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Web server on local network

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The figure below illustrates a Web publishing scenario, with the Web servers located behind the Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server computer.

Two Web servers are located on the internal network, which is protected by ISA Server. When an Internet user requests an object on example.microsoft.comMarketing or example.microsoft.com\Development, the request is actually sent to the ISA Server computer, which routes the request to the appropriate Web server.

Notice that when external clients request objects from the Web servers, they actually gain access to the ISA Server computer. This way, ISA Server ensures that the network is never penetrated by external users. Furthermore, the Internet Protocol (IP) addresses of the Web servers are never exposed. Instead, the Internet users gain access to the Web servers by specifying the ISA Server computer's IP address.

Suppose you want to publish two internal servers, on the example.microsoft.com domain, one called Dev and one called Mktg. The Mktg computer should return objects when a client requests example.microsoft.com/Marketing, and Dev should return objects when a client requests example.microsoft.com/Development.

Follow these steps to publish the Web servers, as illustrated in the figure:

  1. Verify that the DNS server maps the fully-qualified domain name to the IP address of the ISA Server computer. Internet clients use the domain name to request content.

  2. Configure the ISA Server incoming Web request properties. The IP address should include the IP address of the external interface. For more information, see Configuring incoming Web request properties.

  3. Create a destination set, called Marketing, which should include the computer example.microsoft.com and the path \Marketing\*. For more information, see Configuring destination sets.

  4. Create a destination set, called Development, which should include the computer example.microsoft.com and the path \Development\*. 

  5. Configure a Web publishing rule with the following parameters:

    • Set Destination Set to the Marketing destination set.

    • Set Applies to to Any user, group, or client computer.

    • Set Action to Redirect to a hosted site and specify Mktg as the specified host.

  6. Configure the second Web publishing rule with the following parameters:

    • Set Destination Set to the Development destination set.

    • Set Applies to to Any user, group, or client computer.

    • Set Action to Redirect to a hosted site and specify Dev as the specified host.

For more information, see Web publishing rules.

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