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Guide for Installing and Deploying Microsoft® Windows® XP Service Pack 2

Published: August 09, 2004
On This Page

About This Guide
What You Should Know Before You Deploy Service Pack 2
What Is in Service Pack 2?
Planning Your Deployment
Installing Service Pack 2
After You Install Service Pack 2
Removing Service Pack 2
For More Information

About This Guide

This guide provides information for administrators and other advanced users who are installing Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2).

This guide includes procedures and recommendations that can help you install the service pack on multiple computers in a small business or corporate environment. It also includes key scenarios for installing the service pack either alone or integrated with Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition or Microsoft Windows XP Professional. As an alternative to using the methods described in this guide, you can buy and install Windows XP, which now includes SP2.

Throughout the rest of this guide, Windows XP is used to refer to both Windows XP Home Edition and Windows XP Professional unless otherwise stated.

Important

  • If you are installing SP2 from the CD, the service pack installer file is called Xpsp2.exe. If you are downloading SP2 from the Microsoft Web site, the installer file is called WindowsXP-KB835935-SP2-xxx.exe (xxxstands for a specific language code, such as ENU for English). Both installer files are identical, they just have different names.

  • If you are downloading SP2 from the Web, for the purposes of this document, use WindowsXP-KB835935-SP2-xxx.exe wherever you see Xpsp2.exe.

Organization of This Guide

This guide includes the following main sections:

  • What You Should Know Before You Deploy Service Pack 2

    Provides links to information and resources you should review before you deploy SP2.

  • What Is in Service Pack 2

    Provides an overview of the service pack. It also provides information about additional resources that can help you plan your service pack deployment.

  • Planning Your Deployment

    Identifies important steps to take when planning your service pack deployment. It also provides information about installation methods, deployment tools and files, the supported platforms for the service pack, and methods you can use to test the deployment in your environment.

  • Installing Service Pack 2

    Describes the methods you can use to install SP2. If your computer is already running Windows XP, you can install the standalone version of SP2 separately as an update. If you want to upgrade your operating system while you install SP2, you can integrate SP2 with Windows XP, and then install the operating system and service pack simultaneously.

  • After You Install Service Pack 2

    Explains why you do not need to reinstall SP2 if you have added or removed new devices or software. It also provides information about using Group Policy to configure settings for Install Updates and Shut Down.

  • Removing Service Pack 2

    Provides the procedure for removing SP2.

  • For More Information

    Provides links to useful sources of information about SP2 and Windows XP.

Terminology Used in This Guide

The following table provides definitions of terms that are used throughout this guide.

Term

Definition

Integrated

An installation in which the operating system and the service pack are installed together as a single installation.

Standalone

A service pack that is not integrated with other software and can be used to update the operating system it is designed for.

systemdrive

The drive where the operating system is installed. On most computers, the systemdrive is C:\.

systemroot

The "root" directory of the Windows installation on the computer's hard disk. On most computers running Windows XP, systemroot is C:\WINDOWS. If you have upgraded your computer to Windows XP from another version of Windows, systemroot might be C:\WINNT.

Update

Noun: A broadly released fix for a specific problem.

Verb: To make a system or data file more current.

Upgrade

Noun: A software package that replaces an installed version of a product with a newer version of the same product. The upgrade process typically leaves existing customer data and preferences intact while replacing the existing software with the newer version.

Verb: To change to a newer, usually more powerful or sophisticated version of a product.

For additional definitions see the Microsoft Security and Privacy Glossary on the Microsoft Security Web site.



What You Should Know Before You Deploy Service Pack 2

Although this guide includes some basic operating system information, it assumes that you already have a working knowledge of Windows XP and service pack installations. It is not designed to replace formal training or Windows documentation, but should be used along with those resources.

For a list of resources in addition to those presented in this section, see For More Information later in this guide.

Updating Microsoft Windows XP Tablet PC Edition or Microsoft Windows XP Media Center Edition

For information about updating either Microsoft Windows XP Tablet PC Edition or Microsoft Windows XP Media Center Edition to SP2, see "What to Know Before You Install Service Pack 2" on the Windows XP Service Pack 2 Web Site.

For information about deploying the version of SP2 that is integrated with Windows XP Tablet PC Edition, see Single-Image Deployment Guide for Windows XP Tablet PC Edition 2005 on the Microsoft TechNet Web Site.

Note

  • SP2 is not being released for Microsoft Windows XP 64-Bit Edition. If you want to run a 64-bit version of Windows XP, contact Microsoft about obtaining Windows XP 64-Bit Edition Version 2003.

For information about installing the service pack in combination with updates, critical updates, and security updates (all of which were formerly referred to as hotfixes), see the Guide for Installing and Deploying Updates for Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (HFDeploy.mspx).

Resources to Review Before You Plan Your Deployment

The Web sites and other resources in this section contain information that can help you plan an effective deployment of SP2.

Windows XP Service Pack 2 Resources for IT Professionals

Before you deploy the service pack, you should review the information at Windows XP Service Pack 2 Resources for IT Professionals on the Microsoft TechNet Web site.

This resource includes links to the following information:

  • Documents you should read before you deploy the service pack.

  • Important information about changes to security in SP2.

  • Information about how to manage an environment where computers are running Windows XP with SP2.

  • Information about application compatibility issues.

New functionality and changes to security

Read the following topics for important information about new functionality that SP2 includes:

Updates included in Service Pack 2

The following resources provide information about security updates and other updates included in SP2:

  • For details about security updates SP2 includes, see the List of Security Bulletins on the Microsoft TechNet Web Site.

  • For details about other updates SP2 includes, see article 811113, "List of Fixes included in Windows XP Service Pack 2," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

Release notes for SP2

For information about problems that can arise with SP2, see article 835935, "Release Notes for Windows XP Service Pack 2," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 Web site

The Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 Web site provides links to information you should review before you install SP2. This includes the following:

  • Resources for all users who are installing SP2.

  • A link to "What to Know Before You Install Service Pack 2."

  • A link to "What's New in SP2," which provides additional information about new functionality in SP2.



What Is in Service Pack 2?

This section describes the files and programs that are provided on the Service Pack 2 CD. It also explains how to obtain these files and programs from the SP2 Web sites.

Contents of the Service Pack 2 CD

The Service Pack 2 CD contains the following files:

  • Service pack installation files that you can extract from the XPsp2.exe file. This file contains all of the service pack binary files that have been updated for SP2. It also contains the Update.exe program file.

The Service Pack 2 CD also contains the following documents and tools for advanced users and system administrators:

  • The Guide for Installing and Deploying Updates for Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2. This guide provides instructions for installing updates, hotfixes, critical updates, and security updates (all of which were formerly known as hotfixes) on multiple computers. This guide is located on your Service Pack 2 CD in the \Support\Tools folder (see HFDeploy.mspx).

  • The Deploy.cab file. This is a compressed file that contains a collection of tools. It is located on the Service Pack 2 CD in the \Support\Tools folder. Deploy.cab is not automatically loaded when you install SP2.

    For information about these deployment tools, see the following:

    • The Microsoft Windows Corporate Deployment Tools User's Guide (Deploy.chm) and Microsoft Windows Preinstallation Reference Help (Ref.chm). These are both included in Deploy.cab in the \Support\Tools folder on the CD.

    • Article 838080 "Windows XP Service Pack 2 Deployment tools," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

  • The Support.cab file. This is a compressed file that also contains a collection of tools. It is located in the \Support\Tools folder. Support personnel and network administrators can use the updated support tools in this file to manage networks and troubleshoot problems. Support.cab is not automatically loaded when you install SP2.

    For more information about the support tools, see the following:

    • Windows Support Tools Help (Suptools.chm in Support.cab). This Help file describes the support tools and gives examples of how to use them.

    • Release Notes (Readme.htm) for Windows Support Tools for Microsoft Windows XP Professional, which is located in the \Support\Tools folder.

    • Article 838079, "Windows XP Service Pack 2 Support Tools," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

Obtaining Service Pack 2 Files and Programs from the Web

All files and programs included on the Service Pack 2 CD are also available on the following SP2 Web sites:

Web-based Installation Options

There are two installation options available from the Windows XP SP2 Web sites: the Express installation and the Network installation. Although these installations use slightly different methods, they provide you with the same software.

  • The Express installation (recommended for users with only one computer to update)

    You can link to the Express installation from the Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 Web site.

    The Express installation is one method you can use to perform a standalone installation of SP2 on a single computer.

    The Express installation package includes only the files that are required to start the installation and connect to the download server. The files included in this installation are the information (.inf) file and the version (.ver) file. The remaining files that you need are identified and downloaded when you link to the download server.

    The Express installation detects the service pack files that are already installed on your computer and installs only those files that need to be updated. This significantly reduces the time it takes to download the files.

  • The Network installation (recommended for advanced users and system administrators)

    You can link to the Network installation from Windows XP Service Pack 2 Resources for IT Professionals on the Microsoft TechNet Web site.

    The Network installation is a self-extracting package that contains all of the files required to install SP2 on any computer running Windows XP. This installation option downloads all of the SP2 files to your computer from the network you are connected to. This can be an effective option for administrators who want to set up a shared network folder for deploying SP2 on multiple computers. It is also the method to use if you want to integrate the service pack files with Windows XP and deploy this installation to multiple computers.



Planning Your Deployment

To ensure a successful deployment, review the information presented in What You Should Know Before You Deploy Service Pack 2.

After you have reviewed this information, complete the following set of planning tasks:

  • Choose an installation method.

  • Identify the deployment tools and files.

  • Determine update and upgrade options.

  • Check space requirements.

  • Test and troubleshoot the deployment in your environment.

  • Review the post-installation information in After You Install Service Pack 2, later in this guide.

For detailed information about deployment-planning tasks and strategies, see the Microsoft Windows XP Professional Resource Kit Documentation at Windows Deployment and Resource Kits. This guide is an important tool that can help you design, plan, and develop your deployments of Windows XP and the service pack. It provides information that can help you get started, including how to create a deployment plan and how to run a pilot project.

Choosing the Standalone Installation or the Integrated Installation Method

Before you deploy the service pack in your organization, you must decide which type of installation method to use: the standalone installation or the integrated installation.

To do so, first consider the update and upgrade paths supported by the standalone installation and the integrated installation. These are determined by whether you are already running Windows XP on the computers in your environment.

Overview of the standalone installation

The standalone installation is the standard method for installing the service pack on a computer that is already running Windows XP. If you have previously installed a service pack on Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 or Microsoft Windows 2000, you are probably familiar with this type of installation.

To start the service pack installation, you can either link to the Express installation from the Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 Web site, or you can run Update.exe after you use a command-line option to extract the contents of XPsp2.exe.

To determine the versions of Windows on which you can perform a standalone installation of SP2, go to What to Know Before You Install Service Pack 2, and click Updating Windows XP to Service Pack 2.

Svcpack.log file creation

When you run a standalone installation, the Update.exe program creates a log file named Svcpack.log in systemroot. This log file contains the following information:

  • The command-line utility that initiated the Update.exe program.

  • A list of the files that the Update.exe program copied to your computer.

  • Error messages if any errors were encountered.

  • The command-line options that were used to install the service pack.

For more information, see “The Standalone Installation” later in this guide.

Overview of the integrated installation

When you perform an integrated installation, you install the operating system and the service pack simultaneously. This means that you do not need to perform separate installations of the operating system and the service pack.

To perform an integrated installation, you first use the /integrate option to update Windows XP with SP2 in a shared distribution folder. After this is done, you run Windows XP Setup.

The path you use to upgrade previous versions of Windows to Windows XP integrated with SP2 is the same path you would use to upgrade to Windows XP.

Spslpsrm.log file creation

The Update.exe program creates a log file named Spslpsrm.log for integrated installations. This log file is created in systemroot; it contains the following information:

  • The command-line utility that initiated the Update.exe program.

  • A list of the files that the Update.exe program copied to your computer.

  • Error messages if any errors were encountered.

  • The command-line options that were used to install the service pack.

For more information, see “The Integrated Installation” later in this guide.

The combination installation

For a combination installation, you install the service pack along with a variety of other components.

You do this by creating an installation that combines the integrated installation and Windows XP updates. For more information about this type of installation, see the Guide for Installing and Deploying Updates for Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (HFDeploy.mspx).

Overview of the Deployment Tools and Files

After you select your installation method, review the corresponding scenario in Installing Service Pack 2 later in this guide. This will help you identify the tools and files you need for your deployment.

Depending on your particular deployment, you might need one or more of the following deployment tools and files:

  • Microsoft Windows Installer

    Windows Installer is a Windows component that standardizes and simplifies the way you install and manage software programs (such as the service pack) on multiple computers. You can use this installation service to manage the installation, modification, repair, and removal of programs. Because Windows Installer facilitates consistency in your deployments, it enables you to manage shared resources, customize installation processes, make decisions about application usage, and resolve configuration problems.

  • The Unattend.txt answer file (for integrated installations only)

    The Unattend.txt answer file identifies how Windows XP Setup interacts with the distribution folders and files you create and provides information about your preinstallation requirements. It also supplies Setup with all of the information that the end user is prompted to provide during a typical Windows XP installation.

    You can create or modify the Unattend.txt file by using either a text editor or Setup Manager. Make sure that only the system administrator has Write access to this file.

    For more information, see the Microsoft Windows Preinstallation Reference Help (Ref.chm) Unattend.txt topic in Deploy.cab in the \Support\Tools folder on your CD.

  • Microsoft Systems Management Server

    Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS) provides a variety of tools to help you deploy the service pack in your organization. With the SMS 2003 software-distribution feature, you can automatically update all of the SMS client computers in your organization with the new service pack.

    You can allow users to run the service pack installation whenever they like, or you can schedule the service pack installation to run at a specific time. You can also schedule the service pack to run on SMS client computers at a time when users are not logged on.

Note

  • SMS provides tools for upgrading your current computers from other versions of Windows (including Windows NT 4.0). You can also use SMS 2003 OS Deployment Feature Pack to install new operating systems onto computers even if they do not already have an operating system installed.

The following resources provide more detailed information about specific deployment tools and files.

  • Windows Deployment and Resource Kits.

  • Article 838080, "Windows XP Service Pack 2 Deployment Tools," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

  • The Microsoft Windows Corporate Deployment Tools User's Guide (Deploy.chm) and the Microsoft Windows Preinstallation Reference Help (Ref.chm) on your CD in the \Support\Tools folder included in Deploy.cab.

  • The Windows Support Tools Help (Suptools.chm in Support.cab). This Help file describes the support tools and gives examples of how to use them.

  • The Release Notes (Readme.htm) for Windows Support Tools for Microsoft Windows XP Professional, which is located in the \Support\Tools folder.

  • Article 838079, "Windows XP Service Pack 2 Support Tools," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

Checking Space Requirements

Disk space requirements for SP2 integrated with the operating system vary according to whether you are installing Windows XP Home Edition or Windows XP Professional. For specific information about the space required to install SP2 on or with a particular version of Windows XP, see article 837783, "Hard Disk Space Requirements for Windows XP Service Pack 2," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

Command-line Options for XPsp2.exe and Update.exe

To deploy the service pack, you can run the XPsp2.exe program, which extracts the contents of the service pack. The Update.exe program then runs automatically to install the service pack.

Alternatively, you can extract all of the files XPsp2.exe contains. These files are provided on the Service Pack 2 CD and at Windows XP Service Pack 2 Resources for IT Professionals on the Microsoft TechNet Web site.

After you have extracted the files, use command-line options to specify the type of installation you want.

For example, you can extract all of the files to a shared network folder, and then use Update.exe to update individual computers.

If you run XPsp2.exe without command-line options, all of the SP2 files are installed on the local computer, which is the default installation location.

The following table describes the command-line options that both the Update.exe and XPsp2.exe programs support. You can include the options you want to use when you enter the command to extract files from XPsp2.exe.

Command-line option

Description

/U or /passive

Uses default options and does not require user interaction. If you use this option, only critical error prompts appear on screen during the installation process.

/F

Forces other applications to close at shutdown.

/N

Does not back up files for removing the service pack.

/O

Overwrites OEM files without prompting.

/Z

Does not restart the computer after the installation is completed.

/forcerestart

Restarts the computer after the installation is completed.

/norestart

Specifies that the computer will not restart the when installation is completed.

/Q or /quiet

Uses quiet mode (the same as unattended mode, but with the user interface hidden from view). If you use this option, no prompts appear on screen during the installation process.

/L

Lists installed Windows updates, critical updates, and security updates.

/integrate:path

Combines the operating system with the service pack in a shared distribution folder for an integrated installation.

/uninstall

Uninstalls the package.

/help

Displays the same information as /?.

/d:path

Backs up files for removing the service pack into the folder you specify.

/n

Does not back up files for uninstalling the service pack.

The options, which are passed to Update.exe, dictate the specifics of the installation process; they do not affect the way the files are extracted.

Although the options listed in the table include a forward slash (/), you can use either a forward slash or a hyphen (-); the options work the same way with either character.

To view the command-line options, at the command prompt, type:

XPsp2.exe /?

For more information about these options, see article 262841, "Command-Line switches for Windows software update packages," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

Using command-line options

You can use these options to install the service pack as follows:

  • For an unattended installation, use the /Passive option:

    XPsp2.exe /Passive

    Use this option to install the service pack using all the default options. The installation does not prompt you for any input, but the installation progress bar in the user interface is displayed throughout the installation process.

  • To set XPsp2.exe to close all other applications after installing SP2, use the /F option:

    XPsp2.exe /F

    After the installation is completed, you must close all open programs before restarting the computer. To force applications to close without saving files, use the /F option. You can use this option in conjunction with other command-line options, except /integrate (used for an integrated installation), /L (used to list installed Windows updates, critical updates and security updates), and /norestart (prevents the computer from restarting automatically after the installation).

  • To prevent the automatic creation of backup files for removing the service pack, use the /N option:

    XPsp2.exe /N

    If you select this option, the files needed to remove the service pack are not backed up during the installation. Although this can help save disk space, it means that you cannot remove the service pack later, either through Add or Remove Programs or from the command line. The service pack is not added to Add or Remove Programs. 

    You can use this option in conjunction with other command-line options, except /integrate (used for an integrated installation only) or /L (lists installed updates, critical updates, and security updates).

  • To update OEM-supplied files without prompts, use the /O option:

    XPsp2.exe /O

    For example, if you have OEM-specific drivers installed on your computer, using the /O option enables these drivers to be updated with drivers that were included in the service pack and without prompting you first.

    Important

    • If you use the /quiet or /passive option to run Update.exe in quiet or unattended Setup mode, and you want to update OEM-supplied files, you must also use the /O option. If you do not use the /O option, files such as the hardware abstraction layer (HAL) and disk miniport drivers are not updated.

  • To prevent the computer from restarting automatically after the service pack is installed, use the /norestart option:

    XPsp2.exe /norestart

    You can use this option in conjunction with other command-line options except /integrate and /L.

  • For a quiet installation, use the /quiet option:

    XPsp2.exe /quiet

    Use this option to install SP2 in the way that is described for the unattended installation. If you use this option, neither the progress bar in the user interface nor any errors that might occur are displayed during installation.

  • To view a list of all updates, critical updates, and security updates that are currently installed on the computer, use the /L option:

    XPsp2.exe /L

    This option is not designed for use with any other command-line options.

  • To deploy Windows XP with SP2, use the /integrate:path option in the following command:

    XPsp2.exe /integrate:path

    If you want to deploy Windows XP with SP2 as an integrated installation, you can use this option to build an integrated shared network folder that contains files for the operating system and SP2. You can then use this shared folder to install both the operating system and the service pack together in an integrated installation.

To see which updates, critical updates, security updates, and service pack are currently installed on your computer, type the following:

Qfecheck.exe

Qfecheck.exe is a command-line tool that network administrators can use to record the installed updates, hotfixes, and security updates in a log file. Using only /L displays this information on your screen.

For more information about the Qfecheck.exe program, see the following articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 282784: "Qfecheck.exe Verifies the Installation of Windows 2000 and Windows XP Hotfixes"

  • 304864: "Qfecheck Hotfix Tool Reports False Need to Reinstall Freshly Installed Hotfixes"

Command-line options for XPsp2.exe only

The following table lists the command-line options that only the XPsp2.exe program supports.

Command-line option

Description

/X

Extracts service pack files without starting Update.exe.

You are prompted to provide the path for the folder to which you want to extract XPsp2.exe.

XPsp2.exe / X:path

Extracts service pack files to the path folder without prompting and without starting Update.exe.

Testing the Deployment in Your Computing Environment

Although Microsoft has a high degree of confidence in SP2, it is not possible to test all hardware configurations and applications that might be present in all environments where you might install SP2.

We therefore recommend that you test the service pack in your computing environment before you deploy it to all of your users.

Testing the service pack can include the steps described in following procedure, but might include more, depending on your environment.

To test the service pack in your environment

  1. Your test environment should include a cross-section of the types of computers on which you want to deploy the service pack. Make sure that the test computers are equipped with the software and the hardware devices that are typically used in your organization.

  2. Install the service pack on each test computer just as you would in the environment where you plan to use the service pack.

    Make sure that you complete each of the following tasks:

    • Update test computers that are running Windows XP to SP2.

    • Upgrade test computers that are running Microsoft Windows 98, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 2000 Professional to SP2 integrated with Windows XP Home Edition or Windows XP Professional.

    • Install SP2 integrated with Windows XP Home Edition or Windows XP Professional onto a test computer that has no other operating system installed. (That is, perform a "clean installation.")

  3. Verify that the software and hardware continue to work as expected for a variety of scenarios.

If you are installing Windows XP Home Edition or Windows XP Professional for the first time in your company or work group, you might want to set up a pilot group to test your deployment and verify that it works in your environment as expected.

For more information about planning for, testing, and deploying Windows XP in your computing environment, see the deployment information at Windows Deployment and Resource Kits.

Service pack debugging symbols

The service pack debugging symbol files are recommended for system administrators and others who must diagnose Windows XP system problems. However, it is not necessary to install these debugging symbols in order for your computer to run properly.

The debugging symbols are located on the Service Pack 2 CD in the \Support\Symbols folder (symbols.exe). During the installation process, the service pack debugging symbol files overwrite previous versions of the debugging symbol files in the symbol installation folder.

You can also obtain information and download symbols from the following resources:



Installing Service Pack 2

The following sections provide instructions for installing SP2.

You can either perform a standalone installation of SP2 on computers already running Windows XP, or you can perform an integrated installation of Windows XP with SP2.

Both types of installations require administrative logon credentials. To install the service pack on a computer or over a network, you must be logged on as an administrator.

The Standalone Installation

During the standalone installation, the service pack is installed on a computer that is already running Windows XP. When you run the Update.exe program, it installs the updated system files and makes the necessary registry changes. After the computer is restarted, the installation is complete, and the operating system runs with an updated file set.

This section describes four different scenarios for installing the service pack.

  • Scenario 1: Installing the service pack so that computers use local service pack source files (recommended)

  • Scenario 2: Installing the service pack so that computers use shared, remote, service pack source files

  • Scenario 3: Using Systems Management Server (SMS) to install the service pack

  • Scenario 4: Using Windows Installer and Group Policy to install the service pack

Important

  • If a system file on a computer becomes corrupted or must be replaced for some other reason, you must have the service pack source files in order to replace that system file.

You can distribute the service pack through several types of media, including CD-ROMs, shared folders on networks, and Web downloads. Because this guide is intended for corporate audiences, it focuses on using shared distribution folders on networks, which is the most common distribution medium for this audience.

Scenario 1: Installing the service pack so that computers use local service pack source files (recommended)

This method enables you to set up a shared distribution folder on a network. This allows users to update their computers from a central location, and then store their system backup files locally.

You can perform this type of installation by starting the XPsp2.exe program, setting the options that you want to use. You can also create logon scripts for users, which will ensure that they can update to SP2 when they next use their computers.

Note

  • In the following procedure, Drive: represents the drive name of the network or computer where your distribution folder is located.

To install the service pack so that computers use local service pack source files

  1. For each computer you plan to update to SP2, back up the files and close any open programs before you continue (unless you plan to force programs to close during the installation).

  2. Connect to the network or computer where you want to create the distribution folder.

  3. In the shared folder on the network, create a distribution folder for the service pack.

    For example, to create a distribution folder named XPSP2, type the following at the command prompt:

    mkdir Drive:\XPSP2 

  4. Copy XPsp2.exe into the distribution folder you created in Step 3.

  5. If you are not connected to a network or the Internet, and you want to minimize the time it takes to install SP2, you can choose to disable your antivirus software. You can usually do this by right-clicking your antivirus-software icon (which typically appears in the bottom right-hand corner of your screen) and clicking Disable.

    Important

    • Antivirus software is a critical part of keeping a computer secure. But the time that it takes for the software to scan files on your system can add significantly to the time required to install the service pack—as much as an hour or more on slower systems.

      Disabling your antivirus software before you install the service pack eliminates this extra installation time.

      If you disable your antivirus software before you install the service pack, be sure that you are aware of the risks involved, and be sure to enable it after the service pack is installed.

  6. To install the service pack from the distribution folder (in this example, named XPSP2), type the following at the command prompt:

    Drive:\XPSP2\XPsp2.exe

    You can include command-line options as needed.

    For example, to force programs to close when the service pack installation starts, include the /F option in the installation command.

    For more information about command-line options, see “Command-Line Options for XPsp2.exe and Update.exe” earlier in this guide.

    The progress of the installation is displayed as files are verified and extracted. As soon as this process is completed, the SP2 Setup Wizard appears. Follow the instructions in the Setup Wizard.

  7. After the installation is completed, the Setup Wizard gives you the option to restart the computer either immediately or later. We recommend that you restart the computer immediately after the installation has completed.

    If you want to install updates, critical updates and security updates, see the Guide for Installing and Deploying Updates for Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (HFDeploy.mspx).

  8. If you disabled your antivirus software, be sure to enable it again after you restart the computer.

    Important

    • SP2 will not be fully operational until you restart your computer.

Scenario 2: Installing the service pack so that computers use shared, remote, service pack source files

This section explains how to prepare a shared distribution folder on a network and then install the service pack from the shared folder onto computers that are already running Windows XP.

With this method, service pack source files are stored in the shared distribution folder rather than on local computers.

Important

  • Because the service pack source files are stored remotely on the network, this method is suitable only for computers that are permanently connected to the network. For example, this method is not suitable for upgrading laptops.

  • You must use a shared distribution folder that was created specifically for SP2. Do not reuse a folder that was set up for a previous service pack. Shared distribution folders for service pack source files must be permanent to ensure that all of the files a computer might need to replace are available.

It can be useful to extract the files from XPsp2.exe if you want to use the distribution folder as the folder that contains the service pack source files. This saves disk space on local computers because the installation will point to the distribution folder for ServicePackFiles instead of creating this folder locally. The ServicePackFiles folder is needed whenever the operating system requires a service pack file, such as when Windows File Protection must restore a corrupted file, or when an optional component is being configured.

If you move the shared distribution folder, see the article, "Files and Folders Are Added to Your System After Service Pack Is Installed," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base for more information.

Note

  • In the following procedure, Drive: represents the drive name of the network or computer where your distribution folder is located.

To install the service pack so that computers use shared, remote, service pack source files

  1. Connect to the network or computer on which you want to create the distribution folder.

  2. If you are not connected to a network or the Internet, and you want to minimize the time it takes to install SP2, you can choose to disable your antivirus software. You can usually do this by right-clicking your antivirus-software icon (which typically appears in the bottom right-hand corner of your screen), and clicking Disable.

    Important

    • Antivirus software is a critical part of keeping a computer secure. But the time that it takes for the software to scan files on your system can add significantly to the time required to install the service pack—as much as an hour or more on slower systems.

      Disabling your antivirus software before you install the service pack eliminates this extra installation time.

      If you disable your antivirus software before you install the service pack, be sure that you are aware of the risks involved, and be sure to enable it after the service pack is installed.

  3. In the shared folder on the network, create a distribution folder for the service pack. For example, to create a distribution folder named XPSP2, type the following at the command prompt:

    mkdir Drive:\XPSP2

  4. To extract files to the shared distribution folder, type the following at the command prompt:

    XPsp2.exe /X:path 

    where path is the location of the shared distribution folder.

    When you use /U, the extraction programs use default values, so no user interaction is required.

  5. For each computer you plan to update, back up the files and close programs before you continue (unless you plan to force programs to close during the installation).

  6. To install the service pack from the shared distribution folder, run the service pack update, using Update.exe. For example, to install the service pack from a distribution folder named XPSP2, type the following at the command prompt:

    Drive:\XPSP2\i386\Update\Update.exe

    The installation continues as described in Scenario 1 earlier in this section.

  7. We recommend that you restart the computer immediately after the installation has completed.

    If you want to install updates, critical updates, or security updates, see the Guide for Installing and Deploying Updates for Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (see HFDeploy.mspx).

  8. If you disabled your antivirus software, be sure to enable it again after you restart the computer.

    Important

    • SP2 will not be fully operational until you restart your computer.

Scenario 3: Using SMS to install the service pack

This scenario explains how to use Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS) to install the service pack from a shared distribution folder on a network. This installation method installs the service pack on SMS client computers that are already running Windows XP.

This scenario assumes that you have an understanding of SMS and a working knowledge of software distribution.

Important

  • To perform this type of installation, your computer must be running one of the following:
    SMS 2.0 with Service Pack 4
    SMS 2.0 with Service Pack 5
    Microsoft Systems Management Server 2003

To use SMS to install the service pack

  1. Create the SMS package by importing the package definition file for the service pack. In the package, provide the path to the service pack source files.

  2. Distribute the SMS package to the distribution points.

  3. Create the advertisement to notify SMS clients that the service pack is available.

For details about deploying SP2 using SMS, see article 842844, "How to install Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) by using Systems Management Server," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

Scenario 4: Using Windows Installer and Group Policy to install the service pack

This scenario explains how to use Windows Installer to install the service pack from a shared distribution folder on a network. This method installs the service pack on computers that are already running Windows XP.

To use this method, you should have a thorough understanding of Windows Installer and a working knowledge of Group Policy and Active Directory®. For more information about Windows Installer, Group Policy, and Active Directory, see Windows Deployment and Resource Kits.

Using Windows Installer

The Windows Installer package file (Update.msi) contains all of the information that Windows Installer requires to install or remove the service pack and run the Setup user interface.

This package file describes the relationships between service pack components and resources. It also contains an installation database from which you can view a summary (know as a summary information stream) of the properties used by the installation program. To view this summary, right-click the installation database, and then click Properties.

You can use Software Installation and Maintenance in Windows XP. It uses Windows Installer to deploy Update.msi for all the computers and install the service pack.

Software Installation and Maintenance uses a Group Policy object (GPO) to deploy the package (on networked computers) within Active Directory containers, such as sites, domains, and organizational units that are associated with the GPO.

You must use the machine-assigned distribution method with Update.msi. There are no other methods available.

Important

  • We recommend that you use XPsp2.exe when deploying SP2 at the command prompt. If you use Update.msi to distribute service packs, you must use a computer-based (machine-assigned) GPO only. Microsoft does not support user-based Group Policy deployments with Update.msi. For more information, see article 278503, "Best Practices for Using Update.msi to deploy Service Packs," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

Computers that are to receive the service pack deployment must be joined to the same domain as the server where the Windows Installer (MSI) file resides. After you assign the package, Windows Installer automatically installs the service pack the next time users who are connected to the network start their computers.

Only a network administrator or someone who is logged on to a local computer as an administrator can remove the assigned software.

Assigning Service Pack 2 to computers

The procedure in this section explains how to assign the service pack to computers that are managed by a Group Policy object (GPO), which you create for the Desktops organizational unit under Resources. For your installation, you might want to associate the GPO with a different Active Directory container.

This procedure applies to environments that are running Microsoft Windows 2000 Server or Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003 family operating systems.

To use Group Policy to assign the service pack

  1. Create a shared network distribution folder.

  2. Create a Group Policy object for SP2 deployments.

  3. Deploy the SP2 Update.msi from the shared distribution folder as machine-assigned. Do not deploy it as a user deployment.

  4. When the computers are restarted, they are updated to SP2.

    Important

    • Check the properties of each computer to ensure that the update has completed. You might need to restart a computer more than once to complete the update.

Each of the tasks listed in this procedure is explained in detail in article 302430, "HOW TO: Assign Software to a Specific Group By Using a Group Policy," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

The Integrated Installation

If you already have the version of Windows XP that does not include a service pack, you can apply the service pack directly to the Windows XP installation files. You can complete the integrated installation by using a shared distribution folder on a network.

Because the integrated installation replaces individual files, the space requirements for this installation are nearly identical to the space requirements for Windows XP. For information about these requirements, see Readme.htm on your version of the Windows XP product CD that does not include the service pack.

The following scenario explains how to use Update.exe to build the integrated installation. It then explains how to run Setup to install Windows XP with the service pack already applied.

Because this guide is intended for corporate audiences, the integrated scenario it describes focuses on the use of shared distribution folders on networks, which is the most common distribution medium for this audience.

Important

  • A service pack that you installed as part of an integrated installation with Windows XP cannot be removed.

  • If you are upgrading from Windows versions other than Windows XP, and you want to install SP2 integrated with Windows XP, check with the manufacturer of your computer about upgrading your BIOS before you proceed.

This section explains the two scenarios for performing an integrated installation.

  • Scenario 1: Creating an installation of Windows XP integrated with the service pack

  • Scenario 2: Using Remote Installation Services (RIS) to install Windows XP integrated with the service pack

Scenario 1: Creating an installation of Windows XP integrated with the service pack

This section explains how to create an integrated installation of Windows XP and the service pack in a shared distribution folder on a network. The integrated Windows XP Setup includes the service pack files as part of the normal set-up process.

The steps in this procedure use example file locations for creating an integrated installation of Windows XP Professional. You can follow similar conventions for Windows XP Home Edition.

Note

  • In the following procedure, Drive:\ represents the drive name of the network or computer where your distribution folder is located.

To create an installation of Windows XP integrated with the service pack

  1. Connect to the network or computer where you want to create the distribution folder, and then set up Drive: to correspond to the distribution folder.

  2. In the shared folder on the network, create a distribution folder for the Windows XP installation files.

    For example, to create a distribution folder named XPSP2_INT\PRO, type the following:

    mkdir Drive:\XPSP2_INT\PRO

    Ensure that only the system administrator has full access to this folder. Other users should have only Read and Execute permissions.

  3. Insert your version of the Windows XP product CD that does not include the service pack into the CD-ROM drive, and then copy the contents of the CD to the distribution folder that you created in Step 2.

    For example, to copy the installation files and folders from the Windows XP product CD in the CD-ROM drive (D:) to the distribution folder named XPSP2_INT\PRO, type the following:

    xcopy D:\ Drive:\XPSP2_INT\PRO /E

  4. Remove the product CD from the CD-ROM drive, and then insert the service pack CD.

  5. If you want to store these files locally (described in “The Standalone Installation” earlier in this guide), you can extract the service pack source files from XPsp2.exe and put them in a folder on your hard disk.

    If you do not want to store these files locally, skip this step. The installation will put the files in the default location. The default location is randomly chosen and determined by the installation.

    For example, to extract the service pack files located in the CD-ROM drive (D:) to a folder named temp on the drive where the distribution folder is located, you would type the following:

    D:\ XPsp2.exe /X: Drive:\temp

  6. If you extracted the files, you can apply the service pack to the Windows XP installation files located in the folder named XPSP2_INT\PRO by typing the following:

    Drive:\temp\i386\update\update.exe /Integrate:Drive:\XPSP2_INT\PRO

    For a list of command-line options that you can use with this command line, see “Command-Line Options for XPsp2.exe and Update.exe” earlier in this guide.

  7. The Setup Wizard for SP2 for Windows XP displays the progress of your installation and informs you when the installation is completed.

  8. Customize Windows XP Setup as necessary (for example, to complete an unattended installation or add OEM files).

    For information about how to do this, see the Microsoft Windows XP Professional Resource Kit Documentation at Windows Deployment and Resource Kits, and Microsoft Windows Preinstallation Reference Help (Ref.chm) included in Deploy.cab on your CD in the \Support\Tools folder.

  9. You can now deploy Windows XP to multiple computers from the shared distribution folder in either attended or unattended Setup mode. During the standard installation process, Setup installs the operating system with the service pack already applied.

    For more information about this, see the Microsoft Windows Corporate Deployment Tools User's Guide (Deploy.chm) included in Deploy.cab in the \Support\Tools folder on your Service Pack 2 CD.

    Important

    • When you run the Update.exe program for an integrated installation (as described earlier), a Spslpsrm.log file is created automatically in systemroot on the computer that is running the Update.exe program. If you plan to update more than one version of Windows XP on this computer, rename the Spslpsrm.log file after you update each version. This ensures that you do not overwrite the current log file when you update additional versions of Windows XP.

Scenario 2: Using RIS to install Windows XP integrated with the service pack

This section explains how to use Remote Installation Services (RIS) to install Windows XP integrated with the service pack. However, this section does not explain how to set up RIS. For more information about RIS, see Step-by-Step Guide to Remote OS Installation.

Types of RIS images

RIS support two types of operating system images: CD-based images (images created by using RISetup) and Remote Installation Preparation (RIPrep) images.

Using the CD-based option is similar to setting up a client operating system directly from the Windows XP product CD, but in this case, the source files reside on a RIS server. An administrator can use the RIPrep image to configure a client computer, and then copy that image for installation on other client computers connected to the network.

Adding a Service Pack 2 integrated CD-based image to a RIS server

After you complete the installation of RIS on the server, perform the following steps to add an image of Windows XP integrated with the service pack to your RIS server.

To copy Windows XP integrated with Service Pack 2 to your RIS server

  1. Create an integrated installation of Windows XP with SP2. For more information, see “Scenario 1: Creating an installation of Windows XP integrated with the service pack” earlier in this guide.

  2. To create a new image, click Start, click Run, and then type the following:

    risetup.exe -add

  3. The Remote Installation Services Setup Wizard appears. Follow the instructions in the wizard. When the Installation Source Files Location page prompts you for the image source, enter the path to the shared folder that contains the integrated installation that you created in Step 1.

  4. A box appears showing the progress of the installation. After the RISetup image is complete, you can install the image on each computer by following the instructions in the "Remote Installation Services" topic in Help and Support Center.

Updating existing RIPrep images to Service Pack 2

If you want to add additional programs or settings to your integrated installation image, you must have a Service Pack 2 CD–based image of Windows XP on your RIS server. (See the preceding section, "Adding a Service Pack 2 integrated CD-based image to a RIS server.")

To update existing RIPrep images

  1. Use RIS to install the RIPrep image on your computer.

  2. Add the additional programs and settings that you want to include in the image.

  3. Run RIPrep to copy the image back to the RIS server.

    For instructions on how to run RIPrep, see the following resources:

  4. You can now deploy your RIPrep image to other computers. For details about how to do this, see the "Remote Installation Services" topic in Help and Support Center.

    Note

    • You cannot use the /integrate option to integrate SP2 directly into an existing CD-based image or RIPrep image.



After You Install Service Pack 2

This section includes information about why you do not need to reinstall SP2 if you add or remove new devices or software. It also explains how to use Group Policy to configure settings for Install Updates and Shut Down.

Adding New Devices or Software to Your Computer

If you add a device or new software to your computer after you have installed the service pack, it is not necessary to reinstall the service pack.

For example, Windows XP includes a file named Driver.cab that contains all of the files that might be installed by Plug and Play. Setup and other components use this file to install the drivers for new devices (such as a PCMCIA card or a USB keyboard). It does this without requiring you to use the Windows XP CD or connect to the network.

The service pack does not update the Driver.cab file. Instead, the Update.exe program installs an additional driver file named Sp2.cab. This file contains only updated versions of drivers that exist in the original Windows XP Driver.cab file.

The Update.exe program also installs a new Drvindex.inf that points to Sp2.cab for all of the updated drivers. It also points to Driver.cab for all of the drivers that were not updated by SP2.

Update.exe installs a new copy of the Layout.inf file. Layout.inf ensures that the correct software is installed and that all the correct updates are made to Windows XP when you remove services from or add services to your computer.

For more information about Update.exe, see Inside Update.exe - The Package Installer for Windows and Windows Components on the Microsoft TechNet Web Site.

The Layout.inf file also determines whether you must install any files from the original Windows XP CD or the service pack. If the Layout.inf file determines that you must install any files, your system prompts you for the appropriate installation medium.

For more information about the Layout.inf file, see article 327393, "Not Necessary to Reinstall Windows XP Service Packs After System State Changes," in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

Using Group Policy Settings to Configure "Install Updates and Shut Down"

Automatic Updates can improve the security of your computer. After you install SP2, you can configure your computer so that available updates will be installed when you shut down your computer.

When you click Shut Down, if updates are downloaded and ready to install, a dialog box gives you the option to install these updates before shutting down.

If you do not want this dialog box to appear, you can disable it through settings in Group Policy.

You can use the Group Policy settings in the following table to specify whether the option to Install Updates and Shut Down appears in the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

Group Policy settings associated with Do not display "Install Updates and Shut Down"

Group Policy setting

Description

Not Configured

If updates are available for installation, the option to Install Updates and Shut Down appears when the user selects Shut Down in the Start menu.

Enabled

The option to Install Updates and Shut Down does not appear when the user selects Shut Down in the Start menu. This applies even if updates are available for installation.

Disabled

If updates are available for installation, the option to Install Updates and Shut Down appears when the user selects Shut Down in the Start menu.

Note

  • The path to the setting Do not display "Install Updates and Shut Down" is as follows:

    Local Computer Policy\Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Update

You can use the Group Policy settings in the following table to specify whether the option to Install Updates and Shut Down appears as the default option in the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

Group Policy settings associated with Do Not Adjust Default (user configuration)

Group Policy setting

Description

Not Configured

Install Updates and Shut Down will be the default option in the Shut Down Windows dialog box if updates are available for installation when the user selects Shut Down in the Start menu.

Enabled

The user's most recent shut-down choice (Hibernate, Restart, and so on) is the default option in the Shut Down Windows dialog box. This applies even if Install Updates and Shut Down is one of the options listed in What do you want the computer to do?.

Disabled

Install Updates and Shut Down will be the default option in the Shut Down Windows dialog box if updates are available for installation when the user selects Shut Down in the Start menu.

Note

  • The path to the setting Do Not Adjust Default is:

    Local Computer Policy\User Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Update

You can use the Group Policy settings in the following table to specify whether the option to Install Updates and Shut Down appears as the default option in the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

Group Policy settings associated with Do Not Adjust Default (computer configuration)

Group Policy setting

Description

Not Configured

Install Updates and Shut Down will be the default option in the Shut Down Windows dialog box if updates are available for installation when the user selects Shut Down in the Start menu.

Enabled

The user's most recent shut-down choice (Hibernate, Restart, Stand by) is the default option in the Shut Down Windows dialog box. This applies even if Install Updates and Shut Down is one of the options listed in What do you want the computer to do?.

Disabled

Install Updates and Shut Down will be the default option in the Shut Down Windows dialog box if updates are available for installation when the user selects Shut Down in the Start menu.

Notes

  • The path to the setting Do Not Adjust Default is:

    Local Computer Policy\Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Update

  • This policy setting has no effect if you have enabled the policy setting Do not display "Install Updates and Shut Down" in the Shut Down Windows dialog box.



Removing Service Pack 2

This section explains how to remove the service pack from your computer.

When you install the service pack, a subfolder named $ntservicepackuninstall$ is created in your systemroot folder.

You can remove the service pack by using Add or Remove Programs in Control Panel or by using the /uninstall option described in “Command-Line Options for XPsp2.exe and Update.exe” earlier in this guide.

Installing and removing the service pack does not change storage formats, such as those used for files, databases, and the registry.

If you install Microsoft Internet Explorer after you install the service pack, Internet Explorer will not appear in Add or Remove Programs.

Important

  • Applications or services that require the service pack can be adversely affected if you remove the service pack.

To use Add or Remove Programs to remove the service pack

  1. If you installed any applications after the service pack was installed, you must remove the most recently installed application first, the next most recently installed program second, and so on.

    For example, if you installed Application A first, Application B second, and Application C third, you must remove C first, B second, and A third.

  2. Open Control Panel. 

  3. Click Add or Remove Programs, click Windows XP Service Pack 2, and then click Change or Remove Programs. 

  4. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

Important

  • If you choose to remove SP2, a dialog box appears that displays a list of applications you have installed since you updated your system to SP2. If you continue to remove SP2, these applications might not work correctly.



For More Information

For additional information about Windows XP and this service pack, see the following resources:

  • The Readme file for SP2, which contains important information you should read before you install this service pack. The file is located in the root on your Service Pack 2 CD. You can also find this information in "What to Know Before You Install Service Pack 2" on the Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 Web site.

  • Windows XP Help and Support Center, which provides detailed information to help you learn more about the features and functions of Windows XP.

  • The Microsoft Windows XP Professional Resource Kit Documentation, which contains detailed instructions for deploying Windows XP Professional in an organization. This resource kit includes information for managers, network architects, system administrators, and others who plan to deploy Windows XP Professional. The resource kit is available at Windows Deployment and Resource Kits, and from Microsoft Press at the Microsoft Learning Web site.

  • The Microsoft Windows Update Web site, which provides information about and downloads of Windows software updates (including drivers).

  • The Microsoft Windows Catalog Web site, which provides up-to-date information about supported hardware and software products.

  • The Microsoft Knowledge Base Web site, which provides updated information about Windows XP.

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