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Scripts overview for GPMC

Updated: January 21, 2005

Applies To: Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2

Scripts

Group Policy Object Editor includes two extensions for script deployment:

  • Scripts (Startup/Shutdown)—You can use this extension, which is located under Computer Configuration\Windows Settings in the console tree of Group Policy Object Editor, to specify scripts that are to run when the computer starts up or shuts down. These scripts run as Local System.

  • Scripts (Logon/Logoff)—You can use this extension, which is located under User Configuration\Windows Settings in the console tree of Group Policy Object Editor, to specify scripts that are to run when the user logs on or logs off the computer. These scripts run under the account of the user who is logging on or off.

There are five script types:

  • Group Policy logon scripts.

  • Group Policy logoff scripts.

  • Group Policy startup scripts.

  • Group Policy shutdown scripts.

  • Legacy logon scripts of the style that predates Group Policy. These are specified on the User object.

Controlling script behavior

The main administrative template file, system.adm, is present by default, and includes several settings that control how Group Policy processes logon, logoff, startup and shutdown scripts. To see these settings, in the Group Policy Object Editor console tree, click Scripts.

Where?

  • Group Policy object name/Computer (or User) Configuration/Administrative templates/System/Scripts

Notes

  • By default, scripts run invisibly to the user. However, there are policy settings that make logon or logoff scripts run visibly.

  • Scripts that run synchronously in order from the top to the bottom of the list shown in the Properties dialog box for scripts of the given type. Logon scripts run asynchronously by default, and there is a policy setting to make them run synchronously. Startup scripts run synchronously by default, and there is a policy setting to make them run asynchronously.

  • Whenever possible, it is recommended to use Group Policy scripts rather than legacy-style scripts attached to the user object.

See Also

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