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SQL Server™ 2000 Reporting Services Deployment Guide

Updated : March 27, 2004

By Susie Bernard and John H. Miller Microsoft Corporation

Applies To: SQL Server 2000

Abstract: SQL Server Reporting Services provides a comprehensive, server-based reporting platform. Reporting Services combines the speed, scalability, and manageability of centrally-managed reporting with the flexibility and on-demand nature of desktop and Web-based applications. This deployment guide provides an overview of Reporting Services components and provides guidelines for installing and configuring Reporting Services.

On This Page

Introduction
Deployment Planning
Deployment Scenarios
Interoperability
Installation
Configuration
Additional Resources

Introduction

Microsoft® SQL Server™ Reporting Services is a reporting platform that combines the speed, scalability, and manageability of centrally managed reporting with the flexibility and on-demand advantages of desktop and Web-based applications.

To print this guide, click Printer-Friendly Version at the bottom of this page.

Overview

This guide provides a high-level overview of Reporting Services components, describes the hardware and software requirements for deploying Reporting Services, and offers installation and configuration instructions. It is meant to provide you with sufficient guidelines to install and configure Reporting Services.

This guide does not provide comprehensive information about Reporting Services or Reporting Services operations. For detailed information about using and maintaining the product, see SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/bb545450.aspx), also available on the product CD. SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online is referenced throughout this guide. For links to more resources, see "Additional Resources" at the end of this guide.

This document assumes that you have some familiarity with the following topics:

  • Microsoft SQL Server 2000

  • Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS)

  • The Microsoft .NET Framework

Reporting Services Components

In order to understand this guide, you should be familiar with the main components of Reporting Services.

The three main server components of Reporting Services are a server layer, an application layer, and a data layer, as shown in Table 1.

Table 1. Server components

Server component

Details

Report Server (server layer)

Primary component of Reporting Services that provides:

  • Programmatic interfaces.

  • Report processor.

  • Data processing extensions.

  • Rendering extensions.

  • Scheduling and delivery processor.

  • Delivery extensions.

Report Manager (application layer)

Web-based report viewing and management tool.

Report Server database (data layer)

SQL Server databases (ReportServer and ReportServerTempDB, by default) that store the information used by Report Server. ReportServer stores static configuration data (metadata) such as:

  • Report definitions.

  • Data sources.

  • Users, policies, and roles.

  • Report snapshots.

  • ReportServerTempDB stores temporary information such as:

    • Session data.

    • Cached reports.

Reporting Services client components include Report Designer and a method for viewing reports, such as a supported Web browser. Client components might also include third-party tools that you create or purchase.

Table 2. Client components

Client component

Details

Report Designer

Report authoring tool installed by Reporting Services and integrated with Microsoft Visual Studio® .NET 2003.

Web browser

Used to view and manage reports. For more information, see "Browser Types Supported by Reporting Services" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa256321.aspx).

Third-party tools

Management and authoring tools supported through open interfaces and a Web services API.

See Figure 1 for an architectural overview of these components. This diagram includes tools that are included with Reporting Services and SQL Server, and shows how custom tools provided by third-party vendors fit into the overall framework. It also shows the flow of requests and data among the server components, and which components send and retrieve content from a data store.

Report Server is implemented as a Web service and a Microsoft Windows® service. The Web service runs as an ASP.NET application in IIS. The Windows service is used to activate a report server during installation, and to support the ongoing operations of the Scheduling and Delivery Processor.

Figure 1: Reporting Services architecture

Figure 1: Reporting Services architecture

Data source processing, report rendering, and delivery are all implemented using components that are resident on Report Server. These extensions use published application programming interfaces (APIs).

Reporting Services includes a set of tools that enable you to use the product without modification. However, because Report Server is fully programmable, you can replace existing tools with custom applications that you create. Examples of custom applications that you might want to create include applications to:

  • View reports

  • Design reports

  • Manage reports

In addition to writing custom applications, you can create custom extensions to extend the data processing, rendering, security, and delivery capabilities of a report server.

For more information, see "Reporting Services Component Overview" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa256330.aspx).

Deployment Planning

There are a few items to consider before installing and configuring Reporting Services. This section describes these considerations:

  • Choosing a Reporting Services Edition

  • Determining Virtual Directory Names

  • Choosing a Licensing Mode

  • Understanding System Requirements

Choosing a Reporting Services Edition

First you must determine which edition of Reporting Services to install. Reporting Services is available in Standard Edition, Enterprise Edition, Developer Edition, and Evaluation Edition. Editions vary by licensing restrictions and by the features they support. For more information about features, see "Reporting Services Features" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa256334.aspx).

Standard Edition

Standard Edition is designed for a small organization with basic reporting needs. Choose Standard Edition if you do not need to support a large number of users, and do not need to support the dynamic distribution of reports to many users.

Do not deploy Standard Edition if you plan to implement any of the following features:

  • Clustered report servers (that is, report servers implemented in a Network Load Balancing cluster)

  • Security extensions, including support for custom or forms-based authentication

  • Data-driven subscriptions

  • Support for more than four processors

For more information about deploying this edition, see "Standard Deployment Model" later in this guide.

Enterprise Edition

For large organizations, you should consider installing Enterprise Edition. Enterprise Edition is designed for servers that must meet the high-volume reporting requirements of a large organization. Enterprise Edition supports all Reporting Services features, including data-driven subscriptions that derive recipient information at run time from a database, custom security models, and server clusters for (Web server Network Load Balancing or SQL Server failover). It also supports installation on a computer equipped with four or more processors.

For more information about deploying this edition, see "Enterprise Deployment Models," later in this guide.

Developer Edition

Developer Edition is designed for developers who want to integrate or extend the report server for use with a custom application, or who want to build custom tools. Developer Edition runs on the largest variety of operating systems. Developer Edition supports the same features as Enterprise Edition, but it is licensed for use as a test and development system, and is not suited for production servers.

Evaluation Edition

Evaluation Edition is designed to allow the user to evaluate all of the features of Reporting Services. Evaluation Edition is identical to Developer Edition; however, Evaluation Edition is licensed for evaluation purposes, and ceases to function after 120 days.

Determining Virtual Directory Names

Reports are accessed through virtual directories on the report server. Before running Reporting Services Setup, determine how you want to name your Reporting Services virtual directories. During setup you are prompted to configure the virtual directories for both Report Server and Report Manager. Virtual directory names must comply with IIS naming conventions. For more information about IIS naming conventions, see the IIS documentation.

Note   You can access IIS documentation on a computer running IIS by typing http://localhost/iisHelp in your browser address bar and pressing ENTER.

Table 3 shows the URLs created for Report Manager and Report Server when you select the default virtual directory names during setup.

Table 3. URLs created when you use the default virtual directories

Component

URL

Report Server

http://<server>/ReportServer

Report Manager

http://<server>/Reports

Note   To access reports directly by URL, you need to use the fully qualified URL of the report on Report Server as follows:

http://<server>/ReportServer?/<folder name>/<report name>

For more information, see "Reporting Services Virtual Directories" (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa225467.aspx) and "Report Server Folder Namespace" (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa256345.aspx) in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online.

Choosing a Licensing Mode

Reporting Services is included in your SQL Server 2000 license. You must have a valid SQL Server license for each computer that has a SQL Server 2000 component (such as Reporting Services) installed. For example, the computer running Reporting Services requires a SQL Server license. If the report server database is located remotely, a separate license is required for the remote computer running SQL Server. You do not need a license to install Report Designer, the administrative tools, samples, or product documentation.

During setup, choose one of the following two licensing modes:

  • Per seat licensing

  • Per processor licensing

Per seat licensing requires a license for the computer running Reporting Services, as well as a client access license (CAL) for each user or client device that accesses reports either directly or indirectly (including the Report Designer).

Per processor licensing is required for extranet or internet deployments. It requires a single license for each CPU in the operating system instance running Reporting Services. This license does not require any device or CALs.

For detailed information about licensing, see "How to License Reporting Services" .

Understanding System Requirements

Reporting Services hardware and software requirements are described in this section. You can install Reporting Services on the same computer as the SQL Server database, or on a separate computer. You can use the client component of Reporting Services on the same computer as the other components or on separate client computers.

Server Requirements

Hardware, software, and security requirements are outlined here for Report Server, Report Manager, and report server database.

Hardware Requirements

The minimum hardware requirements for installing Reporting Services in a standard deployment model are listed in Table 4. For information about this basic deployment model, see Standard Deployment Model later in this guide. Note that these are minimum requirements, not recommendations.

Table 4. Minimum hardware requirements for a standard deployment

Computer processor

RAM

Hard disk space (per component)

PC with an Intel or compatible Pentium II 500 MHz or higher processor

256 MB, 512 MB minimum recommended

Report Server (includes Report Manager): 50 MB

Report Designer: 30 MB

Microsoft .NET Framework: 100 MB

Samples, AdventureWorks database, and Books Online: 145 MB

Remember that hardware recommendations vary considerably, depending on how you intend to use the product. If you are using an enterprise deployment model, as described later in Enterprise Deployment Models, your hardware needs increase significantly.

The following guidelines are general and do not address all of the factors that go into capacity planning, but they can help you plan an enterprise Reporting Services deployment:

  • If you plan to distribute a high volume of reports, use a fast dual- or quad-processor computer to host Report Server components. If additional processing capability is required, increase the amount of RAM on the report server and consider the following:

    • The first step you can take to scale out your Reporting Services implementation is to use a dedicated SQL Server instance to host the report server database. For more information, see "Using a Remote SQL Server Instance to Host a Report Server Database" later in this guide.

    • The next you can take to scale out Reporting Services is to implement Network Load Balancing in an IIS server cluster (that is, implement a Web farm).

  • If reports are mission critical, deploy the report server database in a server cluster configured for failover. This reduces the risk of reporting down time.

  • In a high-volume reporting scenario, it is the mainly the computer (or computers) hosting the report server database that benefits from increased available hard disk space, not the report server itself.

In general, the computer hosting the report server database requires the most available disk space. Report servers themselves benefit the most from increased RAM and processor speed.

Note   Some Windows operating systems, such as Windows Server 2003 Datacenter Edition and Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition, can provide more than 2 gigabytes (GB) of memory to applications. If you are running Reporting Services on one of these operating systems, Reporting Services can take advantage of that amount of memory. For information about editing the Boot.ini file to modify large memory allocations, see your Windows documentation.

Software Requirements

This section provides information to assist you in preparing component servers for Reporting Services installation. It is recommended that you review this section before running Reporting Services Setup.

Report Server

Before running Reporting Services Setup, use Table 5 as a checklist to ensure that the computer serving as the report server has the appropriate software components enabled or configured.

Table 5. Report Server software requirements

Software

Required for setup

Details

Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator (MSDTC) service

Yes

Verify that the startup type for the service is set to Automatic or Manual. To view service state, point to Administrative Tools in Control Panel and click Services. Right-click Distributed Transaction Coordinator, and then click Properties.

Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC) 2.6 or higher

Yes

See Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 301202, HOW TO: Check for MDAC Version (http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=301202&product=mdac).

IIS 5.0 or later1

Yes

Verify that the default website is accessible through http://<server>.

The default website IP address must be mapped to (All Unassigned). To verify this setting, open the Default Web Site Properties dialog box in Internet Information Services. The IP address is specified on the Web Site tab.

IWAM_<computer> account must be enabled.

Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1

Yes

If the .NET Framework 1.1 is not installed, Setup installs it.

ASP .NET

Yes

Ensure that ASP.NET 1.1 is installed and registered with IIS. See "ASP.NET Configuration" in "Preparing to Install" of SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa179363.aspx).

Connection to SQL Server 2000 SP3a instance.

Yes

For more information, see "Report Server Database Requirements"requirements later in this guide.

User account credentials

Yes

You must have appropriate credentials necessary to log on and perform the database creation on the SQL Server instance hosting Report Server database. For detailed information, see "Security Requirements" later in this guide.

SSL

No

If you select Use SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) connections during setup, Setup checks to see if an SSL certificate is present on the computer. If not, you must either install SSL and continue the setup, or select to not use SSL at this time and configure Report Server for SSL later.

SMTP server

No

Optional, for e-mail delivery of reports.

Note   Servers running Windows Server 2003 must be configured as application servers before you install Reporting Services on them. For more information, see your Windows Server 2003 documentation.

Report Manager

Report Manager is an ASP.NET application that is installed by Setup on the same computer as Report Server. Installing Report Manager is optional. If you use custom report viewing and management tools, for example, you do not need this component.

Report Server database

The computer hosting the report server database must be running SQL Server 2000 SP3a. The ReportServer and ReportServerTempDB databases created during setup are used together. A connection between a report server and a report server database is established during setup. If you rename or move the databases after setup, you must run the Rsconfig.exe utility to update the connection information. For more information, see "Configuring a Report Server Connection" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa972232.aspx).

Important   Do not delete the report server databases, modify their structure, or create applications that interact directly with these databases, either during or after deployment.

Security Requirements

To successfully and securely deploy Reporting Services, you must be familiar with the accounts used to install Reporting Services.

Note   Reporting Services uses a role-based security model. However, security for Reporting Services is multi-layered. A thorough description of security architecture is beyond the scope of this guide. For more information, see "Using Role-Based Security" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa237758.aspx).

Account Requirements

The credentials required to run Setup are different from the account credentials configured during setup and used at run time, as depicted in Figure 2. This section describes credentials needed to:

  • Run Setup and install the report server database.

  • Start the Report Server Windows service.

  • Configure report server database access.

  • Configure IIS and the Report Server Web service.

    Figure 2: User credentials required by Setup vs. credentials used at Reporting Services run time

    Figure 2: User credentials required by Setup vs. credentials used at Reporting Services run time
To Run Setup and Install the Report Server Database

To run Setup, you must be a member of the local Administrators group. Setup uses the credentials of the user installing the product to log on to a SQL Server instance and create the report server database.

You must also have permission to perform the following tasks on the SQL Server instance used to host the report server databases:

  • Create logins

  • Create roles

  • Create databases

  • Assign permissions to users

    Note   If you do not want to use the credentials of the user running Setup, you can supply alternative credentials for creating the report server database by running Setup.exe from the command line. For detailed information, see "Installing Reporting Services from the Command Line" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa179337.aspx).

The credentials that you supply on the Report Server Database page in Setup are used by Report Server services to connect to the SQL Server database. For more information, see "To Configure Report Server Database Access" later in this section.

To Start the Report Server Windows Service

During setup, you are prompted to specify a service account. This is the Report Server Windows service account. Your options are to:

  • Use a built-in account (such as NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM).

  • Use a domain user account.

If you are installing Reporting Services on Windows 2000 Server, and the SQL Server instance that is hosting the report server database is on a separate computer, consider using a domain user account. In some cases, depending on how your network is configured, a domain user account is more effective in supporting subscription and delivery operations used to distribute reports to other domain users. The main reason is that domain accounts have the permissions required to check credentials of domain users. This is necessary if subscriptions are owned by domain users. However, there are cases where a built-in account also works.

To Configure Report Server Database Access

During setup, you specify the server and instance of SQL Server to host the report server database. At the same time, you also specify one of the following types of credentials used by Report Server to connect to the report server database (post-setup):

  • Service Account (default)

  • Domain User Account

  • SQL Login Account

If you select SQL Login Account from the Credentials Type list on the Report Server Database page, Setup creates the account using and grants SQL Server login credentials to it.

Note   A SQL Server update is required if your deployment meets the following conditions:

To Configure IIS and the Report Server Web Service

Before running Setup, verify the following configurations on your report server computer:

  • For Setup to configure IIS, the IWAM_<computer> account must be enabled

  • The default Web site IP address in IIS must be mapped to (All Unassigned)

During run time (post-setup), the Report Server Web service uses the <computer>\ASPNET account. You cannot specify a different account to use for Web service operation. You must use the user account defined for ASP.NET.

Report Server and Report Manager are accessed through virtual directories that are created and configured during setup. How your Web server is configured can affect your Reporting Services installation. It is assumed that you are using a default IIS configuration. If you are using a non-default configuration, you might encounter errors during setup.

Setup defines the virtual directories under the default Web site. If you are using IIS 6.x, Setup uses the default application pool. If the default Web site or application pool is not available, Setup continues, but your installation will not function properly after Setup is finished.

For more information about resolving these issues, refer to the Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Readme file and to postings on the public newsgroups (http://www.microsoft.com/sql/community/newsgroups/dgbrowser/en-us/default.mspx?dg=microsoft.public.sqlserver.reportingsvcs).

Secure Socket Layer Configuration

When you install Reporting Services, one of the first things you configure in Setup is whether or not to use SSL to control access to the Reporting Services and encrypt the data and credentials transported over network. For security reasons, you should choose to use SSL. For detailed information about using and configuring SSL for Reporting Services, see "Using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) for SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services" (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa902687.aspx). This article also contains information about how to install a Root Certificate Authority and how you can request Certificates to secure your Reporting Services Web site.

Client Requirements

This section describes the client computer requirements for viewing and designing reports.

Viewing Reports

The client computer used to view reports must be running a supported Web browser. When the client requests a report directly from Report Server, either using a URL or Report Manager, Report Server implements the HTML rendering extension by default. Depending on the client's browser, the HTML rendering extension produces reports in either HTML 4.0 or HTML 3.2. Supported browsers for HTML 4.0 include:

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer for Windows versions 5.5 and 6.

  • Netscape Navigator for Windows version 7.1.

HTML 3.2 is delivered to all other browsers supporting HTML. This includes earlier versions of the browsers mentioned above, as well as Internet Explorer for Pocket PC.

The HTML rendering extension supports Microsoft Office Web Components (OWC). OWC is a specific type of Microsoft ActiveX® control that provides interactive chart and Microsoft PivotTable® controls. Various report rendering formats might have different requirements. For example, a client must use Adobe Acrobat Reader to view PDF files and Microsoft Excel to access reports in XLS format. Similarly, you must have Microsoft Office Web Components installed on the client computer in order to use the HTML with Office Web Components rendering format.

Note   Various report rendering formats might have different requirements for client computers where reports are viewed. For example, the Portable Document Format (PDF) rendering extension requires Adobe Acrobat Reader to view reports in PDF. You are not required to run any Adobe software on the report server in order to render reports in PDF.

Using Report Designer

Report Designer requires Microsoft Visual Studio® .NET 2003 or another product that provides the Visual Studio 2003 shell (such as Visual Basic .NET 2003 or Visual C# .NET 2003) and MDAC 2.6 or higher.

Deployment Scenarios

Reporting Services components can run on a single server or on multiple servers, allowing for a variety of scalable, flexible implementations. This section describes various possible deployment scenarios.

If your organization is small, the "Standard Deployment Model" section contains the most appropriate deployment scenario for your organization. If your organization is medium or large, you should review the scenarios in the "Enterprise Deployment Models" section before proceeding to Reporting Services installation.

In general, find the scenario here that best fits your environment and objectives, then use the information presented here to help you design your deployment plan.

Standard Deployment Model

This section describes a simple deployment model of Reporting Services. The guidelines here are suited for small organizations and organizations implementing an intranet-only deployment of Reporting Services. Use a standard deployment model if you are deploying the Standard Edition of Reporting Services, evaluating the product, or developing an application using the Reporting Services platform. If your implementation of Reporting Services requires accessing reports from a client on the Internet or setting up multiple Web servers for reporting purposes, see "Enterprise Deployment Models" later in this guide. The standard deployment model is not intended for organizations that have high-availability or high-volume reporting requirements.

Small organizations often can achieve acceptable report processing performance using a single server deployment, as depicted in Figure 3.

Figure 3: Typical standard deployment model for small organizations using a single server

Figure 3: Typical standard deployment model for small organizations using a single server

A primary consideration in choosing where to host the report server database is disk space availability. If you expect your reports to grow substantially in the future, consider deploying Reporting Services using a remote instance of SQL Server to host the report server database, as shown in Figure 4. The remote report server database must be in the same domain as the report server or in a trusted domain with the report server.

For more information, see "Report Server Database Requirements" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa972257.aspx).

Figure 4: Typical standard deployment model using a remote instance of SQL Server

Figure 4: Typical standard deployment model using a remote instance of SQL Server

Enterprise Deployment Models

The enterprise deployment models described here include:

  • Clustered servers

  • Internet-accessible report servers

Server Clusters

Large organizations with high-volume reporting needs will probably choose to distribute the report processing load across multiple servers to increase reporting availability and provide failover capabilities. Reporting Services supports server clustering as follows:

  • You can configure Report Servers for network load balancing.

  • You can configure the report server database for failover.

A report server implemented in a Windows Network Load Balancing cluster (or Web farm) consists of multiple report servers that share a report server database (or share a cluster of report server databases). Typically you specify the report server nodes participating in a cluster during Reporting Services Setup.

Note   You must use additional software to set up and manage a server cluster. The Microsoft Cluster service included in the Windows 2000 Server operating system provides Network Load Balancing and failover capabilities. Microsoft Application Center also provides Web server load balancing. Or, you can use third-party load-balancing software.

You can implement cluster technology for your report servers, report server databases, or both, as depicted in Figure 5.

Figure 5: Typical enterprise deployment model using a cluster of report servers and clustered Report Server databases

Figure 5: Typical enterprise deployment model using a cluster of report servers and clustered Report Server databases
Deploying Report Servers in a Cluster

If you are deploying a new report server to an existing Web farm, that report server requires credentials to connect to a report server that already exists in the Web farm. You can specify Windows credentials, or connect using the security context of the user running Setup. These credentials need to have administrator permissions on the computer that is already part of the Web farm.

For more information, or if you want to install a new report server Web farm, see "Installing a Report Server Web Farm" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa179321.aspx).

Deploying Report Server Databases in a Cluster

You can implement your report server database in a SQL Server failover cluster. For more information, see Installing Failover Clustering in SQL Server Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa196693.aspx). Whether you use a single database or a database cluster, the configuration you use is transparent to a report server.

Internet-Accessible Report Servers

You can also deploy a report server that is accessible from the Internet. To implement access to a report server over the Internet, you modify the Rswebapplication.config file on the report server, as described the "Deploying a Report Server for Internet Access" section of "Enterprise Deployment Model" of SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa972253.aspx).

See Figure 6 for a sample Internet deployment of Reporting Services.

Figure 6: Typical enterprise deployment model using server clusters and providing secure client access to reports over the Internet

Figure 6: Typical enterprise deployment model using server clusters and providing secure client access to reports over the Internet

Interoperability

If you are running middle-tier Web applications other than Reporting Services, your IIS configuration might have been adjusted to run those programs, and some of those adjustments could prevent Report Server from running properly.

For example, if you installed Windows SharePoint services on a server, you need to make a few modifications in order to install and run Reporting Services on the same server.

To enable a side-by-side installation of Reporting Services and Windows SharePoint Services, perform the following steps.

  1. While installing Reporting Services, you might experience activation failures. Ignore any activation errors that occur.

  2. Add the Reporting Services virtual directories to the Windows SharePoint Services list of exclusions. If you installed Reporting Services using the default virtual directories, run the following at the command prompt:

    STSADM.EXE -o addpath -url http://localhost/ReportServer -type exclusion
    

    and

    STSADM.EXE -o addpath -url http://localhost/Reports -type exclusion
    
  3. Add the following text under the HttpModules configuration element of the SharePoint Web.config file. By default, the SharePoint Web.config file is located at C:\Inetpub\wwwroot.

    <HttpModules> 
       <add name="Session" type="System.Web.SessionState.SessionStateModule"/>
    
  4. Enable session state for the pages element by changing the enableSessionState attribute from false to true.

  5. If Report Server does not respond, in Internet Service Manager (or in the IIS snap-in), ensure that the report server is in an application pool that is separate from the SharePoint server. Report Manager can remain in the same application pool where it was originally installed. To assign the report server to a separate application pool, you must first create a new application pool. After you have created a new application pool, expand Web Sites, expand Default Web Site, right-click the report server virtual root that you created during setup (the default is ReportServer), and then click Properties. From the Application pool drop-down list, select the newly created application pool. For more information about application pools, see your IIS documentation.

  6. In Internet Explorer, navigate to http://<server>/ReportServer. This causes Reporting Services to initialize. Your logged-in account must have local Administrator credentials for the initialization to occur.

Installation

You run Reporting Services Setup from the product CD, from a shared folder expressed in Universal Naming Convention (UNC) format, or from a local folder.

Setup installs all components locally except the report server database, which you can configure to run on a remote instance of SQL Server. (For more information, see "Using a Remote SQL Server Instance to Host the Report Server Database" later in this guide.) A complete installation of Reporting Services includes authoring tools, management tools, Report Server Web service, Report Server Windows service, documentation, and sample reports and applications. The simplest configuration is a single system installation. For more information about different configurations, see "Deployment Scenarios" earlier in this guide.

Before Running Setup

Before running Setup, be sure you are prepared for your Reporting Services deployment. Review Table 5 in the "Software Requirements" section, earlier in this guide, to avoid common installation errors.

Important   Before running Setup, verify that the Startup Type for Distributed Transaction Coordinator service is set to Automatic or Manual. Setup fails if the Distributed Transaction Coordinator is not set. For more information, see "Server Requirements" earlier in this guide.

Setup includes a wizard for specifying installation options. Depending upon the components being installed, Setup prompts for a number of settings, summarized in the "Setup User Interface Reference" table (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa225462.aspx). To streamline deployment, familiarize yourself with these settings prior to running Setup in your production environment.

Running Setup

In Windows, run the Setup.exe program to install Reporting Services. Setup.exe is available in the root folder of the Reporting Services product CD. This launches the Setup program, which steps you through the installation process. For detailed information about the screens displayed in the Setup user interface, see "Setup User Interface Reference" (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa225462.aspx).

Or, if you want to customize your installation, you can install Reporting Services from the command prompt. Run Setup.exe at the command prompt, appending the command with the appropriate command-line options described in "Installing Reporting Services from the Command Line" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa179337.aspx).

Using Non-Default Settings and Other Setup Considerations

This section describes using some of the non-default settings when installing Reporting Services, and other considerations:

  • Using Unattended Installation

  • Installing Report Server on a Domain Controller

  • Using Underscore Characters in Report Server Computer Names

  • Using a Remote SQL Server Instance to Host the Report Server Database

  • Using the non-default IIS Web site

  • Running the IIS Lockdown tool

Using Unattended Installation

To run Setup unattended you must run Setup.exe from the command prompt. For information, see "Performing an Unattended Installation of Reporting Services" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa179331.aspx).

Installing Report Server on a Domain Controller

You can host a report server on a domain controller. If the domain controller runs on Windows Server 2003, no additional steps are necessary in order for Reporting Services to install and run properly. On Windows 2000 Server, Reporting Services installs properly on a domain controller, but is not activated. In this case, you should perform the following steps to finish Report Server installation. You can perform these tasks before or after running Setup.

  1. Grant Impersonate privilege to the IWAM_<computer> account. For more information, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article,"IWAM Account Is Not Granted the Impersonate Privilege for ASP.NET 1.1 on a Windows 2000 Domain Controller with SP4" (http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;824308&Product=iis50).

  2. Remove the IWAM_<computer> account from the Guest group. Guest users cannot store or maintain encrypted content. For more information, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article, "Roaming Profiles Cannot Create Key Containers" (http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;265357&Product=iis50).

  3. Reboot the computer.

  4. In Internet Explorer, navigate to http://<server>/ReportServer. This causes Reporting Services to initialize. Your logged-in account must have local Administrator credentials for the initialization to occur.

On both Windows 2000 Server and Windows Server 2003, if you are using a Windows account to connect to the report server database, you must grant the user account the privilege to log on locally to the domain controller on which the report server is running, even if the report server database is on a different computer. Domain users are not granted this permission by default.

Using Underscore Characters in Report Server Computer Names

Avoid installing Report Server on a computer that has an underscore in its computer name. Report Server cannot maintain session state information on computers that have an underscore character in the computer name and that have been updated with Internet Explorer Security Patch MS01-055. The security update prevents cookies from being set on client computers that have an underscore in their names, disabling the session management features of Reporting Services. Recommended solutions are documented in Microsoft Knowledge Base article," Session Variables Do Not Persist Between Requests After You Install Internet Explorer Security Patch MS01-055" (http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;316112&Product=iis50).

Using a Remote SQL Server Instance to Host the Report Server Database

During setup, you choose whether to create the report server database on a local or remote instance of SQL Server. If you decide to use a remote SQL Server instance, consider carefully which credentials the report server should use to connect to the SQL Server instance. Setup does not automatically filter out types of credentials that are not valid for this configuration. For detailed information about configuring credentials in the Report Server Database page of the Setup wizard, see "Choosing a Remote SQL Server Instance" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa179363.aspx).

Note   If you are running Terminal Services in application mode on Windows 2000 Server, you must disable the Terminal Services service before running Reporting Services Setup. Terminal Services can interfere with the report server connection to a remote SQL Server instance during setup. Similarly, if Terminal Services is enabled on Windows Server 2003, you must disable it before running Setup. (This is not necessary if Remote Administration is enabled in Windows Server 2003.)

Troubleshooting Setup

You can verify that the installation was successful by performing a few simple tests described in "Verifying an Installation of Reporting Services" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa179329.aspx).

For information about errors you might encounter while running Setup, see "Troubleshooting an Installation of Reporting Services" in Reporting Services Setup Help (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa179315.aspx), also available in the root folder on the product CD.

Component information is stored in four configuration files during Reporting Services Setup. Configuration files contain a combination of internal-use-only and user-defined values. User-defined values are specified during installation, through tools, and by manually editing the configuration files. For more information, see "Reporting Services Configuration Files" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa972211.aspx).

You can also examine the log files created during setup to troubleshoot errors or other issues. For information, see"to Log Files Used During Installation" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa179323.aspx).

Configuration

This section describes how to configure Reporting Services for basic reporting, and how to back up your configuration as appropriate.

Configuring Reporting Services Components and Security

Configuring Reporting Services components can involve any of the following tasks:

  • Configuring a report server connection that provides authentication between Report Server and the report server database

  • Configuring Report Server for e-mail delivery of reports

  • Configuring Report Server access

  • Configuring an account for unattended report delivery

For detailed information about configuring these components, see "Configuring Reporting Services Components" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://www.msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/rsadmin/htm/arp_configserver_v1_0ijm.asp).

Configuring security in Reporting Services involves the following:

  • Configuring Web host security for Report Server

  • Limiting the number of open connections

  • Implementing best practices for authenticating server and data source connections

  • Securing reports for global access

For detailed information about configuring security, see "Configuring Server Security" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://www.msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/rsadmin/htm/arp_configsecurity_v1_3207.asp).

Initializing a Report Server

In Reporting Services, an initialized (or activated) server is one that can encrypt and decrypt data in a report server database. A report server is automatically initialized during setup by the Report Server Windows service. A report server that is not initialized does not operate properly. Report server initialization completes the server deployment by creating keys used for reversible encryption.

Note   If you manually add a report server to a Web farm using Rsconfig.exe after initial Reporting Services Setup, you must initialize the server manually using the Rsactivate.exe utility.

For information about how to initialize Report Server, see "Activating a Report Server" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://www.msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/rsadmin/htm/drp_customizing_v1_4hys.asp).

Backing Up Your Configuration

The Rskeymgmt.exe tool captures the key set that is defined during setup, and stores it as a file that you can store externally. It is highly recommended that you use this tool to copy your Reporting Services key set to a removable media device (such as a floppy disk) and store it in a secure location. You can use the tool to back up, remove, or apply the symmetric keys used by a report server. If the keys cannot be recovered or applied, this tool provides a way to delete encrypted content that can no longer be used.

For more information about using Rskeymgmt.exe, see "Managing Encryption Keys" in SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa972238.aspx).

You should also back up your report server databases on a regular basis or after making substantial report management changes. Use the built-in SQL Server backup functionality to back up these databases:

  • ReportServer

  • ReportServerTempDB

Optionally, back up these databases too:

  • master

  • msdb

For information about backing up databases, see "Backing Up and Restoring Databases" in SQL Server Books Online (http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/aa176750.aspx).

Additional Resources

Table 6 contains more resources for information about Reporting Services and related products and technologies.

Table 6. Reporting Services resources

Resource

URL

SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Books Online

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/bb545450.aspx

Reporting Services Web site

http://www.microsoft.com/sql/reporting/

Microsoft newsgroup (microsoft.public.sqlserver.reportingsvcs)

news://news.microsoft.com/

Microsoft SQL Server Support

http://support.microsoft.com/support/sql

Microsoft SQL Server product information

http://www.microsoft.com/sql

Microsoft Windows Hardware Compatibility List

http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hcl/default.mspx

MSDN®

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/default.aspx

Professional Association for SQL Server

http://www.sqlpass.org/

SQL Server Magazine

http://www.sqlmag.com/

1Install IIS 5.0 or Later To install IIS on Windows Server 2003, click Add or Remove Programs in Control Panel. In the Add or Remove Programs dialog box, click Add/Remove Windows Components. The Windows Component Wizard appears. In the Windows Components page, select the Application Server check box. Click Next to configure the component. Click Finish to close the wizard.For all other operating systems, you can install IIS by clicking Add or Remove Programs, and then clicking Add/Remove Windows Components. The Windows Component Wizard appears. In the Windows Components page, select the Internet Information Services (IIS) check box. Click Next to configure the component. Click Finish to close the wizard.
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