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Netsh commands for DHCP

The Netsh commands for DHCP offer a command-line tool that helps with the administration of DHCP servers and provides an equivalent alternative to console-based management. This can be useful in the following situations:

  • When managing DHCP servers in wide area networks (WANs), commands can be used in interactive mode at the Netsh command prompt to better manage across slow-speed network links.

  • When managing a large number of DHCP servers, commands can be used in batch mode at the Netsh command prompt to help script and automate recurring administrative tasks that need to be performed for all DHCP servers.

The following commands are available at the Netsh command prompt (as distinguished from the Windows XP command prompt). You cannot run these Netsh commands locally on Windows XP Professional or Windows XP Home Edition. To run these Netsh commands on a remote Windows 2000 Server, you must first use Remote Desktop Connection to connect to a Windows 2000 Server that is running Terminal Server. There might be functional differences between Netsh context commands on Windows 2000 and Windows XP. For more information about how to use the Netsh commands that are provided for DHCP, see Use DHCP command-line tools

For an example of how to use Netsh commands for DHCP in batch files and scripts, see Netsh DHCP example

For more information about Netsh commands, see The Netsh command-line utility

For more information about netsh, see Using Netsh

Netsh DHCP

The following commands are available at the dhcp> prompt, which is rooted within the netsh environment.

To view the command syntax, click a command:

add server

Adds a DHCP server to the list of authorized servers in Active Directory.

Syntax

add server ServerDNS ServerIP

Parameters

ServerDNS   : Required. Specifies the DHCP server to add. Identifies the server by DNS domain name.

ServerIP   : Required. Specifies the DHCP server to add. Identifies the server by IP address.

Examples

In the following example, this command adds a server with the DNS name dhcpsrv1.example.microsoft.com and IP address 10.2.2.2 to the list of authorized servers in Active Directory.

add server dhcpsrv1.example.microsoft.com 10.2.2.2

delete server

Deletes a DHCP server from the list of authorized servers in Active Directory.

Syntax

delete server ServerDNS ServerIP

Parameters

ServerDNS   : Required. Specifies the DHCP server to delete. Identifies the server by DNS domain name.

ServerIP   : Required. Specifies the DHCP server to delete. Identifies the server by IP address.

Examples

In the following example, this command deletes the server with the DNS name dhcpsrv1.example.microsoft.com and IP address 10.2.2.2 from the list of authorized servers in Active Directory.

delete server dhcpsrv1.example.microsoft.com 10.2.2.2

dump 

Dumps the configuration of a DHCP server to the command prompt window or to a text file. Used without parameters, this command dumps the configuration of the local server to the command prompt window.

Syntax

[{\\ServerName | IPAddress}] dump > [FileName]

Parameters

[{ \\ ServerName | IPAddress }] : Specifies the name of the remote (non-local) DHCP server from which you want to dump configuration output. Identifies the server by name or IP address. If unspecified, the configuration of the local server is dumped.

FileName   : Specifies the name of the destination file to which you want to dump DHCP server configuration. If unspecified, DHCP server configuration is dumped to the command prompt window.

Remarks

  • This command dumps the DHCP configuration as text output within the command prompt window, or you can copy or redirect this output to a file for later viewing in a text editor. When file output is obtained, you can use the exec command to execute the output file in order to configure another DHCP server.

  • Before performing the dump command at the source server, reconcile all scopes and fix any inconsistencies that are reported.

  • The following command dumps the current configuration for the local DHCP server (the source) to a text file named dhcpcfg.dmp. This file can then be copied to another new DHCP server (the destination) and used to recreate the source configuration on the destination server:

    dump > dhcpcfg.dmp

  • Before you use the exec command to execute a dump file at the destination server, do the following:

    1. Close the DHCP console at the destination server. Do not reopen the console until after you use the exec command.

    2. Delete all default option definitions and any user and vendor classes at the destination server.

  • These examples demonstrate how to use the delete optiondef and del class Netsh commands to delete all default option definitions and any user and vendor classes. You can run the following commands at the dhcp server> prompt, which is rooted within the netsh environment.

    • delete optiondef 01 

    • delete optiondef 76 

    • del class "Default Routing and Remote Access Class" 

    • del class "Default BOOTP Class" 

    • del class "Microsoft Windows 2000 Options" 

    • del class "Microsoft Windows 98 Options" 

    • del class "Microsoft Options"

  • On the destination server, the exec command is used to load and execute the saved configuration:

    netsh exec dhcpcfg.dmp

  • After you use the exec command to load the dump file, reconcile all scopes again. Use net stop dhcpserver to stop the DHCP Server service and net start dhcpserver to restart it. Once the service is restarted, DHCP database changes take effect.

Examples

In the first example, this command dumps the configuration of DHCP server \\DHCP-A to a text file named dhcpcfg.dmp.

In the second example, this command dumps the configuration of DHCP server 10.0.0.1 to a text file named dhcpcfg.dmp.

In the third example, this command dumps the configuration of the local DHCP server to a text file named dhcpcfg.dmp.

\\DHCP-A dump > dhcpcfg.dmp

10.0.0.1 dump > dhcpcfg.dmp

dump > dhcpcfg.dmp

server

Shifts the current Netsh DHCP command-line context to a different DHCP server. Used without parameters, server shifts the current command-line context to the local computer.

Syntax

server [{\\ServerName | ServerIP}]

Parameters

{ \\ ServerName | ServerIP } : Specifies the DHCP server to which you want to shift the current command-line context. Identifies the server by NetBIOS name or IP address.

Examples

In the first example, this command changes the Netsh DHCP command-line context to the DHCP server named \\DHCP-SRV1.

In the second example, this command changes the Netsh DHCP command-line context to the DHCP server with IP address 10.0.0.1.

server \\DHCP-SRV1

server 10.0.0.1

show server

Displays a list of authorized servers in Active Directory.

Syntax

show server

Parameters

none

Netsh DHCP server

The following commands are available at the dhcp server> prompt, which is rooted within the netsh environment.

To view the command syntax, click a command:

add class

Adds a class to the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

add class ClassName [ClassComment] [Data] [[IsVendor=]{0 | 1}] [[IsBinary=]{B | b}]

Parameters

ClassName   : Required. Specifies the name of the class to create.

ClassComment   : Specifies the comment to associate with the class.

Data   : Specifies class data in ASCII or binary format depending on the IsBinary parameter. If unspecified, it is assumed that the format of the data is ASCII.

[ IsVendor= ]{ 0 | 1 } : Indicates whether the class to add is a user class or a vendor class: 0-User class (default), 1-Vendor class.

[ IsBinary= ]{ B | b } : Indicates if the class data is in binary format. If unspecified, it is assumed that the format of the data is ASCII.

Examples

In the first example, this command creates a vendor class named MyClass, with the comment TestClass, and the class data TestDataForMyClass in ASCII format.

In the second example, this command creates a user class named MyUserClass with binary data of 4345335532 (ASCII-CE3U2).

The third example is an alternate command syntax for the second example.

add class MyClass TestClass TestDataForMyClass 1

add class MyUserClass TestClass1 4345335532 B

add class MyUserClass TestClass1 4345335532 0 b

add mscope

Adds a multicast scope to the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

add mscope MscopeName [MscopeComment] [TTL]

Parameters

MscopeName   : Required. Specifies the name of the multicast scope to add.

MscopeComment   : Specifies a description of the current multicast scope.

TTL   : Specifies the Time-To-Live value for the multicast scope. The valid range for this field is 1 to 255, with a default of 32.

Examples

In the following example, this command creates a multicast scope with the name My MultiCast Scope, a comment of MyTestMulticastScope, and a multicast TTL value of 40.

add mscope "My MultiCast Scope" MyTestMulticastScope 40

add optiondef

Adds a new option type definition to the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

add optiondef OptCode OptName {BYTE | WORD | DWORD | STRING | IPADDRESS} [[IsArray=]{0 | 1}] [vendor=VendorClass] [comment=OptComment] [DefValue]

Parameters

OptCode   : Required. Specifies the option type to define. Identifies the option type with a unique option code. For the value of the code, choose a number between 0 and 255.

OptName   : Required. Specifies the name of the option type.

{ BYTE | WORD | DWORD | STRING | IPADDRESS } : Required. Indicates the data type of the option.

[ IsArray= ]{ 0 | 1 } : Indicates whether the data type is arrayed or non-arrayed: 0-Unary or non-arrayed (default), 1-Arrayed.

vendor= VendorClass   : Specifies the vendor class for the option. If unspecified, the default vendor class, the DHCP standard options class, is used.

comment= OptComment   : Specifies a comment to add to the new option type definition. If unspecified, the default value is NULL.

DefValue   : Specifies a default value to use for this option type, if one is not specified otherwise.

Remarks

  • IsArray must be 0 for STRING type options.

Examples

In the first example, this command defines a new option type named ExtensionsPath with code 18, a STRING data type, and joins it to the DHCP standard options class, assigning it a default value of c:\temp.

In the second and third examples, this command defines a new option type named TestOption with code 231 and an IPADDRESS data type. In the second example, the option is defined to provide only a single IP address. IsArray and DefValue are not necessary because defaults are assumed. In the third example, DefValue, and IsArray are required to create an array containing the IP address values 10.1.1.1, 10.1.1.2, and 10.1.1.3.

add optiondef 18 ExtensionsPath STRING 0 c:\temp

add optiondef 231 TestOption IPADDRESS 

add optiondef 231 TestOption IPADDRESS 1 vendor=MyVendorClass 10.1.1.1 10.1.1.2 10.1.1.3 

add scope

Adds a scope to the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

add scope ScopeAddress SubnetMask ScopeName [ScopeComment]

Parameters

ScopeAddress   : Required. Specifies the scope to add. Identifies the scope by IP network number.

SubnetMask   : Required. Specifies the subnet mask for the scope to add.

ScopeName   : Required. Specifies an identifying name for the scope.

ScopeComment   : Specifies a comment for the scope.

Examples

In the following example, this command adds a scope for the DHCP server with scope address 10.2.2.0, subnet mask 255.255.255.0, a scope name of MyScope, and a scope comment of MyComment.

add scope 10.2.2.0 255.255.255.0 MyScope MyComment

delete class

Deletes a class from the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

delete class Name

Parameters

Name   : Required. Specifies the user or vendor class to delete.

Examples

In the following example, this command deletes the class named MyClass.

delete class MyClass

delete mscope

Deletes a multicast scope from the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

delete mscope MscopeName

Parameters

MscopeName   : Required. Specifies the multicast scope to delete. MscopeName is case-sensitive.

Examples

In the following example, this command deletes the multicast scope MyMulitcastScope from the currently specified DHCP server.

delete mscope MyMulitcastScope

delete optiondef

Deletes a defined option type from the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

delete optiondef OptCode [[vendor=]VendorName]

Parameters

OptCode   : Required. Specifies the unique identifier for the option type to delete.

vendor= VendorName   : Specifies the vendor class name with which the option type is associated. If unspecified, the option type definition is deleted from the non-vendor specific DHCP standard options class.

Remarks

  • This option is applicable only for DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

Examples

In the following example, this command deletes an option type with code 18 from the DHCP standard options class.

delete optiondef 18

delete optionvalue

Deletes the current value of the specified option type for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

delete optionvalue OptCode [[vendor=]VendorClass] [[user=]UserClass]

Parameters

OptCode   : Required. Specifies the unique identifier of the global server option with a value to delete.

vendor= VendorClass   : Specifies the vendor class name with which the option is associated. If the tag is not included, the global VendorName that was set by set vendorclass is assumed. If the tag is used, but no value is specified, then no vendor class is used. This parameter is available only for computers running Windows 2000 Server.

user= UserClass   : Specifies the user class name with which the option is associated. If the tag is not included, the global UserName that was set by set userclass is assumed. If the tag is used, but no value is specified, then no user class is used. This parameter is available only for computers running Windows 2000 Server.

Examples

In the following example, this command deletes the current value of the option type with code 18.

delete optionvalue 18 

delete scope

Deletes a scope from the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

delete scope ScopeAddress {DHCPNOFORCE | DHCPFULLFORCE}

Parameters

ScopeAddress   : Required. Specifies the address of the scope to delete.

{ DHCPNOFORCE | DHCPFULLFORCE } : Required. Indicates the force with which the scope will be deleted: DHCPNOFORCE-Deletes the scope if there are no active clients in the scope, DHCPFULLFORCE-Deletes the scope even if there are active clients in the scope.

Examples

In the following example, this command forces the deletion of the scope 10.2.2.0 from the DHCP server and ignores all warnings.

delete scope 10.2.2.0 dhcpfullforce 

delete superscope

Deletes a superscope from the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

delete superscope SuperscopeName

Parameters

SuperscopeName   : Required. Specifies the name of the superscope to delete.

Remarks

  • You can set the superscope from the scope context with the set superscope command.

  • The superscope name is case-sensitive.

Examples

In the following example, this command deletes the superscope named My Superscope from the specified DHCP server.

delete superscope "My Superscope"

export

Exports the DHCP service configuration to a file.

Syntax

export [Path]FileName {all | ScopeList}

Parameters

[ Path ] FileName   : Required. Specifies, by name, the file where the DHCP configuration will be stored. If the path, the file name, or both contain spaces, quotation marks must be used.

{ all | ScopeList } : Required. Specifies which scopes you want to export. The parameter all exports all scopes. The parameter ScopeList exports the scopes that correspond to the IP addresses you list. Each IP address in the list must be separated by spaces.

Remarks

  • This command works only on the local server.

  • While the export command runs, the DHCP service is stopped and does not respond to DHCP clients seeking new leases or lease renewals.

  • If the DHCP service has a large number of scopes or a large number of client address leases, this command can take a long time to run.

Examples

In the first example, this command exports the complete DHCP service configuration to the file c:\temp\dhcpdb.

In the second example, this command exports the DHCP configuration for scopes 10.0.0.0 and 192.168.0.0 to the file c:\temp\dhcpdb.

In the third example, this command exports the complete DHCP service configuration to the file C:\My Folder\Dhcp Configuration. Note that both the path and file name contain spaces, so quotation marks are used.

export c:\temp\dhcpdb all

export c:\temp\dhcpdb 10.0.0.0 192.168.0.0

export "C:\My Folder\Dhcp Configuration" all

import

Imports a DHCP service configuration from a file to the local service.

Syntax

import [Path]FileName {all | ScopeList]

Parameters

[ Path ] FileName   : Required. Specifies, by name, the file from which the DHCP configuration will be imported. If the path, the file name, or both contain spaces, quotation marks must be used.

{ all | ScopeList } : Required. Specifies which scopes you want to import. The parameter all imports all scopes represented in the file you specify. The parameter ScopeList imports the scopes that correspond to the IP addresses you list. Each IP address in the list must be separate by spaces.

Remarks

  • This command works only on the local server.

  • While the import command runs, the DHCP service is stopped and does not respond to DHCP clients seeking new leases or lease renewals.

  • If the DHCP service has a large number of scopes or a large number of client address leases, this command can take a long time to run.

Examples

In the first example, this command imports the complete DHCP service configuration from the file c:\temp\dhcpdb.

In the second example, this command imports the DHCP configuration for scopes 10.0.0.0 and 192.168.0.0 from the file c:\temp\dhcpdb

In the third example, this command imports the complete DHCP service configuration from the file C:\My Folder\Dhcp Configuration. Note that both the path and file name contain spaces, so quotation marks are used.

import c:\temp\dhcpdb all

import c:\temp\dhcpdb 10.0.0.0 192.168.0.0

import "C:\My Folder\Dhcp Configuration" all

initiate auth

Initiates authorization of the specified DHCP server in Active Directory.

Syntax

initiate auth

Parameters

none

mscope

Switches the command context to a DHCP multicast scope.

Syntax

mscope MscopeName

Parameters

MscopeName   : Required. Specifies the name of the multicast scope to which to switch the command context.

Remarks

  • This command enables you to use any of the available DHCP multicast scope-level commands on the specified DHCP multicast scope. Subsequent operations will be performed on this multicast scope at the specified server.

  • The name of the multicast scope is case-sensitive.

Examples

In the following example, this command switches the command context to a multicast scope named My Multicast Scope.

mscope "My Multicast Scope"

scope

Switches the command context to a DHCP scope.

Syntax

scope ScopeIPAddress

Parameters

ScopeIPAddress   : Required. Specifies the scope to which to switch the command context. Identifies the scope by network or subnet IP address.

Remarks

  • This command enables you to use any of the available DHCP scope-level commands on the specified DHCP scope. Subsequent operations will be performed on this scope at the specified server.

Examples

In the following example, this command switches the command context to the scope with IP address 10.0.0.0.

scope 10.0.0.0

set auditlog

Sets the audit log path parameters for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

set auditlog NewAuditPath

Parameters

NewAuditPath   : Required. Specifies a local folder for the DHCP server to use when storing audit log files. A valid folder path is required, and the folder must be local to the DHCP server where the path is defined.

Remarks

  • In order for this change to take effect, you need to stop and restart the DHCP service after you run this command.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the DHCP server to store audit log files in the directory c:\logpath.

set auditlog c:\logpath

set databasebackupinterval

Sets the backup interval for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

set databasebackupinterval NewInterval

Parameters

NewInterval   : Required. Specifies the backup interval in minutes.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the database backup interval for the specified DHCP server to 1,440 minutes (24 hours).

set databasebackupinterval 1440

set databasebackuppath

Sets the database backup path for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

set databasebackuppath NewBackupPath

Parameters

NewBackupPath   : Required. Specifies a local folder for the DHCP server to use when storing audit log files. A valid folder path is required, and the folder must be local to the DHCP server where the path is defined.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the database backup path to c:\winnnt\dhcp\backup.

set databasebackuppath c:\winnt\dhcp\backup

set databasecleanupinterval

Sets the database cleanup interval of the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

set databasecleanupinterval NewInterval

Parameters

NewInterval   : Required. Specifies the database cleanup interval, in minutes.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the database cleanup interval to 10,080 minutes (every seven days).

set databasecleanupinterval 10080

set databaseloggingflag

Sets or resets the database logging flag for the specified DHCP server. Used without parameters, this command resets the database logging flag.

Syntax

set databaseloggingflag [{0 | 1}]

Parameters

{ 0 | 1 } : Indicates the database logging flag setting: 0-Resets the flag (default), 1-Sets the flag.

Examples

In the following example, this command resets the database logging flag for the currently specified DHCP server.

set databaseloggingflag 0

set databasename

Sets the name of the DHCP server database file for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

set databasename NewFileName

Parameters

NewFileName   : Required. Specifies a new name for the DHCP server database file.

Remarks

  • In order for this change to take effect, you need to stop and restart the DHCP Server service.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the DHCP server database file name to newdatabase.mdb.

set databasename newdatabase.mdb

set databasepath

Sets the path of the DHCP server database file for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

set databasepath NewPath

Parameters

NewPath   : Required. Specifies the path of the DHCP database file.

Remarks

  • In order for this change to take effect, you need to stop and restart the DHCP Server service.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the path of the DHCP server database file to c:\winnt\dhcp.

set databasepath c:\winnt\dhcp

set databaserestoreflag

Sets or resets the database restore flag for the specified DHCP server. Used without parameters, this command resets the database restore flag.

Syntax

set databaserestoreflag [{0 | 1}]

Parameters

{ 0 | 1 } : Indicates the setting of the database restore flag: 0-Resets the flag (default), 1-Sets the flag.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the database restore flag for the currently specified DHCP server.

set databaserestoreflag 1

set detectconflictretry

Sets the number of conflict detection attempts for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

set detectconflictretry RetryNumber

Parameters

RetryNumber   : Required. Specifies the number of conflict detection attempts that the DHCP server will make before it leases a scope IP address to a client.

Remarks

  • The maximum value for RetryNumber is five. All values greater than five will default down to five.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the DHCP server to make four attempts to detect if a there is a conflict for a scope IP address before the DHCP server uses this scope IP address in a new address lease.

set detectconflictretry 4

set dnsconfig

Sets the DNS dynamic update configuration for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

set dnsconfig [Enable=]{0|1} [[Update=]{0|1}] [[Lookup=]{0|1}] [[NonDyn=]{0|1}]

Parameters

[ Enable= ]{ 0 | 1 } : Required. Indicates whether to enable or disable the dynamic updates of DNS client information: 0-Disables dynamic updates of DNS client information, 1-Enables dynamic updates of DNS client information.

[ Update= ]{ 0 | 1 } : Indicates the type of update lookups: 0-Updates according to client request, 1-Updates forward and reverse name lookups.

[ Lookup= ]{ 0 | 1 } : Indicates whether to enable or disable forward lookups for clients when leases expire: 0-Disables forward lookups, 1-Enables forward lookups.

[ NonDyn= ]{ 0 | 1 } : Indicates whether to update DNS information for clients that do not support dynamic updates: 0-Disables updates for clients that do not support dynamic updates, 1-Enables these updates.

Remarks

  • This command is only supported for DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

  • The configured Preferred DNS server, in the TCP/IP properties of the DHCP server, will be updated with DHCP client records when dynamic updates are enabled. If the Preferred DNS server is not available on the network, the Alternate DNS server will be updated.

Examples

In the following example, this command enables the dynamic update of DNS information by the DHCP server and configures updates to always be made for both forward and reverse lookups. This example also disables the option to perform forward lookups when leases expire and enables updates for non-dynamic clients.

set dnsconfig 1 1 0 1

set optionvalue

Sets a DHCP server option value that will be applied for all scopes defined at the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

set optionvalue OptCode {BYTE | WORD | DWORD | STRING | IPADDRESS} [[user=]UserName] [[vendor=]VendorName] [OptionValue]

Parameters

OptCode   : Required. Specifies the unique identifier for the option type with the value to set.

{ BYTE | WORD | DWORD | STRING | IPADDRESS } : Required. Specifies the data type for the option type with the value to set.

[ user= ] UserName   : Sets the applicable user class name to which this command will apply. If unspecified, the default user class is assumed.

[ vendor= ] VendorName   : Sets the applicable vendor class name to which this command will apply. If unspecified, the DHCP standard options class is assumed.

[ OptionValue ] : Specifies the new server default value for the option type identified by OptCode. The value must be of the associated data type.

Remarks

  • Vendor and user classes are supported only for DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

  • To modify the current defaults for an unspecified class, use either set userclass or set vendorclass commands.

Examples

In the first example, this command sets the value of option code 003 to list two router IP addresses, 10.1.1.1 and 10.1.1.2.

In the second example, this command further qualifies the first example and sets the specified value to apply only for those scope clients that identify themselves as members of the vendor class Vendor1. In order for this example to work, this class must already be defined at the server, with the specified option type defined for its use.

set optionvalue 003 IPADDRESS 10.1.1.1 10.1.1.2

set optionvalue 003 IPADDRESS vendor=Vendor1 10.1.1.1 10.1.1.2

set server

Changes the Netsh command-line context to the specified server. Used without parameters, the local server is assumed.

Syntax

set server [{ServerIP | \\ServerDNS}]

Parameters

{ ServerIP | \\ ServerDNS } : Specifies the IP address or the DNS name of the specified DHCP server.

Remarks

  • When this command is used, and the Netsh command-line context is changed to another server, all subsequent command operations are performed on the specified server. To perform command operations on another server, this command must be executed again, with the IP address or DNS name of the new server provided as the parameter.

Examples

In the following example, this command switches the DHCP server command-line context to the server at IP address 10.1.1.1

set server 10.1.1.1

set userclass

Sets the name for the current user class. Used without parameters, the current user class is reset to the default user class

Syntax

set userclass [UserClass]

Parameters

UserClass   : Specifies the name of the user class for the currently specified DHCP server.

Remarks

  • This command is available only for use with DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

Examples

In the first example, this command sets the user class name to MyUserClass.

In the second example, this command resets the current user class to the default user class.

set userclass MyUserClass

set userclass

set vendorclass

Sets the name for the current vendor class. Used without parameters, the current vendor class is reset to the default class, DHCP standard options.

Syntax

set vendorclass [VendorClass]

Parameters

VendorClass   : Specifies the name of the vendor class for the current server.

Remarks

  • This command is available only for use with DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

Examples

In the first example, this command sets the vendor class name to MyVendorClass.

In the second example, this command resets the current vendor class to the default class, DHCP standard options.

set vendorclass MyVendorClass

set vendorclass

show all

Displays all status and configuration information for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show all

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • This command lists all current server status and configuration details, including the stored management information base (MIB) information, for the currently specified DHCP server.

show auditlog

Displays all audit log information for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show auditlog

Parameters

none

show bindings

Displays bindings information for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show bindings

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • This command displays bindings information for the current DHCP server, indicating which active network connections that are configured with static IP addresses are enabled or disabled for use in servicing DHCP clients on your network.

  • The DHCP service automatically disables network connections that obtain their IP address configuration dynamically from service bindings. This happens by default.

show class

Enumerates and displays all class information for the specified DHCP server. This includes both user and vendor class information.

Syntax

show class

Parameters

none

show detectconflictretry

Displays the configured number of conflict detection attempts for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show detectconflictretry

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • This command displays the current number of ping retries that are used to attempt the detection of address conflicts for the scope IP addresses that are distributed by the server.

show dnsconfig

Displays the DNS dynamic update configuration for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show dnsconfig

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • If DNS configuration has not been enabled or set, you can use the DNS console or the set dnsconfig command to configure these settings.

show mibinfo

Displays management information base (MIB) information for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show mibinfo

Parameters

none

show mscope

Displays all information about multicast scopes for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show mscope

Parameters

none

show optiondef

Displays all defined and available options types for use at the specified DHCP server. Used without parameters, all options are displayed.

Syntax

show optiondef [vendor=VendorName]

Parameters

vendor= VendorName   : Indicates which defined and available option types to display. If unspecified, the default for VendorName is the default vendor class that is currently set for the DHCP server.

Remarks

  • The default vendor class can be reset with the set vendorclass command.

  • VendorName is applicable only for DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

Examples

In the first example, this command displays all defined option types for the current vendor class.

In the second example, this command displays the defined option types that are available for use with the specified class Vendor1.

show optiondef

show optiondef vendor=Vendor1

show optionvalue

Displays all of the available option values that are currently set for the specified DHCP server. Used without parameters, all option values are displayed, including those that are used for both user and vendor classes.

Syntax

show optionvalue [user=UserName | vendor=VendorName]

Parameters

user= UserName   : Specifies the default values that are set for the option types that are available for use with the currently set user class.

vendor= VendorName   : Specifies the default values that are set for the option types that are available for use with the currently set vendor class.

Remarks

  • User= UserName and vendor=VendorName are only available for use with DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

  • If you provide values for UserName or VendorName, the respective tags (user= or vendor=) are required. If the tags are not included, the default that is assumed is the current user class, previously set with the set userclass command.

Examples

In the following example, this command displays all of the available option types that have values set at the currently specified DHCP server.

show optionvalue

show scope

Displays information about the scopes for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show scope

Parameters

none

show server

Displays information about the specified DHCP server, including the server's fully qualified domain name and IP address.

Syntax

show server

Parameters

none

show dbproperties

Displays information about server database configuration for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show dbproperties

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • This command displays the following database configuration information:

    • DatabaseName

    • DatabasePath

    • DatabaseBackupPath

    • DatabaseBackupInterval

    • DatabaseLoggingFlag

    • DatabaseRestoreFlag

    • DatabaseCleanupInterval

show serverstatus

Displays status information for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show serverstatus

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • This is an example of the type of status information that this command displays:

    Server Attrib - Server Servicing Clients :TRUE

    Server Attrib - Dynamic BootP Support Enabled :TRUE

    Server Attrib - DHCP Server Part Of DS :TRUE

    Server Attrib - DHCP Server Bindings Aware :TRUE

    Server Attrib - Administrative Rights :TRUE

show userclass

Displays the current user class setting at the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show userclass

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • This is an example of the type of setting information that this command displays:

    Current Class Name set for the Server dhcpsrv1.example.microsoft.com is None.

show vendorclass

Displays the current vendor class setting at the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show vendorclass

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • This is an example of the type of setting information that this command displays:

    Current Vendor Name set for the Server dhcpsrv1.example.microsoft.com is None.

show version

Displays current version information for the specified DHCP server.

Syntax

show version

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • This is an example of the type of version information that this command displays:

    The version of the DHCP Server 192.168.0.100 is 5.6.

Netsh DHCP server scope

The following commands are available at the dhcp server scope> prompt, which is rooted within the netsh environment.

To view the command syntax, click a command:

add excluderange

Adds a range of addresses to exclude from distribution in the current scope.

Syntax

add excluderange StartIP EndIP

Parameters

StartIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that starts the exclusion range.

EndIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that ends the exclusion range.

Examples

In the following example, this command excludes the IP addresses in the range 10.2.2.10 to 10.2.2.20 from distribution in the scope.

add excluderange 10.2.2.10 10.2.2.20

add iprange

Adds a range of IP addresses to the current scope.

Syntax

add iprange StartIP EndIP [{DHCP | BOOTP | BOTH}] [MaxBootP]

Parameters

StartIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that starts the range.

EndIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that ends the range.

{ DHCP | BOOTP | BOTH } : Specifies the type of client to be serviced by this scope and IP range. DHCP is the default.

MaxBootP   : Specifies the maximum number of BOOTP clients.

Remarks

  • MaxBootP is useful only if ClientType is set to support BOOTP-type clients for the scope. If an optional comand-line option is used, all command-line options (mandatory as well as optional) that come before the optional command that is used are required and must appear in proper sequence.

Examples

In the following example, this command adds DHCP clients that are in the IP address range 10.2.2.10 to 10.2.2.20 to the distribution range in the scope.

add iprange 10.2.2.10 10.2.2.20

add reservedip

Reserves an IP address for use by a specified media access control (MAC) address in the current scope.

Syntax

add reservedip ReservedIP MACAddress [ClientName] [ClientComment] [{DHCP | BOOTP | BOTH}]

Parameters

ReservedIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address to reserve.

MACAddress   : Required. Specifies the physical hardware or MAC address to associate with the reserved IP address.

ClientName   : Specifies a client name to associate with this reserved client entry. If unspecified, a client name is not associated with this reserved client entry.

ClientComment   : Specifies a client comment to associate with this reserved client entry. If unspecified, a client comment is not associated with this reserved client entry.

{ DHCP | BOOTP | BOTH } : Specifies the type of clients to associate with this reserved client entry. DHCP is the default.

Remarks

  • If an optional command-line option is used, all command-line options (mandatory as well as optional) that come before the optional command-line option that is used are required and must appear in proper sequence.

Examples

In the following example, this command reserves the IP address 10.2.2.32 for use by the DHCP client that identifies its MAC address as 08-00-2b-30-36-9b when it obtains a lease in the current scope.

add reservedip 10.2.2.32 08002b30369B

delete excluderange

Deletes a range of previously excluded IP addresses from the current scope.

Syntax

delete excluderange StartIP EndIP

Parameters

StartIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that starts the exclusion range.

EndIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that ends the exclusion range.

Examples

In the following example, this command deletes the exclusion range that starts with an IP address of 10.2.1.5 and ends with an IP address of 10.2.1.10 from the current scope.

delete excluderange 10.2.1.5 10.2.1.10

delete iprange

Deletes a range of IP addresses from the current scope.

Syntax

delete iprange StartIP EndIP

Parameters

StartIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that starts the range to delete.

EndIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that ends the range to delete.

Examples

In the following example, this command deletes IP addresses in the range 10.2.1.5 to 10.2.1.10 from the current scope.

delete iprange 10.2.1.5 10.2.1.10

delete optionvalue

Removes or clears the currently set scope option value from the current scope.

Syntax

delete optionvalue OptCode [user=UserName] [vendor=VendorName]

Parameters

OptCode   : Required. Specifies the unique identifier of the option whose value is to delete.

user= UserName   : Specifies the user class from which to delete the currently set option value. If the tag is provided, but the value unspecified, the current default user class is assumed.

vendor= VendorName   : Specifies the vendor class from which to delete the currently set option value. If the tag is provided, but the value unspecified, the current default vendor class is assumed.

Remarks

  • Vendor and user classes are only supported for DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

  • If you specify a user class, a vendor class, or both, this command deletes the set option value from only the scope clients that are identified as members of the specified class or classes.

  • To modify the current defaults for an unspecified class that is used with this command, use either the set userclass or set vendorclass commands.

Examples

In the first example, this command deletes the currently set option value for option code 18 from the current scope.

In the second example, this command deletes the currently set option value for option code 18 from the vendor class MyVendorClass.

delete optionvalue 18

delete optionvalue 18 vendor="MyVendorClass"

delete reservedip

Deletes a reservation for an IP address in the current scope.

Syntax

delete reservedip ReservedIP MACAddress

Parameters

ReservedIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address reservation to delete from the current scope.

MACAddress   : Required. Specifies the media access control (MAC) or physical hardware address string for which the IP address was reserved.

Examples

In the following example, this command removes the IP address reservation 10.2.1.32 for the MAC address 08002B30369B from the current scope.

delete reservedip 10.2.1.32 08002B30369B

delete reservedoptionvalue

Deletes an option value that is currently assigned to a reserved client in the current scope.

Syntax

delete reservedoptionvalue ReservedIP OptCode [User=UserName] [vendor=VendorName]

Parameters

ReservedIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address of the reserved client.

OptCode   : Required. Specifies the unique code for the option type that is currently assigned to the reserved client.

User= UserName   : Specifies the user class from which to delete the option value. If the tag is provided, but no value is specified, the current default user class is assumed.

vendor= VendorName   : Specifies the vendor class from which to delete the option value. If the tag is provided, but no value is specified, the current vendor class is assumed.

Remarks

  • Vendor and user classes are only supported for DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

  • To modify the current defaults for an unspecified class used with this command, use either set userclass or set vendorclass.

Examples

In the following example, this command deletes the currently set option value for the option identified by code 18 for reserved IP address of 10.2.2.32 in the current scope.

delete reservedoptionvalue 10.2.2.32 18

initiate reconcile

Checks and reconciles the current scope. Used without parameters, this command verifies the scopes and check for inconsistencies but does not fix any inconsistencies that it finds in the database.

Syntax

initiate reconcile [fix]

Parameters

[ fix ] : Indicates that the command will fix, if possible, any inconsistencies that it finds in the database.

Examples

In the first example, this command verifies the scopes and checks for inconsistencies.

In the second example, this command verifies the scopes, checks for inconsistencies, and fixes any inconsistencies that are found.

initiate reconcile

initiate reconcile fix

set comment

Sets the comment for the current scope. Used without parameters, set comment deletes the current comment.

Syntax

set comment [NewComment]

Parameters

[ NewComment ] : Specifies a new or modified comment string for the scope.

Examples

In the first example, this command sets a comment string that has no spaces.

In the second example, this command sets a comment string that includes spaces.

set comment NewCommentNoSpaces

set comment "New Comment With Spaces"

set name

Sets the name of the current scope.

Syntax

set name NewName

Parameters

NewName   : Required. Specifies the new name of the scope.

Examples

In the first example, this command sets a name that has no spaces.

In the second example, this command sets a name that includes spaces.

set name NewNameNoSpaces

set name "New Name With Spaces"

set optionvalue

Sets an option value for the current scope.

Syntax

set optionvalue OptCode {BYTE | WORD | DWORD | STRING | IPADDRESS} [user=UserName] [vendor=VendorName] OptionValue

Parameters

OptCode   : Required. Specifies the code for the option type whose value is to be set.

{ BYTE | WORD | DWORD | STRING | IPADDRESS } : Required. Specifies the data type for the option type whose value is to be set.

user= UserName   : Specifies the user class. If the tag is provided, but the value is unspecified, the current default user class is assumed.

vendor= VendorName   : Specifies the vendor class. If the tag is provided, but the value is unspecified, the current default vendor class is assumed.

OptionValue   : Required. Specifies the assigned value for the option type that is specified in OptCode. If the option type supports an array that contains more than a single numeric or IP address value, provide the additional values, in the order that you prefer them, at the end of the command, with each value separated by a space.

Remarks

  • Vendor and user classes are only supported for DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

  • To modify the current defaults for an unspecified class used with this command, use either set userclass or set vendorclass.

Examples

In the first example, this command sets the value of option code 003 to list two router IP addresses (10.1.1.1, 10.1.1.2).

In the second example, this command sets the value that is specified in the first example to apply only to those scope clients that identify themselves as members of the vendor class Vendor1, a class that was previously defined at the server with this specified option type defined for its use.

set optionvalue 003 IPADDRESS 10.1.1.1 10.1.1.2

set optionvalue 003 IPADDRESS vendor=Vendor1 10.1.1.1 10.1.1.2

set reservedoptionvalue

Sets the value of an option for a reservation IP address in the current scope.

Syntax

set reservedoptionvalue ReservedIP OptCode {BYTE | WORD | DWORD | STRING | IPADDRESS} [user=UserName] [vendor=VendorName] OptValue

Parameters

ReservedIP   : Required. Specifies the reserved IP address for which the option value is to be set.

OptCode   : Required. Specifies the code for the option type whose value is to be set.

{ BYTE | WORD | DWORD | STRING | IPADDRESS } : Required. Specifies the data type for the option type whose value is to be set.

user= UserName   : Specifies either the current default user class or the class specified as UserName. If the tag is provided, but no value is specified, the current default user class is assumed.

vendor= VendorName   : Specifies either the current default vendor class or the class specified as VendorName. If the tag is provided, but no value is specified, the current default vendor class is assumed.

OptValue   : Required. Specifies the assigned value for the option type specified in OptCode. If the option type supports an array that contains more than a single numeric or IP address value, provide the additional values, in the order that you prefer them, at the end of the command with each value separated by a space.

Remarks

  • Vendor and user classes are only supported for DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

  • To modify the current defaults for an unspecified class used with this command, use either set userclass or set vendorclass.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the value of the router option (code 003) for the reserved client IP address of 10.1.1.50 in the current scope to set IP addresses of 10.1.1.1 and 10.1.1.2 for its configured routers (default gateways).

set reservedoptionvalue 10.1.1.50 003 IPADDRESS 10.1.1.1 10.1.1.2

set scope

Sets the scope for use in subsequent operations.

Syntax

set scope ScopeAddress

Parameters

ScopeAddress   : Required. Specifies the IP address of the scope to use in subsequent command operations.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the current scope to 10.2.2.0 for subsequent operations.

set scope 10.2.2.0

set state

Sets or resets the state of the current scope to either the active or inactive state. Used without parameters, this command activates the scope.

Syntax

set state [{0 | 1 | 2 | 3}]

Parameters

{ 0 | 1 | 2 | 3 } : Indicates the state of the scope: 0-Deactivates the scope, 1-Activates the scope (default), 2-Deactivates the scope and marks the scope as "Switched," 3-Activates the scope and marks the scope as "Switched."

Remarks

  • 2 and 3 are typically used for switched networks or networks where multiple logical networks are hosted on a single physical network.

Examples

In the first example, this command activates a scope.

In the second example, this command deactivates a scope.

set state 1

set state 0

set superscope

Sets the superscope to use in subsequent operations.

Syntax

set superscope SuperscopeName {0 | 1}

Parameters

SuperscopeName   : Required. Specifies the name of the superscope to include the current scope. The SuperscopeName is case-sensitive.

{ 0 | 1 } : Required. Indicates whether to set the state of the superscope to active or inactive: 0-Deactivates the superscope, 1-Activates the superscope.

Examples

In the following example, this command adds the current scope to the superscope MySuperScope and activates the superscope.

set superscope MySuperScope 1

show clients

Displays all of the available version 4 clients for the current scope. Used without parameters, this command displays the following information for each client: IP address, subnet mask, unique ID, lease expiration, and type.

Syntax

show clients [{0 | 1}]

Parameters

{ 0 | 1 } : Indicates the detail level of the output: 0-Shows the following information for each client: IP address, subnet mask, unique ID, lease expiration, and data type (default), 1-Shows all of the information that 0 provides and also displays the fully qualified domain name of each client.

Remarks

  • To view the output of this command effectively, increase the width of the command prompt window to at least 95 characters.

show clientsv5

Displays all of the available version 5 clients for the current scope. Used without parameters, this command displays the following information for each client: IP address, subnet mask, unique ID, lease expiration, and type.

Syntax

show clientsv5 [{0 | 1}]

Parameters

{ 0 | 1 } : Indicates the detail level of the output: 0-Shows the following information for each client: IP address, subnet mask, unique ID, lease expires, type (default), 1-Shows all of the information that 0 provides and also displays the fully qualified domain name of each client.

Remarks

  • To view the output of this command effectively, increase the width of the command prompt window to at least 95 characters.

show excluderange

Displays all of the currently set exclusion ranges of IP addresses for the current scope.

Syntax

show excluderange 

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • Use other scope-level commands to add and delete exclusion ranges.

show iprange

Displays all of the address ranges that are available for the current scope.

Syntax

show iprange

Parameters

none

show optionvalue

Displays all of the option values that are set for the current scope. Used without parameters, this command assumes the current default user and vendor classes.

Syntax

show optionvalue [user=UserName] [vendor=VendorName]

Parameters

user= UserName   : Specifies that the options that are set for the specified user class will display. If the tag is provided, but no value is specified, the current default user class is assumed.

vendor= VendorName   : Specifies that the options that are set for the specified vendor class will display. If the tag is provided, but no value is specified, the current default vendor class is assumed.

Remarks

  • Vendor and user classes are only supported for DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

  • To modify the current defaults for an unspecified class used with this command, use either set userclass or set vendorclass.

Examples

In the following example, this command displays all options and values set for the current scope for the user defined class My User Class.

show optionvalue user="My User Class"

show reservedip

Displays all of the IP addresses that are currently reserved for the current scope.

Syntax

show reservedip 

Parameters

none

show reservedoptionvalue

Displays all currently set option values for a reserved client IP address in the current scope.

Syntax

show reservedoptionvalue ReservedIP [user=UserName] [vendor=VendorName]

Parameters

ReservedIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address reservation for which currently assigned options are to display.

user= UserName   : Specifies that the options that are set for the specified user class will display. If the tag is provided, but no value is specified, the current default user class is assumed.

vendor= VendorName   : Specifies that the options that are set for the specified vendor class will display. If the tag is provided, but no value is specified, the current default vendor class is assumed.

Remarks

  • Vendor and user classes are only supported for DHCP servers running Windows 2000 Server.

  • To modify the current defaults for an unspecified class used with this command, use either set userclass or set vendorclass.

Examples

In the following example, this command displays the option values set for the reserved IP address 10.2.2.100 in the current scope.

show reservedoptionvalue 10.2.2.100

show scope

Displays information for the current scope.

Syntax

show scope 

Parameters

none

show state

Displays the state of the current scope, indicating whether it is active or inactive.

Syntax

show state 

Parameters

none

Netsh DHCP server mscope

The following commands can run from the dhcp server mscope> prompt, which is rooted within the netsh environment.

To view the command syntax, click a command:

add excluderange

Adds a range of excluded addresses to the current multicast scope.

Syntax

add excluderange StartIP EndIP

Parameters

StartIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that starts the exclusion range.

EndIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that ends the exclusion range.

Remarks

  • The exclusion range must be a subset of the overall scope address range.

Examples

In the following example, this command adds an exclusion range that starts with 224.2.2.10 and ends with 224.2.2.20 to the distribution range of the current multicast scope.

add excluderange 224.2.2.10 224.2.2.20

add iprange

Adds a range of IP addresses to the current multicast scope.

Syntax

add iprange StartIP EndIP

Parameters

StartIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that starts the range.

EndIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that ends the range.

Remarks

  • The range must be within the valid range of multicast IP addresses (from 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255).

Examples

In the following example, this command adds the IP address range 224.2.2.10 to 224.2.2.20 to the distribution range in the multicast scope.

add iprange 224.2.2.10 224.2.2.20

delete excluderange

Deletes an exclusion range of previously excluded IP addresses in the current multicast scope.

Syntax

delete excluderange StartIP EndIP

Parameters

StartIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that starts the exclusion range.

EndIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that ends the exclusion range.

Examples

In the following example, this command removes a multicast scope exclusion with a range of IP addresses that starts at 224.2.2.10 and ends with 224.2.2.20 for the multicast scope.

delete excluderange 224.2.2.10 224.2.2.20

delete iprange

Deletes a range of IP addresses from the current multicast scope.

Syntax

delete iprange StartIP EndIP

Parameters

StartIP   : /b>Required. Specifies the IP address that starts the range to delete.

EndIP   : Required. Specifies the IP address that ends the range to delete.

Examples

In the following example, this command deletes the IP address range 224.2.2.10 to 224.2.2.20 from the overall range of the full multicast scope.

delete iprange 224.2.2.10 224.2.2.20

initiate reconcile

Checks and reconciles the current multicast scope.

Syntax

initiate reconcile

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • This command checks the integrity of the current multicast scope by comparing the current contents of the server database with a mirrored copy of the same information in the Windows registry. If inconsistencies are detected in the database, they are repaired based on the information that is duplicated in the registry. Repair is always attempted for any inconsistency that is found.

set comment

Sets the comment for the current multicast scope.

Syntax

set comment NewComment

Parameters

NewComment   : Required. Specifies the new or revised comment for the multicast scope

Examples

In the first example, this command modifies the multicast scope comment with a new comment that contains no spaces.

In the second example, this command modifies the multicast scope comment with a new comment that contains spaces.

set comment NewCommentNoSpaces

set comment "New Comment With Spaces"

set lease

Sets the lease duration for the multicast scope IP addresses.

Syntax

set lease Time

Parameters

Time   : Required. Specifies the lease duration for clients of the multicast scope. Specifying -1 sets the duration of the IP address lease to an unlimited or infinite time.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the lease duration for the clients of the current multicast scope to 691200 seconds (eight days).

set lease 691200

set mscope

Sets the multicast scope to use in subsequent operations.

Syntax

set mscope NewName

Parameters

NewName   : Required. Specifies the name of the multicast scope to which the command context is changed. NewName is case-sensitive.

Remarks

  • This command changes the context of the netsh dhcp server mscope> prompt from one multicast scope to another.

  • This command does not rename the current multicast scope. To change the name of the current multicast scope, use the command set name.

Examples

In the first example, this command changes the command context to a multicast scope named MyMulticastScope. Note that the multicast scope name contains no spaces.

In the second example, this command changes the command context to a multicast scope named My Multicast Scope. Note that the multicast scope name contains spaces.

set mscope MyMulticastScope

set mscope "My Multicast Scope"

set name

Changes the name of the current multicast scope.

Syntax

set name NewName

Parameters

NewName   : Required. Specifies a new name for the current multicast scope.

Examples

In the first example, this command sets a new name that contains no spaces for the current multicast scope.

In the second example, this command sets a new name that contains spaces for the current multicast scope.

set name NewNameNoSpaces

set name "New Name With Spaces"

set state

Sets or resets the state of the current multicast scope to either an active or inactive state.

Syntax

set state {0 | 1}

Parameters

{ 0 | 1 } : Required. Sets the state of the current multicast scope: 0-Deactivates the current multicast scope, 1-Activates the current multicast scope .

Examples

In the first example, this command activates the current multicast scope.

In the second example, this command deactivates the current multicast scope.

set state 1

set state 0

set ttl

Sets the Time-To-Live (TTL) value for the current multicast scope.

Syntax

set ttl TTL

Parameters

TTL   : Required. Specifies the Time-to-Live (TTL) value. The valid range for this value is a number from 1 to 255.

Examples

In the following example, this command sets the TTL value for the current multicast scope to 32.

set ttl 32

show clients

Displays all available clients for the current multicast scope.

Syntax

show clients

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • To view the output of this command effectively, increase the width of the command prompt window to at least 95 characters.

show excluderange

Displays all currently excluded ranges of IP addresses for the current multicast scope.

Syntax

show excluderange

Parameters

none

Remarks

  • If no exclusion ranges have been previously defined for the scope, this command outputs an empty list.

show iprange

Displays all available IP address ranges for the current multicast scope.

Syntax

show iprange

Parameters

none

show lease

Displays the current lease duration settings for the current multicast scope.

Syntax

show lease

Parameters

none

show mibinfo

Displays management information base (MIB) information for the current multicast scope.

Syntax

show mibinfo

Parameters

none

show mscope

Displays information for the current multicast scope.

Syntax

show mscope

Parameters

none

show state

Displays the state of the current multicast scope.

Syntax

show state

Parameters

none

show ttl

Displays the Time-To-Live (TTL) value for the current multicast scope.

Syntax

show ttl

Parameters

none

Formatting legend

Format

Meaning

Italic

Information that the user must supply

Bold

Elements that the user must type exactly as shown

Ellipsis (...)

Parameter that can be repeated several times in a command line

Between brackets ([])

Optional items

Between braces ({}); choices separated by pipe (|). Example: {even|odd}

Set of choices from which the user must choose only one

Courier font

Code or program output

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