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Introduction to Application Management in Configuration Manager

Updated: June 2, 2014

Applies To: System Center 2012 Configuration Manager, System Center 2012 Configuration Manager SP1, System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager

Application management in System Center 2012 Configuration Manager provides both Configuration Manager administrative users and client device users with the tools to manage applications in the enterprise.

ImportantImportant
A device, in Configuration Manager, is a collective term that includes any kind of computer such as a desktop, server, or a portable computer, and mobile device, such as a phone or tablet.

An application in Configuration Manager contains the files and information that are required to deploy software to a device. Applications are similar to packages in Configuration Manager 2007, but contain more information to support smart deployment. An application must contain one or more deployment types which contain the installation files for a software package. By using deployment types with applications, you can create one application which contains multiple installation files for a software package on different platforms such as a Windows computer or an iOS device. Configuration Manager can then use rules that you configure to determine which software package gets installed on which device.

Applications in Configuration Manager support user-centric management so that you can associate specific users with specific devices. Instead of having to remember the name of a user’s device, you can now deploy software to the user and to the device. This functionality can help you make sure that the most important software is always available on each device that a specific user accesses. If a user acquires a new computer, you can automatically install the user’s applications on the device before the user logs on. For more information, see How to Manage User Device Affinity in Configuration Manager.

Applications in Configuration Manager support state-based monitoring, by which you can track the last application deployment state for users and devices. The state messages display information about individual devices. For example, if an application is deployed to a collection of users, you can view the compliance state of the deployment and the deployment purpose in the Configuration Manager console. You can monitor the deployment of all software by using the Monitoring workspace in the Configuration Manager console. Software deployments include software updates, compliance settings, applications, task sequences, and packages and programs. For more information, see How to Monitor Applications in Configuration Manager.

Application deployments are regularly re-evaluated by Configuration Manager. For example:

  • A deployed application is uninstalled by the end-user. At the next evaluation cycle, Configuration Manager detects that the application is not present and reinstalls it.

  • An application was not installed on a device because it failed to meet the requirements. Later, a change is made to the device and it now meets the requirements. Configuration Manager detects this change and the application is installed.

You can configure the re-evaluation interval for application deployments by using the Schedule re-evaluation for deployments client setting. For more information, see About Client Settings in Configuration Manager.

For an example scenario that shows how you might deploy and manage the life-cycle of an application in your environment, see Example Scenario for Managing Applications by Using Configuration Manager.

Use the following sections in this topic to help you learn more about application management in Configuration Manager:

The Application Management Workflow

The elements in this table outline the application management process in Configuration Manager:

 

Operation Description More Information

Create an application

Use the Create Application Wizard to create applications in Configuration Manager.

For more information, see How to Create Applications in Configuration Manager.

Create deployment types for the application

Use the Create Deployment Type Wizard to create one or more deployment types that contain the installation files and commands for the software package.

For more information, see the Steps to Create a Deployment Type section in the How to Create Applications in Configuration Manager topic.

Perform a simulated deployment of the application

Use simulated deployments to test the applicability of an application deployment to computers without actually installing or uninstalling the application.

For more information, see How to Simulate an Application Deployment in Configuration Manager.

Deploy the application

Use the Deploy Software Wizard to deploy the application to devices.

For more information, see How to Deploy Applications in Configuration Manager.

Monitor the application

You can monitor the deployment of applications in the Configuration Manager console, and by using reports.

For more information, see How to Monitor Applications in Configuration Manager.

Deploy new versions of the application

Configuration Manager provides tools to help you produce new versions of an application and to supersede older versions of an application.

For more information, see How to Manage Application Revisions in Configuration Manager and How to Use Application Supersedence in Configuration Manager.

Uninstall the application

Deploy an application with a deployment action of Uninstall to remove the application.

For more information, see How to Uninstall Applications in Configuration Manager.

Typical Elements of an Application

You can deploy applications to any device that supports being managed by Configuration Manager by using the Deploy Software Wizard. An application and its deployment types might typically contain the elements described here.

 

Component Description More Information Supported by

Requirements

In Configuration Manager 2007, query-based collections were the primary method of determining which devices installed which software package. For example, you might create a collection of all computers that have more than 4GB of RAM and then distribute a software package to only that collection.

System Center 2012 Configuration Manager removes the need to create collections (although you can still do this) by introducing requirements which are processed by the client device when the application is deployed. For example, you can specify that an application can be installed only on computers that run Windows 7. You can then deploy the application to all devices, but it will only be installed on the computers that meet the specified requirements.

The Configuration Manager client evaluates requirements to determine whether an application and any of its deployment types will be installed. Then it determines the correct deployment type by which to install an application. Every seven days, by default, the requirement rules are reevaluated to ensure compliance according to the client setting Schedule re-evaluation for deployments.

For more information about requirements, see How to Create Applications in Configuration Manager.

For more information about client settings, see About Client Settings in Configuration Manager.

Requirements are not supported by Windows Phone 8 and Android devices.

Global conditions

You can configure requirement rules to use with only a single specific deployment type, or you can create global conditions that are available to use with any deployment type.

Configuration Manager contains a set of built-in requirements or you can define custom requirements.

For more information, see How to Create Global Conditions in Configuration Manager.

Global conditions are not supported by Windows Phone 8 and Android devices.

Global conditions are not supported for Mac computers.

Simulated deployment

You can use simulated deployments to test the applicability of an application deployment to devices without installing the application. When you deploy a simulated deployment, the devices to which the application is deployed evaluate the detection method, requirements, and dependencies for a deployment type and then return the evaluation results to the Configuration Manager site. You can view these results in the Deployments node in the Monitoring workspace.

For more information, see How to Simulate an Application Deployment in Configuration Manager.

You cannot use simulated deployments for collections of mobile devices.

Simulated deployments cannot be used to deploy packages and programs.

Deployment action

When you deploy an application, you can specify a deployment action of Install or Uninstall to control whether the application is installed or uninstalled on client devices.

For more information, see How to Deploy Applications in Configuration Manager and How to Uninstall Applications in Configuration Manager.

For System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager only: Mobile devices that are enrolled by Windows Intune now support a deployment action of Uninstall.

Deployment purpose

The deployment purpose is specified in the Deploy Software Wizard. You can choose from two values:

  • Available – If the application is deployed to a user, the user sees the published application in the Application Catalog and can request it on demand. If the application is deployed to a device, the user sees and then can install on demand the applications listed in Software Center or a company portal.

  • Required – The application is deployed automatically. This typically occurs according to the configured schedule. However, a user can track the application deployment status and install the application before the deadline by using Software Center or a company portal.

For more information, see How to Deploy Applications in Configuration Manager.

Mobile devices that are enrolled by Configuration Manager do not support applications with a deployment purpose of available.

For System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager only: Mobile devices that are enrolled by Windows Intune support a deployment purpose of Required if they are configured as Company-owned. Mobile apps with a deployment purpose of Required automatically install on Windows 8.1 and Windows RT. For iOS and Android devices the user must consent to the download before mobile apps are installed.

You cannot deploy applications to Mac computers that have a purpose of Available.

Linux and UNIX servers do not support the deployment purpose option.

Application deployments that contain a deployment type featuring a link to an app store do not support a deployment purpose of Available.

Revisions

When you modify an application, a new revision of the application is created. Earlier versions of the application are stored and you can retrieve them later if they are necessary.

For more information, see How to Manage Application Revisions in Configuration Manager.

No additional information.

Detection method

There are several available methods to determine whether a deployment type is already present on a device. You can detect a Windows Installer product code, a file or a folder, or a registry value to determine whether a deployment type is present. You can also write a script to detect whether a deployment type is present on the device.

For more information, see How to Create Applications in Configuration Manager.

The available detection methods will vary depending on the device you are creating a deployment type for.

Dependencies

A dependency defines one or more prerequisite deployment types that must be installed before another specified deployment type can be installed. You can configure the prerequisite dependent deployment types to install automatically before the dependent deployment type is installed.

For more information, see How to Create Applications in Configuration Manager.

No additional information.

Supersedence

You can upgrade or replace existing applications by using a supersedence relationship. When you supersede an application, you can specify a new deployment type to replace the deployment type of the superseded application and also configure whether to upgrade or uninstall the superseded application before the superseding application is installed.

For more information, see How to Use Application Supersedence in Configuration Manager.

No additional information.

Deployment Types Supported by Configuration Manager

Configuration Manager supports the deployment types shown in the following sections:

noteNote
When you create an application or a deployment type by reading an application installation file, Configuration Manager can automatically populate some fields of the wizard with information from the file and associated installation files in the same folder.

Deployment Types supported by Configuration Manager with no Service Pack, Configuration Manager SP1, and System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager

 

Deployment type name Description

Windows Installer (Native) (Configuration Manager with no service pack) or Windows Installer (*.msi file) (Configuration Manager SP1) and System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager

Creates a deployment type from a Windows Installer file.

Script Installer (Native) (Configuration Manager with no service pack) or Script Installer (Configuration Manager SP1) and System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager

Creates a deployment type that specifies a script that runs on client devices to install content or to perform an action.

Microsoft Application Virtualization (Configuration Manager with no service pack) or Microsoft Application Virtualization 4 (Configuration Manager SP1 and System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager)

Creates a deployment type from a Microsoft Application Virtualization 4 manifest.

Windows Mobile Cabinet

Creates a deployment type from a Windows Mobile Cabinet (CAB) file.

Nokia SIS file

Creates a deployment type from a Nokia Symbian Installation Source (SIS) file.

Deployment Types Supported by Configuration Manager SP1 and System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager

 

Deployment type name Description

Windows app package (.appx file)

Creates a deployment type for Windows 8 or Windows RT from a Windows app package file.

Windows app package (in the Windows Store)

Creates a deployment type for Windows 8 or Windows RT by specifying a link to the app in the Windows Store by browsing to a computer that already has the app installed.

Microsoft Application Virtualization 5

Creates a deployment type from a Microsoft Application Virtualization 5 package file.

Windows Phone app package (*.xap file)

Creates a deployment type from a Windows Phone app package file.

TipTip
You can download sample Windows Phone 8 apps from the Windows Phone Dev Center.

Windows Phone app package (in the Windows Phone Store)

Creates a deployment type by specifying a link to the app in the Windows Phone.

App package for iOS (*.ipa file)

Creates a deployment type from an iOS app package file.

App package for iOS from App Store

Creates a deployment type by specifying a link to the iOS app in the App Store.

App package for Android (*.apk file)

Creates a deployment type from an Android app package file.

App package for Android on Google Play

Creates a deployment type by specifying a link to the app on Google Play.

Mac OS X

Creates a deployment type for Mac computers from a .cmmac file that you have created with the CMAppUtil utility.

Deployment Types Supported by System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager Only.

 

Deployment type name Description

Web Application

Creates a deployment type that specifies a link to a web application. The deployment type installs a shortcut to the web application on the user’s device.

Monitoring Application Deployments

You can monitor the deployment of all software by using the Monitoring workspace in the Configuration Manager console. Software deployments include software updates, compliance settings, applications, task sequences, and packages and programs.

Applications in Configuration Manager support state-based monitoring, by which you can track the last application deployment state for users and devices. The state messages display information about individual devices. For example, if an application is deployed to a collection of users, you can view the compliance state of the deployment and the deployment purpose in the Configuration Manager console.

An application deployment has one of the following compliance states:

  • Success – The application deployment succeeded or was found to be already installed.

  • In Progress – The application deployment is in progress.

  • Unknown – The state of the application deployment could not be determined. This state is not applicable for deployments with a purpose of Available.

  • Requirements Not Met – The application was not deployed because the device was not compliant with a dependency or a requirement rule, or the operating system to which it was deployed was not applicable.

  • Error – The application did not deploy because of an error.

For each compliance state, you can view additional information. This information includes subcategories within the compliance state and the number of users and devices in the category. For example, the Error compliance state includes the following subcategories:

  • Error evaluating policy

  • Content related errors

  • Installation Errors

You can use these subcategories to help you quickly identify any important issues with an application deployment. You can also view additional information about which devices fall into a particular subcategory of a compliance state.

For more information, see How to How to Monitor Applications in Configuration Manager.

Application Catalog, Software Center, and Company Portals

The Application Catalog and company portals in Configuration Manager can give users control over how and when software is installed on their devices. Configuration Manager can also help ensure that the software that users need in order to perform their work is available wherever they log on, not just on their primary devices.

Software Center and the Application Catalog

Users of Windows-based computers can manage their software deployment experience by using the new client interface, Software Center. Software Center is automatically installed on client computers so that users can manage their own software. They can perform the following actions:

  • Install software.

  • Schedule software for automatic installation outside of working hours.

  • Configure when Configuration Manager can install software on their device.

  • Configure access settings for remote control if remote control is enabled in Configuration Manager.

  • Configure options for power management if an administrative user enables this.

By using a link in Software Center, users can connect to the Application Catalog where they can browse for, install, and request software. In addition, users can use the Application Catalog to configure certain preference settings and remotely wipe their mobile devices if it is necessary. Because the Application Catalog website is hosted in Internet Information Services (IIS), users can also directly access the Application Catalog on a browser from the intranet or the Internet.

As an administrative user, you can add the name of your organization to Software Center and the Application Catalog. This helps users recognize the application as being from a trusted source. You can also customize the Application Catalog by using different theme colors.

The Application Catalog supports integration with external websites. For example, if you host a Microsoft SharePoint website, the catalog can be specified as the Web Page link in the Page Viewer. The Application Catalog maintains the style and theme that you configured. The Application Catalog does not support customization by using cascade style sheets (CSS).

The Application Catalog requires two new site system roles on your site.

  • Application Catalog web service point – Provides software information from the Software Library to the Application Catalog website.

  • Application Catalog website point – Gives users a list of available software.

For more information about how to install and configure the Application Catalog and Software Center, see Configuring the Application Catalog and Software Center in Configuration Manager.

On a computer that is running Windows, the Configuration Manager client in Control Panel remains in System Center 2012 Configuration Manager. This can help administrative users troubleshoot problems with the client software.

Company Portals

Users who have mobile devices that are enrolled by Windows Intune and Android devices that are managed by the Exchange Server connector can install apps from the company portal. The company portal is the Application Catalog equivalent for these mobile devices.

Company portals enable device users to access a list of available software and also to perform a number of management tasks on their Windows Phone 8, Windows RT, iOS, and Android devices.

User Device Affinity

With Configuration Manager, you can associate specific users with specific devices. This association is called user device affinity. This mapping of devices to users can remove the need to know the names of a user’s devices when you deploy applications. You can define primary devices for a user. These are typically the devices that users use daily to perform their work.

When you create an affinity between a user and a device, you gain additional options for deploying software. For example, if a user must have Microsoft Visio, you can install the program on the user’s primary device by using a Windows Installer deployment. On a device that is not a primary device, you might deploy Microsoft Visio as a Microsoft Application Virtualization (App-V) virtual application. With user device affinity, you can deploy applications to a user without having to install the application on every device that the user logs on to. You can also pre-deploy software on a user’s device when the user is not logged on.

Configuration Manager automatically manages user device affinities for the mobile devices that it enrolls and that are enrolled by Windows Intune. However, Configuration Manager does not create user device affinities for mobile devices that are discovered by using the Exchange Server connector. When Configuration Manager completes mobile device enrollment, users can see their mobile devices listed in the self-service website, Application Catalog. If Configuration Manager wipes the mobile device, Configuration Manager also automatically wipes the user device affinity information for the mobile device.

Whereas Configuration Manager manages user device affinity automatically for enrolled mobile devices, you have more flexibility in how you can manage user device affinity for computers. You can define user device affinity for Windows computers by using any of the following methods:

  • The computer user can specify that the device is a primary device in the Application Catalog.

  • An administrative user can import a file that lists users and devices.

  • An administrative user can configure the site to automatically create user device affinities that are based on collected usage statistics. An administrative user can then approve the detected user device affinities.

  • An administrative user can manually create affinities.

  • An administrative user can define user device affinity for a client computer during deployment of an operating system to a computer.

noteNote
Configuration Manager does not support user device affinity for Mac computers or Linux and UNIX servers.

For more information, see How to Manage User Device Affinity in Configuration Manager.

Packages and Programs in Configuration Manager

Configuration Manager continues to support packages and programs that were used in Configuration Manager 2007. A deployment that uses packages and programs is useful when you deploy any of the following:

  • Scripts that do not install an application on a computer, such as a script to defragment the computer disk drive.

  • One-time scripts that do not require monitoring.

  • Scripts that run on a recurring schedule and do not use global conditions or requirement rules.

For more information, see Packages and Programs in Configuration Manager.

In Configuration Manager SP1, you must use packages and programs to deploy software to Linux and UNIX servers.

You can use Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager Package Conversion Manager to convert packages and programs into Configuration Manager applications.

Download Package Conversion Manager from the Microsoft Download Center site.

For more information, see Configuration Manager Package Conversion Manager.

Support for Windows Embedded Devices That Use Write Filters
noteNote
For System Center 2012 Configuration Manager SP1 and System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager only:

When you deploy applications to Windows Embedded devices that are write filter-enabled, you can specify whether to disable the write filter on the device during the deployment and then restart the device after the deployment. If the write filter is not disabled, the software is deployed to a temporary overlay, and unless another deployment forces changes to be persisted, the software will no longer be installed when the device restarts.

When you deploy an application to a Windows Embedded device, make sure that the device is a member of a collection that has a configured maintenance window. This lets you manage when the write filter is disabled and enabled, and when the device restarts.

The user experience setting that controls the write filter behavior is a check box named Commit changes at deadline or during a maintenance window (requires restarts).

For more information about how Configuration Manager manages embedded devices that use write filters, see the Deploying the Configuration Manager Client to Windows Embedded Devices section in the Introduction to Client Deployment in Configuration Manager topic.

Using App-V Virtual Applications with Configuration Manager

You can use Configuration Manager to install and manage virtual applications as deployment types in an application. To deploy a virtual application, you must first create the virtual application by using the App-V Application Virtualization Sequencer. The sequencer monitors the installation and setup process for an application and records the information that is needed for the application to run in a virtual environment. You can also use the sequencer to configure which files and configurations apply to all users and which configurations users can customize.

When you sequence an application, you must save the package to a location that can be accessed by Configuration Manager. You can then create an application deployment that contains this virtual application.

Configuration Manager does not support use of the shared read-only cache feature of App-V.

For System Center 2012 Configuration Manager SP1 and System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager only: Configuration Manager supports the shared content store feature in App-V 5.

When you create a deployment type for a virtual application, Configuration Manager creates the deployment type by using the contents of the application manifest file. This is an XML file that contains information about the virtual application. Additionally, Configuration Manager creates requirements for the deployment type based on the contents of the App-V .osd file that contains information about the supported operating systems for the virtual application.

For more information about how to create and sequence applications with App-V, see Application Virtualization in the TechNet Library.

To deploy virtual applications in Configuration Manager, client computers must have the App-V 4.6 SP1 or a later version of the client installed.

Additionally, before you can successfully deploy virtual applications, you must update the App-V client with the hotfix described in the Knowledge Base article 2645225.

For System Center 2012 Configuration Manager SP1 and System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager only: When you use connection groups in Microsoft Application Virtualization 5.0, your deployed virtual applications can share the same file system and registry on client computers. Unlike standard virtual applications, these applications can share data with one another. Additionally, connection groups preserve user settings for the applications that they contain. App-V virtual environments in Configuration Manager are used to configure connection groups on client computers. Virtual environments are created or changed on client computers when the application is installed or when clients next evaluate their installed applications. You can prioritize these applications so that when multiple applications try to change a file system or registry value, the application that has the highest priority takes precedence. For more information, see How to Create App-V Virtual Environments in Configuration Manager.

For information to help you plan to manage and deploy virtual applications, see Planning for App-V Integration with Configuration Manager.

What’s New in Configuration Manager for App-V Virtual Applications

The following items are new or have changed for virtual applications since Configuration Manager 2007.

  • Virtual applications can support App-V Dynamic Suite Composition by using Configuration Manager local and virtual application dependencies.

  • You can selectively publish the components of a virtual application to client computers.

  • Performance is improved for publishing application shortcuts to client computers.

  • Clients check more quickly for required installations after logon. Clients also now check for required installations when the desktop is unlocked.

  • Applications can be deployed to users of Remote Desktop Services or Citrix servers when other users are logged in.

  • System Center 2012 Configuration Manager supports streaming virtual applications over the Internet from an Internet-based distribution point.

  • Streaming support is provided for packages suited together using Dynamic Suite Composition.

  • In System Center 2012 Configuration Manager, all distribution points are automatically capable of virtual application streaming. Previously, in Configuration Manager 2007, you had to enable streaming support for virtual applications on each distribution point.

  • Disk space usage is reduced on distribution points because application content is no longer duplicated for multiple application revisions.

  • Virtual application content is no longer persisted by default in the Configuration Manager client cache.

  • You can no longer create virtual applications by using Configuration Manager packages and programs. You must use Configuration Manager application management.

  • Configuration Manager supports migrating virtual application packages from Configuration Manager 2007 to System Center 2012 Configuration Manager. When you migrate an App-V package from Configuration Manager 2007, the migration Wizard will create the package as a System Center 2012 Configuration Manager application.

  • The Configuration Manager 2007 client option Allow virtual application package advertisement has been removed. In System Center 2012 Configuration Manager, virtual applications can be deployed by default.

  • Virtual applications that are deployed from an App-V Server are not deleted by the Configuration Manager client.

  • Configuration Manager hardware inventory can be used to inventory virtual applications that are deployed by an App-V Server.

  • Application content that has been downloaded to the App-V cache is not downloaded to the Configuration Manager client cache.

    noteNote
    To modify a virtual application, you must first create it as a Configuration Manager application.

What’s New in Configuration Manager

The following items are new or have changed for application management since Configuration Manager 2007:

  • Software distribution in Configuration Manager 2007 is now replaced by application management in System Center 2012 Configuration Manager. Application management provides new benefits such as user-centric management. Application management implements user device affinity, state-based deployments, deployment types, global conditions, simulated deployments, revisions, dependencies, and supersedence. If you do not require the full management capabilities of application management, you can still deploy packages and programs.

  • Deployments replace advertisements.

  • Required deployments replace mandatory or assigned advertisements. Available deployments replace optional advertisements.

  • The Deploy Software Wizard in System Center 2012 Configuration Manager replaces the previous New Advertisement Wizard in Configuration Manager 2007.

  • Users can browse and request software from the Application Catalog. This requires the two new site system roles: the Application Catalog website point and the Application Catalog web service point.

  • The new Software Center client program replaces the Program Download Monitor and Run Advertised Programs in Control Panel. Software Center is automatically installed on client computers.

  • When you deploy software to users, they no longer have to log off and back on again for Configuration Manager to include the new software deployment in the user policy. However, if the deployment uses a Windows group, any user who was recently added to the group will still have to log off and log back on to receive the software deployment.

What’s New in Configuration Manager SP1
noteNote
The information in this section also appears in the Getting Started with System Center 2012 Configuration Manager guide.

The following items are new or have changed for application management in Configuration Manager SP1:

  • App-V virtual environments in Configuration Manager enable virtual applications to share the same file system and registry on client computers. This lets applications that are in the same virtual environment to share data with one another. For more information, see How to Create App-V Virtual Environments in Configuration Manager.

  • You can configure new deployment types for Windows 8 applications that support stand-alone applications (.appx files) and links to the Windows Store.

  • Configuration Manager includes a new deployment type that you can use to deploy virtual applications that you have created by using Microsoft Application Virtualization 5.0.

  • Configuration Manager includes a new deployment type that you can use to deploy applications to Mac computers that run the Configuration Manager client.

  • Configuration Manager includes new deployment types for these mobile devices when you use the Windows Intune connector: Windows Phone 8, Windows RT, iOS, and Android. Users download apps for these devices from the new self-service portal for mobile devices, the company portal. For more information, see How to Manage Mobile Devices by Using Configuration Manager and Windows Intune.

  • You can control the behavior of the write filter on Windows Embedded devices when you deploy applications, and packages and programs, by using the new user experience setting of Commit changes at deadline or during a maintenance windows (requires restarts).

  • For Windows Embedded devices that have the write filter enabled:

    • Software deployments that have a purpose of Available are not supported. If you target a software deployment to these devices, users can see the deployment in Software Center. However, if they try to install the software, they see an error message that they do not have permissions.

    • Users on these devices cannot configure their business hours in Software Center.

    • Users on these devices do not see user notifications to let them postpone a software deployment to nonbusiness hours.

  • Users can no longer install applications from the Application Catalog if the Client Policy client setting Enable user policy on clients is set to No.

  • By default, the new Computer Agent client setting, Disable deadline randomization, disables the installation randomization delay for required software updates and for required application deployments. For more information, see the Computer Agent section in the About Client Settings in Configuration Manager topic.

What’s New in System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager
noteNote
The information in this section also appears in the Getting Started with System Center 2012 Configuration Manager guide.

The following items are new or have changed for application management in System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager:

  • Web applications in System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager are a new deployment type that allows you to deploy a shortcut to a web-based app on users’ devices.

  • Windows 8.1 introduces the app bundle (or .appxbundle package) to help optimize the packaging and distribution of Windows Store apps and resource packages. Configuration Manager extends the existing Windows app package deployment type to recognize .appxbundle package files.

  • The Create Application Wizard includes a new option that allows you to configure featured applications. These applications are displayed prominently in the company portal to help users find them.

  • You can specify a privacy link for each application that users can review before they install the application.

For more information, see How to Create Applications in Configuration Manager.

See Also

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For additional resources, see Information and Support for Configuration Manager.

Tip: Use this query to find online documentation in the TechNet Library for System Center 2012 Configuration Manager. For instructions and examples, see Search the Configuration Manager Documentation Library.
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