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How to Configure Exchange and Windows Server POP3 Service to Coexist Using a Single SMTP Mail Domain

 

Topic Last Modified: 2005-05-17

This topic explains how to configure Exchange Server and the Windows Server POP3 service to allow users to share a single SMTP mail domain.

Before you perform the procedure in this topic, review the following information:

  • The figure below illustrates an example of coexistence by using a single SMTP mail domain. In this scenario, Exchange Server functions as the first mail server, and the Exchange Server is configured to use the SMTP mail domain of northwindtraders.com. The server running the Windows Server POP3 service is configured with a domain of pop.northwindtraders.com, but POP3 clients are configured to use northwindtraders.com as their return address.

    Sharing an SMTP domain

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  • Before you perform the procedure in this topic, it is important that you first read Scenarios for Coexistence of the POP3 Service in Exchange Server 2003 and Windows Server 2003.

  • To successfully complete the procedure in this topic, confirm the following:

    • You are running Exchange Server 2003.

    • You are running Windows Server 2003.

    • You have configured your server running the Windows Server POP3 service with a different mail domain from the Exchange Server mail domain.

  1. Set up your infrastructure. For detailed steps, see How to Set up Your Infrastructure for Coexistence of Exchange and Windows Server POP3 Service.

  2. Mail-enable each POP3 user in Active Directory directory service and assign an external address that is the same as the mail domain on the server running Windows Server POP3 service. In this example, that address is pop.northwindtraders.com. For detailed steps, see How to Mail-Enable a POP3 User Account for the coexistence of Exchange and Windows Server POP3 Service While Sharing an SMTP domain.

  3. (Optional) Configure your POP3 clients to use your Exchange Server as an SMTP server. For detailed steps, see How to Configure a POP3 Client Computer to Use Exchange as the SMTP Server.

  4. Configure your POP3 clients to use authentication on their outgoing mail server, which is the SMTP server. For detailed steps, see How to Configure Authentication on a POP3 Client Computer's Outgoing Mail Server.

  5. Configure your POP3 clients to use the shared SMTP address as their return address. In this example, the shared SMTP address is northwindtraders.com. For detailed steps, see How to Configure a POP3 Client Computer to Use the Shared SMTP Mail Domain as the Return Address.

  6. Make sure that your recipient policy for the SMTP mail domain that you want to share is configured on your recipient policy and is the primary SMTP address for your Exchange Server users. For detailed steps, see How to Configure the Recipient Policy for the Shared SMTP Mail Domain for Exchange Users.

  7. Create a recipient policy for your POP3 users that assigns the shared SMTP mail domain as a secondary e-mail address. For detailed steps, see How to Configure the Recipient Policy for POP3 Users.

  8. Create an SMTP connector to route mail to the server running the Windows Server POP3 service. For detailed steps, How to Create an SMTP Connector on Exchange to Route Mail to the Server Running Windows Server POP3 Service when using a Single SMTP Mail Domain.

  9. Configure the SMTP service on the server running the Windows Server POP3 service to use Exchange Server as a smart host. For detailed steps, see How to Configure Exchange as a Smart Host in the SMTP Service when using a Single SMTP Mail Domain.

  10. Configure the SMTP service on the server running the Windows Server POP3 service with permissions to relay. For detailed steps, see How to Create a Remote Domain for the Exchange SMTP Mail Domain on the Server Running the Windows Server POP3 Service.

 
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