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Groove Protocol Support

Groove Server 2007

Updated: April 1, 2008

Applies To: Groove Server 2007

 

Topic Last Modified: 2007-09-13

Groove clients and servers utilize several transport and application-layer protocols to sustain communications under a wide range of network conditions. This chapter provides a high-level description of how the leading protocols are used.

Groove's Simple Symmetric Transmission Protocol (SSTP) is the primary protocol of client-to-client and client-to-server communication. But if SSTP port 2492/TCP is unavailable, Groove clients can establish SSTP connections in other ways. For example, if a firewall blocks 2492/TCP outbound connections, Groove Clients can establish SSTP connections to relay servers over port 443/TCP. If a firewall also blocks port 443/TCP, SSTP can be encapsulated within standard HTTP over port 80/TCP. Connections across HTTP, however, are less efficient because of the increased overhead of encapsulation and HTTP connections.

Groove Manager, as a Web application, processes Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) requests from Groove clients and from an administrative browser interface. Groove clients communicate with the Groove Manager server by sending Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) requests over HTTP to which the Groove Manager responds. Groove Manager also uses SOAP to communicate with any relay servers that are registered with it. SOAP exchanges with the relay server are always initiated by the Groove Manager. Neither the Groove Manager nor the Groove Relay initiates connections with Groove clients.

Groove Relay supports multiple protocols to maintain communications among Groove users when client devices cannot contact each other directly. Foremost is Groove’s native SSTP over port 2492/TCP which relay servers use for processing Groove messages, including instant messages, Groove workspace invitations, and workspace updates. However, Groove Relay employs other ports and HTTP to allow messages to traverse firewalls when a Groove user is behind a firewall that blocks native SSTP communications.

Like Groove clients, Groove Data Bridge uses SSTP to communicate with directly-connected Groove clients. Its transactions with external applications utilize SOAP.

Figure 3-1 introduces firewalls to the simple client-to-client topology shown in The The Groove Solution, and, to represent an enterprise deployment, includes Groove Manager and Data Bridge servers.

Figure 3-1. Groove Installation with Supporting Servers and Firewalls

Groove manager protocol support topology

Under some conditions, Groove clients connect to relay servers across proxy servers. As with browser connections across proxies, various ports can be specified for the local client-to-proxy connection. When communicating across a proxy, Groove clients can use SSTP over port 443/TCP using the HTTP Connect method. Alternatively, HTTP encapsulated SSTP may be transacted as standard HTTP Long-lived, HTTP Keep-alive, or HTTP polling over port 80/TCP, if supported by the proxy server.

Groove clients also depend on the LAN and WAN Device Presence Protocol (DPP). LAN DPP is a Groove application-layer protocol carried by User Datagram Protocol (UDP). LAN DPP allows clients to find each other on a LAN subnet publishing their presence information and monitoring device presence information for identities in their contact lists. WAN DPP is an application-layer protocol supported by Groove Relay and carried by Groove’s SSTP. WAN DPP allows clients to find each other across the wide area network by publishing and subscribing to device presence information maintained on relay servers.

The Groove client and servers supported protocols are summarized in the following table:

 

Groove Server and Client Protocols Functions Listening Ports Used

Simple Symmetric Transport Protocol (SSTP)

Used by Groove clients and relay servers to transport Groove messages.

Supports:

Message queues for user identity and device targeted messages.

Fanout of SSTP message streams to multiple identities and multiple Groove Relays.

Device and user authentication for dequeueing SSTP messages.

Wide Area Network Device Presence Protocol (WAN DPP)

Port 2492/TCP:

Inbound on Groove Relay.

Inbound on Groove clients.

Outbound from Groove clients to Groove Relay and clients.

Outbound from Groove Relay to Groove Relay.

SSTP over Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) port 80

Used by Groove clients and Groove Relay to transport messages when direct SSTP is blocked by firewalls.

Supports:

Firewall transparency through HTTP encapsulation of SSTP datagrams.

Port 80/TCP:

Inbound on Groove Relay

Outbound from Groove clients to Groove Relay.

SSTP over port 443

Used by Groove clients and Groove Relay to transport messages when native SSTP transmissions are blocked by firewalls and for proxies that support the HTTP Connect method.

Port 443/TCP:

Inbound on Groove Relay.

Outbound from Groove clients to Groove Relay.

Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) over port 80

Used by Groove clients to communicate with Groove Manager.

Port 80/TCP:

Inbound on Groove Manager.

Outbound from Groove client to Groove Manager.

Outbound from Groove Data Bridge to Groove Manager.

SOAP over port 8009

Used by Groove Manager to contact Groove Relay.

Port 80/TCP:

Inbound on Groove Relay.

Outbound from Groove Manager to Groove Relay.

SOAP over port 9080

Used by Groove Data Bridge to receive XML calls from external applications.

Port 9080/TCP:

Inbound on Groove Data Bridge to receive requests from external applications.

HTTP over port 8010

Supports Groove Relay administrative Web pages.

Port 8010/TCP:

Inbound on Groove Relay.

MS-SQL Tabular Data Stream (TDS) encapsulated in TCP

Used by Groove Manager front-end IIS server to contact back-end SQL server.

Port 1433/TCP (typically):

Inbound on SQL database server.

Outbound from Groove Manager IIS server to SQL server.

Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)

Used by Groove Manager to integrate with optional LDAP-based directory server.

Port 389/TCP (typically):

Inbound on LDAP directory server.

Outbound from Groove Manager IIS server to LDAP directory server.

Local Area Network Device Presence Protocol (LAN DPP)

Used by Groove clients on a LAN subnet.

Supports Groove device presence detection, enabling clients on a LAN to find each other.

Port 1211/UDP:

Inbound on Groove clients.

Outbound from Groove clients to Groove client.

Wide Area Network Device Presence Protocol (WAN DPP)

Used by Groove clients and relay servers to WAN device presence detection.

Groove application-layer protocol over SSTP.

Rendezvous Protocol (RVP)

Used by Groove clients to support user presence information.

Groove application-layer protocol over SSTP.

IM protocol

Used by Groove clients to support instant messaging.

Groove application-layer protocol over SSTP.

Workspace protocol

Used by Groove clients to support data synchronization.

Groove application-layer protocol over SSTP.

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)

Used by a Microsoft virtual SMTP server and called by Groove Manager, to send e-mail containing account configuration codes or account backup files to a mail host for delivery to Groove users.

Port 25/TCP:

Inbound on mail host.

Outbound from Groove Manager IIS front-end servers.

Figure 3-2 illustrates the interaction between Groove Manager and Groove Relay servers, and Groove client ports. See Summary of Groove Port Configurations for a table of port configurations in the context of various protocols.

Figure 3-2. Interaction of Groove Servers and Clients

Groove network diagram

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