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NetWare Connectivity

Archived content. No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.
By Lisa Donald and James Chellis

Archived content - No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

Chapter 9 from MCSE: NT Server 4 in the Enterprise, published by Sybex Inc.

Traditionally netware has held a large share of the network operating system market. This is changing rapidly as Windows NT is becoming a market leader. One of the strategies Microsoft has used since the early days of Windows NT is interoperability with other operating systems. Windows NT is able to interoperate with Novell NetWare through the NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport protocol stack, Client Services for NetWare (CSNW) and Gateway Services for NetWare (GSNW). If you decide that you want to convert your NetWare file servers to Windows NT, Microsoft provides a migration tool called Migration Tool for NetWare that allows you to migrate your NetWare users, groups, data, and security to a Windows NT domain controller. In this chapter you will learn about:

  • NWLink (IPX/SPX compatible transport)

  • Client Services for NetWare

  • Gateway Services for NetWare

  • Migration Tool for NetWare

Microsoft Exam Objective

Configure Windows NT Server for interoperability with NetWare servers by using various tools. Tools include:

  • Gateway Service for NetWare

  • Migration Tool for NetWare

On This Page

NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport
Client Services for NetWare
Gateway Services for NetWare
Migration Tool for NetWare
Chapter Summary
Review Questions

NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport

NWlink IPX/SPX compatible transport is Microsoft's implementation of Novell's IPX/SPX protocol stack. IPX/SPX stands for Internetwork Packet Exchange/Sequenced Packet Exchange. The Windows NT implementation adds support for NetBIOS which is used for Windows NT browsing services. (See Chapter 7, "NT Domain Management," for more information on browsing.)

NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport is a transport protocol. The purpose of a transport protocol is to route packets across an internetwork. NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport by itself does not provide access to NetWare file and print services. It does provide a method of transporting data to the NetWare server. One way to think of transport protocols is in terms of language. NetWare servers speak IPX/SPX, and in order to communicate with them our Windows NT environment needs to speak the same language, in this case NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport. This protocol is comparable to the TCP/IP protocol stack.

In order to install Client Services for NetWare or Gateway Services for NetWare you must be running NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport already. If the protocol stack has not been installed, it will auto-install during CSNW or GSNW installation. If you used the default protocol selections when you installed Windows NT Server, the NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport protocol was selected by default in addition to TCP/IP. Windows NT Workstation, however, does not have NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport as its default protocol; instead it uses only TCP/IP.

One of the advantages of using the NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport protocol is that it is very easy to configure. The only configuration options you have to choose from are the internal network number and the frame type. The internal network number is used to uniquely identify NetWare file servers. This option is left at the default of 00000000 unless you are using File and Print Services for NetWare or are using IPX routing.

Note: File and Print Services is an add-on product you can purchase from Microsoft; it allows NetWare clients to access Windows NT resources. It is not covered on this exam, so it is not covered in this book.

A frame is a piece of data that is transmitted over the network. Different LAN cards support different frame types. For example, if you are using Ethernet, you can use the following frame types:

  • Ethernet_II

  • Ethernet_802.2

  • Ethernet_802.3

  • Ethernet_SNAP

Frame types are not compatible with each other, so your network needs to use common frame types. When configuring NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport you can choose to configure your frame types through auto-detection or manually. If you choose auto-detection, Windows NT will auto-detect what frame types are currently being used on your network. If Windows NT detects Ethernet_802.2, the industry standard, that is the frame type it will use. Otherwise it will select the first frame type it detected. Manual frame-type selection allows you to specify what frame type or types you will use. Manual frame-type selection is also used to specify multiple frame types. In Exercise 9.1 you will see the options for configuring NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport.

Exercise 9.1xercise 9.1

Viewing NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport Options

This exercise should be completed from PDC1 while logged on as ADMINISTRATOR.

  1. Select Start Settings Control Panel

  2. Double-click Network.

  3. Click the Protocols tab.

  4. Select the network protocol NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport and click Properties to call up the NWLink IPX/SPX Properties dialog box, shown below.

    Cc722565.f0901(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    There is not really anything you need to configure at this time. The purpose of this exercise was to show you that NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport Protocol is installed by default, and how it can be viewed or modified.

Client Services for NetWare

Client Services for NetWare (CSNW) is only available on Windows NT Workstation. CSNW is a NetWare redirector that allows Windows NT Workstations to access NetWare servers. Windows NT Workstation comes with the CSNW software that you can install if your Windows NT Workstations require access to NetWare file and print resources.

Note: A redirector is a program that intercepts program or user requests and directs them to the appropriate environment. For instance, a networking redirector can direct requests to DOS or to the network interface card for transmission to the server.

Figure 9.1 shows how CSNW can be used to access NetWare resources. Assume you are a user sitting at NTWS2 in Figure 9.1. You need to access the WP resource on the NetWare file server NWFS. You may want to use this solution temporarily as you migrate to Windows NT, or if you have existing NetWare servers that you need to share resources such as directories and/or printers.

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Figure 9.1: Accessing NetWare resources through CSNW

In order to access NetWare resources using CSNW the following conditions must be met:

  • To access the directory, you must have a valid user account with appropriate permissions on the NetWare file server.

  • NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport must be running on Windows NT Workstation.

  • CSNW must be running on Windows NT Workstation.

  • The user sitting at NTWS2 connects to the desired resource through Network Neighborhood or the NET USE command line utility.

Note: One of the nice things about Windows NT 4.0 is that it supports accessing NetWare servers in NetWare Directory Services (NDS) mode or in bindery mode. If you are accessing NetWare 4.x file servers, you will be using NDS. If you are accessing NetWare 2.x or NetWare 3.x file servers you are using bindery mode. Windows NT 3.51 and earlier versions only supported bindery mode.

Installing Client Services for NetWare

You will be able to install CSNW in Exercise 9.2, but because you most likely won't have a NetWare server in your test environment, you will not be able to test it (but trust me, it works).

Exercise 9.2.2

Installing CSNW

This exercise should be completed from your NTWS2 while logged on as ADMINISTRATOR.

  1. Select Start Settings Control Panel.

  2. Double-click Network.

  3. Click the Services tab.

  4. Click Add. The Select Network Service dialog box will appear. Choose Client Service for NetWare and click OK. Insert the Windows NT Workstation CD if necessary. After the file copy, close the Network Services box.

  5. You will now see a dialog box prompting you to restart the computer for changes to take effect. Click Yes to restart your computer.

  6. The Startup menu will appear as your computer reboots, choose to start Windows NT Workstation again and log on as ADMINISTRATOR.

  7. After you log on notice that you see the Select NetWare Logon dialog box. This dialog box allows you to specify your preferred server, default tree and context, and whether to run the NetWare logon script. Close this box for now. You will see how these options can be configured in Exercise 9.3.

Configuring Client Services for NetWare

CSNW is configured the first time a user logs on after installing CSNW or at anytime by accessing Control Panel. Table 9.1 defines the options for configuring CSNW.

Table 9.1 CSNW configuration options

CSNW Option

Description

Preferred Server

Used for accessing bindery-mode servers. Allows you to specify which NetWare server you want to connect to by default.

Default Tree and Context

For use in an NDS environment. Allows you to specify the NDS name and context (where the user account resides within a NetWare NDS tree) the user will use when accessing the NetWare server.

Print Options

Allows you to specify how to handle print requests. Add form feed tells the printer to eject a blank page after each document. Notify when printed ensures that the user receives a pop-up message letting them know when their document has printed. Print banner specifies whether or not a banner page should be printed with each document. A banner page identifies the user who sent the job, and gives a job description.

Login Script Options

Specifies whether the NetWare logon script should run when the user logs on to a NetWare server or NDS tree.

In Exercise 9.3, you will assume that you are attaching to a NetWare 3.12 file server called NETWARE312. You will then configure the Client Services for NetWare. As noted before, CSNW is only available on Windows NT Workstations. If you need to access NetWare file and print resources through Windows NT Server, use Gateway Services for NetWare (GSNW), which I cover in detail in the next section. GSNW is used on Windows NT Servers in place of Client Services for NetWare, and in addition to providing the functionality of CSNW on a Windows NT Server, it allows other clients to access NetWare file and print resources through its gateway.

Exercise 9.3

Configuring CSNW

Complete this exercise from your Windows NT Workstation while logged on as ADMINISTRATOR.

  1. Select Start Settings Control Panel.

  2. Double-click CSNW.

  3. Click the Services tab to access the Client Service for NetWare dialog box, shown below.

    Cc722565.f0903(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  4. Click Preferred Server and in the Select Preferred Server box type in NETWARE312.

  5. Under the Print Options box click Add Form Feed.

  6. Under Login Script Options click Run Logon Script.

  7. Click OK to save your changes. You will receive an error message letting you know the NETWARE312 file server could not authenticate you (because it doesn't exist). Click Yes to specify it as your default server anyway. You will receive a message letting you know that the changes you have made will take effect the next time you log on.

Gateway Services for NetWare

Gateway Services for NetWare (GSNW) is used for accessing NetWare file and print resources through an Windows NT Server. You would use GSNW for the following reasons:

  • Your Windows NT Server needs to access NetWare file or print resources.

  • Your Windows NT Workstations do not have CSNW installed and they want to access NetWare file or print resources.

  • You have MS-DOS, Windows for Workgroups or any other client that needs to access the NetWare file server through your Windows NT server.

Figure 9.2 shows three users who want to access the EMAIL resource on the NetWare file server, NWFS.

Cc722565.f0904(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.2: Using Gateway Service for NetWare

USER1 is sitting at the Windows NT Server. Windows NT Server does not support CSNW. His only choice in this scenario is to use GSNW. USER2 is sitting at Windows NT Workstation NTWS1. CSNW has not been installed on her machine. She can use GSNW to access the NetWare file server. USER3 is sitting at Windows NT Workstation NTWS2. Because CSNW has been installed on his machine he would access the NetWare file server through CSNW.

Benefits of Using GSNW

There are two main benefits to using GSNW over CSNW. The first benefit is that by using GSNW you don't have to install CSNW on every Windows NT Workstation. There are two sides to this issue. If you install CSNW on Windows NT Workstation, you will have better performance between Windows NT Workstation and the NetWare Server; this is because you are making a direct connection to the NetWare Server instead of having to go through the gateway. The flip side of this argument is that you take up system resources on Windows NT Workstation when you install CSNW on it. The most important factor to consider when deciding whether to use GSNW or CSNW is how much access to the NetWare file server the workstation will require. For workstations that have to access the NetWare resources frequently, CSNW is a better choice. For workstations that require occasional access, GSNW is a better choice.

The second benefit of using GSNW is a licensing issue. NetWare licenses access to its file servers on a per-server basis. That means that if 10 users will connect to the NetWare file server at any given time, you need a 10-user license. If you use CSNW, you need a license for each CSNW connection.

If you use GSNW, you are using a single gateway connection. Let's say you have 10 Windows NT Workstations that are accessing the NetWare file server through CSNW and 10 Windows NT Workstations that are accessing the NetWare file server through GSNW. The CSNW users would take up 10 connections. The GSNW users would only take up one connection through the gateway account.

Setting Up GSNW

Gateway Services for NetWare can only be installed on Windows NT Server. NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport is required. If it hasn't already been installed, NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport will be installed automatically when you install GSNW. In order for GSNW to work, you will first need to configure the NetWare file server and the Windows NT Server. The following sections cover the setup on each platform.

Configuring the NetWare File Server for GSNW

In order for GSNW to work, you must have access to the NetWare file server. The NetWare file server must have a user account that will be the gateway account. If you do not have administrative rights or are not familiar with NetWare administration utilities, see your NetWare administrator.

The requirements for the NetWare file server are as follows:

  1. You will need a user account that has all the access rights the gateway users will need. Let's assume your gateway user is NTUSER. If your Windows NT user accounts require access to the SYS:APPS NetWare file resource, the NTUSER user account needs the appropriate NetWare access rights to access SYS:APPS.

  2. You must have a group called NTGATEWAY. The user you created in step 1 must be a member of this group.

  3. If you want to support Windows NT long file names on the NetWare file server you must have OS/2 name space on the NetWare volumes that will store long file names. If you do not use OS/2 name space on the NetWare volume, you are limited to the DOS FAT 8.3 naming conventions. If you have NetWare 4.11, then you would use Long Name Space.

Installing GSNW on Windows NT Server

After the NetWare file server has been prepared you are ready to install GSNW. In Exercise 9.4 you will install GSNW on Windows NT Server.

Exercise 9.4

Installing GSNW

Complete this exercise from PDC1 while logged on as ADMINISTRATOR.

  1. Select Start Settings Control Panel.

  2. Double-click Network.

  3. Click the Services tab.

  4. Click Add and select Gateway (and Client) Services for NetWare. Click OK. If necessary provide the Windows NT Server CD and click Continue.

  5. Click Close to save the changes. Click Yes on the Network Settings dialog box; this will restart your computer.

  6. Restart the computer as Windows NT Server and log on as ADMINISTRATOR.

  7. You will see a Select NetWare dialog box. Click OK to close this box.

Configuring GSNW

After GSNW has been installed, the Control Panel will have a new icon, GSNW. When you click this item you will see the dialog box in Figure 9.3.

Cc722565.f0904g(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.3: The Gateway Service for NetWare dialog box

You will notice that the Gateway Service for NetWare dialog box is very similar to the CSNW dialog box, shown back in Exercise 9.3. With the exception of the Gateway button, all of the options presented in this dialog box are the same as CSNW. For the options that are the same, refer back to Table 9.1. To configure GSNW, click the Gateway button, and you will see the GSNW Configure Gateway dialog box, as shown in Figure 9.4.

Cc722565.f0905(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.4: The GSNW Configure Gateway dialog box

The configuration options available in the GSNW Configure Gateway dialog box are defined in Table 9.2.

Table 9.2 The Configure Gateway Dialog Box Options

Configure Gateway Option

Description

Enable Gateway

Enables the gateway. Required for GSNW to be functional.

Gateway Account

This is the user account that was setup on the NetWare file server. This user must be a member of the NTGATEWAY group on the NetWare file server.

Password and Confirm Password

This establishes and confirms the NetWare side password that the NetWare user account has been assigned.

Share Name

Lists the shares that have been created on the Windows NT Server that accesses NetWare resources.

Add

Allows you to create additional shares on NetWare volumes or directories.

Permissions

Used to control how Windows NT users can access NetWare resources.

Once the gateway has been configured, Windows NT users can access NetWare file and print resources through the Network Neighborhood utility.

Migration Tool for NetWare

In the previous sections, you learned how to operate in a mixed environment of Windows NT and Novell NetWare. In this section, you will learn how to migrate an existing NetWare File Server to a Windows NT PDC using Migration Tool for NetWare; this is assuming that now that you've worked with a mixed environment, have come to see what a superior product Windows NT is over NetWare, and you want to convert everything to Windows NT.

Note: It is important to note that this is a migration, not an upgrade. An upgrade would assume that you were going to use the NetWare file server and upgrade it to a Windows NT Server (basically using the same machine). It is not possible to upgrade a NetWare file server to a Windows NT Server, only to migrate. In a migration you leave the NetWare file server intact and copy the information to an existing Windows NT Server.

Items That Can Be Migrated

If you've been supporting a mixed environment of NetWare and Windows NT you probably have a lot of time invested in your NetWare file servers. When converting to a Windows NT environment you don't want to throw away the work you've already done, and you don't have to. Using the migration tool, you can migrate the following items:

  • User accounts

  • Groups Accounts

  • Selected directories and files

  • Effective rights on files and directories

The Migration Tool for NetWare can be used to migrate a NetWare file server or multiple NetWare file servers to a single Windows NT PDC. For example, you might have three NetWare file servers that you want to incorporate into a single Windows NT server. Figure 9.5 illustrates the migration model.

Cc722565.f0907(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.5: Migration from NetWare to Windows NT

Note: The Windows NT computer that user and group accounts will be migrated to must be an Windows NT domain controller.

Note: The Migration Tool for NetWare does not support NetWare 4.x NDS (Novell Directory Services), so if you are migrating from an NDS environment, your NetWare 4.x server must be using bindery emulation.

Items That Cannot Be Migrated

While the NetWare migration will preserve important items like users, groups, and data, it will not migrate everything. Specifically, the following items will not be migrated from the NetWare environment.

  • User passwords

  • Workgroup and User Account Managers (this is not commonly used in a NetWare environment)

  • Logon Scripts (the exception is if you are migrating to an Windows NT server running File and Print Services for Netware)

  • Print Server and Print Queue information

Prerequisites for Running a NetWare Migration

In order to run Migration Tool for NetWare you need a NetWare file server and a Windows NT Server. If you are transferring user and group information, the Windows NT Server needs to be a PDC. If you are transferring directory and file information, the Windows NT Server can be a member server or a domain controller.

When preparing to migrate from NetWare to Windows NT, you want to be aware of the following conditions:

  • You can migrate from NetWare 2.x, 3.x, or 4.x.

  • On the NetWare side, you have to have Supervisor rights (for NetWare 2.x or 3.x) or Admin rights (for NetWare 4.x).

  • On the Windows NT side, you need to be a member of the ADMINISTRATORS group.

  • You must be running NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport on your destination Windows NT server.

  • GSNW must be running.

  • If you are migrating directory and file information and you want to preserve NetWare permissions, the destination Windows NT drive must be NTFS.

Another prerequisite to the migration is your careful planning of what will and will not be migrated from the NetWare file server. I think of a migration like moving from one house to another. We all have junk in our houses that we don't need (some of us more than others). Many file servers are the same. We have data and applications that are not being used. During a migration you probably do not want to bring the junk, so by planning out your migration before the event, you only transport what you will need at your new home.

Using Migration Tool for NetWare

Without a NetWare file server you will not be able to complete a sample migration. If your test environment does not have a NetWare file server, you will not get past the first dialog box on the Migration Tool for NetWare. With that in mind, this section will provide the steps to access the dialog boxes used to configure the Migration Tool for NetWare and, will show you through figures the dialog boxes you would encounter during the migration process.

Accessing the Migration Tool for NetWare

To access the Migration Tool for NetWare, select Start Administrative Tools (Common) Migration Tool for NetWare. The Migration Tool for NetWare dialog box will appear, as shown in Figure 9.6.

Cc722565.f0907g(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.6: The Migration Tool for NetWare dialog box

Selecting NetWare File Server and Windows NT Server for Migration

After you access the Migration Tool for NetWare, the first step in the configuration is to choose the NetWare file server that you will migrate from and the Windows NT Server that you will migrate to. The file servers must be up and running and you must have administrative privileges on both sides.

To select the file servers, click Add in the Migration Tool for NetWare dialog box. The Select Servers For Migration box, shown in Figure 9.7, will appear.

Cc722565.f0908(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.7: The Select Servers for Migration dialog box

At this point, you will need to select the NetWare file server and the Windows NT server.

Tip You can type in the name of the server you are selecting or use the ellipsis button to the right of the selection box. It's easier to choose the ellipsis button so you are guaranteed that the server is up and running. You eliminate the possibility of misspelling the server's name.

After you select your servers, all of the buttons within the Migration Tool for NetWare will become active and you are ready to configure the migration options. The migration options are covered in detail in the next subsection.

Configuring User Options for Migration

The default option during migration is that all user and group accounts are migrated from the NetWare file server to the Windows NT Server domain controller that you specified. The User and Group dialog box allows you to customize how users and groups will be transferred. You should keep the following issues in mind when configuring users and groups for migration:

  • Passwords will not transfer. The default is that users will not have a password, but other options are available and will be defined in this section.

  • It is possible to have duplicate user and group names between the NetWare and Windows NT servers. You can choose how duplicate names will be handled.

  • Whether you want to use the default NetWare account policies or to use the default Windows NT domain account policies.

  • Whether NetWare administrators will have administrative rights in the Windows NT domain.

To access the User and Group Options dialog box, click the User Options in the Migration Tool for NetWare dialog box. The User and Group Options dialog box, shown in Figure 9.8, will appear.

Cc722565.f0909(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.8: The User and Group Options dialog box

You will notice that at the top of the box the Transfer Users and Groups box is checked by default. If you do not want to migrate users and groups, you should uncheck this box and click OK. Each of the other options and tabs within the User and Group Options dialog box are defined in the following sections.

Passwords

The Passwords tab page allows you to make choices about user passwords in a very general fashion. You will see the Passwords tab when you access the Users and Groups Options dialog box. Table 9.3 defines the password options.

Table 9.3 password options available during migration

Option

Description

No Password

This is the default option. After a migration, users will have no password the first time they log on.

Password is Username

Users use their logon account name for their first password.

Password is:

Allows you to specify a general password that will be used by all migrated users for their first logon.

User Must Change Password

This box is checked by default. It specifies that after the initial logon, the users must change the password in order to complete subsequent logons.

None of the options are great choices if you are in an environment that requires any kind of security. The initial logon is basically unprotected. In order to provide a more secure initial logon, you can use a mapping file. This allows you to specify each user's initial password. I will cover the mapping file in the Use Mappings in File subsection.

Usernames

From the User and Group Options dialog box, you can check the Usernames tab page and you will see the options shown in Figure 9.9.

Cc722565.f0910(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.9: The Usernames tab page of the User and Group Options dialog box

The function of the Usernames tab page is to specify how to handle duplicate names that might be encountered during the migration. This is a fairly common problem. Let's assume that Kevin has been accessing the NetWare file server and the Windows NT domain. On the NetWare side his user account is KDONALD. On the Windows NT domain his user account is also KDONALD. This will be especially common in environments where you have been using CSNW. The problem is that if you already have an existing KDONALD account, you can't create another account with the same name. So what do you do? Table 9.4 defines the options for handling duplicate account names.

Table 9.4 Username conflict options

Duplicate Username Option

Description

Log Error

Records the error in the ERROR.LOG file. This file will be covered in more detail in the Logging Options During Migration section.

Ignore

Causes no action to be taken if there is a conflict.

Overwrite with new Info

Replaces the existing Windows NT account information with the NetWare account information.

Add Prefix

Allows you to specify a prefix to be added to the duplicate name. For example, if you choose NW as your prefix and you had duplicate KDONALDs, the NetWare account would become NWKDONALD.

Group Names

The Group Names tab page specifies how to handle duplicate group names. You access the window shown in Figure 9.10 by clicking the Group Names tab page of the User and Group Options dialog box.

Cc722565.f0911(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.10: The Group names tab page of the User and Group Options dialog box

The options for handling duplicate group names are similar to the options for handling duplicate user names. Table 9.5 defines the options on the Group Names tab page.

Table 9.5 The group name conflict options

Duplicate Group Name Option

Description

Log Error

Records the error in the ERROR.LOG file. This file will be covered in more detail in the "Logging Options During Migration" section.

Ignore

Causes no action to be taken if there is a conflict.

Add Prefix

Allows you to specify a prefix to be added to the duplicate group name. For example, if you choose NW as your prefix and you had a duplicate group named SALES, the NetWare group would become NWSALES.

Defaults

The Defaults tab page specifies how default account restrictions should be handled. You can choose the NetWare default account restrictions or you can use the default Windows NT domain account policies. To access the Defaults tab page from the User and Group Options dialog box, shown in Figure 9.11, click it.

Cc722565.f0912(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.11: The Defaults tab page of the User and Group Options dialog box

The two options you have under the Defaults tab page are as follows:

  • Use Supervisor Defaults

  • Add Supervisors to the ADMINISTRATORS Group

You will notice that the first option, Use Supervisor Defaults, is checked by default. In NetWare, you can set default account restrictions. It is a similar concept to the Windows NT account policies that were covered in Chapter 5, "User Profiles, System Policies and Hardware Profiles." This means that if your NetWare account restrictions required five-character passwords that needed to be changed every 45 days and your Windows NT account policy required seven-character passwords to be changed every 30 days, the default option is that the NetWare defaults apply.

The Add Supervisors to Administrators option specifies whether or not NetWare users who have administrative rights on the NetWare side should have administrative rights on the Windows NT side. If you check this box, administrative rights are retained during migration. The default option is that NetWare administrators do not become members of the ADMINISTRATORS group, and administrative rights are lost.

Use Mappings in File

The Use Mappings in File checkbox option allows you to create a mapping file that specifies how migrated accounts should be treated. Specifically, you can specify how usernames will be transferred, what passwords the new user accounts will use, and what groupnames groups will use.

Let's assume your NetWare File Server used first names for user accounts. On the Windows NT domain controller, you are using first initial–last name as your naming scheme. The mapping file allows you to specify a new name for each NetWare account. You can also specify a password for each user account. This is much more secure than using the options listed on the Passwords tab page of the User and Group Options dialog box. You can also specify new names for groups that will be used.

To create a mapping file you would:

  1. Check the Use Mapping File option in the User and Group Options dialog box.

  2. Type in the name of the file you want to create. In this example, NW312. You will use the User and Group Options dialog box, shown in Figure 9.12.

    Cc722565.f0913(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Figure 9.12: The User and Group Options dialog box with the Use Mappings in File option checked
  3. Click the Create button to the right of the mapping file. You will see the Create Mapping File dialog box, shown in Figure 9.13.

    Cc722565.f0914(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Figure 9.13: The Create Mapping File dialog box
  4. Click OK to create the mapping file. You will see a message box letting you know the mapping file was created successfully. When asked if you want to edit, click Yes. The mapping file, shown in Figure 9.14, will appear.

    Cc722565.f0915(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Figure 9.14: The Mapping File for NetWare to Windows NT Migration

At this point all of the decisions for configuring your users and groups for migration have been made. In the next section, you will see how the file options can be configured for migration.

Configuring File Options for Migration

The File Options portion of the NetWare migration allows you to specify how the NetWare volumes, directories, and files will be transferred. The options within the File Options box allow you to:

  • Specify whether you want to transfer files.

  • Select which directories and files will be transferred.

  • Set the resource share name on the Windows NT side.

By default the following files and directories are not migrated from NetWare.

  • \SYSTEM directory, containing program files specific to the NetWare OS.

  • \LOGIN directory, containing files specific to the NetWare login environment.

  • \ETC directory, containing files specific to the NetWare TCP/IP environment.

  • All hidden and system files; these are files that have been flagged with the NetWare file attributes of hidden and system. The rationale is that the files will most likely be NetWare related, and thus not needed on the Windows NT side.

The File Options dialog box allows you to select the NetWare source volume and the destination Windows NT directory. If you click the File Options button in the Migration Tool for NetWare dialog box, you see the File Options dialog box, as shown in Figure 9.15.

Cc722565.f0916(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.15: The File Options dialog box

The Transfer Files option is not selected by default, but once this box is checked, the options within this dialog box become active. The default source files are the NetWare root volumes. The default destination directory is the NTFS partition with the most free space.

Warning: If you migrate files to a FAT partition instead of an NTFS partition, your NetWare file permissions will not migrate.

Modifying Destination Directory

The default destination directory is the NTFS partition with the most free space. To specify a different destination directory, click Modify within the File Options dialog box. The Modify Destination dialog box, shown in Figure 9.16, will appear.

Cc722565.f0917(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.16: The Modify Destination dialog box

The volume name, SYS, is automatically shared on the Windows NT Server. If you click Properties within the Modify Destination dialog box, you see the Share Properties dialog box, as shown in Figure 9.17.

Cc722565.f0918(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.17: The Share Properties dialog box

The Path text box of the Share Properties dialog box allows you to edit the destination path of the migrated files.

Specifying Files to Transfer

In the File Options dialog box, shown in Figure 9.15, click Files. If you click this option, you see the Files to Transfer dialog box, shown in Figure 9.18.

The Files To Transfer dialog box allows you to specify the directories and files that you want to migrate to the Windows NT Server. Notice in Figure 9.18 that the ETC, LOGIN, and SYSTEM directories are not selected by default.

Cc722565.f0919(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Figure 9.18: The Files To Transfer dialog box

Trial and Actual Migration

After you have completed all of the configuration regarding your migration, you can choose to do a trial migration or an actual migration. A trial migration allows you to go through all the steps that you would for an actual migration, but you do not complete the last step, which is writing the data.

It is a really good idea to run a trial migration before you run an actual migration. If you encounter any problems at this stage, you have an opportunity to correct the problem(s) before you make any commitments. You might even run several trial migrations until you have zero or unavoidable errors.

After you are satisfied with the results of the trial migration, you can run an actual migration. At this point, all the options you had configured for the migration will be transferred from the NetWare file server to the Windows NT server.

Logging Options during Migration

During the migration process you can log information that relates to the success or failure of the migration process. This information is very helpful in troubleshooting and for confirming that the trial or actual migration was successful. You will always have summary information regarding your migration in a file called LOGFILE.LOG. If you require more detailed information, you can configure the logging options. Configuring the logging options allows you to get more complete information on a trial or actual migration. The three options that you can choose from are:

  • Pop-up on Errors

  • Verbose User/Group Logging

  • Verbose File Logging

Table 9.6 defines these options.

Table 9.6 Logging Options Defined

Logging Option

Description

Pop-up on Errors

This option causes a pop-up box to appear every time an error occurs. This is a good option to use once you have eliminated all known errors.

Verbose User/Group Logging

Provides more complete information regarding user and group migrations.

Verbose File Logging

Provides more complete information regarding file and directory migrations.

The three files that will be created during a migration are:

  • error.log

  • summary.log

  • logfile.log

Chapter Summary

NetWare has been a dominant force in the network operating system market for many years. Many environments are now faced with the challenge of supporting a mixed networking environment of NetWare and Windows NT. Microsoft has addressed this issue and provides connectivity solutions through NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport, Client Services for NetWare, Gateway Services for NetWare, and Migration Tool for NetWare.

NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport is a transport protocol that is used to transfer packets across a network. Because NetWare uses the IPX/SPX protocol by default, using the NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport allows you to use a transport protocol that is compatible with the NetWare environment.

The CSNW utility is a NetWare redirector that can be installed on Windows NT Workstation. Once installed the CSNW utility can be used to access NetWare file and print resources. Each Windows NT Workstation using CSNW takes up one connection on the NetWare file server.

The GSNW utility is used with Windows NT Server. It is used to provide NetWare connectivity for Windows NT Servers. It also provides gateway services for Windows NT Workstations that do not have CSNW installed. The gateway connection to the NetWare file server only takes up one NetWare connection, regardless of the number of users accessing the gateway.

The Migration Tool for NetWare allows you to migrate NetWare file servers to Windows NT Server domain controllers. This utility allows you to migrate users, groups, and data. One nice feature of this utility is that you can perform a trial or practice migration without actually making any changes. Once you are satisfied with the way that the migration is working, you can perform an actual migration.

Review Questions

If you were configuring NWLink IPX/SPX compatible transport protocol, and you weren't sure which frame type to use, what is your best option?

  1. Ethernet_802.2 because it's the industry standard

  2. Scan the network for frame type option

  3. Auto-detect option

  4. Choose all frame types

Which of the following statements are true of NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport protocol? Choose all that apply.

  1. It is Microsoft's implementation of Novell's IPX/SPX protocol stack.

  2. It is completely compatible with Novell's IPX/SPX protocol stack.

  3. It is suggested, but not required, for use with CSNW and GSNW.

  4. Microsoft's implementation of IPX/SPX has built-in support for NetBIOS.

You are sitting at Windows NT Workstation and want to access a NetWare file server so that you can access file and print resources. Which of the following options could be installed at your workstation to allow you access? Choose all that apply.

  1. CSNW

  2. GSNW

  3. File and Print Services for NetWare

  4. Microsoft Services for NetWare

In order for GSNW to work, what group must be created?

  1. NTGATEWAY on the NetWare file server

  2. NTGATEWAY on the Windows NT Server

  3. NWGATEWAY on the NetWare file server

  4. NWGATEWAY on the Windows NT Server

Which of the following items can be migrated through Migration Tool for NetWare? Choose all that apply.

  1. Users

  2. Groups

  3. Login scripts

  4. Print queues and print servers

  5. User passwords

  6. File structures and permissions

Which versions of NetWare can be migrated with Migration Tool for NetWare? Choose all that apply.

  1. NetWare 2.x

  2. NetWare 3.x

  3. NetWare 4.x

For the highest level of password security after migrating your NetWare user accounts to Windows NT, which option should you choose?

  1. Preserve NetWare password

  2. Password Is:

  3. Assign Random password

  4. Use the mapping file

You have 10 Windows 95 computers and 10 Windows for Workgroup clients that need access to NetWare file and print resources. What should be installed on your Windows NT server to support the access? Choose all that apply.

  1. NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport

  2. CSNW

  3. File and Print Services for NetWare

  4. GSNW

Your NetWare users want to access Windows NT file and print resources. The Windows NT server is running NWLink. What other software must be installed?

  1. You must install GSNW.NLM on the NetWare server.

  2. You must install GSNW on the Windows NT server.

  3. You must install File and Print Services for NetWare on the NetWare server.

  4. You must install File and Print Services for NetWare on the Windows NT server.

You have decided to migrate your NetWare users and groups to an Windows NT server. Which of the following are prerequisites?

  1. The Windows NT server must be running NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport.

  2. The Windows NT server must be running CSNW.

  3. The Windows NT server must be running GSNW.

  4. The Windows NT server must be running File and Print Services for NetWare.

Which two options can be configured through NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport?

  1. IPX address

  2. Frame type

  3. Internal network number

  4. Default gateway

Which of the following options can be configured for GSNW?

  1. The preferred NetWare server

  2. The default tree and context to be used

  3. Whether or not logon scripts should be run

  4. The gateway group that should be used

About the Authors

Lisa Donald is a Microsoft Certified Trainer and Microsoft Certified System Engineer. She has worked with numerous Fortune 500 companies, including Digital and Apple, and government agencies including the U.S. Postal Service and the U.S. Naval Academy.

James Chellis, an MCP, is President of EdgeTek Technical Education, a national network training company and Microsoft Solution Provider specializing in Windows NT.

© 1999 Sybex Inc. http://www.sybex.com/ All Rights Reserved.

We at Microsoft Corporation hope that the information in this work is valuable to you. Your use of the information contained in this work, however, is at your sole risk. All information in this work is provided "as -is", without any warranty, whether express or implied, of its accuracy, completeness, fitness for a particular purpose, title or non-infringement, and none of the third-party products or information mentioned in the work are authored, recommended, supported or guaranteed by Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Corporation shall not be liable for any damages you may sustain by using this information, whether direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, even if it has been advised of the possibility of such damages. All prices for products mentioned in this document are subject to change without notice.

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