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Scenario Guide and Walkthrough

This scenario guide outlines the steps to install and configure the Microsoft® Windows® 2000 operating system as a file, print, and Web server in a Windows NT® 4.0-based network. Specifically, it focuses on how to plan and deploy basic file, print, and Web services that do not require the use of the Active Directory® service.

On This Page

Introduction
Installing Windows 2000
Windows 2000 Setup Tasks
Setting Up File Sharing Services
Setting up Disk Indexing
Setting Up Print Sharing
Setting Up Web Services
Summary

Introduction

Fast file and printer sharing is a basic network service that virtually all users require on an internal network. Today, however, the software underlying a digital business infrastructure must also have Web functionality built in so companies can extend their existing computing system to take advantage of Internet technologies without starting over from scratch. This means that companies can share not just traditional files and network resources but Web content in standard formats such as HTML and XML, which can make fundamental changes in the way information is shared internally and with customers and partners.

There is a lot to be gained by integrating Windows 2000 Server into a mixed environment. You can publish shares to a Web server and even make files and folders available to users when they are offline. Offline folders—a new feature of Windows 2000—make it easy to keep documents on a server, where they can be centrally administered, and still have those files available for use by offline users (typically, portable computer users who are disconnected from the network).

Running Windows 2000 Server lets your organization take advantage of a number of print server improvements so you can share printing resources across the entire network. If you have clients on a variety of platforms, they can send print jobs to printers attached locally to a Windows 2000 print server, across the Internet/intranet, or to printers connected to the network using internal network interface cards, external network adapters, or another server.

As with file servers, you will typically install print servers as member servers rather than domain controllers to avoid the administrative overhead associated with the logon and security roles performed by a domain controller. Often, one server can act as both file and print server.

Internet Information Services 5.0 is included in the Windows 2000 operating system. It contains improved features, such as support for enhanced Active Server Pages (ASP) and Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV). Using the IIS 5.0 implementation of WebDAV, you can allow remote authors to move, search, edit, or delete files and directories—as well as their properties—on your server. WebDAV is configured using the Web server permission settings.

Scenario Requirements

This document is intended to provide the reader with the required information to configure a computer running Windows 2000 Server to provide basic file, print, and Web services. The assumption is that this server will participate in an existing Windows NT-based domain environment.

Scenario Tasks

In this walkthrough you will perform the following tasks.

Setup and Management Tasks

Installation of Windows 2000 Server
Configuring Windows 2000 file sharing on a member server
Configure Windows 2000 print sharing on a member server
Configure Windows 2000 Internet Information Server.

Installing Windows 2000

For the purpose of this walkthrough, the assumption is that the target computer will be a member server in an existing Windows NT 4.0 environment as part of an incremental deployment of Windows 2000.

System Requirements

To ensure adequate performance, make sure that computers on which you will install Windows 2000 Server meet the following requirements:

  • 133-MHz Pentium or higher central processing unit (CPU).

  • A maximum of four CPUs per computer are supported.

  • 256 megabytes (MB) of RAM recommended minimum (128 MB minimum supported; 4 gigabytes (GB) maximum).

    A hard disk partition with enough free space to accommodate the Setup process. The minimum amount of space required will be approximately 1 GB. More space might be needed, depending on the following:

    • The components being installed: the more components, the more space needed.

    • The file system used: FAT requires 100-200 MB more free disk space than other file systems.

    • The method used for installation: if installing from across a network, allow 100-200 MB more space than if installing from the CD-ROM. (More driver files need to be available during installation across a network.)

    • The size of the paging file.

  • VGA or higher-resolution monitor.

  • Keyboard.

  • Mouse or other pointing device (optional).

Note: The Setup process requires the free disk space described in the previous paragraphs. After Setup is finished, actual hard disk space used for the operating system (excluding user accounts) is usually less than the free space required for Setup, depending on system components installed.

For CD-ROM installation

  • A CD-ROM or DVD drive.

  • High-density 3.5-inch disk drive, if you plan to start the computer from the Setup media and your system does not support starting the computer from the CD-ROM. If your computer does not have a working operating system and does not support startup from the CD-ROM, you must have a high-density 3.5-inch disk drive.

For network installation

  • One or more Windows 2000–compatible network adapters and related cables.

Hardware Compatibility

Windows 2000 Setup automatically checks your hardware and software and reports any potential conflicts. To ensure a successful installation, however, check to make sure your computer hardware is compatible with Windows 2000 Server before starting Setup.

To do this, see the Windows 2000 Hardware Compatibility List (HCL) at http://www.microsoft.com/hcl/default.asp. If your hardware is not listed, Setup might not be successful. (Note that one type of hardware no longer supported is the MicroChannel bus.)

To see the version of the HCL that is included with Windows 2000, on the Windows 2000 CD-ROM, in the Support folder, open the Hcl.txt file.

In addition, check that you have updated drivers for your hardware devices and that you have the latest system BIOS. The device manufacturers can assist you in obtaining these items.

To test your system, you can use Setup to verify and report any discrepancies.

To test system readiness

Click Start, click Run, and type:

%setup file location path%\winnt32 /checkupgradeonly

When you run Setup in this mode, it checks the installed software against a list of applications known to be incompatible and logs any that it finds. This tool can alert you to potential compatibility problems.

The Windows 2000 Readiness Analyzer tool analyzes your system and reports potentially incompatible hardware devices and software applications. You can download and run the tool before installing Windows 2000 to help ensure your installation will succeed.

Windows 2000 Setup Tasks

Gathering Information for Setup

Make sure you have the necessary information gathered before you begin the setup routine. Here is what you'll be asked for:

  • Licensing Agreement Be sure you have purchased a license for every instance of Windows 2000 you install.

  • Regional Settings If you speak English and live in the United States, you can accept the defaults here. Otherwise, select the proper language and locale settings as discussed in Chapter 2.

  • Computer Name and Administrator Password Both can be changed after setup has completed. Be sure to set an administrator password, or your machine will be vulnerable to attack as soon as the network starts.

  • Date and Time Settings Choose your time zone. If this is the first operating system installed on the computer, you will need to set the time as well.

  • Network Settings If you are using Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), select the default and your network settings will be automatically configured. If you must enter the settings manually, you should enter at a minimum an Internet Protocol (IP) address, subnet mask, and default gateway. If you are using DNS (Domain Name System) or Windows Internet Name Service (WINS), specify those servers as well.

  • Domain Settings If you are joining a domain, you must have a user account that has rights to create a computer account in the domain.

  • Upgrade to NTFS If you are not dual booting with an older operating system, you should upgrade your partitions to the NTFS file system. If you choose to skip this step now, you can always upgrade later.

  • Name and Organization

  • Provide Upgrade Packs Upgrade packs are used to modify applications to work with Windows 2000. Check with your software vendor to obtain an upgrade pack. They will not always be necessary—most software should run on Windows 2000 without modification.

Starting Windows 2000 Setup for a New Installation

For information about unattended Setup and other options available when starting Setup, see "Planning for Unattended Setup" later in this walkthrough.

Starting a New Installation from a CD-ROM

If you use the Microsoft Windows 2000 CD-ROM for running Setup, you have several options for starting Setup.

To start Setup and perform a new installation by starting the computer from the CD-ROM

  1. With the computer turned off, insert the CD-ROM in the drive.

  2. Start the computer and wait for Setup to display a dialog box.

  3. Follow the Setup instructions.

Starting a New Installation from a Network

To install Windows 2000 from a network, you share the files either directly from the CD-ROM or copy them to a shared folder. Then you start the appropriate program to run Setup.

To install Windows 2000 from a network

  1. On a network server, share the installation files, either by inserting the CD-ROM and sharing the CD-ROM drive, or by copying the files from the I386 folder on the CD-ROM to a shared folder.

    On the computer on which you want to install Windows 2000, connect to the shared Setup files:

    • If you are sharing the CD-ROM drive, connect to the shared drive and change to the I386 folder.

    • If you are sharing a folder, connect to that folder.

    Find and run the appropriate file on the I386 folder of the CD-ROM or in the shared folder:

    • Run Winnt32.exe.

  2. Follow the Setup instructions.

Starting a New Installation from Floppy Disks

The following method applies only if you want to perform a new installation, not an upgrade. Using this method, you can perform an installation on a computer that does not have an operating system, although you can also use this method on computers that have operating systems. You can create a set of floppy disks by using the Makeboot utility in the Bootdisk folder of the Windows 2000 Setup CD-ROM. You can create the Setup disks from a computer running any version of Windows or MS-DOS.

You will need four blank, formatted, 3.5-inch, 1.44-MB floppy disks. Label them Setup Disk One, Setup Disk Two, Setup Disk Three, and Setup Disk Four.

To create Setup disks

  1. Insert a blank, formatted, 3.5-inch, 1.44-MB disk into the floppy disk drive.

  2. Insert the Windows 2000 CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive.

  3. Click Start, and then click Run.

  4. In the Open box, type

    d:\bootdisk\makeboot a: (where d: is the drive letter assigned to your CD-ROM drive), and then click OK.

  5. Follow the screen prompts.

To start Setup for a new installation by starting the computer from floppy disks

  1. Locate both the Windows 2000 Setup floppy disks and the Windows 2000 CD-ROM.

  2. With your computer turned off, insert the first Setup disk into drive A of your computer.

  3. Turn on your computer.

  4. Follow the Setup instructions.

Testing and Verifying an Installation

It is useful to test and verify that the installation of Windows 2000 Server was successful to ensure that the server is ready to provide better service and increased functionality without unplanned downtime before you place it back into production.

To test network connectivity

Use the IPCONFIG utility to verify the TCP/IP configuration parameters on the newly upgraded Windows 2000 Server. This includes the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway. This is useful in determining whether the configuration is initialized.

After the configuration is verified with the IPCONFIG utility, use the PING utility to test network connectivity. The PING utility is a diagnostic tool that test TCP/IP configurations and diagnoses connection failures. Open a command prompt window and ping the following:

Ping 127.0.0.1 (Loop back address): This will verify that TCP/IP is installed and loaded correctly.

Ping IP address of your local host: This will verify that it was added correctly.

Ping IP address of default gateway: This will verify that the default gateway is functioning correctly.

Ping IP address of a remote host: This verifies that you can communicate through a router.

Testing File Shares

From the server, open Windows Explorer and right click a few file shares and check their properties for sharing.

From a several workstations, log on and map drives for several known shares to verify that sharing works properly on the Windows 2000 Server.

Testing Printer Shares

From the server, click the Printers icon in Control Panel. Next, right click each printer icon and select Properties. In the Printer Properties dialog box, click Print Test Page to print a test page and confirm that all of the printer shares are operating correctly under Windows 2000 Server.

After printing a test page for each printer on the server, repeat the test from multiple client workstations verifying that they are able to map to the printer share and submit print jobs.

Testing the Web Server

From the server, open the Internet Services Manager snap-in and verify that all Web sites were successfully upgraded to Internet Information Server (IIS) 5.0 on the Windows 2000 member server.

From a client, open a browser and verify connectivity to Web sites on the Windows 2000 member server.

Troubleshooting an Installation

During an upgrade, you might encounter difficulties that in most cases are easy to resolve.

The following table lists common installation problems and possible resolutions.

Problem

Possible resolution

Media Errors

Try another compact disc or another set of shared installation files for a server-based installation. To request a replacement compact disc, contact Microsoft Corporation or your vendor.

Insufficient disk space

Use Setup to create more space by formatting an existing partition if available; delete or rearrange files or folders; compress an NTFS partition; and remove and create partitions as needed to create a partition large enough for installation.

Failure to locate a Windows 2000 installation upgrade

To find upgradeable Windows NT installations, Setup examines C:\Boot.ini on Intel-based computers. Setup then checks to see if Windows NT is actually installed on the partitions indicated.
If you add or remove a partition from the hard disk containing your Windows NT installation before running Setup, and you don't update Boot.ini, Setup may not be able to locate and upgrade your Windows NT installation.
If this happens, press F3 to exit from Setup. Use an MS-DOS boot disk and a text editor to update Boot.ini with the correct information.

The Recovery Console allows system administrators to access the file system of a Windows 2000 computer—even if the hard disk is formatted using NTFS—by using the Windows 2000 Setup CD. This allows support professionals to fix even a non-booting Windows 2000 system. Since the Recovery Console has batch support, it is even possible for system administrators to create batch files to fix common scenarios and distribute those batch files for users to run on their systems.

It's a good idea to install Recovery Console on all of your Windows 2000 Server computers, as well as Windows 2000 Professional computers that are more at risk, such as those used by developers, software testers, or fearless power users.

To install the Recovery Console

Run: winnt32 /cmdcons

To install the Recovery Console unattended

You can also script this as part of setup.

Winnt332/cmdcons/unattend

The Windows 2000 Installation Process should now be complete and the server ready for service.

If you are planning multiple server installations, the unattended installation method may save time and effort by automating the server install process.

Setting Up File Sharing Services

This section describes the steps required to set up file sharing services for Windows 2000 Server running in a Windows NT-based network.

The administrator should consider business reasons associated with file sharing so that the file names are coherent and easy to identify by users.

Consideration should be given to adding the shared files into a Distributed File System (Dfs) or into an Active Directory structure at some future date.

Setting up File Sharing

The general mechanism for sharing drives and directories in Windows 2000 is unchanged from Windows NT 4.0:

In Windows Explorer, choose the drive or directory you would like other users to be able to access.

To set up file sharing

  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Properties.

  2. The share name is automatically derived from the directory name. To change the share name, click the share name data field and then type the correct name.

  3. A comment can also be added to distinguish this folder from other folders that may have the same name, but are associated with a different server or have a similar share name.

  4. Click Permissions to set the permissions to the share. Permissions for the share and users can be added in this dialog box.

  5. Click Caching to open the Caching dialog box. Offline folder behavior can be set from this dialog box. It is set to Manual Caching for Documents. This means that users must set caching for individual files that they want available to them on their local computers when they are not connected to the server.

  6. Click Apply and then click OK. The share is now ready for use on the network.

Setting up Web Sharing

Web sharing allows you to create a virtual directory on a Web server that publishes the contents of your shared folder. The mechanism is similar to network sharing but uses the Windows 2000 integrated Web server to allow for file sharing through the Web server. Users with a WebDAV-enabled client such as Windows 2000 or Internet Explorer 5 can browse your Web-shared folders across the Internet just as if they were on your local network.

To set up Web sharing

  1. In Windows Explorer, choose the drive or directory you would like other users to be able to access.

  2. Right-click the folder, and then click Properties.

  3. In the Properties dialog box, click the Web Sharing tab

  4. Select the Web site on which to create the share.

  5. Click Share this folder, and the Edit Alias dialog box appears.

  6. Choose the appropriate access permissions for users and applications. Creators of these Web shares should be aware of the access required by users and applications prior to setting them up. This corresponds to what is to be contained in the share and what Web services will be accessing them.

Folders, which are published using Web sharing, can also be managed in more detail using the Internet Services Manager. You find this tool by clicking Start, pointing to Administrative Tools, and then clicking Internet Services Manager.

Note: If you choose to share an entire volume, you may see a default share name with a dollar sign appended. This share was created automatically by the operating system for administrative purposes and should not be used by users. Create a new share instead.

Setting up Disk Quotas

Disk quotas track and control disk space usage for volumes. By specifying the amount of disk space to be allocated and the entering the alarm limit, system administrators can configure Windows to:

  • Prevent further disk space use and log an event when a user exceeds a specified disk space limit.

  • Log an event when a user exceeds a specified disk space warning level.

To assign default quota values

  1. On the Windows desktop, double-click My Computer.

  2. Right-click the volume for which you want to assign default quota values, and then click Properties.

  3. In the Properties dialog box, click the Quota tab.

  4. On the Quota Properties page, click Enable quota management.

  5. Select the Limit disk space to option. This activates fields for disk space limit and warning levels.

  6. Type numeric values in the text fields, select a disk space limit to from the drop-down list, and then click OK. You can use decimal values (for example, 20.5 MB).

If the volume is not formatted with the NTFS file system, or if you are not a member of the Administrators group, the Quota tab is not displayed in the volume's Properties dialog box. When you enable disk quotas on a volume, any user with write access to the volume who has not exceeded their quota limit can store data on the volume. The first time a user writes data to a quota-enabled volume, default values for disk space limit and warning level are automatically assigned by the quota system.

To add new quota entries

  1. On the Windows desktop, double-click My Computer.

  2. Right-click the volume for which you want to add new disk quota entries, and then click Properties.

  3. In the Properties dialog box, click the Quota tab.

  4. On the Quota properties page, click Quota Entries.

  5. In the Quota Entries window, on the Quota menu, click New Quota Entry.

  6. In the Select Users dialog box, in the Look in list box, select the name of the domains or workgroup from which you want to select user names. Click Add, and then click OK.

    In the Add New Quota Entry dialog box, specify one of the following options and then click OK:

    • Do not limit disk usage—Tracks disk space usage without limiting disk space.

    • Limit disk space to—Activates fields for limiting disk space and setting warning levels. Type a numeric value in the text field, and then select a disk space limit to from the drop-down list. You can use decimal values (for example, 20.5 MB). The value you enter cannot exceed the maximum capacity of the volume.

If the volume is not formatted with the NTFS file system, or if you are not a member of the Administrators group, the Quota tab is not displayed in the volume's Properties dialog box.

You use the New Quota Entry feature to set up quota limits and warning levels before the user actually writes data to the volume. This is useful when you do not want to use the default disk space limit and warning level values for a particular user. Typically, the default disk space limit and warning level values established by the volume administrator are sufficient for new users of the volume.

Setting up Distributed File System

Any member server or domain controller can host a Dfs root. Currently, a host server is limited to one Dfs root. Although the Dfs root may be located in a FAT partition, NTFS offers considerable security advantages.

To create a Dfs root

  1. To open Dfs, click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Distributed File System.

  2. On the Action menu, click New Dfs Root, and then click Next.

    Bb727036.adfile01(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  3. Click the type of Dfs root to create, for this exercise select Stand-alone as this document is not intended for an Active Directory deployment, then click Next.

  4. Enter the name of the host computer for the Dfs root or click a name from the list of available servers, then click Next.

  5. Click an existing shared folder or specify the path and name of a new shared folder to create, then click Next.

  6. Accept the default name for the Dfs root or specify a new name, then click Next.

  7. Click Finish to create the new Dfs root, and restart the computer to enable use of the new Dfs root.

To add a Dfs root share

  1. To open Dfs, click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Distributed File System.

  2. On the Action menu, click New Root Share.

  3. Enter the name of the host computer for the root share or click a name from the list of available servers, then click Next.

  4. Click an existing shared folder or specify the path and name of a new shared folder to create, then click Next.

  5. Accept the default name for the root share or specify a new name, then click Next.

  6. Click Finish to create the new root share.

To add a Dfs link

  1. To open Dfs, click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Distributed File System.

  2. In the console tree, right-click the Dfs root, and click New Dfs Link.

  3. Type a name and path for the new Dfs link or click Browse to select from the list of available shared folders, and optionally, enter a comment to further identify or describe the Dfs link.

  4. Type the duration for which a reference to this Dfs link will be cached on a Dfs client, then click OK.

When the cached period elapses, the Dfs client must access the root share to update the shared folder information. Entering a lower value increases associated network traffic. A higher value reduces associate network traffic at the possible expense of accurate share information.

To add a Dfs shared folder

  1. To open Dfs, click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Distributed File System.

  2. In the console tree, right-click the Dfs link to which you want to assign a shared folder.

  3. Click New Dfs Shared Folder.

  4. Under Send the user to this shared folder, enter the name of a shared folder, or click Browse to select from the list of available shared folders.

  5. If the partition is an NTFS partition, choose one of the following options.

    To

    Do this

    Have the files that are located in the DFS root or DFS link that you selected automatically replicate as changes occur to the source file

    Select the Join Replication check box

    Have the source file remain unchanged

    Select the No Replication check box

  6. Copy the files to be replicated from the selected Dfs Root or Dfs link to the Dfs shared folder.

Note: This procedure for adding a Dfs shared folder should not be used for adding the first shared folder. The first shared folder is added when you create the Dfs link. Join Replication requires that the host server for the Dfs root or Dfs link be a member of a domain. Automatic replication is not available for stand-alone distributed file systems.

To set replication policy

  1. To open Dfs, click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Distributed File System.

  2. Right-click a Dfs root or Dfs link and click Replication Policy.

  3. In the list of shared folders, click a Dfs shared folder that you want to use as the master folder for replication.

  4. Click each shared folder in the list and click either Enable or Disable, then click OK.

By default, the first Dfs folder that you create becomes the master folder for replication. If you want to change this default, use the Initial Master button. After you have set a master for replication, Initial Master no longer appears when you display this window. This is because you only set a master once, to initiate replication; from then on, the Dfs shared folders replicate to one another whenever data in one of the Dfs shared folders changes.

Setting up Disk Indexing

Administering Indexing Service

In the Windows NT Server 4.0 operating system, Content Indexing Server shipped as part of the Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS), giving customers full text indexing and searching of documents located on their Web sites. However, Windows 2000 Server ships the Indexing Service as part of the base operating system. This development extends the indexing and searching services to locate information on file servers as well as on Web sites.

You must have administrator permission to administer Indexing Service.

When you open Indexing Service, the details pane contains a list of all catalogs on the local computer. For each catalog, it shows the following information:

  • Catalog. The name of the catalog.

  • Location. The disk drive and directory where the catalog is located.

  • Size (MB). The size of the catalog, in megabytes.

  • Total Docs. The total number of documents and directories indexed in the catalog.

  • Docs to Index. The number of documents waiting to be indexed.

  • Deferred for Indexing. The number of documents that cannot be indexed at the moment.

  • Word Lists. The number of word lists in memory.

  • Saved Indexes. The number of indexes saved on disk.

  • Status. The current status of the catalog.

When you expand a catalog, the Directories and Properties folders and the Indexing Service query form appear. When you expand the Directories folder, the details pane shows a list of all directories in the scope of the catalog, the alias for each directory, and the indication of whether the directory is to be indexed.

When you click the Properties folder, the details pane shows a list of all properties identified in all installed filters. The details pane has the following columns:

  • Property Set. The property number of a group of properties.

  • Property. The hexadecimal or string ID for a property.

  • Friendly Name. The understandable name of the property.

  • Data Type. The property's data type.

  • Cached Size. The amount of space allocated to the property value in the cache.

  • Storage Level. The cache level where the property value is stored.

To configure Indexing Service

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.

  2. In the console tree, under Services and Applications, click Indexing Service.

  3. On the Action menu, click Properties.

    In the Indexing Service Properties dialog box, on the Generation tab, select the check boxes for the choices you want:

    • If you want to index documents with unknown extensions (those for which you do not have filters installed), select the Index files with unknown extensions check box. Indexing Service extracts whatever content and properties it can from the documents.

    • If you want Indexing Service to produce abstracts of documents to present in the list of results, select the check box for Generate abstracts. In the Maximum size box, type the maximum number of characters for the abstracts.

  4. Click the Tracking tab.

  5. Select the check box for Add Network Share Alias Automatically if you want Indexing Service to use the share name of any shared directory as the alias for that directory.

  6. Stop and restart Indexing Service for these changes to take effect.

Creating Catalogs

During installation, Indexing Service creates a default catalog called System. You can add and remove catalogs at any time. You can also configure existing catalogs. When configuring a catalog, you can specify:

  • Whether network share aliases are added automatically.

  • What Web server to index, if any.

  • Whether you want to index documents with unknown extensions.

  • Whether you want Indexing Service to produce abstracts of indexed documents, and if so, the maximum size of the abstract.

To create a catalog

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.

  2. In the console tree, click Indexing Service.

  3. On the Action menu of the Indexing Service snap-in, point to New, and then click Catalog.

  4. Type the name of the catalog.

  5. Click Browse, and select the folder in which you want this new catalog to be located. Click OK.

Note: After adding a catalog, you must stop and restart Indexing Service to begin the indexing process. You cannot add a catalog to a remote computer if the default administration shares on the remote computer have been removed.

Manually starting a Scan

You can manually start a full scan or an incremental scan on any of the indexed directories. You should start a full scan in the following situations:

  • You installed a new filter, removed a filter, or repaired a filter's registration information.

  • You changed the size of the abstract.

  • You changed the indexing of unknown document extensions.

  • You added new word-breaker software.

  • You added a property to the property cache.

  • You changed the type or size of a property in the property cache.

  • You added a new language in Control Panel.

  • You edited an exception-word list.

Starting a full scan results in all the documents in a catalog's scope being rescanned, which can take a long time. Queries will continue to return documents, but query speed may slow down during scanning and indexing.

To manually start a scan

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.

  2. In the console tree, under the appropriate catalog in Indexing Services, click Directories.

  3. In the details pane, click the directory you want to scan.

  4. On the Action menu, point to All Tasks, and click Rescan (Full) for a full scan or Rescan (Incremental) for an incremental scan.

A full scan can be lengthy. If a full scan is necessary, do it when there is the least demand on the system.

To merge temporary indexes in a catalog

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.

  2. In the console tree, click the appropriate catalog under Indexing Services.

  3. On the Action menu, point to All Tasks, and then click Merge.

  4. In the Merge Catalog dialog box, click Yes.

Indexing Service must be running in order to merge indexes.

To pause, stop, or start a catalog or Indexing Service

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.

  2. In the console tree, click Indexing Service under Services and Applications.

  3. If you want to pause, stop, or start a particular catalog, in the details pane, click that catalog.

  4. On the Action menu, click All Tasks, and then click the appropriate choice.

Instead of using the Action menu, you can click Indexing Service and use the buttons in the upper-right corner of the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) to start, pause, and stop a catalog or the entire service.

To check the indexing status of a catalog

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.

  2. In the console tree, click Indexing Service.

To view directories indexed by a catalog

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.

  2. In the console tree, under the appropriate catalog, click Directories.

Adding and Excluding Directories from the Catalog

After you add a catalog, you must add the directories that are to be included within the catalog's scope. This is the set of directories that it covers, both those to be indexed and those to be specifically excluded from being indexed. By default, the System catalog includes all directories on all local storage, except temporary Internet files and history files. You can add directories to a catalog's scope, and you can specifically exclude directories from being indexed. For example, suppose your local drive D has the following directories:

D:\Marketing

D:\Marketing\Personal

D:\Marketing\Miscellaneous

If you include D:\Marketing in the scope of a catalog, then D:\Marketing\Personal and D:\Marketing\Miscellaneous are also indexed. If you do not want documents in D:\Marketing\Personal to be indexed, add it to the Directories list and under Include in Index, click No.

If a directory is contained within another directory that is excluded from being indexed, the contained directory is also excluded, even if you add it to the catalog as a separate entry and under Include in Index, Yes is selected.

You can use wildcard characters to limit the scope of a catalog. For instance, you can add the following to the list of directories:

Directory

Include in Catalog

Explanation

C:\

Yes

Include everything on drive C.

C:\Winnt\Profiles\*\Temporary Internet Files\*

No

Exclude all documents under any folder named Temporary Internet Files under the C:\WINNT\Profiles directory.

To add network share aliases automatically

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.

  2. In the console tree, click the appropriate catalog under Indexing Services.

  3. On the Action menu, click Properties.

  4. In the Properties dialog box, click the Tracking tab.

  5. To have Indexing Service use the share name of any shared directory as the alias for that directory, select the Add Network Share Alias Automatically check box.

  6. Or, to use the same settings as the service, select the Inherit above settings in the Service check box.

For these changes to take affect, you must stop and restart the catalog. To restart a catalog, on the Action menu, point to All Tasks, and then click Start.

To add a property to the property cache

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.

  2. In the console tree, under the appropriate catalog under Indexing Services, click Properties.

  3. In the details pane, in the Property Set column, click the property ID of the property you want to add to the cache.

  4. On the Action menu, click Properties.

  5. In the Properties dialog box, select the Cached check box.

  6. In the Size box, for variable-size properties, set the size (in bytes) for the property. (You cannot change the size for a fixed-size property.)

  7. If you want the property to be stored in the primary level of the cache, in the Storage list, click Primary.

Note: It is important to note that making changes to the property cache can have substantial impact on the performance of Indexing Service.

  • The changes take effect the next time you start Indexing Service.

  • The Data Type list box automatically shows the appropriate data type for the property if the property is known to Indexing Service. If it is not known, VT_LPWSTR is displayed. You can choose another data type from the list.

  • Adding properties to the primary level of the cache can cause performance to slow.

  • The primary level is optimized for fixed-length properties. Avoid storing variable-length properties there because that will greatly increase the space required for the cache.

  • After you choose a storage level for a property and restart Indexing Service, you cannot change it.

  • You must rescan all indexed documents before the new properties are stored.

Specifying Properties to Save

The following property values are stored by default in the property cache of the System catalog.

Property

Friendly name

Cache storage level

Description

0x8

FileIndex

Primary

Unique identifier of a document in an NTFS partition. This is used to track changes to documents.

0xd

Attrib

Primary

Document attributes (such as Archive, Read-Only, or Directory). These are cached to optimize queries that exclude directories (as opposed to documents).

0x5

-----

Primary

Volume ID. This is the unique volume identifier for NTFS volumes. It is used in conjunction with FileIndex to uniquely identify an NTFS file.

0x6

-----

Primary

Parent Work ID. Work ID is the internal cross-file system identifier. The parent Work ID is the Work ID of the parent directory (for example, the Parent Work ID for C:\Allwork\Reports is the Work ID of C:\Allwork). This is cached to optimize scope checking of queries.

0x7

-----

Primary

Secondary Storage ID. This is the ID of record in the secondary level of the property cache corresponding to this primary record. This is reserved for internal use.

0xe

Write

Secondary

Time document was last written.

0xc

Size

Secondary

Size of document.

0xb

Path

Secondary

Path name of document.

0x2

DocTitle

Secondary

Title of document (HTML <TITLE> or ActiveX Summary Info title).

You can add other property values to be stored in either level of the cache.

Note: Removing a property value means that it might not be displayed in a results list. Adding property values to either level, and especially to the primary level, can degrade performance and require a large amount of disk space.

Setting the Property Size

Property size is the number of bytes required to store the value of the property. Properties have either a fixed size or a variable size. If you add a fixed-size property to a catalog, Indexing Service sets the correct size for the property. You cannot change the size.

For variable-size properties, you can select the size. The entire value of each selected property is stored for each document, even if it is greater than the size you set. The size you set affects the amount of disk space required for the catalog and the amount of time it takes to process a query.

There are two considerations to keep in mind:

  • If you set a large size, the catalog will require more disk space, but query-processing performance may improve.

  • If you set a small size, you will save disk space, possibly at the expense of performance.

When setting the size for a variable-size property, make the best estimate you can of the size of the property for most documents, taking into account that the property may be empty for some documents, and then set the property size slightly larger. That should ensure that most values for the property would fit in the allotted space.

You can change the property size to improve performance or disk utilization. However, each time you make a change, you must do a full scan for the change to take effect for all documents.

Monitoring Performance

You can use the performance-monitoring capability built into Windows 2000 to monitor the Indexing Service. It is important that the performance of the server is tracked to provide the best performance to users.

Indexing-related Performance Counters

The following performance counters are related to indexing and merging (under the Indexing Service object in System Monitor):

Counter name

Explanation

Index size (MB)

Total size of all the saved indexes, in megabytes

Saved indexes

Total number of saved indexes

Merge progress

Percentage of merge completed

Word lists

Total number of word lists

Unique keys

Number of unique words in the index

# documents indexed

The number of documents indexed since the current indexing session started. Note that this does not include the documents indexed in prior sessions of Indexing Service.

Documents to be indexed

The least number of documents known to need indexing

Deferred for indexing

The number of documents that need to be indexed but cannot be because they are in use.

Total # of documents

The total number of documents known to the index

The following counters are present under the Indexing Service Filter object in System Monitor.

Counter name

Explanation

Binding time (in milliseconds)

Average time (in milliseconds) to bind to a filter file

Indexing speed (MB/hr)

Speed (in megabytes per hour) at which documents are indexed. This does not include generating abstracts.

Total indexing speed

Speed (in megabytes per hour) at which documents are indexed. This includes generating abstracts.

Query-related Performance Counters

The following query-related counters are present under the Indexing Service object in System Monitor.

Counter name

Explanation

Running queries

The number of queries being processed

Total # of queries

The total number of queries that have been processed in this indexing session

To modify Indexing Service performance

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.

  2. In the console tree, click Indexing Service.

  3. On the Action menu, click Stop.

  4. On the Action menu, point to All Tasks, and then click Tune Performance.

  5. In the Indexing Service Usage dialog box, select the option that best fits the way Indexing Service is used on your computer.

  6. If you selected Customize, click the Customize button and proceed to Step 8. If you did not select Customize, skip to Step 11.

  7. In the Desired Performance dialog box, move the Indexing slider to Lazy for less immediate indexing or to Instant for immediate indexing of new and changed documents. Lazy indexing uses fewer resources; Instant indexing uses as much of the computer's resources as it can.

  8. Move the Querying slider to Low load if you expect to process only a few queries at a time or to High load if you expect to process many queries at a time. Low load uses fewer resources; High load uses more.

  9. Close the Desired Performance dialog box.

  10. Close the Indexing Service Usage dialog box and restart Indexing Service.

Windows 2000 provides a rich set of simple to use tools to create and share files and folders on your network. Users can quickly share important documents while having control over access and availability. Management of these resources can be easily assigned to local administrators or control can be kept at a central location

Setting Up Print Sharing

Windows 2000 Server provides a rich, multi-protocol printing platform. In addition to providing print services for standard Windows clients, including Windows NT 4.0, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 3.1,and Windows for Workgroups, MS-DOS, LAN Manager, and OS/2 clients, Windows 2000 Server can provide printing services to Novell clients (over NCP/IPX), standard UNIX clients (through LPR or IPP), and Macintosh clients over AppleTalk. Windows 2000 supports a wide variety of printers from many different vendors connected through many different interfaces, including parallel, USB, IEEE 1394, infrared, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, DLC, and others.

This walkthrough covers the following subjects:

  • Adding a printer attached to your computer

  • Adding a printer connected directly to your network

  • Managing Printer permissions

  • Managing Printers from a browser

  • Adding printer drivers for other clients

  • Creating a port

  • Creating a TCP/IP port

Planning for Printer Sharing

It is usually best to group printers by location and proximity to their respective print server. This makes maintenance and troubleshooting processes quicker and easier. Other business rules may dictate that printers and print servers be located in different areas. It is suggested that good change control policies and using comments when defining print queues and setting up printers will make maintenance and tracking easier.

It is assumed that the server running Windows 2000 will be in a Windows NT 4.0 environment with possibly many diverse clients. The Print Manager must install printer drivers for each type of client that will be using the shared printer. If the printer driver for that client is not on the Windows 2000 CD, then the Print Manager must supply these drivers.

To add a printer attached to your computer

  1. Connect the printer to the appropriate port on your computer according to the printer manufacturer's documentation, and verify that it is ready to print.

  2. Although Windows automatically detects and installs most printers, you might need to provide additional information to complete the installation. Choose from the following, depending on the type of printer you have.

LPTPort

If your printer is attached to your computer through a parallel port (LPT port) connect the printer to your computer, and then open Printers by clicking Start, pointing to Settings, and then clicking Printers.

Double-click Add Printer to start the Add Printer wizard, and then click Next. Click Local Printer, make sure the Automatically detect and install my Plug and Play printer check box is selected, and then click Next. Depending on the printer you are installing, a Found New Hardware message or the Found New Hardware wizard appears to notify you that the printer has been detected and that installation has begun. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the printer installation.

Or, after connecting your printer, you can start or restart your computer to allow Windows 2000 to automatically detect and start the Found New Hardware wizard.

The printer icon will be added to your Printers folder.

USB or IEEE 1394

If you install a universal serial bus USB or IEEE 1394 printer, Windows 2000 detects it and automatically starts the Found New Hardware wizard. You do not need to shut down or restart your computer; just follow the instructions on the screen to finish the setup.

The printer icon will be added to your Printers folder.

USB or IEEE 1394

If you install a universal serial bus USB or IEEE 1394 printer, Windows 2000 detects it and automatically starts the Found New Hardware wizard. You do not need to shut down or restart your computer; just follow the instructions on the screen to finish the setup.

The printer icon will be added to your Printers folder.

Infrared Printers

If you install an infrared printer, Windows 2000 detects it and automatically installs it. You do not need to shut down or restart your computer. First, make sure that the infrared-enabled computer and the printer are turned on. Then, position the two infrared capable devices to within approximately one meter of each other to establish a wireless infrared connection. After several seconds, the computer recognizes the printer, the printer icon appears in the status bar of the task bar, and the appropriate drivers are installed on the computer. (You do not need to continue with the rest of the steps in this topic.)

The printer icon will be added to your Printers folder.

If your computer is not infrared-capable, you can attach an infrared transceiver to your serial (COM) port.

COM port and Non-Plug and Play

If you could not install your printer using Plug and Play, or if the printer is attached to your computer with a serial (COM) port, then to open Printers, click Start, point to Settings, and then click Printers.

  1. Double-click Add Printer to start the Add Printer wizard, and then click Next.

  2. Click Local printer, and then click Next.

  3. Follow the instructions on the screen to finish setting up the printer by selecting a printer port, selecting the manufacturer and model of your printer, and typing a name for your printer.

  4. In Windows 2000 Server, the Add Printer wizard shares the printer and publishes it in Active Directory by default, unless you select Do not share this printer in the wizard's Printer Sharing screen. In Windows 2000 Professional, the Add Printer wizard doesn't share the printer automatically; you need to select Share as to share and publish the printer.

If you add and set up a Plug-and-Play printer (USB, IEEE 1394, LPT, infrared, etc.), you do not need to have administrative privileges. However, to add and set up a non Plug-and-Play printer connected directly to your computer, you must be logged on as an administrator or a member of the Administrators group. If your computer is connected to a network, network policy settings may also prevent you from completing this procedure.

If you intend to share the printer with clients other than Windows 2000, you need to install the appropriate printer drivers for these clients on the print server. When clients on Windows NT 4.0, Windows 95, and Windows 98 connect to the printer, the system automatically downloads the correct driver to the client. See Adding drivers for other clients

When you are adding a new printer that is connected to a computer and the Add Printer wizard prompts you to select the printer port, you normally select from the Existing list one of the parallel (LPT) ports. For some plotters you might need to select one of the serial (COM) ports.

The following Group Policy settings can change the default behavior of the Windows 2000 Server Add Printer wizard:

  • Allow printers to be published is enabled by default; you can disable it to prevent printers from being published.

  • Automatically publish new printers in the Active Directory is enabled by default; you can disable it to prevent the Add Printer wizard from automatically publishing printers when adding a new printer.

  • Display the down level page in the Add Printer wizard is enabled by default; you can disable it to prevent the Add Printer wizard from browsing the network for shared printers.

To add a printer attached directly to the network

To add and set up a printer connected directly to your computer, you must be logged on as a member of the Administrators group.

  1. Open Printers, click Start, point to Settings, and then click Printers.

  2. Double-click Add Printer to start the Add Printer wizard, and then click Next

  3. Click Local Printer, clear the Automatically detect my printer check box, and then click Next.

  4. Follow the instructions on the screen to finish setting up the printer by selecting a printer port, selecting the manufacturer and model of your printer, and typing a name for your printer.

  5. When the Add Printer wizard prompts you to select the printer port, click Create a new port.

  6. From the list, click the appropriate port type and follow the instructions. (By default, only LocalPort and StandardTCP/IPPort appear in the list.)

You must clear the Automatically detect my printer check box because the printer is attached directly to the network, not to a Windows 2000 computer.

If you intend to share the printer with clients other than Windows 2000, you need to install the appropriate printer drivers for these clients on the print server. When clients running Windows NT 4.0, Windows 95, and Windows 98 connect to the printer, the system automatically downloads the correct driver to the client.

To set or remove permissions for a printer

  1. To open Printers, click Start, point to Settings, and then click Printers.

  2. Right-click the printer for which you want to set permissions, click Properties, and then click the Security tab.

  3. To change or remove permissions from an existing user or group, click the name of the user or group.

  4. To set up permissions for a new user or group, click Add. In Name, type the name of the user or group you want to set permissions for, click Add, and then click OK to close the dialog box.

  5. In Permissions, click Allow or Deny for each permission you want to allow or deny, if necessary. Or, to remove the user or group from the permissions list, click Remove.

To change device settings, you must have the Manage Printers permission.

To view or change the underlying permissions that make up Print, Manage Printers, and Manage Documents, click the Advanced button. A printer must be shared in order for the permission settings to affect the users and groups listed.

You can also view the permissions assigned to you by clicking the group you belong to on the Security tab.

To manage printers from any Windows 2000 computer

  1. Double-click My Network Places, and then locate the print server for the printers you want to manage.

  2. Double-click the print server, double-click the Printer folder icon on that server, and then click a printer.

  3. Change the print server, printer, or printing preference settings as required.

You can change printer settings only if you have Manage Printers permission.

If you are having trouble finding your printer and you are logged on to a Windows 2000 domain, you can find your printer by clicking Start, pointing to Search, and then clicking Printers. You can also drag the Printers folder of any print server (or specific printers from any Printers folder) to the Printers folder on your computer. This is an easy way to manage any printer without having to search for it.

To manage printers from a browser

  1. In Internet Explorer, or other browser, type the following URL:

    http:// PrintServerName/ printers/

  2. Or, type a specific printer URL:

    http:// PrintServerName/PrinterName/

  3. In All Printers on PrintServerName, click the printer you want to manage.

  4. In PrinterName on PrintServerName, you can click any function on the left pane to stop, resume, or cancel a specific document or all documents. You can also click on a specific document in the queue, to see its properties.

An administrator can disable Internet printing with the Group Policy setting Disable Web-based Printing.

For Internet printing you must have Internet Information Server (IIS) installed on the Windows 2000 Server (this is installed by default), or Peer Web Services (PWS) on Windows 2000 Professional. You can also access the Web-based view from the Printers folder if Enabled Web view content in folder is selected (the folder has the Web-based view in the left pane). If you click any printer in the right pane, you can select Get More Info in the left pane to view the printer's content in Web-based view.

In addition, you can use the link in the left pane to connect to online product at the Microsoft Web site, and, if available, the printer vendor's support Web site.

You can manage any printer on any Windows 2000 print server from any Windows 2000 computer when Web-based printing is enabled (default).

To add printer drivers for other clients

  1. To open Printers, click Start, point to Settings, and then click Printers.

  2. On the File menu, click Server Properties, and then click the Drivers tab.

  3. Click Add, click Next, and then follow the instructions on the Add Printer Driver wizard.

  4. After selecting the printer's manufacturer and model, you are prompted to select the environment and operating systems for which you want to install drivers.

You can add printer drivers for other platforms (such as Alpha-based or Intel-based), or for other operating systems, using the Sharing tab on each printer's properties page. If you need to add additional drivers for multiple printers, it might be easier to use the Drivers tab on the properties page of the print server.

To add a port

  1. To open Printers, click Start, point to Settings, and then click Printers.

  2. On the File menu, click Server Properties.

  3. Click the Ports tab, and then click AddPort.

  4. From the Available port types list, click the appropriate port name, and then click NewPort.

  5. Configure the port you added.

  6. Click Close to close the Printer Ports dialog box.

By default, only LocalPort, and StandardTCP/IPPort appear in the Available port types list. To add other port types, click New Port Type and enter the path to the compact disc containing the necessary files. You can also add a printing port while you add a new printer using the Add Printer wizard. This wizard prompts you to select a new or existing port. For a list of ports you can add, and information about adding them, see Related Topics.

It is better to use the Print Server Properties dialog box when adding multiple ports. Then, when you add a printer with the Add Printer wizard, the new ports you added will appear in the Existing list.

To add a standard TCP/IP port

  1. To open Printers, click Start, point to Settings, and then click Printers.

  2. Double-click Add Printer, and then click Next.

  3. Click Local Printer, clear the Automatically detect my printer check box, and then click Next.

  4. Click Create a new port, and then click Standard TCP/IP Port.

  5. Click Next to run the Add Standard TCP/IP Printer Port wizard.

  6. Follow the instructions on the screen to finish installing the TCP/IP printer.

You can also add ports using the Print Server Properties dialog box.

Most directly attached network printers currently support TCP/IP protocol. The standard TCP/IP port simplifies connecting remote printers with TCP/IP protocol. A computer that acts as a print server must run TCP/IP protocol to communicate with and send print jobs to the printer.

For print servers that need to communicate with host computers (such as UNIX or VAX computers), it is best to install an LPR port.

Adding a Printer on a Windows 2000 Client

To install a printer share as a local printer

  1. In the Printers folder, double-click Add Printer, and then click Next.

  2. Click Local Printer, and then click Next.

  3. Click Create a new port, select Local Port, and then click Next.

  4. In the Port name field, type the address of the network printer share as \\server_name\share_name.

  5. On the Name Your Printer page, the print device name appears in the input field. Be sure to change the name so that your copy of the printer software cannot be confused with the printer share.

  6. Complete the wizard's instructions.

If you choose to share the printer with other network users, the wizard uses the server name and print device name to build a printer share address.

Creating and managing print servers and printers on your network is made easier with Windows 2000. There are several new management options in Windows 2000 to make care and feeding of networked printers a virtual snap. The best way to ensure a successful printing solution using Windows 2000 is by having a well thought out Windows 2000 deployment plan.

Setting Up Web Services

The Windows 2000 Server operating system integrates Internet technologies throughout the operating system, from file and print to advanced application services. This helps organizations to more effectively exchange information with customers, partners, and employees worldwide.

Deploying A Web Server

Internet Information Services (IIS) is the Web service integrated with Windows 2000 Server. You can use IIS to set up a Web or FTP site on your corporate intranet, create large sites for the Internet, or develop component-based programs. Windows 2000 will support a large number of Websites and virtual directories on a single server. In order to manage the default Website or create new Websites and virtual directories, you need to use the Internet Services Manager, a Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in.

To deploy a Web server

  1. Log on using the local Administrator account for this computer.

  2. Click Start, point to Settings, and click Control Panel, and double-click Administrative Tools.

  3. Click Configure your Server. The Process wizard appears.

  4. On the toolbar at left, click on Web Server/Media Server and select Web Server.

  5. Click Open Internet Services Manager.

  6. In the console tree, expand Internet Information Services, expand your server, and click Default Web Site.

  7. On the Action menu, point to New, and click Virtual Directory.

  8. In the Virtual Directory Setup wizard, click Next.

  9. Type in the alias name of the virtual directory (for example, Webfolder), then click Next.

  10. Select to which folder the alias is assigned (for example, C:\share), then click Next.

  11. Assign the appropriate permissions to the folder, then click Next, and then click Finish.

You have now created a Virtual Directory named Webfolder that references the folder "C:\share".

Creating and Managing Web Sites and Virtual Directories

  1. Log on using the local Administrator account for this machine.

  2. Click Start and Run and type MMC. The Microsoft Management Console program opens.

  3. On the tool bar, click Console, the select Add/Remove Snap-in.

  4. In the Add/Remove Snap-in dialog box, select where the component is to be added, then click Add. A list of components appears.

  5. Select Internet Information Services and click Add. After selecting, click Close.

  6. Verify that the component is listed in the Add/Remove Snap-in dialog box and click OK.

  7. In the Console Root\Internet Information Services window, double-click Internet Information Services and select your server name.

  8. A four-folder list will appear. Select the appropriate folder and set the attributes for the keys. In the Action menu, new Virtual Directories and sites can be created.

To create a Virtual Directory

  1. After complete the above 8 steps, select Default Website.

  2. Click Action, then point to New and create a new Virtual Directory.

  3. The Virtual Directory wizard appears. Refer to step 9 under the Web Server Process wizard above.

Managing Your Web Server

Using the IIS Snap-In

The Internet Information Services snap-in is an administration tool for IIS 5.0 that has been integrated with other administrative functions of Windows 2000. In earlier versions of the operating system, this tool was called Internet Service Manager.

To open the Internet Information Services snap-in

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and click Computer Management.

  2. Under the Server Applications and Services node, expand Internet Information Services.

    Bb727036.adfile02(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Setting Up a Site Quickly with IIS

IIS creates a default Web site and FTP site when you install Windows 2000 Server. This topic describes how to publish information on those default sites.

To publish content on your Web site

  1. Create a home page for your Web site. This is done with Microsoft FrontPage®, Microsoft Word, or some other HTML authoring tool of which there are many. There are also many books related to this subject available.

  2. Name your home page file Default.htm, Default.html, or Default.asp.

  3. Copy your home page into the default Web publishing directory for IIS. The default Web publishing directory is also called the home directory, and the location provided by Setup is \Inetpub\Wwwroot.

  4. If your network has a name resolution system (typically DNS), then visitors can simply type your computer name in the address bar of their browsers to reach your site. If your network does not have a name resolution system, then visitors must type the numerical IP address of your computer.

To publish content on your FTP site

  1. Copy or move your files into the default FTP publishing directory. The default directory provided by Setup is \Inetpub\Ftproot.

  2. If your network has a name resolution system (typically DNS), then visitors can type ftp:// followed by your computer name in the address bar of their browsers to reach your site. If not, then visitors must type ftp:// and the numerical IP address of your computer.

For more information check the documentation that is available once IIS is installed in your local machine at http://localhost/iishelp about name resolution, setting FTP messages, and directory output style.

Testing Your Installation

After installing, you can test your installation by using Internet Explorer to view the files in your home directory.

To test a Web site connected to the Internet

  1. Ensure that your Web server has HTML files in the Wwwroot folder.

  2. Start a Web browser, such as Internet Explorer, on a computer that has an active connection to the Internet. This computer can be the computer you are testing, although using a different computer on the network is recommended.

  3. Type in the URL for the home directory of your new Web site.

  4. The URL begins with http:// followed by the name of your Web site, followed by the path of the file you want to view. (Note the forward slash marks.) For example, if your site is registered in DNS as "examples.microsoft.com" and you want to view the file Homepage.htm in the root of the home directory, in the Address box you type: http://examples.microsoft.com/homepage.htm then press ENTER. The home page appears on the screen.

To test a Web site on your intranet

  1. Ensure that your computer has an active network connection and that the WINS server service (or other name resolution method) is functioning.

  2. Start a Web browser, such as Microsoft Internet Explorer.

  3. Type in the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) for the home directory of your new server.

  4. The URL is "http://" followed by the Windows Networking name of your server, followed by the path of the file you want to view. (Note the forward slash marks.) For example, if your Web site is registered with the WINS server as Admin1 and you want to view the file Homepage.htm in the root of the home directory, in the Address box you type: http://admin1/homepage.htm then press Enter. The home page appears on the screen.

Summary

Windows 2000 is an ideal platform for the next generation of business computing. It was designed to bring new technologies to the corporate network but still has features and functions that fit into existing Windows NT 4.0 environments. Being able to plug directly into existing environments also supports a logical migration path in moving to a Windows 2000 corporate environment without having to make that migration all at once.

Windows 2000 was also designed to be flexible so that no matter the size of the network, all business customers will find it easy to work with, extremely robust, and is customizable to fit any environment. Using the steps in this guide, organizations can quickly adopt Windows 2000 to take advantage of its benefits.

For More Information

For the latest information on Windows 2000, check out the Microsoft Web site at http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000.

Additional Windows 2000 Web Site Resources

Exploring File and Print Services
http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/technologies/fileandprint/default.asp

Windows 2000 Deployment Guide
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windows2000serv/reskit/w2rkbook/dpg.asp

Terminal Services
http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/technologies/terminal/default.asp

The Windows 2000 Technical Overview
http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/professional/evaluation/overview/default.asp

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