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Deploying Windows 2000 Server Terminal Server to Host User Desktops in a Windows Small Business Server 2003 Environment

Objective

If you have use a server running the Microsoft® Windows® 2000 Server operating system in your current network, you can add it to your Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2003 network and then enable Windows 2000 Terminal Services in Application Server mode. By using Terminal Services in Application Server mode, you can host your users’ desktops. This can save your organization money by extending the life of your desktop hardware. If you prefer to use a server running the Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003 operating system, see “Deploying Windows Server 2003 Terminal Server to Host User Desktops in a Windows Small Business Server 2003 Environment” on the Microsoft Web site at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=17050.

You can also host line-of-business applications with Terminal Services for central administration of the application and data. For example, you can install a version of Microsoft Office on the terminal server and ensure that everyone in your business is using the same version, regardless of what operating system is running on their desktop computer. For more information about hosting line-of-business applications with Terminal Services, click Start, click Help, and then search for “Program Installation.” In addition, see “Windows 2000 Terminal Services” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=31211).

What is Terminal Services?

Terminal Services is a component of Windows 2000 Server. It can run in two modes. In Application Server mode, it delivers the Windows desktop and Windows-based applications from a centralized server to almost any type of desktop computer, including computers that cannot run Windows. Terminal Services transmits only the user interface of the application to the client computer. The client computer then returns keyboard and mouse clicks, which the server processes. To communicate between the client and the server, Terminal Services uses the Remote Desktop Protocol. Users see only their individual sessions, which are independent of all the other client sessions and which the server operating system manages transparently.

Terminal Services and Windows Small Business Server

You cannot run Terminal Services in Application Mode on a server that is running Windows Small Business Server 2003. Because Terminal Services is optimized for the desktop experience, it does not coexist well with the rest of the applications and services that Windows Small Business Server includes. Terminal Services and Windows Small Business Server contend for the same resources and can conflict with one another, degrading the performance of both. Also, Windows Server 2003 and Windows Small Business Server 2003 are more secure by default than previous versions, making it unfeasible for Terminal Services to coexist with the domain-controller capacity of Windows Small Business Server. For a small organization, it is recommended that one server run Windows Small Business Server and a second server run Terminal Services. To facilitate this and to simplify the licensing requirements for this scenario, Microsoft allows the client-access license (CAL) for Windows Small Business Server to satisfy the CAL requirement for Windows Server on the second server.

If you are currently using Microsoft Small Business Server 2000 and have enabled Terminal Server in Application Server mode, use the following list to determine the Windows Small Business Server 2003 solution that is appropriate for you:

  • If you currently use Terminal Server to allow mobile users to access the network and user desktops, in Windows Small Business Server 2003 you can use Remote Web Workplace to provide this functionality. For more information about Remote Web Workplace, see the “Feature Guide for Windows Small Business Server 2003” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=31801).
  • If you currently use Terminal Server to host user desktops or line-of-business applications, in Windows Small Business Server 2003 you can add an additional server to your network. On the additional server, install either Windows 2000 Server or Windows Server 2003 and enable Terminal Server. For information about using Windows Server 2003 Terminal Server with Windows Small Business Server 2003, see “Deploying Windows Server 2003 Terminal Server to Host User Desktops in a Windows Small Business Server 2003 Environment” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20997). For more information about migrating from Small Business Server 2000 with Terminal Services enabled to Windows Small Business Server 2003 and Windows 2000 Server with Terminal Server enabled, see “Upgrading from Small Business Server 2000 with Terminal Services Enabled” later in this paper.

Figure 1 illustrates the options you have if you are currently running Small Business Server 2000 with Terminal Server in Application Server mode enabled.

Figure 1   Options for Small Business Server 2000 with Terminal Server in Application Server mode enabled

Application Server mode options

Terms and Definitions

Terminal server The server running Terminal Services. This paper describes how to add a terminal server to your Windows Small Business Server network. This paper sometimes refers to a terminal server as an additional server.

License server The computer that stores and manages the Terminal Server client access licenses. In this paper the terminal server functions as the license server.

Upgrading from Small Business Server 2000 with Terminal Services Enabled

If you are currently hosting line-of-business applications by running Small Business Server 2000 with Terminal Services enabled and you are planning to upgrade to Windows Small Business Server 2003 with an additional server configured as a terminal server, perform the following steps before you continue on to the steps in the remainder of this paper.

  1. Upgrade your server to Small Business Server 2000 with Service Pack 1.
  2. Remove the Terminal Services role from the server by using the following procedure.
To remove the Terminal Services role from the server
  1. Click Start, click Settings, and then click Control Panel.

  2. Double-click Add/Remove Programs.

  3. Click Add/Remove Windows Components to open the Windows Components Wizard.

  4. Clear the Terminal Services check box, and then click Next to complete the wizard.

    noteNote
    Do not clear the Terminal Services Licensing check box.
  5. Uninstall your line-of-business applications from the server. You will reinstall them on the additional server as part of the steps in the remainder of this paper.

Overview of Planning and Deploying Terminal Services in a Windows Small Business Server Environment

To complete the steps in this paper, you need to have a server running Windows Small Business Server, with the items on the To Do list completed. You must also have an additional server that is running Windows 2000 Server, using the default setup with no additional configuration.

ImportantImportant
Because Terminal Services supports multiple users, it is strongly recommended that you use the NTFS file system on the server, rather than the FAT file system. FAT does not offer any user or directory security features, whereas NTFS does. With NTFS, you can limit subdirectories to certain users or groups of users. Without it, every user has access to every directory and file on the terminal server. For more information about file systems, see “Designing and Deploying File Servers” at the Microsoft TechNet Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=19637).
noteNote
If you are deploying Terminal Services to host a line-of-business application, make sure your application is compatible with Terminal Services. For more information about hosting line-of-business applications with Terminal Services, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “Program considerations.” In addition, see “Hosting Applications with Terminal Server” at the Microsoft TechNet Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=19636).

Use the following steps to plan and deploy Terminal Services on your additional server:

  1. Plan terminal server and network resources.
  2. Plan for Terminal Services licensing.
  3. Create a domain administrator account.
  4. Configure Terminal Services licensing.
  5. Create a server computer account and connect to the network.
  6. Install Terminal Services.
  7. Install client applications.
  8. Configure the client computers.

Figure 2 illustrates this process, organizing it by the computers on which you perform each step.

Figure 2   Planning and Deploying Terminal Services in a Windows Small Business Server Environment

Planning and deploying Terminal Services in SBS

Step 1: Plan Terminal Server and Network Resources

For optimal performance, ensure that your terminal server and network hardware are sufficiently upgraded and configured. To do this:

  • Plan the capacity of your terminal server.
  • Plan the bandwidth for your network connectivity.
  • Plan for printers.

Plan the Capacity of Your Terminal Server

The capacity of your terminal server depends on many factors, including the type of user, the configuration of the terminal server and of the network, and the requirements of the applications the terminal server is hosting. For adequate performance, a terminal server requires a minimum of 128 megabytes (MB) of RAM, plus additional RAM for each user, depending on the type of use.

You can maximize the availability of the CPU if you use more than one processor. In general, processor and memory requirements scale linearly. But by using a system that can support multiple processors, doubling the number of processors, and doubling the amount of memory, you can nearly double the number of users the system can support. For this reason, if you purchase a system that can support multiple processors, even if you initially need only one, you can easily add capacity as your requirements grow.

Use the following guidelines to determine how much capacity your server needs:

  • User demand. The amount of RAM and CPU cycles that Terminal Services users consume depends on the application features that they use, how often they use the application, and how much data they input in any unit of time.
  • Application considerations. Carefully check the system requirements for each application you plan to install on your server, and consider that RAM and CPU requirements increase according to the number of user sessions that run simultaneously. Because the terminal server shares executable resources among individual users, the memory requirements for additional users running the same program are typically less than the requirements for the first user who loads the application.
  • Data considerations. Printing, sound, drive redirection, and file transfers can require additional bandwidth, which might cause performance to drop below an acceptable level.

To be sure your server has adequate capacity, monitor the server load after deployment.

Planning the Bandwidth for Your Network Connectivity

Terminal Services works very well over connections with low bandwidth, and it uses whatever IP connection you provide. However, you can optimize both application and overall network performance by making sure that the type of connection is appropriate for the work that is done.

Planning for Printers

When the user logs on to the terminal server, the server detects the client computer’s local printer and installs the appropriate printer driver on the client computer. If multiple printers are connected to the client computer, Terminal Services defaults to routing all print jobs to the client computer’s default printer. If the driver for the printer is not included with Windows 2000 Server, you must manually install it on the terminal server.

Step 2: Plan for Terminal Services Licensing

To use Terminal Services in your organization, you must have a Windows 2000 Server license for the terminal server and you must have a client access license (CAL) for each device that accesses the terminal server. The required CAL differs depending on the operating system running on the client computer. The CAL is stored locally and presented to the terminal server each time the client computer connects to the terminal server. The server validates the license, and then it allows the client to connect.

Required Client Access Licenses

Deploying Terminal Services on your Windows Small Business Server network requires the following licenses, depending on the operating system running on the client computer.

Clients Running Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP Professional

For each client computer running Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP Professional, you need only a Windows Small Business Server CAL. This CAL serves as the Windows 2000 CAL and also provides a built-in Terminal Services CAL.

Clients Running Other Windows Operating Systems

Each client computer running Microsoft Windows CE, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Millennium Edition, or Windows XP Home Edition needs a Terminal Services CAL to access the terminal server, in addition to the Windows Small Business Server CAL. You must have a Terminal Services CAL to start a Terminal Services session and to run Windows-based applications on the terminal server.

Planning for Terminal Services Licenses

Terminal Services licenses are required for all clients that access the terminal server. You must install Terminal Services licensing on the server running Windows Small Business Server. A server running Terminal Services licensing on your network manages the Terminal Services CALs. This server stores all Terminal Services CAL tokens that have been installed for a terminal server and tracks the license tokens that have been issued to clients.

ImportantImportant
You must install Terminal Services Licensing even if your client computers are running Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP Professional and do not require a separate Terminal Services CAL.

When you install Terminal Services licensing on the server running Windows Small Business Server, you are installing the Windows Server 2003 version. This version can serve both Windows 2000 Server and Windows Server 2003 Terminal Services licenses.

For more information about Terminal Services licensing, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “Terminal Services Licensing overview.”

noteNote
Each service or application that users access from the terminal server must be licensed appropriately. Typically, each device requires application licenses and CALs associated with it, even if the application or service is accessed indirectly through the terminal server. For more information, check the product documentation, End-User License Agreement (EULA), or any other document that specifies product usage rights.

Step 3: Create a Domain Administrator Account

In order to administer the terminal server, you must log on using a domain administrator account that was created with the Add User Wizard in Windows Small Business Server. A domain administrator account that was created using any other method, including the administrator account that was created during Setup, does not work for administering an additional server on a Windows Small Business Server network. If you have already created a domain administrator account using the Add User Wizard, you can skip this step.

To create a domain administrator account for the additional server
  1. Log on to the computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003 using a domain administrator account.

  2. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

  3. In the console tree, click Users.

  4. In the details pane, click Add a User. The Add User Wizard starts.

  5. On the Template Selection page, in the Templates dialog box, click Administrator Template.

  6. On the Set Up Client Computer page, click Do not set up a computer.

  7. On the Completing the Add User Wizard page, click Finish.

Step 4: Configure Terminal Services Licensing

After you have created the domain administrator account, you need to configure Terminal Services licensing on the domain controller, which is the computer running Windows Small Business Server. There are three steps necessary for Terminal Services licensing to work:

  1. Install Terminal Services licensing on the computer running Windows Small Business Server. This computer is now a license server.
  2. Activate the license server.
  3. Install the client license key packs on the license server.

For more information about Terminal Services licensing, click Start, click Help, and then search for “licensing Terminal Services.”

Configure Terminal Services Licensing

A license server manages the Terminal Services CALs. It stores all of the Terminal Services CAL tokens that have been installed for a terminal server, and it tracks the license tokens that have been issued to client computers.

To install Terminal Services Licensing
  1. On the computer running Windows Small Business Server, click Start, click Settings, click Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.

  2. Click Add/Remove Windows Components.

  3. In the Components dialog box, click Terminal Services Licensing, and then click Next.

  4. On the first page of Terminal Services Licensing Setup, click Next to accept the defaults on that page. The wizard then installs Terminal Services Licensing.

    ImportantImportant
    You might be asked for the Windows Small Business Server product CD at this step. Files from the CD might be needed to install Terminal Services Licensing. Insert Disc 1 into the CD drive. When a Setup window appears, ignore it.
  5. Click Finish to exit the wizard.

Activate the License Server

After you have installed Terminal Services Licensing on the computer running Windows Small Business Server, that computer becomes the license server for the terminal server. After the Terminal Services license server is activated, it becomes the repository for Terminal Services client licenses. A license server can issue temporary licenses for client computers that allow the client computers to use the terminal server for up to 90 days from the date the first client computer logs on. After this evaluation period ends, a terminal server no longer allows clients to connect unless it first locates a license server to issue client licenses. Properties that you set while completing the License Server Activation Wizard, such as activation method and company information, can be changed later.

To activate the license server
  1. On the computer running Windows Small Business Server, click Start, click Administrative Tools, and then click Terminal Server Licensing.

  2. In the console tree, right-click the computer running Windows Small Business Server, which is the license server you want to activate, and then click Activate Server to start the Terminal Services License Server Activation Wizard.

  3. In Connection method, select Automatic connection (recommended), and then click Next. Follow the remaining instructions to finish the wizard.

Install Client Access Licenses on the License Server

Before users can access the terminal server, you must purchase client access licenses (CALs) for each client computer that connects to the terminal server and install them on the license server. For more information about Terminal Services licensing, on the server running Windows Small Business Server, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “licensing Terminal Services.”

To install client license key packs
  1. On the server running Windows Small Business Server, click Start, click Control Panel, click Administrative Tools, and then click Terminal Server Licensing.

  2. In the console tree, right-click the computer running Windows Small Business Server.

  3. Click Install Licenses to start the Terminal Services CAL Installation Wizard, and then click Next.

  4. In Program and Client License Information, provide the required information, and then click Next.

    The Microsoft Clearinghouse processes your request and installs the encrypted client license key pack on your license server.

  5. Click Finish. The license server can now issue licenses to clients that connect to the terminal server.

Step 5: Create a Server Computer Account and Connect to the Network

You are now ready to make your additional server a part of your network. This is accomplished by first creating the computer account for the additional server, and then logging the additional server on to the network. After you connect your additional server to the network, client computers on the network will be able to access the server.

To create a server computer account for the additional server
  1. Log on to the computer running Windows Small Business Server using the domain administrator account.

  2. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

  3. In the console tree, click Server Computers.

  4. In the details pane, click Set Up Server Computers. The Set Up Server Wizard starts.

  5. Click Next on the Welcome page.

  6. On the Server Computer Name page, enter the name of the additional server in the dialog box.

  7. Click Next on the IP Address Configuration page to accept the default setting.

  8. Click Finish on the Completing the Set Up Server Wizard page.

To connect the additional server to the network
  1. Log on to the additional server using an administrator account.

  2. In Internet Explorer, go to http://ServerName/connectcomputer, where ServerName is the name of the server running Windows Small Business Server, and click Connect to the network now.

    noteNote
    A Security Warning dialog box might appear. Click Yesto install the Small Business Server Network Configuration Wizard.
  3. Follow the instructions in the wizard to connect the additional server to the network. Use the domain administrator user name and password that you created in Step 3. The additional server will restart automatically after you have connected it to the network.

Step 6: Install Terminal Services

The next step is to install Terminal Services on the additional server. This makes it possible for the terminal server to host user desktops. For more information about Terminal Services, on the additional server, click Start, click Help, and see the Terminal Services topics under Client Services.

To install Terminal Services
  1. Log on to the additional server using an administrator account.

  2. Click Start, click Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Add/Remove Programs.

  3. Click Add/Remove Windows Components to start the Windows Components Wizard.

  4. On the Windows Components page, check the Terminal Servicescheck box.

  5. On the Terminal Services Setuppage, choose Application server mode,and then click Next.

  6. On the following Terminal Services Setuppage, choose Permissions compatible with Windows 2000 users, and then click Next.

    ImportantImportant
    The default setting (Permissions compatible with Terminal Server 4.0 users) gives users access to system components on the terminal server, such as the ability to modify the system32 directory where operating system files are stored, access to the Program Files directories, and read/write access to registry settings in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE. Use the default setting only if your applications will not run properly otherwise.
  7. Click Next on the following page to install the Terminal Services component.

    ImportantImportant
    You might be asked for the Windows 2000 Server product CD at this step. Files from the CD might be needed to install Terminal Services. Insert the product CD into the CD drive. When a Setup window appears, ignore it.
  8. Click Finish. A window appears asking whether you want to restart your computer. Click Yes.

Step 7: Install Client Applications

You can install the client applications that are available in the \\ClientApps folder of the computer running Windows Small Business Server on to the terminal server. You can install and configure:

  • Outlook
  • Internet Explorer 6.0
  • Fax Services

You can also install client applications directly on to the terminal server. To install client applications directly on to the terminal server, refer to the documentation for those applications.

For more information about installing and running applications with Terminal Server, click Start, click Help, and then search for “Terminal Services.” For more information about installing Microsoft Office 2003 in a Terminal Services environment, see “Deploying Office 2003 in a Windows Terminal Services Environment” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=24921).

Install Outlook

You can install the Microsoft Office Outlook® 2003 messaging and collaboration client on to the terminal server from the server running Windows Small Business Server. You do not need to configure Outlook for each Terminal Services user. Instead, Client Setup automatically configures Outlook when the user logs on for the first time.

noteNote
For Terminal Services users, Cached Exchange Mode is not available.
To install Outlook
  1. Before beginning this procedure, ensure that Applnch.exe is no longer running. To check its status, press CTRL+ALT+DELETE, and then click Task Manager. On the Processes tab, ensure that Applnch.exe does not appear.

  2. On the terminal server, log on using a domain administrator account.

  3. Click Start, click Settings, and then click Control Panel.

  4. Double-click Add or Remove Programs.

  5. ClickAdd New Programs.

  6. Click CD or Floppy, and then click Next. A dialog box appears asking for the location of the CD or floppy disk.

  7. In the dialog box, type \\ServerName, where ServerName is the name of the computer running Windows Small Business Server.

  8. Double-click ClientApps, and then double-click outlook2003.

  9. Double-click Setup.exe, and then follow the Setup instructions.

  10. To close Outlook Setup after installation, click Next, and then click Finish. Ensure that you close the wizard that launches with Setup.

    noteNote
    A Finish Administrative Installdialog box appears during the installation. Click Finishor Cancel in the dialog box. However, do not click Finishor Cancel before the installation is complete.

Install Internet Explorer 6.0

Windows 2000 Server includes Internet Explorer 5. But you need to install Internet Explorer 6.0 on the terminal server in order for Client Setup to configure the Favorites menu and connection settings. Some links on the Favorites menu point to items that require Microsoft ActiveX® controls or certificates.

To install Internet Explorer 6.0
  1. Before beginning this procedure, ensure that Applnch.exe is no longer running. To check its status, press CTRL+ALT+DELETE, and then click Task Manager. On the Processes tab, ensure that Applnch.exe does not appear.

  2. Log on to the terminal server using a domain administrator account.

  3. Click Start, click Settings, and then click Control Panel.

  4. Double-click Add or Remove Programs.

  5. ClickAdd New Programs.

  6. Click CD or Floppy, and then click Next. A dialog box appears asking for the location of the CD or floppy disk.

  7. In the dialog box type \\ServerName, where ServerName is the name of the computer running Windows Small Business Server.

  8. Double-click ClientApps, and then double-click ie6.

  9. Double-click Setup.exe, and then follow the Setup instructions.

  10. To close Outlook Setup after installation, click Next, and then click Finish. Ensure that you close the wizard that launches along with Setup.

    noteNote
    A Finish Administrative Installdialog box appears during the installation. Click Finishor Cancel in the dialog box. However, do not click Finishor Cancel before the installation is complete.
  11. Restart the computer.

Configure Fax Services for Terminal Services Users

You can configure the server running Windows Small Business Server 2003 as the fax server for Terminal Services users by installing Fax Services on it. For more information about hosting Fax Services on the additional server, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “Using Fax.”

To configure Fax Services for Terminal Services users, you need to configure the terminal server and each client computer that will use the service. Use the following procedure to configure the terminal server for using Fax Services. When you are configuring the client computers to use the Terminal Services, you also need to configure the client computers to use Fax Services.

To configure the terminal server for Fax Services
  1. On the terminal server, log on using a domain administrator account.

  2. Click Start, click Settings, and then click Control Panel.

  3. Double-click Add or Remove Programs.

  4. Click Add New Programs.

  5. Click CD or Floppy and then click Next. A dialog box appears asking for the location of the CD or floppy disk.

  6. In the dialog box type \\ServerName where ServerName is the name of the server running Small Business Server.

  7. Double-click ClientApps, and then double-click Shared Fax Client.

    noteNote
    You may be prompted for your Windows 2000 Server operating-system disc.
  8. Click Finish.

Step 8: Configure the Client Computers

To configure the client computers so they can access the terminal server, you must install Remote Desktop Connection on each client computer. After you have installed Remote Desktop Connection, you can also configure the client computers for Fax Services.

  • Remote Desktop Connection is installed by default when you install Windows Server 2003 or Windows XP. On earlier versions of Windows, you must install Remote Desktop manually.
To install Remote Desktop Connection on the client computers
  1. On each client computer, click Start, click Run, and then type \\ServerName\clientappswhere ServerName is the name of the server running Windows Small Business Server.

  2. Click tsclient.

  3. Double-click the Win32 folder, and then double-click Setup.exe.

  4. Complete the Remote Desktop Connection - InstallShield Wizard.

To configure client computers to use Fax Services
  1. From each client computer, click Start, click Programs, click Accessories, click Communications, click Remote Desktop Connection, and then log on to the terminal server using the Remote Desktop Connection.

  2. Click Start, click Printers and Faxes, and then double-click Add a printer. The Add Printer wizard starts.

  3. Click Next.

  4. Click A network printer, or a printer attached to another computer, and then click Next.

  5. Click Find a printer in the directory, and then click Next.

  6. In the Find Printers dialog box, click Find Now.

    In the search results list, a printer named Fax should appear. Select Fax, and then click OK.

    noteNote
    You may be prompted for your client operating-system media.
  7. Click No when asked if you want to set this printer as the default printer, and then click Finish.

    noteNote
    When a user logs on to the terminal server, the server detects the client’s local printer and installs the appropriate printer driver on the remote computer.

Redirect My Documents

It is recommended that you redirect users’ My Documents folders to the computer running Windows Small Business Server and that you apply volume quotas to the folders. By default, the My Documents folders are saved with the user profiles on the terminal server. If you use My Documents Redirection and the backup feature of Windows Small Business Server, the users’ data will be backed up with the rest of the data that is on the computer running Windows Small Business Server. For information about redirecting the My Documents folders from the terminal server to the computer running Windows Small Business Server, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “Folder redirection.”

noteNote
If you redirect My Documents, the redirection applies to all users in the domain.

Related Links

See the following resources for further information:

  • For information about Terminal Services, see “Windows Server 2003 Terminal Services” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=14341).
  • For more information about deploying Terminal Services, see “Hosting Applications with Terminal Server” at the Microsoft TechNet Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=19636).
  • For the latest information about Windows Small Business Server 2003, see the Windows Small Business Server Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=16918).
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