and then expand the FlightDetails node.

  2. Expand the Methods node, and then expand the Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS node.

  3. Expand the Parameters node, and then expand the DETAILS node.

  4. Go back to the Parameters node, and expand the CARRID parameter.

  5. Select the child CARRID node, and in the Properties pane, select CarrierID[FlightList] from the Identifier list.

    Mapping identifiers to the FlightDetails parameter
  6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 for the CONNID and FLDATE parameters to map them to the ConnectionId[FlightList] and FlightDate[FlightList] identifiers respectively.

2.7: Create an Association method instance for the Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS method

Create an Association method instance for the Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS method, and choose FlightList as the source entity. This tells the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor to use a selected item from the return list of the Z_FLIGHT_LIST Finder method, and send it as the input parameter for this Association call.

To create an Association method instance for the Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS method:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane, expand the Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS node, right-click Instances, and then click Add Method Instance to open the Create Method Instance window.

  2. In the Create Method Instance window, click Association for Method Instance Type.

  3. In the Source Entities list, click FlightList.

    Creating Association method instance
  4. Click OK to create the instance.

  5. In the Properties pane, type DisplayDetails in the Name box.

2.8: Test the Finder and the Association method instances

Now that the Finder and Association method instances are created for the Z_FLIGHT_LIST and Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS methods respectively, you are ready to test these method instances in the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor.

To test the Finder method instance for the Z_FLIGHT_LIST method:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane, expand the Z_FLIGHT_LIST node, and then expand the Instances node.

  2. Select the ListFlight instance, and then click Execute on the tool bar.

  3. In the Execute ListFlights dialog box, you can choose to type in the filter values or leave everything blank, which tells the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor to supply the default values specified in Step 2.4: Create a Finder method instance for the Z_FLIGHT_LIST method.

  4. Click Execute to display a list of flights, indicating a successful query to the SAP NetWeaver ABAP server.

Dd442475.note(en-US,BTS.10).gifNote
You must be curious as to how you were able to fetch the data from SAP system because the SAP user credentials were not supplied in the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor! The answer lies in the web.config file that was configured earlier in Step 1.2: Modify the web.config file. The user name and password of the SAP NetWeaver ABAP server was added in the endpoint address in the web.config file, so that the connectivity can be tested in the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor The SAP credentials can be removed later after the application definition file is imported in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server.

To test the Association method instance for the Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS method:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane, expand the Z_FLIGHT_DETAILS node, and then expand the Instances node.

  2. Select the DisplayDetails instance, and then click Execute on the tool bar.

  3. In the Execute DisplayDetails dialog box, click on the magnifier icon in the FlightList row.

  4. In the Select Entity Instance dialog box, select ListFlights from the Select a Method Instance list, and click Execute. A list of flights based on the default values specified for the ListFlights method instance is returned in the Results pane.

    Select Entity Instance dialog box
  5. To view the details of a flight in the Results pane, select the row containing the flight, and click OK.

  6. You are returned to the Execute DisplayDetails dialog box with the FlightList row populated with three identifiers for the selected flight: CarrierID, ConnectionID, and FlightDate.

  7. Click Execute to see the detailed information about the flight in the Results pane, which is returned from the SAP NetWeaver ABAP server.

    Execute DisplayDetails dialog box

2.9: Set up Single Sign-On for Connecting to the SAP NetWeaver ABAP System

To enable Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to access data from the SAP NetWeaver ABAP system, you must create a mapping between a user in the SAP system and the user in the SharePoint application. You create this mapping in SharePoint Central Administration console after you have imported the application definition file. However, to create this mapping, you must set a property called “SecondarySsoApplicationId” in the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor. This is done to leverage the SSO capabilities of Microsoft Office SharePoint Server.

To do so:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane, expand the FlightBookingSystem node, and then expand Instances.

  2. Click FlightBookingSystem_Instance, and in the Properties pane, click the ellipsis (…) button against the Properties box.

  3. In the PropertyView Collection Editor window, click Add, and in the Property pane, type SecondarySsoApplicationId for the Name box. Type miniSAP or any arbitrary value for the PropertyValue box, and then click OK.

2.10: Export the Application Definition to a File

You have now created an application definition that contains the SAP NetWeaver ABAP system metadata. You must export this definition to an XML file, which can be imported into Microsoft Office SharePoint Server.

To export the file:

  1. In the Metadata Objects pane, right-click the FlightBookingSystem node, and then click Export.

  2. Save the file as “FlightBooking.xml” on your computer.

You can open this XML file using a text editor or Internet Explorer, and explore the configuration you have done so far. Without the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor, you would have to write all this manually!

Step 3: Import the application definition file in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server

You must now import the application definition file created using the Business Data Catalog Definition Editor in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server. To do so:

  1. Start SharePoint 3.0 Central Administration. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Office Server, and then click SharePoint 3.0 Central Administration.

  2. In the left navigation pane, click SharedServices1 or the name of any other Shared Service Provider (SSP) to which you want to import the application definition. For information about SSP, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=105119.

  3. In the Business Data Catalog section, click Import application definition.

  4. On the Import Application Definition page that opens, browse to FlightBooking.xml, select the file, and then click Open.

  5. Click Import, and then click OK.

After importing the application, you can view your application by clicking the View applications link. In the Business Data Catalog Applications page, the FlightBookingSystem application is listed in the Applications list. Click the FlightBookingSystem application to see the two entities in the application: FlightDetails and FlightList.

Entities of FlightBookingSystem application

Step 4: Configure Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to display the data

You must now configure Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to display the data from the SAP NetWeaver ABAP system on a SharePoint portal using Business Data Web Parts. For detailed information about Business Data Web Parts, and benefits of using it, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=131448.

4.1: Configure SSO settings

Create the SSO mapping so that when a user logs on to Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, the credentials are passed on to SAP without prompting the user to enter the user name and password. Before you can proceed, make sure that the Microsoft Office Sign-on Service is running. This service is installed with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server. This service must run on a service account in Active Directory® directory service. In other words, your Microsoft Office SharePoint Server environment must live inside a Windows domain.

To configure SSO settings:

  1. In the SharePoint Central Administration console, on the top navigation bar, click the Operations tab.

  2. On the Operations page, in the Security Configuration section, click Manage settings for single sign-on.

  3. On the Manage Settings for Single Sign-On page, in the Enterprise Application Definition Settings section, click Manage settings for enterprise application definitions.

  4. On the Create Enterprise Application Definition page:

    1. In the Display name box, type SAP Flight Booking System.

    2. In the Application name box, type the name of the application that you specified while setting up SecondarySsoApplicationId in Step 2.9: Set up Single Sign-On for Connecting to the SAP NetWeaver ABAP System. In this case, type miniSAP.

    3. In the Contact e-mail address box, type an e-mail address that can be contacted for this application.

    4. In Account type, click Individual. This causes the SSO to map individual user identity to this credential. If you select Group, you can map all accounts under certain Active Directory groups to the same credentials.

    5. Click OK to finish creating the definition.

      Create Enterprise Application Definition page
  5. Go back to the Manage Settings for Single Sign-On page, and in the Enterprise Application Definition Settings section, click Manage settings for enterprise application definitions.

  6. On the Manage Account Information for an Enterprise Application Definition page, in the Enterprise application definition list, click SAP Flight Booking System.

  7. In the User account name box, type in the Active Directory user name you use to log on to Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, and then click Next.

    Managing account information
  8. In the Provide SAP Flight Booking System Account Information page, type the SAP NetWeaver ABAP user name and password.

    Specify SAP acoount information
  9. Click OK. You have now created the SSO mapping between the Active Directory user credentials and the SAP user credentials.

4.2: Create Business Data s

You must now create Business Data Web Parts in your SharePoint site to view and manage the business data that will be extracted from the SAP NetWeaver ABAP system. Web Parts are reusable components that can contain any kind of Web-based information, including analytical, collaborative, and database information.

To create Business Data Web Parts, create a Web Part page, and then add Web Parts to the page.

To create a Web Part page:

  1. Start SharePoint 3.0 Central Administration. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Office Server, and click SharePoint 3.0 Central Administration.

  2. In the left navigation pane, click the name of the SSP to where you want to create the Web Part page.

  3. On the Shared Services Administration page, in the upper-right corner, click Site Actions, and then click Create.

  4. On the Create page, in the Web Pages section, click Web Part Page.

  5. On the New Web part page, specify a name for your Web Part, and select a layout. Click OK.

    A page is displayed where you can add the Web Parts.

You must now add two Web Parts to this page: Business Data and Business Data Related List. To do so:

  1. On the Web Part page (created in step 5), click Add a Web Part.

  2. In the Add Web Parts dialog box, in the Business Data section, select the Business Data List and Business Data Related List check boxes, and then click Add.

    Add Web Parts dialog box
  3. In the newly added Business Data List Web Part:

    1. Click the Open the tool pane link.

    2. The Business Data List tool pane opens in the right pane. In the Business Data List section, for the Type field, click the Browse button.

    3. In the Business Data Type Picker dialog box, select the FlightList as the Business Data Type, and then click OK.

      Business Data Type Picker dialog box
  4. In the newly added Business Data Related List Web Part:

    1. Click the Open the tool pane link.

    2. The Business Data Related List tool pane opens in the right pane. In the Business Data Related List section, for the Type field, click the Browse button.

    3. In the Business Data Type Picker dialog box, select FlightDetails as the Business Data Type, and then click OK.

      Business Data Type Picker dialog box
  5. Now, connect both the Web Parts so that the Business Data List Web Part (FlightList) can pass on the information of the aircraft to the Business Data Related List Web Part (FlightDetails), where the detailed information about the flight is displayed. Go to the FlightList List Web Part (Business Data List), and click edit. In the edit menu, select Connections, select Send Selected Item To, and then click FlightDetails List.

    Connecting the Business Data Web Parts

After the connection is established, publish this page. Both Web Parts become available on the Web page.

4.3: View SAP data on the SharePoint Portal

Now, you are ready to view the data from the SAP NetWeaver ABAP system on a SharePoint portal. Before doing that, remove the SAP NetWeaver ABAP user name and password from the endpoint address section in the web.config file of the WCF service (step 1.2). The credentials need not be stored in the web.config file anymore because the credentials will be supplied through Microsoft Office Single Sign-On Service.

To view data from the SAP NetWeaver ABAP system on the SharePoint portal:

  1. Browse to the page where you created the Web Parts in the previous step.

  2. Click the Retrieve Data link in the FlightList List Web Part.

  3. A list of flights is returned back from the SAP NetWeaver ABAP system. Next, click the radio button in any row to select a single flight, and the FilghtDetails List will display the detailed information of the selected flight.

    SAP data displayed in the SharePoint portal
  4. You can also add additional filters to the FlightList List Web Part by clicking Add to specify the query parameters to SAP.

    Specify additional parameters

As you can see, it is fairly easy to leverage the SAP adapter in the BizTalk Adapter Pack with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server to expose your SAP system for end users to consume in a highly secure way. It might seem like many steps of configuration, but it is quite manageable once you understand every step, and they become very logical. Lastly, the whole process does not require you to write a single piece of code!

The BizTalk Adapter Pack enables you to connect other LOB systems, such as Oracle and Siebel, with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, and to quickly share your business data in a secure manner. For information about all the adapters available in BizTalk Adapter Pack, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=131475.

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