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Local and Global Monitors

Local monitors are Health Monitor data collectors, thresholds, and actions that are associated with a particular member and are not synchronized across the entire cluster. Global monitors are Health Monitor data collectors, thresholds, and actions that are synchronized across the entire cluster. These monitors are loaded by default and are described in the .mof file Program Files\Microsoft Application Center\Acsdefaultpolicies.mof.

Bb687498.note(en-us,TechNet.10).gif Note   Changing monitors for a specific member causes it to be taken out of synchronization with the rest of the cluster, from a monitoring stand-point. Unless this change is made correctly, Application Center overwrites the change and restores the default setting in the next synchronization cycle.

Local vs. Global Monitors

By default, Application Center creates only global monitors. However, you might want to create local monitors. For example, you might have one member with a smaller hard disk, and a threshold of 80 percent usage might be too high for this member. You can set the threshold to 70 percent to gain leeway when the disk reaches this amount.

Setting local monitors allows you greater flexibility; however, it can add complexity to your monitoring tasks. Application Center will still use these monitors for the Status and Events views, and logging and the status icon will reflect the changes you make. For example, if you change the threshold on a particular member from 80 percent to 70 percent, Application Center uses the new setting to determine the status for that member.

Bb687498.note(en-us,TechNet.10).gif Note   When using customized monitors, the member's status reflects the new settings.

Changing Monitors for a Computer

You can create and maintain local monitors for any members, including the cluster controller. These settings are not synchronized from the controller to members nor are the settings overwritten during the next synchronization cycle.

There are three ways to create local monitors: manually (by using Health Monitor), by copying and modifying pre-made monitors (with Health Monitor), and by creating and compiling .mof files.

To create local monitors manually

  1. In the Health Monitor snap-in, expand All Monitored Computers.

  2. Expand the server's node.

  3. Right-click Non-Synchronized Monitors or create a new data group.

    Do not create a data group under the Synchronized Monitors (Application Center) data group.

  4. Create the local monitors.

To create local monitors by copying them

  1. In the Health Monitor snap-in, expand All Monitored Computers.

  2. Expand the server's node.

  3. Expand the appropriate nodes to locate the monitor to copy.

  4. Drag the monitor to the Local folder.

    You might need to adjust the local monitors to suit your requirements.

To create local monitors programmatically by using .mof files

This approach allows you to create many local monitors at one time but involves developing classes by using .mof files, and then compiling them for use by WMI.

Changing Monitors for the Cluster

You can create and maintain global monitors for your cluster. These settings will be synchronized from the controller to other members or overwritten during the next synchronization cycle.

To create global monitors manually

  1. In the Health Monitor snap-in, expand All Monitored Computers.

  2. Expand the server's node.

  3. Click Synchronized Monitors (Application Center).

  4. Create the global monitors for your cluster.

To create global monitors by copying them

  1. In the Health Monitor snap-in, expand All Monitored Computers.

  2. Expand the server's node.

  3. Click Synchronized Monitors (Application Center).

  4. Drag the monitors to the Synchronized folder.

    You might need to adjust the global monitors to your requirements.

Related Topics

Did you find this information useful? Please send your suggestions and comments about the documentation to acdocs@microsoft.com

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