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Connecting Computers to a Domain

Archived content. No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

Archived content - No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

from Chapter 12, Windows NT Administrator's Pocket Consultant by William R. Stanek.

Before users can log on to a Windows NT domain from a new computer, the computer must be added to the domain. Computers can be added to a domain during installation of Windows NT. They can also be added to or removed from the domain after installation.

Adding a Computer to a Domain

After you install network adapters and configure TCP/IP, you can add the computer to the domain. You can do this using the Server Manager utility or you can do it from the new computer.

To add a computer to the domain using the Server Manager utility, follow these steps:

  1. Start the Server Manager, then select Add To Domain from the Computer menu. This opens the dialog box shown in Figure 12-11, on the following page.

    Cc722519.12wnta11(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Figure 12-11: Add computers to a domain using the Add Computer To Domain dialog box.
  2. Specify the computer type. Only servers that are installed as domain controllers can become backup domain controllers.

  3. Enter the computer name in the Computer Name field.

  4. Click on the Add button.

You've now created an account for the computer on the domain controller. The next step is to have the computer join the domain. You can do this in one of two ways:

  • From the computer's logon prompt Have users select the domain from the Domain drop-down list before logging on to the computer.

  • Using the Identification tab of the Network Control Panel utility With this tab open, click on the Change button. Enter the domain name, then click OK.

Another way to add a computer to a domain is to do so directly from the computer you're configuring. Do this by completing the following steps:

  1. Access the Identification tab of the Network Control Panel utility, then click on the Change button.

  2. In the Member Of area, select the Domain radio button, then enter the domain name in the field provided.

  3. Select Create A Computer Account in the Domain.

  4. Enter the user name and password for an account with domain administration privileges.

  5. Click OK.

Removing a Computer from a Domain

Before you move a computer to a different domain or workgroup, you should remove the computer from the domain it's attached to. You do this by completing the following steps:

  1. Access the Identification tab of the Network Control Panel utility, then click on the Change button. Remove the computer from the domain by making a new selection in the Member Of area. To add the computer to a workgroup, select the Workgroup radio button and then enter the name of the workgroup. To add the computer to a different domain, select the Domain radio button and then enter the new domain name.

  2. Remove the computer account from the old domain by using Server Manager. Be sure to select the old domain in Server Manager before you proceed. To remove the computer account, select the computer name and then select Remove From Domain on the Computer menu.

Configuring Additional TCP/IP Services

Windows NT systems can be configured for additional TCP/IP services, such as RIP, DNS, or DHCP. When you add these services, Windows NT installs the service and binds the service to the currently installed protocols and adapters as necessary. Windows NT also installs any utilities that the service needs in order to operate. These utilities are installed in the Administrative Tools (Common) folder. For example, if you install DNS, the DNS Manager utility is added to this folder.

Table 12-1 provides a brief overview of the various network services you can install. The management of key network services, such as DNS and DHCP, is covered in later chapters.

Table 12-1 Network Services Available on Windows NT

Service Name

Description

BOOTP Relay Agent

Allows the computer to forward BOOTP messages across network segments. BOOTP is used to support the remote booting of diskless workstations.

Computer Browser

Allows browsing of network computers, such as through Network Neighborhood.

DHCP Relay Agent

Allows the computer to forward DHCP messages to DHCP servers in a different network segment.

Gateway (and Client) Services for NetWare

Allows the computer to access NetWare networks.

Microsoft DHCP Server

Allows the computer to be configuredas a DHCP server.

Microsoft DNS Server

Allows the computer to be configured as a DNS server.

Microsoft Internet Information Server

Allows the computer to be configured as a Web/FTP server.

Microsoft TCP/IP Printing

Allows the computer to print over TCP/IP using the LPD facility.

NetBIOS Interface

Provides the basic functions needed for NetBIOS and services that use NetBIOS, such as WINS.

Network Monitor Agent

Allows the computer to collect network performance information for the computer.

Network Monitor Tools and Agent

Allows the computer to collect network performance information for the computer. Includes the utilities necessary for performance monitoring.

Remote Access Service

Allows the computer to use dial-up networking.

Remoteboot Service

Installs services needed to remotely boot diskless workstations.

RIP for Internet Protocol

Installs services needed for dynamic routing between subnets.

RIP for NWLink IPX/SPC Compatible Transport

Installs services needed for dynamic routing to NetWare networks.

RPC Configuration

Installs the remote procedure call facilities.

RPC Support for Banyan

Allows for remote procedure calls to computers on Banyan Vines networks.

SAP Agent

Allows the computer to support the NetWare Service Advertising Protocol.

Server

Provides the services needed for the computer to act as a Windows NT server.

Services for Macintosh

Allows the computer to communicate with Macintosh clients.

Simple TCP/IP Services

Adds basic services and command-line tools for TCP/IP. Includes chargen, daytime, discard, echo, and quote.

SNMP Service

Installs the Simple Network Management Protocol used by most network management utilities.

Windows Internet Name Service

Allows the computer to be configured as a WINS server.

Workstation

Provides the services needed for the computer to act as a Windows NT workstation.

Using the Services Tab

The Services tab of the Network Control Panel utility allows you to configure TCP/IP services (see Figure 12-12). The Network Services list box shows the services that are currently installed on the computer. The buttons on the Services tab are used as follows:

  • Add Used to add additional services. To add a service, click Add, select the service you want to add from the Select Network Service dialog box, and then click OK.

    Cc722519.12wnta12(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Figure 12-12: Use the Services tab to view, add, and remove network services.
  • Remove Used to remove the currently selected service. To remove a service, click Remove and then confirm the action by selecting Yes when prompted.

  • Properties Used to configure properties of the currently selected service. If this button is shaded, the service is not configurable through this dialog box.

  • Update Used to update a service. If this button is shaded, the service can't be updated in this manner.

Testing the TCP/IP Configuration

Whenever you install a new computer or make configuration changes to the computer's network settings, you should test the configuration. The most basic TCP/IP test is to use the ping command to test the computer's connection to the network. Ping is a command-line utility and is used as follows:

ping host

where host is the host computer you're trying to reach.

On Windows NT, there are several ways to test the configuration using ping:

  • Try to ping IP addresses. If the computer is configured correctly and the host you're trying to reach is accessible to the network, ping should receive a reply. If ping can't reach the host, ping will time out.

  • On domains that use WINS, try to ping NetBIOS computer names. If NetBIOS computer names are resolved correctly, the NetBIOS facilities, such as WINS, are correctly configured for the computer.

  • On domains that use DNS, try to ping DNS host names. If fully qualified DNS host names are resolved correctly, DNS name resolution is configured properly.

You may also want to test network browsing for the computer. If the computer is a member of a Windows NT domain and computer browsing is enabled throughout the domain, log on to the computer and then use the Windows NT Explorer or Network Neighborhood to browse other computers in the domain. Afterward, log on to a different computer in the domain and try to browse the computer you just configured. These tests tell you if the NetBIOS facilities, such as the Computer Browser service, are configured correctly. If you can't browse, check the configuration of the related services and protocols.

from Windows NT Administrator's Pocket Consultant by William R. Stanek. Copyright © 1999 Microsoft Corporation.

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