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Creating an X.400 Connector

 

Topic Last Modified: 2005-04-26

After you create a TCP X.400 or X.25 X.400 transport stack, you can create an X.400 connector to connect to another X.400 system. Remember that connectors send mail in only one direction, so the X.400 connector enables mail to flow from your system to the remote system or routing group. If you are connecting to a remote system, the administrator of that system must also create a connector to send mail to your organization.

The following table lists the configuration settings that are available for an X.400 connector. These settings are available in the Properties dialog box for an X.400 connector.

General tab of the Properties dialog box for an X.400 connector

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Configuration settings for an X.400 connector

Settings Description

Remote X.400 name

When you configure an X.400 connector, you must specify a valid account and password for the remote X.400 system to which you are connecting.

You configure these settings on the General tab of the X.400 connector's Properties dialog box.

Address space

The address space defines the mail addresses or domains for the e-mail messages that you want routed through a connector. You can specify the X.400 address of a third-party X.400 system or an Exchange 5.5 server to which you are connecting, so that all mail destined to the specified X.400 system is routed through this connector.

You configure these settings on the Address Space tab of the X.400 connector's Properties dialog box.

Transport address information for the remote system

You must specify transport address information for the remote X.400 system to which you are connecting.

You configure these settings on the Stack tab of the X.400 connector's Properties dialog box.

Content restrictions

You can specify what types of messages are delivered through a connector.

You configure these settings on the Content Restrictions tab of the X.400 connector's Properties dialog box.

Scope

You can select either a whole organization or a routing group for the connector's scope. For example, if you create an X.400 connector to send mail to an X.400 system on a server in one routing group, and an X.400 connector exists on a server in another routing group, you may choose to specify a routing group scope for these connectors so that servers in each routing group are forced to use the connector. If an X.400 connector that is set to a routing group scope becomes unavailable, messages queue in the routing group until the connector becomes available. If your user requirements permit this, you can implement the connectors with a routing group scope.

You configure these settings on the Address Space tab of the X.400 connector's Properties dialog box.

Override options

By default, the X.400 connector inherits the settings that are configured on the X.400 protocol.

To override these settings, you use the Override tab of the X.400 connector's Properties dialog box.

Delivery restrictions

You can restrict who can send mail through a connector. By default, mail is accepted from everyone.

You configure these settings on the Delivery Restrictions tab of the X.400 connector's Properties dialog box.

For detailed instructions, see How to Create an X.400 Connector.

 
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