Export (0) Print
Expand All
3 out of 4 rated this helpful - Rate this topic

CHAPTER 2 Before You Begin

This chapter covers the main steps that you should complete to ensure that your network is configured for Microsoft® Windows® Small Business Server 2003 and to complete Setup. These steps are generic and apply to each installation type that Windows Small Business Server 2003 supports. Depending on your existing environment, there may be additional tasks necessary for your small business. For example, you may need to configure standalone computers for a network or purchase additional client access licenses (CALs). For a list of additional tasks, see Appendix A, "Additional Information."

Regardless of your installation type, it is recommended that you complete the following steps to ensure that everything is in place for a successful installation. The main steps to complete before you begin install Windows Small Business Server 2003 include: identifying your existing network topology, adding the server to the network, starting Setup, collecting required information, and then completing the configuration.

Steps to Complete Before You Begin

Step 1: Identify Your Existing Network Topology

The two most common network topologies are peer-to-peer and server-based networks. If you do not have an existing network, see the section "Network Standalone Computers" in Appendix A.

Peer-to-peer network

In a peer-to-peer network configuration, your computers are connected together to communicate and share data. The computers may connect through an Internet connection device that also provides firewall service for the local network. If you do not have a firewall device on the local network, the computers connect through a switch or hub. Additionally, they may share an Internet connection through one computer or your computers may not have an Internet connection. Figure 2.1 shows peer-to-peer network configurations with and without a firewall device.

Peer-to-peer network

Figure 2.1 Peer-to-peer network

Server-based network

In this server-based configuration, your network includes a server, such as a computer running Microsoft® Windows NT® 4.0 Server. In a server-based network, the server is the central location for storing data. Additionally, client computers connect to the Internet either through the server or an Internet connection device. To protect the local network from unauthorized Internet access, many small businesses have a firewall service running on their server or on the Internet connection device, as shown in Figure 2.2.

In a server-based network, the server is often a domain controller, file server, or print server. If the server is a domain controller, it manages access to resources on your network, such as user accounts and client computers. To access the resources, users must log on to the domain with a user name and password. With a file server or a print server, there is not a domain to manage resources for the entire network. Instead, the server is used for centrally storing data, and it is from where the network printer is shared.

Server-based network

Figure 2.2 Server-based network

Step 2: Add the Computer to Your Network.

After you have identified your existing network topology, you can then add the computer on which you will install Windows Small Business Server 2003.

Add the computer to a peer-to-peer network that has a firewall device

If your Internet connection device provides a firewall service, you will add the computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003 to the network as shown in Figure 2.3. Additionally, ensure that the power for the Internet connection device is on.

Broadband connection and one network adapater

Figure 2.3 - Broadband connection and one network adapter

In this configuration, the following applies:

  • The computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003 uses only one network adapter to connect to both the local network and the Internet.
  • The Internet connection must use a network device, such as a local router, dial-on-demand router, or ISDN router. For each of these Internet connection devices, your Internet service provider (ISP) provides an IP address for the external interface. The IP address is either dynamically assigned by the DHCP server at your ISP, or you had to manually configure a static IP address on the device.
  • The IP addresses for the local network adapter on your server and the IP address for the internal interface of your Internet connection device must be within the same range. Setup will prompt you with a suggested IP address for the local network adapter. For example, if the Internet connection device also provides IP addresses to client computers, Setup suggests an IP address within the same range as the range of IP addresses used by the internal interface of the Internet connection device. For more information about IP addressing for your Windows Small Business Server network, see Appendix A.
  • Because the Internet connection device is the default gateway to the Internet, the device must provide a firewall service or you must add a firewall device to protect your local network from unauthorized Internet access. In this topology, you cannot configure the firewall provided by Windows Small Business Server 2003 because the server is not the gateway to the Internet. If you want to use the firewall provided by Windows Small Business Server 2003, you must install a second network adapter in your server and use the topology shown in Figure 2.4. For more information, see Appendix B, "Understanding Your Network."
    You must configure the firewall on the local network with the necessary settings for your Windows Small Business Server network. If your firewall supports the UPnP framework, these settings can automatically be configured as part of Setup when you configure your Internet connection. To do so, complete the Connect to the Internet task on the To Do List. Otherwise, you must use the settings provided in Appendix C, "Network Configuration Settings," to configure the device. For more information about how to configure settings on the device if it does not support the UPnP framework, see your device manufacturer's documentation.
  • If your Internet connection requires a user name and password, also called Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE), these settings must be configured on your Internet connection device, even if the device supports the UPnP framework. For information about how to configure PPPoE on your device, see your device manufacturer's documentation.

Add the computer to a peer-to-peer network without a firewall device

The method that you use to add the server to a peer-to-peer network that does not have a firewall device on the local network depends on whether you have a broadband or dial-up connection to the Internet.

Using a broadband connection

If you have a broadband connection but you do not have a device on your local network that provides a firewall service, you must add the server that will run Windows Small Business Server 2003 as shown in Figure 2.4.

Broadband connection and two network adapters

Figure 2.4 - Broadband connection and two network adapters

In this configuration, the following applies:

  • There must be two network adapters: one network adapter connects to the local network, and one connects to the Internet using an Internet connection device.
  • The Internet connection must use a network device, such as a DSL modem or cable modem. Your ISP provides an IP address for the ISP network adapter (external adapter) on your server. The IP address is either dynamically assigned by the DHCP server at your ISP, or you can enter a static IP address when you configure your Internet connection during Setup.
  • During Setup, you are prompted to enter an IP address for your local network adapter (internal adapter). It is recommended that you accept the default values provided, as they are typical for a small business network.
  • To protect your local network from unauthorized Internet access, you must enable the firewall that Windows Small Business Server 2003 provides. When you enable the Windows Small Business Server firewall, your computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003 becomes the default gateway to the Internet.
  • If your Internet connection requires a user name and password, also called PPPoE, you must enter these settings when you configure your Internet connection during Setup.

You can configure your Internet connection settings by completing the Connect to the Internet task on the To Do List.

Using a dial-up connection

If you have a dial-up connection using either a dial-up modem or ISDN terminal adapter, you must add the server that will run Windows Small Business Server 2003 as shown in Figure 2.5.

Dial-up connection

Figure 2.5 - Dial-up connection

To protect your local network from unauthorized Internet access, you must enable the firewall provided by Windows Small Business Server 2003. When you enable the firewall, your computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003 becomes the default gateway to the Internet.

Add the computer to a server-based network

You have the following options for adding the computer that will run Windows Small Business Server 2003 to your existing server-based network:

  • If you want to replace Microsoft® Small Business Server 2000, Microsoft® Windows 2000 Server, or Windows Server™ 2003 with Windows Small Business Server 2003, on an existing computer, you must complete an upgrade. Upgrading replaces the installation while saving data and settings. In this case, your server is already configured to connect to the network.
  • If you want to replace an existing computer running Microsoft® Small Business Server 4.5, Small Business Server 2000, Windows NT 4.0 Server, or Windows 2000 Server with a new computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003, you must complete a migration. Migrating replaces the installation on a new computer while saving data and settings. Before completing a server migration, ensure that your network topology is configured as specified in the server migration documentation. For more information about obtaining this documentation, see Step 3: Start Setup.
  • If you do not have a domain controller and want to add a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003 to the existing server-based network without changing your existing server, you must complete a new installation. You can then use the existing server as a second server in the Windows Small Business Server domain. For more information, after Setup is complete, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “second server.”

Step 3: Start Setup

The method that you use to start Setup depends on whether you have an existing peer-to-peer network or a server-based network and whether you have an existing Windows Server™ operating system running on the network.

Before starting Setup, it is recommended that you read the release notes, as they contain essential information for the success of your installation. To access the release notes, insert Windows Small Business Server Disc 1 or the DVD (if available) into a computer running any version of Windows, and then from the Autorun menu, click Read Release Notes. If the Autorun menu is disabled, use Windows Explorer to browse to Sbsrelnotes.htm.

For the latest release notes, which were not available when Windows Small Business Server 2003 was released, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=17116.

ImportantImportant
Windows Server hardware detection can cause some UPS devices to switch to battery mode. This may cause Setup to fail. During Setup, unplug any UPS devices. After completing the installation of the operating system, you can plug in the UPS.

Start Setup for a peer-to-peer network

To start Setup when you are adding a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003 to the network.

For detailed instructions on completing Setup, see Chapter 3A, "New Installation."

ImportantImportant
If you are installing Windows Small Business Server 2003 on a computer with an existing operating system that does not support an upgrade, it is recommended that you back up any existing data that you want to preserve.
  1. Insert Windows Small Business Server 2003 Disc 1 or the DVD (if available) into the CD-ROM or DVD drive, and then restart the computer. When the Press any key to boot to the CD message appears, do so.
    noteNote
    If your computer does not boot from the CD or the DVD, restart the computer and ensure that the boot sequence in the BIOS Setup is set to first boot to CD-ROM. For more information, see your hardware manufacture's documentation.
  2. Setup prompts you through the following steps:
    1. Windows installation (approximately 40 minutes)
      During this part of Setup, you are prompted to select the location where the operating system will be installed and to specify the type of formatting to use.
      Specify the location where the operating system will be located - If your server has multiple hard disks, as shown in Figure 2.6, it is recommended that you separate your data from your operating system to improve system performance and to simplify data backup. If your server has one hard disk, as shown in Figure 2.6, it is recommended that you create at least two partitions to simplify data backup: one to install the operating system and one to store data. For either configuration, it is recommended that you have 6 gigabytes (GB) or more of disk space on the partition where the operating system is installed.
      Partitioning vs. separate physical disks
      ImportantImportant
      If you are installing on a computer with an existing operating system that does not support an upgrade, it is recommended that you delete the partition(s), and then create new partitions. When you delete a partition, any existing data on the partition is lost.
      Specify the type of formatting - After you specify the partition where you will install the operating system, you are prompted to format the partition. You must select the NTFS file system. It is recommended that you use NTFS for all partitions. NTFS provides security features such as file encryption, file permissions, and disk quotas.
      For more information about partitioning, see Appendix A, "Additional Information."
    2. Windows configuration (approximately 30 minutes)
      During this part of Setup, you are prompted to provide information that is used to create your Windows Small Business Server domain. A domain is a way to manage access to resources on your network (for example, user accounts, client computers, shared folders, or printers). As a best practice, Setup provides default settings for your internal domain that are designed to separate your local (or internal) network from the Internet (or external network). It is recommended that you use these values.
      Additionally, you are prompted to enter the IP address to use for the local network adapter. As a best practice, unless the network adapter was previously configured with a static IP address, or unless you have a device on the local network providing DHCP service, Setup provides a default setting for a private IP address. Using a private IP address helps to secure your local network.
      For more information about the internal domain and IP addressing, see Appendix B, "Understanding Your Network."
    3. Server applications installation (approximately 90 minutes)

Start Setup for an existing server-based network

You have the following options for installing Windows Small Business Server 2003 on your existing server-based network:

  • If you are upgrading Small Business Server 2000, Windows 2000 Server, or Windows Server 2003, do the following:
    1. Log on to the computer, using the built-in Administrator account.
    2. Insert Windows Small Business Server 2003 Disc 1 or the DVD (if available) into the CD-ROM or DVD drive. When the Autorun page appears, click Set Up Windows Small Business Server.
    3. Setup will prompt you through Windows installation (approximately 40 minutes), Windows configuration (approximately 30 minutes), and server applications installation (approximately 90 minutes).
      noteNote
      For detailed instructions on upgrading, see Chapter 3B, "Upgrade Windows 2000 Server or Windows Server 2003" and Chapter 3C, "Upgrade Small Business Server 2000."
  • If you are migrating from Small Business Server 4.5, Small Business Server 2000, or Windows NT 4.0 Server, see the following step-by-step instructions.
  • If you are adding a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003 to an existing server-based network without changing your existing server, follow the instructions in the "Start Setup for a peer-to-peer network" section, earlier in this chapter, to complete a new installation. You can then use the original server as a second server in the Windows Small Business Server domain. For more information, after Setup is complete, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “second server.”

Step 4: Collect Required Information

While Setup is running, it is recommended that you collect the information that is necessary to successfully complete it. To do so, complete the section "Required Information for Completing Setup" in Appendix A.

The section includes the following:

  • Information for Configuring Server Applications. Provides a place to collect the company information that is requested as part of Setup.
  • Required Information for Connecting to the Internet. Provides a place to collect the information that is necessary to complete the Setup task of connecting to the Internet.
  • Information for Adding Users and Computers. Provides a place to collect the information that is necessary for the Setup task of creating user accounts and client computer accounts associated to each user account.

Step 5: Complete the Configuration

After you install Windows Small Business Server 2003, your computer restarts, and the To Do List appears. The tasks on the To Do List are required to complete the configuration of server tools and applications. It is recommended that you complete these tasks in the order presented.

ImportantImportant
Information about backing up or restoring your server running Windows Small Business Server is not included in this guide. When you complete the To Do List, it is recommended that you download and then print a copy of “Backing Up and Restoring Windows Small Business Server 2003,” which is available at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=39741). Alternatively, information about restoring your server is available in the “Restoring Your Server” section of Restrdoc.htm, which is in the \Docs folder on Windows Small Business Server 2003 Disc 1.

After you complete the To Do List, you are ready to begin using Windows Small Business Server 2003. For ongoing management of your server, use Server Management. To open Server Management, click Open the Server Management console on the To Do List. Or, click Start, and then click Server Management. To learn more about managing your server, see Chapter 4, "Administering and Monitoring Your Server."

Did you find this helpful?
(1500 characters remaining)
Thank you for your feedback

Community Additions

ADD
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft. All rights reserved.