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Monitoring Connections, Services, Servers, and Resource Usage

Archived content. No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.
Updated : September 4, 2001

from Chapter 15, Microsoft Exchange 2000 Administrator's Pocket Consultant by William R. Stanek.

As an Exchange administrator, you should routinely monitor connections, services, servers, and resource usage. These elements are the key to ensuring that the Exchange organization is running smoothly. Because you can't be on-site 24 hours a day, you can set alerts to notify you when problems occur.

On This Page

Checking Server and Connector Status
Working with Queues
Managing Queues

Checking Server and Connector Status

The Tools node in System Manager has a special area that you can use to track the status of Exchange servers and connectors. To access this area, follow these steps:

  1. Start System Manager.

  2. Expand Tools, and then expand Monitoring And Status.

  3. Select Status in the console tree.

In the right pane, you should now see the status of each Exchange server and connector configured for use in the organization. The status is listed as either

  • Available The server or connector is available for use.

  • Unreachable The server or connector isn't available and a problem may exist.

In the Name column you may also see icons that give further indication of the status of a given server or connector:

  • A red circle with an X indicates that a critical monitor has exceeded its threshold value or the connector/server is unreachable.

  • A yellow triangle with an exclamation point indicates that a warning monitor you've set for a server has exceeded its threshold value.

    Tip To get the latest status on servers and connectors, right-click the Status node in the console tree, and then select Refresh. This refreshes the view, ensuring that you have the latest information.

You'll learn more about configuring server monitors in the following section, "Monitoring Server Performance and Services."

Monitoring Server Performance and Services

Exchange 2000 monitors provide a fully automated method for monitoring server performance and tracking the status of key services. You can use Exchange 2000 monitors to track

  • Virtual memory usage

  • CPU utilization

  • Free disk space

  • SMTP and X.400 queues

  • Windows 2000 service status

Using notifications, you can then provide automatic notification when a server exceeds a threshold value or when a key service stops.

Note: Windows 2000 Performance Monitors are an alternative to Exchange 2000 monitors. You use these monitors in the Windows 2000 Performance Monitor utility as discussed in Chapter 3 of Microsoft Windows 2000 Administrator's Pocket Consultant (Microsoft Press, 2000).

Setting Virtual Memory Usage Monitors

Virtual memory is critically important to normal system operation. When a server runs low on virtual memory, system performance can suffer and message processing can grind to a halt. To counter this problem, you should set monitors to watch virtual memory usage, Then you can increase the amount of virtual memory available on the server or add additional RAM as needed.

You configure a virtual memory monitor by completing the following steps:

  1. Start System Manager. If administrative groups are enabled, expand the administrative group in which the server you want to use is located.

  2. Expand Servers. Right-click the server you want to work with, and then select Properties.

  3. In the Monitoring tab, click Add. In the Add Resource dialog box, select Available Virtual Memory, and then click OK. As shown in Figure 15-7, you'll see the Virtual Memory Thresholds dialog box.

    Cc722539.exch1507(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Figure 15-7: . Use the Virtual Memory Thresholds dialog box to set warning thresholds for virtual memory usage.
  4. In the Duration (Minutes) field, type the number of minutes that the available virtual memory must be below a threshold to change the state. Normally, you'll want to set a value of 5 to 10 minutes.

  5. To set a warning state threshold, select Warning State (Percent), and then select the smallest percentage of virtual memory your server can operate on before issuing a warning state alert. In most cases you'll want to issue warnings when less than 10 percent of virtual memory is available for an extended period of time.

  6. To set a critical state threshold, select Critical State (Percent), and then select the smallest percentage of virtual memory your server can operate on before issuing a critical state alert. In most cases you'll want to issue critical alerts when less than 5 percent of virtual memory is available for an extended period of time.

    Note: If you also set a warning state threshold, this value must be larger.

  7. Click OK. For automated notification, you must configure administrator

    notification.

Setting CPU Utilization Monitors

You can use a CPU utilization monitor to track the usage of a server's CPUs. When CPU utilization is too high, Exchange Server can't effectively process messages or manage other critical functions. As a result, performance can suffer greatly. CPU utilization at 100 percent for an extended period of time can be an indicator of serious problems on a server. Typically, you'll need to reboot a server when the CPU utilization is stuck at maximum utilization (100 percent).

You configure a CPU monitor by completing the following steps:

  1. Start System Manager. If administrative groups are enabled, expand the administrative group in which the server you want to use is located.

  2. Expand Servers. Right-click the server you want to work with, and then select Properties.

  3. In the Monitoring tab, click Add. In the Add Resource dialog box, select CPU Utilization, and then click OK. As shown in Figure 15-8, you'll see the CPU Utilization Thresholds dialog box.

    Cc722539.exch1508(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Figure 15-8: . Use the CPU Utilization Thresholds dialog box to set warning thresholds for CPU usage.
  4. In Duration (Minutes), type the number of minutes that the CPU usage must exceed to change the state. Normally, you'll want to set a value of 5 to 10 minutes.

  5. To set a warning state threshold, select Warning State (Percent), and then select the maximum allowable CPU before issuing a warning state alert. In most cases you'll want to issue warnings when CPU usage is 95 percent or greater for an extended period.

  6. To set a critical state threshold, select Critical State (Percent), and then select the maximum allowable CPU before issuing a critical state alert. In most cases you'll want to issue warnings when CPU usage is at 100 percent for an extended period.

    Note: If you also set a warning state threshold, this value must be larger.

  7. Click OK. For automated notification, you must configure administrator notification.

Setting Free Disk Space Monitors

Exchange Server uses disk space for data storage, logging, tracking, and virtual memory. When hard disks run out of space, the Exchange server malfunctions and data gets lost. To prevent serious problems, you should monitor free disk space closely on all drives used by Exchange Server.

You configure a disk monitor by completing the following steps:

  1. Start System Manager. If administrative groups are enabled, expand the administrative group in which the server you want to use is located.

  2. Expand Servers. Right-click the server you want to work with, and then select Properties.

  3. In the Monitoring tab, click Add. In the Add Resource dialog box, select Free Disk Space, and then click OK. As shown in Figure 15-9, you'll see the Disk Space Thresholds dialog box.

    Cc722539.exch1509(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Figure 15-9: . Use the Disk Space Thresholds dialog box to set the thresholds that monitor the available disk space on key drives.
  4. Use the Drive To Be Monitored selection list to choose a drive you want to monitor, such as C:.

  5. To set a warning state threshold, select Warning State (MB), and then select the smallest disk space (in MB) the server can operate on before issuing a warning state alert. Typically, you want Exchange Server to issue a warning when a drive has less than 100 MB of disk space.

  6. To set a critical state threshold, select Critical State (MB), and then select the smallest disk space (in MB) your server can operate on before issuing a critical state alert. Typically, you'll want Exchange Server to issue a critical alert when a drive has less than 25 MB of disk space.

    Note: If you also set a warning state threshold, this value must be smaller.

  7. Click OK. Repeat this procedure for all the drives that Exchange Server uses except M:. For automated notification, you must configure administrator notification.

Setting SMTP and X.400 Queue Monitors

If a messaging queue grows continuously, it means that messages aren't leaving the queue and aren't being delivered as fast as new messages arrive. This can be an indicator of network or system problems that may need your attention.

You configure a queue monitor by completing the following steps:

  1. Start System Manager. If administrative groups are enabled, expand the administrative group in which the server you want to use is located.

  2. Expand Servers. Right-click the server you want to work with, and then select Properties.

  3. In the Monitoring tab, click Add. To set an SMTP queue monitor, select SMTP Queue Growth, and then click OK. To set an X.400 queue monitor, select X.400 Queue Growth, and then click OK.

  4. To set a warning state threshold, select Warning State, and then type the number of minutes that the queue can grow continuously before issuing a warning state alert. A queue that's growing continuously for more than 10 minutes is usually a good indicator of a potential problem.

  5. To set a critical state threshold, select Critical State, and then type the number of minutes that the queue can grow continuously before issuing a critical state alert. In most cases a queue that's growing continuously for more than 30 minutes indicates a serious problem with the network or the server.

    Note: If you also set a warning state threshold, this value must be longer.

  6. Click OK. For automated notification, you must configure administrator notification.

Setting Windows 2000 Service Monitors

Exchange 2000 monitors can track the status of Windows 2000 Services as well. Then if a service you've configured for monitoring is stopped, Exchange Server generates a warning or critical alert.

When you install an Exchange server, certain critical services are configured for monitoring automatically. These services are displayed in the Monitoring tab under the heading Default Microsoft Exchange Services, and they're generally the following services:

  • Microsoft Exchange Information Store

  • Microsoft Exchange MTA Stacks

  • Microsoft Exchange Routing Engine

  • Microsoft Exchange System Attendant

  • Simple Mail Transport Protocol (SMTP)

  • World Wide Web Publishing Service

When you configure service monitors, you can add them to the Default Microsoft Exchange Services heading. Or you can create your own heading for additional services. The key reason for grouping services under a common heading is to ease the administrative burden. Instead of having to configure separate entries for each service, you create a single entry, add services to it, and then set the alert type for all the services in the group.

You configure service monitors by completing the following steps:

  1. Start System Manager. If administrative groups are enabled, expand the administrative group in which the server you want to use is located.

  2. Expand Servers. Right-click the server you want to work with, and then select Properties.

  3. In the Monitoring tab, click Add. In the Add Resource dialog box, select Windows 2000 Service, and then click OK. As shown in Figure 15-10, you'll see the Services dialog box.

  4. Type a name for the group of services for which you're configuring the monitor.

  5. Click Add. Select a service to add to the monitor, and then click OK. Repeat as necessary.

  6. When any of the selected services stops running, an alert is issued. This can be either a Warning alert or a Critical alert, depending on the value you select in the When Service Is Not Running Change State To field.

  7. Click OK. For automated notification, you must configure administrator notification as described in the section of this chapter entitled "Configuring Notifications."

    Cc722539.exch1510(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Figure 15-10: . In the Services dialog box, type a name for the group of services you want to monitor. Then after adding the services, set the type of alert as either Warning or Critical.

Removing Monitors

If you don't want to use a particular monitor anymore, you can remove it by completing the following steps:

  1. Start System Manager. If administrative groups are enabled, expand the administrative group in which the server you want to use is located.

  2. Expand Servers. Right-click the server you want to work with, and then select Properties.

  3. Click the Monitoring tab. You should now see a list of all monitors configured on the server.

  4. Select the monitor you want to delete, and then click Remove.

  5. Click OK.

Disabling Monitoring

When you're troubleshooting Exchange problems or performing maintenance, you may want to temporarily disable monitoring and in this way stop Exchange Server from generating alerts. To disable monitoring, complete the following steps:

  1. Start System Manager. If administrative groups are enabled, expand the administrative group in which the server you want to use is located.

  2. Expand Servers. Right-click the server you want to work with, and then select Properties.

  3. Click the Monitoring tab. You should now see a list of all monitors configured on the server.

  4. Select Disable All Monitoring Of This Server, and then click OK.

    Caution: When you're finished testing or troubleshooting, you should repeat this procedure and clear the Disable All Monitoring On This Server check box. If you forget to do this, administrators won't be notified when problems occur.

Configuring Notifications

One of the key reasons to configure monitoring is to notify administrators when problems occur. You can configure two types of notification:

  • E-Mail Used to send e-mail to administrators when a server or connector enters a warning or critical state

  • Script Used to have Exchange Server execute a script when a server or connector enters a warning or critical state

The sections that follow explain how you can create and manage notifications.

Note: Useful resources for creating scripts are Windows NT Scripting Administrator's Guide, and Windows 2000 Scripting Bible (IDG Books Worldwide, 2000).

Notifying by E-Mail

You use e-mail notification to send e-mail to administrators when a server or connector enters a warning or critical state. You can select multiple recipients to be notified and you can select a specific server to use in generating the e-mail.

To configure e-mail notification, follow these steps:

  1. Start System Manager.

  2. Expand Tools, and then expand Monitoring And Status.

  3. Right-click the Notification folder, point to New, and then click E-Mail Notification. This displays the Properties dialog box shown in Figure 15-11.

  4. To specify the server that will monitor and notify users by e-mail, click Select, and then choose a server.

    Cc722539.exch1511(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Figure 15-11: . Use the Properties dialog box to configure e-mail notification.
  5. Use the Servers And Connectors To Monitor list box to choose the servers or connectors you want administrators to be notified about. The available options are

    • This Server

    • All Servers

    • Any Server In The Routing Group

    • All Connectors

    • Any Connector In The Routing Group

    • Custom List Of Servers

    • Custom List Of Connectors

    Note: To create a custom list of servers or connectors, select Custom List Of Servers or Custom List Of Connectors, and then click Customize. Afterward, in the Custom List windows, click Add, and then choose a server or connector to add to the custom list.

  6. You can configure notification for either Warning alerts or Critical state alerts. Use Notify When Monitored Items Are In to choose the state that triggers notification.

  7. Click To, and then select a recipient to notify. You can notify multiple users by selecting an appropriate mail-enabled group.

  8. Click Cc, and then select additional recipients to notify. Again, you can notify multiple users by selecting an appropriate mail-enabled group.

  9. Click E-Mail Server, and then choose the e-mail server that should generate the e-mail message.

  10. Use the Subject field to set a subject for the notification message. The default subject line specifies the type of alert that occurred and the item on which the alert occurred. These values are represented by the subject line %TargetInstance.ServerStateString% on %TargetInstance.Name%.

  11. The message box at the bottom of the window sets the body of the message. In most cases you'll want to edit the default message body. The default text tells administrators the following information:

    • %TargetInstance.Name% is the name of the server or connector that triggered the notification

    • %TargetInstance.ServerStateString% is the type of alert

    • %TargetInstance.QueuesStateString% is the reported status of queues

    • %TargetInstance.DisksStateString% is the reported status of drives

    • %TargetInstance.ServicesStateString% is the reported status of services

    • %TargetInstance.MemoryStateString% is the reported status of virtual memory

    • %TargetInstance.CPUStateString% is the reported status of CPUs

  12. Click OK. Repeat this procedure to configure notification for other servers and connectors.

Using Script Notification

You use script notification to have Exchange Server execute a script when a server or connector enters a warning or critical state. The script can execute commands that restart processes, clear up disk space, or perform other actions needed to resolve a problem on the Exchange server. The script could also generate an e-mail through an alternate gateway, which is useful if the Exchange server is unable to deliver e-mail.

To configure script notification, follow these steps:

  1. Start System Manager.

  2. Expand Tools, and then expand Monitoring And Status.

  3. Right-click the Notification folder, point to New, and then click Script Notification. This displays the Properties dialog box shown in Figure 15-12.

  4. To specify the server that will monitor and notify users by e-mail, click Select, and then choose a server.

    Cc722539.exch1512(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Figure 15-12: . Use the Properties dialog box to configure script notification.
  5. Use the Servers And Connectors To Monitor list box to choose the servers or connectors you want administrators to be notified about. The available options are

    • This Server

    • All Servers

    • Any Server In The Routing Group

    • All Connectors

    • Any Connector In The Routing Group

    • Custom List Of Servers

    • Custom List Of Connectors

    Note: To create a custom list of servers or connectors, select Custom List Of Servers or Custom List Of Connectors, and then click Customize. Afterward, in the Custom List windows, click Add, and then choose a server or connector to add to the custom list.

  6. You can configure notification for either Warning alerts or Critical state alerts. Use Notify When Monitored Items Are In to choose the state that triggers notification.

  7. In Path To Executable, type the complete file path to the script you want to execute, such as C:\scripts\mynotificationscript.vbs. You can run any type of executable file, including batch scripts with the .bat or .cmd extension and Windows scripts with the .vb, .js, .pl, or .wsc extension.

    Note: The Exchange System Attendant must have permission to execute this script, so be sure to grant access to the local system account or any other account that you've configured to run this service.

  8. To pass arguments to a script or application, type the options in the Command Line Options field.

  9. Click OK.

Viewing and Editing Current Notifications

You can view all notifications configured in the organization with the Notification entry in System Manager. Start System Manager, expand Tools, expand Monitoring And Status, and then select Notifications.

Each notification is displayed with summary information depicting the following:

  • Name of the monitoring server

  • Items monitored

  • Action performed

  • State that triggers notification

To edit a notification, double-click it, and then modify the settings as necessary. When you're finished, click OK.

To delete a notification, right-click it, and then select Delete. When prompted to confirm the action, click Yes.

Working with Queues

As an Exchange administrator, it's your responsibility to monitor Exchange queues regularly. Exchange Server uses queues to hold messages while they're being processed for routing and delivery. If messages remain in a queue for an extended period, there may be a problem. For example, if an Exchange server is unable to connect to the network, you'll find that messages aren't being cleared out of queues.

Exchange Server supports two types of queues:

  • System queues The default queues in the organization. There are three providers for system queues: SMTP, Microsoft MTA (X.400), and MAPI (Messaging Application Programming Interface).

  • Link queues Created by Exchange Server when there are multiple messages bound for the same destination. These queues are accessible only when they have messages waiting to be routed.

Using SMTP Queues

Each SMTP virtual server has several system queues associated with it. These queues are

  • Local Delivery Contains messages that are queued for local delivery—that is, messages that the Exchange server is waiting to deliver to a local Exchange mailbox.

  • Messages Awaiting Directory Lookup Contains messages to recipients who have not yet been resolved in Active Directory.

  • Messages Waiting To Be Routed Contains messages waiting to be routed to a destination server. Messages move from here to a link queue.

  • Final Destination Currently Unreachable Contains messages that can't be routed because the destination server is unreachable.

  • Pre-Submission Contains messages that have been acknowledged and accepted by the SMTP service but haven't been processed yet.

As you can see, SMTP queues are used to hold messages in various stages of routing. You access these queues through the SMTP virtual server node by completing the following steps:

  1. Start System Manager. If administrative groups are enabled, expand the administrative group in which the server you want to use is located.

  2. Navigate to the Protocols container in the console tree. Expand Servers, expand the server you want to work with, and then expand Protocols.

  3. Navigate to a virtual server's Queues node. Expand SMTP, expand the virtual server you want to work with, and then expand Queues.

  4. Select the queue you want to work with.

Using Microsoft MTA (X.400) Queues

The Microsoft Message Transfer Agent (MTA) provides addressing and routing information for sending messages from one server to another. The MTA relies on X.400 transfer stacks to provide additional details for message transfer, and these stacks are similar in purpose to the Exchange virtual servers used with SMTP.

The key queue used with the Microsoft MTA is the PendingRerouteQ. This queue contains messages that are waiting to be rerouted after a temporary link outage. To access the PendingRerouteQ, follow these steps:

  1. Start System Manager. If administrative groups are enabled, expand the administrative group in which the server you want to use is located.

  2. Navigate to the Protocols container in the console tree. Expand Servers, expand the server you want to work with, and then expand Protocols.

  3. Expand X.400, and then expand Queues. Finally, select PendingRerouteQ.

Using MAPI Queues

Novell GroupWise, Lotus Notes, and Lotus cc:Mail connectors all use MAPI queues. MAPI queues are used to route and deliver messages over the related connector. The queues you may see are

  • MTS-In Contains messages that have come to the Exchange organization over the connector. The message contents and addresses haven't been converted to Exchange format.

  • Ready-In Contains messages that have been converted to Exchange format and are ready to be delivered. Recipient addresses still need to be resolved.

  • Ready-Out Contains messages that have been prepared for delivery to a foreign system. The message addresses have been resolved, but the message contents haven't been converted.

  • Badmail Contains all messages that caused errors when the connector tried to process them. No further delivery attempts are made on these messages and they are stored in this queue until you delete them manually.

To access a MAPI queue, follow these steps:

  1. Start System Manager. If administrative groups are enabled, expand the administrative group you want to work with.

  2. If available, expand Routing Groups , and then expand the routing group that contains the connector you want to work with.

  3. Navigate to the connector's Queues node. Expand Connectors, expand the connector, and then expand Queues.

  4. Select the queue you want to work with.

Managing Queues

You usually won't see messages in queues because they're processed and routed quickly. Messages come into a queue, Exchange Server performs a lookup or establishes a connection, and then Exchange Server either moves the message to a new queue or delivers it to its destination.

Messages remain in a queue when there's a problem. To check for problem messages, you must enumerate messages in the queue. Messages aren't enumerated by default—you must do this manually.

Enumerating Messages in Queues

In order to manage queues, you must enumerate messages. This process allows you to examine queue contents and perform management tasks on messages within a particular queue.

The easiest way to enumerate messages is to do so in sets of 100. To display the first 100 messages in a queue, follow these steps:

  1. Start System Manager, and then navigate to the queue you want to work with.

  2. Right-click the queue, and then select Enumerate 100 Messages.

Repeat this process if you want to access the next 100 messages. Or to refresh the current list of messages, right-click the queue, and then select Re-enumerate.

Note: You can only re-enumerate a queue that you've managed previously. If you haven't enumerated a queue previously, the Details pane will display the following message: Enumerate messages from the queue node. Additionally, if there are no messages in the queue, the Details pane will display the following message: There are no matching messages queued.

You can also use a custom filter to enumerate messages. To create a custom filter and then set the filter as the default, follow these steps:

  1. Start System Manager, and then navigate to the queue you want to work with.

  2. Right-click the queue, and then select Custom Filter.

  3. From the Action selection list, select Enumerate.

  4. To select a specific number of messages, choose Select Only The, and then specify the Number Of Messages to enumerate.

  5. To select messages by other criteria, choose Select Messages That Are, and then set the enumeration criteria.

  6. To select all available messages, choose Select All Messages.

  7. Optionally, you can save your changes as the default filter by selecting Set As Default Filter.

  8. When you click OK, the custom filter is automatically executed.

Understanding Queue Summaries and Queue States

Whenever you click a Queues node in System Manager, you get a summary of the currently available queues for the selected node. These queues can include both system and link queues, depending on the state of the Exchange server.

Although queue summaries provide important details for troubleshooting message flow problems, you do have to know what to look for. The connection state is the key information to look at first. This value tells you the state of the queue. States you'll see include

  • Active An active queue is needed to allow messages to be transported out of a link queue.

  • Ready A ready queue is needed to allow messages to be transported out of a system queue. When link queues are ready, they can have a connection allocated to them.

  • Retry A connection attempt has failed and the server is waiting to retry.

  • Scheduled The server is waiting for a scheduled connection time.

  • Remote The server is waiting for a remote dequeue command (TURN/ETRN).

  • Frozen The queue is frozen, and none of its messages can be processed for routing. Messages can enter the queue, however, as long as the Exchange routing categorizer is running. You must unfreeze the queue to resume normal queue operations.

Administrators can choose to enable or disable connections to queues. If connections are disabled, the queue is unable to route and deliver messages.

You can change the queue state to Active by using the FORCE CONNECTION command. When you do this, Exchange Server should immediately enable a connection for the queue, which will allow messages to be routed and delivered from it. You can force a connection to change the Retry or Scheduled state as well.

Other summary information that you may find useful in troubleshooting includes:

  • Time Of Submission Of Oldest Msg Tells you when the oldest message was sent by a client. Any time the oldest message has been in the queue for several days, you have a problem with message delivery. Either Exchange Server is having a problem routing that specific message, or a deeper routing problem may be affecting the organization.

  • Total # Of Msgs Tells you the total number of messages waiting in the queue. If you see a large number of messages waiting in the queue, you may have a connectivity or routing problem.

  • Total Msg Size (KB) Tells you the total size of all messages in the queue. Large messages can take a long time to deliver, and, as a result, they may slow down message delivery.

  • Time Of Next Connection Retry When the connection state is Retry, this column tells you when another connection attempt will be made. You can use Force Connection to attempt a connection immediately.

Viewing Message Details

Anytime a message is displayed in a queue, you can double-click it to view message details. The details provide additional information that identifies the message, including a message ID that you can use with message tracking.

Enabling and Disabling Connections to Queues

The only way to enable and disable connections to queues is on a global basis, which means that you enable or disable all queues for a given SMTP virtual server, MTA object, or connector. Enabling queues makes the queues available for routing and delivery. Disabling queues makes the queues unavailable for routing and delivery.

To enable or disable connections to queues, follow these steps:

  1. Start System Manager.

  2. Navigate to the Queues node for the SMTP virtual server, MTA object, or connector you want to manage.

  3. To enable connections to all queues, right-click the Queues node, and then select Enable All Connections.

  4. To disable connections to all queues, right-click the Queues node, and then select Disable All Connections.

Forcing Connections to Queues

In most cases you can change the queue state to Active by forcing a connection. Simply right-click the queue, and then select Force Connection. When you do this, Exchange Server should immediately enable connections to the queue, and this should allow messages to be routed and delivered from it.

Freezing and Unfreezing Queues

When you freeze a queue, all message transfer out of that queue stops. This means that messages can continue to enter the queue but no messages will leave it. To restore normal operations, you must unfreeze the queue.

You freeze and then unfreeze a queue by completing the following steps:

  1. Start System Manager, and then navigate to the queue you want to work with.

  2. Enumerate the queue so that you can see the messages it contains.

  3. Right-click the queue, and then select Freeze All Messages.

  4. When you're done troubleshooting, right-click the queue, and then select Unfreeze All Messages.

Another way to freeze messages in a queue is to do so selectively. In this way, you can control the transport of a single message or several messages that may be causing problems on the server. For example, if a large message is delaying the delivery of other messages, you can freeze the message until other messages have left the queue. Afterward, you can unfreeze the message to resume normal delivery.

To freeze and then unfreeze an individual message, complete the following steps:

  1. Start System Manager, and then navigate to the queue you want to work with.

  2. Enumerate messages in the queue.

  3. Right-click the problem message, and then select Freeze.

  4. When you're ready to resume delivery of the message, right-click the problem message, and then select Unfreeze.

Deleting Messages from Queues

You can remove messages from queues in several ways. To delete all messages in a queue, follow these steps:

  1. Start System Manager, and then navigate to the queue you want to work with.

  2. Enumerate the messages in the queue to make sure that you really want to delete all the messages that the queue contains.

  3. Right-click the queue, and then select one of the following options:

    • Delete All Messages (No NDR) Deletes all messages from the queue without sending a nondelivery report to the sender

    • Delete All Messages (Send NDR) Deletes all messages from the queue and notifies the sender with a nondelivery report

  4. When prompted, click Yes to confirm the deletion.

To delete messages selectively, follow these steps:

  1. Start System Manager, and then navigate to the queue you want to work with.

  2. Enumerate messages in the queue.

  3. Right-click the message or messages that you want to delete, and then select one of the following options:

    • Delete Messages (No NDR) Deletes the selected messages from the queue without sending a nondelivery report to the sender.

    • Delete Messages (Send NDR) Deletes the selected messages from the queue and notifies the sender with a nondelivery report.

  4. When prompted, click Yes to confirm the deletion.

Deleting messages from a queue removes them from the messaging system permanently. You can't recover the deleted messages.

from Microsoft Exchange 2000 Administrator's Pocket Consultant by William R. Stanek. Copyright © 1999 Microsoft Corporation.

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