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APPENDIX A Additional Information

This appendix provides additional information related to completing Setup, forms for recording the required information for completing Setup, and a list of additional resources to learn more about Microsoft® Windows® Small Business Server 2003.

Additional Tasks to Complete Before Setup

Depending on your small business network configuration, there are several tasks that you may need to complete in addition to the steps that are listed in Chapter 2, "Before You Begin.” Review the following sections and complete any tasks that apply to your Windows Small Business Server 2003 installation.

Choose Your Internet Service Provider

Windows Small Business Server 2003 provides Internet services to the small business network. To provide Internet services, you must first obtain an Internet service provider (ISP). When selecting your ISP, you should consider what services you need from your ISP:

  1. Internet access. Windows Small Business Server 2003 supports both broadband and dial-up connections. For more information about the connection types supported by Windows Small Business Server 2003, see “Connect to the Internet” in Appendix B, “Understanding Your Network.”
  2. Maintenance of your Internet domain name. The Internet domain name is used to access services on your server from the Internet. It is also part of your e-mail address. For example, if wingtiptoys.com is your registered Internet domain name, an e-mail address could be chris@wingtiptoys.com. The Internet domain name must match the mail exchanger (MX) resource record maintained at your ISP for delivering e-mail. For more information, see “Registering Your Internet Domain Name” later in this appendix.
  3. E-mail. Windows Small Business Server 2003 includes Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003 for e-mail services. To use Internet e-mail, your ISP must support electronic mail routing and queuing.
  4. Web hosting. If you want to have an Internet Web site, your ISP must support Web hosting. You can either host your Web site at your ISP or host it locally on your network. For more information about hosting an Internet site on your local network, see Help and Support Center after Setup is complete. To do so, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “Hosting a Web site.”
    noteNote
    If the network adapter used to connect to the Internet has a dynamically assigned IP address, your ISP must support dynamic Domain Name System (DNS) updates.
    noteNote
    If your ISP does not support dynamic DNS updates, when the IP address of your adapter changes, DNS servers on the Internet will not be able to resolve your server’s Internet domain name.

Registering Your Internet Domain Name

Many ISPs can register your domain name for you, or you can register it yourself. There are domain name registrars located around the world, available for the registration of domain names under many top-level domains (such as .com, .net, .org, as well as country/region code domains such as .us for the United States and .uk for the United Kingdom). These registrars charge a yearly fee to register and maintain your domain name. This fee varies from registrar to registrar, as do the services available. Your domain may be hosted by your ISP, the registrar you choose, or advanced users may choose to host it themselves.

For Windows Small Business Server, you will need a registered Internet domain name to access services on your server from the Internet and to use Internet e-mail. For information about obtaining a domain name, see the Accredited Registrar Directory at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=1773.

Web addresses can change, so you might be unable to connect to the Web site mentioned here.

noteNote
To allow access to the Windows® SharePoint® Services intranet site through Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2004, you must register a new host (A) resource record for your domain name for “companyweb.” For example, if your domain name is wingtiptoys.com, you would also need to register an A resource record for companyweb.wingtiptoys.com. For more information about registering a new A resource record, contact your Internet service provider (ISP).

Obtaining a Certificate from a Certification Authority

If you want to allow access to Web services on your server from the Internet, a Web server certificate is automatically created when you run the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard. This certificate is used to configure Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), which secures communications between a Web browser and your Web server. You also have the option of using a certificate that is signed by a commercial certification authority (CA), such as VeriSign.

To obtain an certificate from a CA, use the Web Server Certificate Wizard to create the request. You can then install the request by using the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard. For more information about obtaining a certificate or using the wizards, see Help and Support Center after Setup is complete. To open Help and Support Center, on a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “To change the Web server certificate.”

noteNote
If you want users to securely access their Internet e-mail on the server using either Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) 2.x devices or Microsoft Smartphone 2002 or Microsoft Pocket PC Phone Edition 2002 mobile devices, either the server must have a commercial certificate from a trusted CA or you must follow a procedure so the device works with a self-signed certificate that you create. This procedure decreases the security of your mobile device. Therefore, the recommended and more secure method is to use a commercial certificate. For more information, see “Connecting Mobile and Remote Users” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=33539). The 2003 versions of these mobile devices do not require a commercial CA for the higher level of security.

Upgrade Operating Systems on Client Computers

If you have client computers running Microsoft® Windows® 98 and earlier or Windows NT® 4.0 and earlier, it is recommended that you upgrade these computers to either Microsoft® Windows® XP Professional or Windows® 2000 Professional.

Windows XP Professional and Windows 2000 Professional are designed to work with Windows-based networking environments. These operating systems provide additional security features, reliability, performance, and functionality for the local network.

In addition, some Windows Small Business Server 2003 applications are specifically designed to work with Windows 2000 Professional and Windows XP Professional. For example, you can automatically configure the necessary network settings for your Windows Small Business Server network on client computers running Windows 2000 Professional and Windows XP Professional using the network Setup Web site (http://ServerName).

If you choose not to upgrade client computers, you can still manually configure client computers for the local network. However, to install Microsoft® Outlook® 2003, Windows® 2000 Professional or Windows® XP Professional is required.

For information about upgrading client computers, see the Previous Versions of Windows page at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=16422.

Network Standalone Computers

If your computers are not currently connected together for sharing information over a local network, you must install network adapters on each computer. A network adapter is a hardware device that connects your computer to a network. Then, you connect each network adapter to a switch or hub using a network cable.

  1. Internal vs. external network adapters. You can connect your computers using either an internal or external network adapter.
    Internal network adapters are installed in an expansion slot inside your computer. Most computers come with several peripheral component interconnect (PCI) expansion slots so you can expand the capabilities of your computer by adding hardware such as network adapters.
    External network adapters do not require that you open up your computer or install network cables. You can plug an external network adapter into a universal serial bus (USB) port on the back of your computer. External network adapters are an easy way to set up your network. External network adapters are available for Ethernet or wireless.
  2. Networking cable. To connect your computers using a switch or hub, you also need a network cable, called Ethernet RJ-45 twisted pair (10BaseT or 100BaseT). Ethernet can operate at speeds of 10 megabits per second (Mbps) or 100 Mbps. To get 100 Mbps, you must use 100 Mbps Ethernet adapters, Category 5 twisted pair cabling, and connect to a 100 Mbps port on an Ethernet switch or hub.
  3. Network switch or hub. Connecting your computers requires that you have a switch or hub. You can then connect the network adapter to the device using a network cable. The switch or hub should have enough jacks to accommodate all the computers on your network.
    A hub is a common connection point for devices in a network. Typically used to connect segments of a local area network (LAN), a hub contains multiple ports. When data arrives at one port, it is copied to the other ports so that all segments of the LAN can see the data.
    A switch (also referred to as a multiport hub) provides the same purpose as a hub. However, the way the network traffic is transported through a switch compared to a hub provides for faster connection speed for each client computer connected to the device. A switch forwards packets to specific ports rather than broadcasting every packet to every port like a hub does.
    If you are using wireless network adapters, you do not need to use cables, a switch, or hub. However, you will need wireless network devices. For more information, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=17048.

Additionally, if you plan to connect to the Internet immediately following your installation, you will need an Internet connection device, such as a dial-up modem or broadband device.

  1. Dial-up connection. To connect to the Internet using a dial-up connection, you must have a modem or ISDN terminal adapter. For more information about modems recommended for Windows Server 2003, see the Windows Server Catalog Web site at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=4303.
    To configure your dial-up connection, complete the Connect to the Internet task on the To Do List, which appears as part of Setup.
  2. Broadband connection. To connect to the Internet using a broadband connection, you must use a broadband device that is supported by your ISP. Contact your ISP for a list of recommended or required broadband devices.
    To configure your broadband connection, complete the Connect to the Internet task on the To Do List, which appears as part of Setup. Windows Small Business Server 2003 supports configuring three types of broadband connection: a direct broadband connection, a local router broadband connection, or a broadband connection that requires a user name or password (also called Point-to-Point over Ethernet or PPPoE). For more information about each of these broadband connection types, see “Connecting to the Internet,” in Appendix B, “Understanding Your Network.”

Purchase Client Access Licenses

Windows Small Business Server 2003 includes licenses for five client computers. A client access license (CAL) gives either a client computer or a user the legal right to access a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003 and the services supported by that server.

Depending on the type of installation you are completing, you must either purchase additional CALs or additional upgrade CALs:

  1. To complete a new installation of Windows Small Business Server 2003 with more than five client computers, you will need additional CALs for the client computers to access the server.
  2. To upgrade or migrate from Small Business Server 4.0, Small Business Server 4.5, or Small Business Server 2000, you must replace your pre-existing CALs with Windows Small Business Server 2003 upgrade CALs.
  3. To upgrade from Windows 2000 Server or Windows Server 2003, your Windows Server CALs cannot be used for Windows Small Business Server 2003 client access licenses. You must replace your pre-existing CALs with Windows Small Business Server 2003 CALs.

For more information about your CALs, see the end-user license agreement (EULA).

For information about how to purchase additional Windows Small Business Server 2003 CALs, open the Licensing snap-in, and then click Purchase Licenses.

Review Hardware Requirements

The following hardware requirements are recommended to ensure your computer meets at least the minimum requirements, determine if there is additional hardware you will need, and check that the drivers for your hardware are supported by Windows Server 2003.

Minimum/Recommended Hardware Requirements

The computer on which you will install Windows Small Business Server 2003 must meet at least the minimum hardware requirements. Additionally, you should use hardware from the Windows Server Catalog. For more information, see the Windows Server Catalog at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=4303.

 

Hardware Minimum Recommended Maximum

Processor

300 megahertz (MHz

at least 550 MHz

Multi-processor support for up to 2 processors (hyperthreading is supported)

Memory

256 megabytes (MB) of random access memory (RAM)

384 (MB) of RAM

4 gigabytes (GB) of RAM

Hard disk

4 GB plus space for data storage

6 GB plus space for data storage

N/A

Network Adapters

1

1 or 2 depending on your topology

N/A

CD or DVD drive

Bootable CD or DVD drive.

same

N/A

Monitor and video adapter

Super VGA (SVGA) monitor

Video adapter with 800 x 600 or higher resolution and a minimum of 256 colors.

same

N/A

Notes

  • Windows Server 2003 may not use multiple processors with some Intel Pentium processors or Pentium II processors. For more information, search for article 319091 in the Microsoft Knowledge Base at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=4441.
  • To determine if you need one or two network adapters, see Chapter 2, “Before You Begin.”
  • During the Setup you need 1.5 GB of free disk space.
  • To verify that your CD-ROM or DVD drive is bootable, review your hardware manufacturer’s documentation. If your computer system basic input/output system (BIOS) does not support booting from the CD-ROM or DVD drive, check with your hardware manufacturer to see if there are drivers available that support booting from the CD-ROM or DVD drive.
  • The Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard (CEICW) does not support USB networking devices for PPPoE Internet connections. If you have a PPPoE connection and you use the CEICW included with Windows Small Business Server 2003 Standard Edition to configure your Internet connection, you must use a non-USB form of network hardware, such as an internal card. Alternatively, you can upgrade to Windows Small Business Server 2003 Premium Edition and install Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server. The CEICW in Premium Edition then configures ISA Server to make the connection for you.

Additional Recommended Hardware

Depending on your small business needs, you may want to use additional hardware such as a tape backup device or fax modem.

  1. Tape or other backup device. It is highly recommended that you install a backup device.
  2. Modem or fax device. If you plan to use a modem to connect to the Internet, use Fax Service, or use remote access through dial-up networking, it is recommended that you dedicate a modem device for each service. Using the same modem for multiple services may result in service conflicts. For example, if the modem is hosting a remote connection, it cannot simultaneously host other remote users or dial out to make connections to the Internet. Similarly, any time the modem is in use for faxing or connecting to the Internet, it cannot host a remote connection.
  3. Uninterruptible power supply (UPS). To protect your computer from damage that can occur due to a loss of power, it is recommended that you connect your computer running Windows Small Business Server to a UPS.
    ImportantImportant
    Windows Server hardware detection can cause some UPS devices to switch to battery mode. This may cause Setup to fail. During the operating system installation, unplug any UPS devices. After completing the installation of the operating system, you can plug in the UPS.

Check for Updated Drivers and Application Compatibility

You should do the following if you are using an existing computer to install Windows Small Business Server or if you have a line-of-business application:

  1. Before you begin Setup, ensure that you have updated drivers for your hardware devices and the latest system BIOS. The device manufacturers can help you obtain these items. Additionally, if you have a hardware driver that is not listed in the Windows Catalog and you do not have a manufacturer-supplied driver file for use with Windows Server 2003, contact your hardware manufacturer before running Setup.
  2. If you are currently using a line-of-business application that you will continue to use after installing Windows Small Business Server 2003, it is especially important that you verify that it is compatible with Windows Server 2003 before you begin.
  3. If you are upgrading an existing computer or plan to install existing software (such as a line-of-business application), you should ensure that hardware drivers and existing software are supported.
    During installation, Setup automatically checks your hardware and reports any potential conflicts. To verify that your computer hardware and existing applications are compatible before starting Setup, check the hardware and software compatibility information in the Windows Server Catalog at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=4303.
    If you are completing an upgrade, you also have the option of using the Check System Compatibility link available from the Autorun page of Windows Small Business Server Disc 1. If you click Check System Compatibility, the Microsoft Windows Upgrade Advisor wizard appears. It is recommended that you use this wizard to check for compatibility issues that may result with third-party applications. You can also review compatibility issues for upgrading your operating system to Windows Small Business Server 2003. However, Windows Small Business Server 2003 Setup automatically checks to ensure any Setup requirements for the operating system are met when you start Setup.

Using Disk Space

During Setup, you have the option to specify the location of where server applications and data folders for these applications are installed. It is recommended that you separate the location of your server applications and data. To do this, either use multiple physical disks or partition your disk into multiple drives. If, after reading this section, you are still unsure of how you want to allocate disk space, it is recommended that you use the default values provided during Setup, which are typical for a small business.

Partitioning vs. Separate Physical Disks

Separating the location where your operating system is installed from the location where your data is saved improves the performance of your server. You can do this during Setup either by creating partitions or using multiple physical disks, as shown in Figure A.

Partitioning vs. separate physical disks

Figure A - Partitioning vs. separate physical disks

If you have multiple drives installed on your server, save your data folders for server applications on a drive other than the one where your operating system is installed. Another option for a server with multiple drives is to create create fault-tolerant volumes (mirrored and RAID-5 volumes) using dynamic disks. A fault-tolerant volume is a way to protect your operating system and data by either creating mirrored or RAID-5 volumes.

  1. Mirrored volume.A fault-tolerant volume that duplicates data on two physical disks. It provides data redundancy by using a copy (mirror) of the volume to duplicate the information contained on the volume. The mirror is always located on a different disk. If one of the physical disks fails, the data on the failed disk becomes unavailable, but the system continues to operate using the unaffected disk.
  2. RAID-5 volume. A fault-tolerant volume with data and parity striped intermittently across three or more physical disks. Parity is a calculated value that is used to reconstruct data after a failure. With RAID-5, up to one physical disk can fail while still allowing you to recreate the data. You can create RAID-5 volumes only on dynamic disks, and you cannot mirror or extend RAID-5 volumes.
    RAID-5 volumes can be created through the operating system using Disk Management or by using a hardware solution. The hardware solution requires that your computer has a hard disk controller. In which case, you must follow your hardware manufacturer’s instructions for partitioning the disks.

A partition is a portion of a physical disk that functions as though it were a physically separate disk, as shown in Figure A, “One physical hard disk partitioned into two drives.” Once the partition is formatted and assigned a drive letter, the partition is referred to as a volume. By creating partitions as part of installing your operating system, you can then divide your physical disk usage. For example, if you have one physical disk and then create two partitions, you could install the operating system and applications on the first partition and use the second partition for user data. If you wanted to further divide the use of your disk, you could use one partition for the operating system, one partition for data folders used by applications, and one partition for user data.

Allocating Disk Space

If you are performing a new installation, before you run Setup, determine the size of the drive or partition on which to install. There is no set formula for figuring a drive or partition size. The basic principle is to allow enough space for the operating system, applications, and other files that you plan to install. The files for setting up the operating system require approximately 1.5 gigabyte (GB) to 2 GB. It is recommended that you allow considerably more disk space than the minimum amount. It is not unreasonable to allow 4 GB to 6 GB on drive or partition where the operating system is installed. This allows space for a variety of items, including adding additional components, future service packs, and the paging file used by the operating system. You then need an additional space for the server applications that you plan to install.

If you are upgrading from another operating system or a previous version of Small Business Server, you cannot modify the allocation of disk space without losing data unless you are using a dynamic disk, which was introduced in Windows 2000 Server. For more information about working with dynamic disks, see Help. To do so, click Start, click Help (in Windows 2000 Server) or Help and Support (in Windows Server 2003), and then search for “dynamic disks.”

See the following table for a list of how much disk space is used for each component:

 

Component Approximate disk space for component

Operating system

1.5 gigabyte (GB)

Server tools (not including the following Client deployment applications)

75.8 megabytes (MB)

Client deployment applications:

  • Windows service packs
  • Internet Explorer 6
  • Outlook 2003
  • Fax Client
  • ActiveSync®

1.2 GB

Exchange Server 2003

407 MB

Fax Service

3.5 MB

Additional applications you plan to install on your server after Setup is complete, such as line-of-business applications.

Check the manufacturer’s documentation

noteNote
At least 4 GB of available hard disk space is recommended for data storage. During Setup, disk quotas are enabled so that you can monitor and control the amount of disk space used by individual users. Each user is allowed 1 GB of space. Administrators are not assigned a disk quota limit. For more information about changing disk quotas, see Help after Setup is complete. To do so, click Start, click Help and Start, and search for “disk quota limits.”

Information for Completing Setup

During Setup, you are asked for general information about your company and for information necessary to configure your local network. When you configure your Internet connection and when you add users and computers, you must also collect some information. The forms in this section provide a place for you to record this information prior to beginning Setup.

Information for Configuring Server Applications

During Setup, you are prompted for general company information, for domain configuration information, and to specify server applications that you want to install.

  1. General Company Information. Company information that you provide is stored and used by several server applications. This means you do not have to supply the same information multiple times. Providing company information is optional.

     

    Item Information

    Name

    ______________________________

    Organization

    ______________________________

    Address

    ______________________________

    City

    ______________________________

    State/Province

    ______________________________

    Country/region

    ______________________________

    Zip/Postal code

    ______________________________

    Phone number

    ______________________________

    Fax number

    ______________________________

  2. Internal Domain Information. Default values are provided based on best practices for a small business. It is recommended that you use these values.

     

    Item Information

    Full DNS name for internal domain

    [organization_name.local (default)]

    NetBIOS domain name

    [organization_name (default)]

    Local network adapter IP address / subnet mask

    [192.168.16.2 / 255.255.255.0 (standard default)]

     

    Component Purpose

    Server Tools

    This component is required. It installs your intranet Web site, monitoring tools, networking tools, administration tools, and client deployment tools.

    Note

    The Outlook 2003 components within the client deployment tools is not required. However, it is highly recommended that you use Outlook 2003 as your e-mail client.

    Exchange Server 2003

    Provides messaging for Internet and intranet e-mail. It integrates with Outlook 2003 to schedule meetings or share contacts. In addition, it provides users with remote Web access to e-mail, scheduling, and contacts.

    Fax Service

    Enables users to send faxes from their desktops. This service eliminates the need for each workstation to have its own modem and a business to have multiple fax phone lines.

Required Information for Connecting to the Internet

Use this form to record information necessary to complete the Connect to the Internet task on the To Do List, which appears as part of completing Setup. To complete this task requires specific information about your network, firewall, secure Web site, and e-mail services. It is recommended that you contact your Internet service provider (ISP) to obtain this information.

Internet Connection

Dial-up connection. Complete this section if you have a dial-up connection using a modem or Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) terminal adapter.

 

Dial-up connection information Description

Phone number: ____________________

ISP user name: ____________________

Password: ____________________

Settings used to configure your local network to connect to the Internet.

Static IP address: ____________________

Preferred DNS server: ____________________

Alternate DNS server (optional): ____________________

This is required only if you have a static IP address for your Internet connection; otherwise, your IP address is obtained dynamically.

 

Broadband connection information Description

Static IP address (if applicable): ____________________

Subnet mask: ____________________

Default gateway: ____________________

Preferred DNS server: ____________________

Alternate DNS server (optional): ____________________

Settings used to configure your local network to connect to the Internet. For broadband connection information, the following applies:

  • The IP address and subnet mask are required only if your ISP provided a static IP address for connecting to the Internet.
  • If your server uses a local router (such as a dial-on-demand or ISDN router), the default gateway is the local IP address of the router, as shown in the following diagram:
Local IP address of router

Local IP address of router

The local IP address of router is not provided by your ISP. You must check the configuration of your router.

Service name (optional): ____________________

ISP user name: ____________________

Password: ____________________

This is required if you have a Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) connection.

ImportantImportant
In addition to the configuration settings performed by this wizard, you must follow your ISP’s instructions for connecting your broadband device to the Internet.

Firewall

Complete this section if you plan to enable the firewall provided with Windows Small Business Server 2003. Or, if you use a router device to connect to the Internet and it supports the UPnP™ architecture, complete this section.

You can allow predefined services for the Web, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), e-mail, virtual private network (VPN), or Terminal Services, by running the wizard.

If you want to allow custom services through the firewall, such as services necessary for a third-party application, complete the following table:

 

Custom service name Protocol type (TCP or UDP) Port number

1. ____________________

_____

_____

2. ____________________

_____

_____

noteNote
Standard services to ensure Internet connectivity are automatically allowed when you enable the firewall. For more information, click Start, click Help and Support, and search for “firewall settings.”

Secure Web Site

If you want to allow access from the Internet to your default Web site or Web services, the wizard will configure Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) to secure communications. For the wizard to configure SSL, you must provide a registered Internet domain name used to access your server from the Internet:

Web server full Internet name: ____________________

Example: ServerName.wingtiptoys.com

noteNote
You may also obtain a Web server certificate from a trusted authority. For more information, see Appendix A, “Additional Information.”

E-mail

If you will send and receive Internet e-mail using Exchange, complete the following:

  1. Specify method used to deliver e-mail to the Internet:
       Exchange uses DNS to send e-mail.
    -OR-
       Exchange forwards all e-mail to the following e-mail server at my ISP: ____________________

     

    Option Additional information

       E-mail from the Internet is delivered directly to my server.

    none

       E-mail from the Internet is held at my ISP until my server sends a signal to the following ISP e-mail server:

    ____________________

    Specify the ISP e-mail server name: ____________________

    Specify the type of signal used to notify your ISP to send mail to Exchange:

    •    ETRN
    •    TURN after Authentication
      If you use TURN after authentication to send mail to Exchange, complete the following:
      User name: ____________________
      Password: ____________________
      Use SSL for TURN after authentication:
         Yes    No
  2. Specify the registered Internet domain name for e-mail:
    E-mail domain name: ____________________
    Example: Wingtiptoys.com
  3. If you currently receive e-mail from a POP3 e-mail account and you want it delivered to your local Exchange accounts, complete the following table.
    noteNote
    Using the Microsoft Connector for POP3 Mailboxes requires that you install Exchange to use as the SMTP server for sending e-mail.

 

POP3 account username POP3 account password POP3 mail server name Supports SPA (Yes/No) Exchange mailbox

1._________________

___________

______________

__________

_________

2._________________

___________

______________

__________

_________

3._________________

___________

______________

__________

_________

4._________________

___________

______________

__________

_________

5._________________

___________

______________

__________

_________

6._________________

___________

______________

__________

_________

7._________________

___________

______________

__________

_________

8._________________

___________

______________

__________

_________

9._________________

___________

______________

__________

_________

10.________________

___________

______________

__________

_________

noteNote
Exchange mailbox is the mailbox name on your server.

Information for Adding Users and Computers

Use this form to record information requested when adding users and computers.

 

First and last name Logon name E-mail alias Telephone Password Template Client computer name Designate as a mobile client

_________

______

_____

________

________

________

______

Yes / No

_________

______

_____

________

________

________

______

Yes / No

_________

______

_____

________

________

________

______

Yes / No

_________

______

_____

________

________

________

______

Yes / No

_________

______

_____

________

________

________

______

Yes / No

_________

______

_____

________

________

________

______

Yes / No

_________

______

_____

________

________

________

______

Yes / No

_________

______

_____

________

________

________

______

Yes / No

_________

______

_____

________

________

________

______

Yes / No

_________

______

_____

________

________

________

______

Yes / No

Using the wizard, you can apply one of the following four Windows Small Business Server 2003 user templates:

  1. User Template. Accounts based on this template have access to shared folders, printers and faxes, e-mail, and the Internet. Accounts assigned with this template can open a Remote Desktop Connection to a computer running Windows XP Professional but not to a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003.
  2. Mobile User Template. Accounts based on this template have all the permissions of the User Template and can access the local network from a remote location.
  3. Power User. Accounts based on this template have all the permissions of the Mobile User Template but can also perform delegated management tasks. A Power User can log on remotely to a computer running Windows Small Business Server 2003 but cannot log on locally.
  4. Administrator Template. Accounts based on this template have unrestricted system access.
    noteNote
    In addition to using or modifying the default user templates, you can create user templates by using the Add Template Wizard. The templates you create can be customized to fit your business needs. Like the default Windows Small Business Server templates, your custom user templates provide common settings and default security group memberships for the user accounts to which they are applied.

Additional Resources

To find more information about Windows Small Business Server 2003 and the Windows Server 2003 family, see the following:

  1. Help and Support Center, which is available after running Setup by clicking Start, and then clicking Help and Support. Help and Support Center is a comprehensive resource for practical advice, tutorials, and demonstrations to help you learn to use the products in the Windows Server 2003 family. Use the Search feature, Index, or Help Contents to view all Windows Help resources, including those that are on the Internet. For an overview of the documentation resources that are available for the Windows Server 2003 family, in the Help Contents for Help and Support Center, see “Roadmap to Help and Information.”
  2. Windows Resource Kits, including:
    1. A Resource Kit for Windows Small Business Server 2003 (planned for release later) contains information to help you maximize the productivity of your small business.
    2. The Windows Deployment and Resource Kits provide technical information and tools needed to successfully deploy, manage, and support Windows operating systems.
      For more information about purchasing Windows Resource Kit tools and printed books, or to browse the Web version of Windows Resource Kit documentation, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=8022.
  3. Support Tools. These tools are intended to assist network administrators and Microsoft support personnel in diagnosing and resolving computer problems.
    Support Tools for diagnosing and resolving computer problems related to components specific to Windows Small Business Server 2003 are included in the \SBSSupport folder on Windows Small Business Server 2003 Disc 3 (or in the \CD3 folder on the DVD, if the DVD is available).
    Support Tools for diagnosing and resolving computer problems related to your operating system are included in the \Support folder on Windows Small Business Server 2003 Disc 1 (or in the \CD1 folder on the DVD, if the DVD is available). For more information about using Support Tools after Setup is complete, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “Support Tools on the Windows CD.”
    CautionCaution
    Certain support tools, if used improperly, might cause your computer to stop functioning. It is recommended that only experienced users install and use Support Tools.
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