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Internet Protocol Version 6: Request for Comments and Internet Drafts

Published: August 01, 2001 | Updated: February 17, 2003
By Joseph Davies

Abstract

This article outlines how Internet drafts dealing with standards for TCP/IP become RFCs. Included is a table listing the RFCs and Internet drafts related to the implementation of the IPv6 protocol in Microsoft® Windows® XP and Microsoft Windows Server 2003.

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IPv6 RFCs and Internet Drafts
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IPv6 RFCs and Internet Drafts

The standards for TCP/IP are published in a series of documents called Requests for Comments (RFCs). RFCs are an evolving series of reports, proposals for protocols, and protocol standards that describe the internal workings of TCP/IP and the Internet.

Although TCP/IP standards are always published as RFCs, not all RFCs specify standards. RFCs are authored by individuals who voluntarily write and submit a draft proposal for a new protocol or specification to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and other working groups. Submitted Internet drafts are first reviewed by a technical expert, a task force, or an RFC editor, and then assigned a status.

If an Internet draft passes this initial review stage, it is circulated to the larger Internet community for a period of time for further comment and review, and assigned an RFC number. This RFC number remains constant.

If changes are made to the proposed specification, Internet drafts that are revised or updated are circulated by using a new RFC (a number higher than the original RFC number) to identify more recent documents.

Table of RFCs and Internet Drafts

The following table lists the RFCs and Internet drafts related to the implementation of the IPv6 protocol in Microsoft® Windows® XP and Microsoft Windows Server 2003.

RFC number or Internet draft

Title

1752

The recommendation for the IP next generation protocol

1828

IP authentication using keyed MD5

1886

DNS extensions to support IP version 6

1933

Transition mechanisms for IPv6 hosts and routers

1981

Path MTU discovery for IP version 6

2185

Routing aspects of IPv6 transition

2373

IP version 6 addressing architecture

2374

An IPv6 aggregatable global unicast address format

2401

Security architecture for the Internet protocol

2402

IP authentication header

2403

The use of HMAC-MD5-96 within ESP and AH (implemented for AH only)

2404

The use of HMAC-SHA-1-96 within ESP and AH (implemented for AH only)

2406

IP encapsulating security payload (ESP)

2428

FTP extensions for IPv6 and NATs

2460

Internet protocol, version 6 (IPv6) specification

2461

Neighbor discovery for IP version 6 (IPv6)

2462

IPv6 stateless address autoconfiguration

2463

Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMPv6) for the Internet protocol version 6 (IPv6) specification

2464

Transmission of IPv6 packets over Ethernet networks

2467

Transmission of IPv6 packets over FDDI networks

2526

Reserved IPv6 subnet anycast addresses

2529

Transmission of IPv6 over IPv4 domains without explicit tunnels

2553

Basic socket interface extensions for IPv6

2710

Multicast listener discovery (MLD) for IPv6 (implemented for host only)

2711

IPv6 router alert option (implemented for host only)

2732

Format for literal IPv6 addresses in URLs

3041

Privacy extensions for stateless address autoconfiguration in IPv6

3056

Connection of IPv6 domains via IPv4 clouds

Internet draft

An extension of format for IPv6 scoped addresses

Internet draft

Intra-site Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP)

Internet draft

Default address selection for IPv6

Internet draft

IP version 6 addressing architecture

Internet draft

IP version 6 scoped address architecture

Internet draft

Mobility support in IPv6 (host only)

Internet draft

Routing of scoped addresses in the Internet protocol version 6 (IPv6)

Internet draft

Site prefixes in neighbor discovery

Internet draft

The UDP lite protocol

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