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Windows 98 Getting Started Guide

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Chapter 5 - Advanced Issues

This chapter covers a wide variety of topics, ranging from using the online troubleshooters to connecting to printers and networks. You can read about backing up files, the FAT32 file system, disk defragmentation, and more. You'll also find a list of answers to some common questions, such as what Active Desktop and Channels are.

Using Troubleshooters

If you're having a problem with your hardware or software, first check the troubleshooters available in Windows Help. The extensive troubleshooters help you diagnose common problems and determine how best to fix them.

Updated and additional troubleshooters are available on the Support Online Web site.

Note To see the latest troubleshooting information, you can connect to Support Online by clicking the Web Help button in Windows Help or by connecting to http://support.microsoft.com/support/ 

In the troubleshooters, you can find information about topics such as:

  • Networking 

  • Modems 

  • Startup and Shutdown 

  • Printing 

  • DriveSpace 3 

  • Memory 

  • MS-DOS programs 

  • Display 

  • DirectX® 

  • Sound 

  • The Microsoft Network 

  • Hardware Conflicts 

  • Dial-Up Networking 

  • Direct Cable Connections 

  • PC Cards 

To open a troubleshooter in Windows 98 Help 

  1. Click Start, and then click Help

  2. On the Contents tab, click Troubleshooting, click Windows 98 Troubleshooters, and then click the topic you want. 

Maintaining Your Computer

You can use the Maintenance wizard to check your hard disk for problems, manage hard disk space more efficiently, delete unnecessary files, and make your programs run faster. The Maintenance wizard combines the functions of ScanDisk, Disk Cleanup, Disk Defragmenter, Compression Agent, and other tools in one easy-to-use feature. You can even schedule these tasks to run on a regular basis.

Note You can use Compression Agent to compress files only on drives compressed using DriveSpace 3. For more information, see "DriveSpace 3" on the Index tab in Windows Help.

To start the Maintenance wizard 

  • Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Maintenance wizard

    The Maintenance wizard starts. Follow the instructions on your screen. 

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For more information about power management features, look up "power management" on the Index tab in Windows Help.

Backing Up Your Files

How you back up your files depends on your current operating system.

Backing Up Files Before Installing Windows 98

Before installing Windows 98, you should back up your current files. The following procedures describe how to back up your files from Windows 3.1 and Windows 95. If you're currently using another operating system, you should see its documentation for information about backing up files.

Backing up your files in Windows 3.1

Before backing up your files, be sure the Windows Backup tool is installed on your computer. To do this, open the Microsoft Tools program group. If the Backup icon is present, Windows Backup is already installed.

If there is no Microsoft Tools program group, or if it doesn't include the Backup icon, you need to install the Backup tool. Because the Windows Backup tool is installed during MS-DOS Setup, reinstall MS-DOS and select Windows Backup when prompted.

To back up files in Windows 3.1 

  1. In the Microsoft Tools program group, double-click Backup

    If this is the first time you've used Microsoft Backup, you're prompted to configure it before performing your first backup. Click Yes. During the configuration process, Backup automatically creates a test backup of your MS-DOS folder. Follow the prompts to complete the test backup. 

  2. In the Microsoft Backup dialog box, click Backup

  3. In Backup From, select the source drive (the drive you want to copy from). 

  4. In Backup To, select the destination drive (the drive you want to copy to). 

  5. To select all files on the drive, double-click the drive letter in Backup From

    To select specific files or folders for backup, click Select Files.

    • Double-click any folder you want to back up. 

      -Or- 

    • To back up individual files in a folder, click the folder once, and then right-click each file you want to back up. 

  6. Click OK when you're finished. 

  7. In Backup Type, select a backup type. Click Help, and then click Backup for an explanation of each backup type. 

  8. Click Start Backup to begin the backup process, click OK, and then follow the instructions that appear on your screen. 

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For more information about Backup, see Windows 3.1 online Help.

Backing up your files by using Windows 95

Before backing up your files, be sure that the Windows 95 Backup tool is installed. If Backup appears in Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel, you can skip this procedure and begin backing up.

To install the Backup program in Windows 95 

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel

  2. Double-click Add/Remove Programs, click the Windows Setup tab, and then select Disk Tools

  3. Click Details, select Backup, click OK, and then click OK again. 

  4. Insert your Windows 95 Setup disk or CD when prompted, and then click OK

To back up files in Windows 95 

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Backup

  2. Read the information in the Welcome to Microsoft Backup dialog box, and then click OK

    Microsoft Backup starts. 

  3. Read the Full System Backup information, and then click OK

  4. Select each item you want to back up. To see folder contents, click the plus (+) sign to the left of each folder. 

  5. Click Next Step

  6. Select the device on which you want to store the backup files. For example, if you have a tape drive, click the tape drive icon. 

  7. Make sure you have a tape or disk in the backup drive, and then click Start Backup

  8. When prompted for a Backup Set Label, type a name for the backup. You can also set a password. Click OK

A message indicates when Backup is complete. If any errors occur during Backup, they're noted in the lower left of the Backup dialog box.

Backing Up Files After Installing Windows 98

In Windows 98, you can use Microsoft Backup to back up your files to floppy disks, a tape drive, a removable storage device, or another computer on your network. If the data on your hard disk is damaged, you can restore copies of your files from your backup.

You can back up all of the files on your computer, or you can select specific folders and files to back up. It's recommended that you back up your files on a regular basis. If your hard disk is damaged, you'll be able to retrieve information you backed up.

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For more information about the Backup program, look up "Backup" on the Index tab in Windows Help.

Note For a list of hardware that's compatible with the Backup feature, visit the Microsoft Hardware Compatibility List Web page at http://www.microsoft.com/hwdq/hwtest/ 

To install the Backup program in Windows 98 

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Add/Remove Programs

    The Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box appears. 

  2. Click the Windows Setup tab, and then select System Tools

  3. Click Details, select Backup, click OK, and then click OK again. 

  4. Insert your Windows 98 Setup disk or CD when prompted, and then click OK

To back up files in Windows 98 

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Backup

    The Microsoft Backup dialog box appears. 

  2. Follow the instructions on your screen. 

Using the Startup Disk

If you have problems with Setup or have trouble starting Windows 98, you can use a Startup Disk to start your computer and run Setup or to gain access to your system files. If you have problems with your hard disk, for example, you can use a Startup Disk to start your computer and troubleshoot your hard disk.

You're prompted to create a Startup Disk during Setup. If you want to create another Startup Disk after you install Windows 98, you easily can. You can even save a specific startup configuration on a disk. For example, you can save the specific drivers for your computer on a Startup Disk.

The Startup Disk contains generic CD-ROM drivers, which you can use if your computer has difficulty communicating with your CD-ROM drive. To use these drivers, select the CD-ROM drive option.

Important Startup disks created with previous versions of Windows aren't compatible with Windows 98.

To create a Startup Disk from within Windows 98 

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Add/Remove Programs

    The Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box appears. 

  2. Click the Startup Disk tab, and then click Create Disk

  3. Label a floppy disk "Windows 98 Startup Disk," insert it into your floppy disk drive, and then click OK

To start your computer using a Startup Disk 

  1. Insert the Startup Disk in the floppy disk drive. 

  2. Restart your computer. 

    The Microsoft Windows 98 Startup menu appears.

  3. Type the number of the appropriate CD-ROM option, and then press ENTER. 

  4. Follow the instructions on your screen.

    After a series of scans, the MS-DOS prompt appears. From this prompt, you can gain access to the system files on the Startup Disk. For information about running Setup from a Startup Disk, see Chapter 2, "Installing Windows 98." 

    Note If you normally use a CD-ROM drive and you start your computer with a Startup Disk, the drive letter designated to the CD-ROM may change for that session. For example, if your CD-ROM is normally drive D, it might be temporarily changed to drive E. 

Uninstalling Windows 98

During the upgrade from an earlier version of Windows to Windows 98, you have the option of saving your old system files. If you save your system files, you can uninstall Windows 98 and restore your earlier version of Windows.

Important This recovery capability is available only if you don't compress the hard disk on which Windows 98 is installed.

To uninstall Windows 98 

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Add/Remove Programs

  2. On the Install/Uninstall tab, click Uninstall Windows 98, and then click Add/Remove Programs

  3. Click Yes, and then click Yes again. 

    Your hard disk is checked for errors. 

  4. After the disk check is complete, click Yes to continue. 

    Your computer restarts, and your previous version of Windows is restored. 

  5. Remove any floppy disks, and then press ENTER when prompted. 

    Your previous version of Windows starts. 

Using the FAT32 File System

When you save files, your computer uses a file system to control how your files and folders are stored on your hard disk. Earlier versions of MS-DOS and Windows use the FAT16 file system exclusively. Windows 98 uses FAT16 by default, but you have the option of using FAT32, an enhanced file system that can improve disk performance and increase available disk space.

Understanding How Information Is Stored

When you save a file or install a program, your computer stores the information on your hard disk in small areas called clusters. The smaller the cluster size you use, the more efficiently your disk stores information. Cluster size depends on the size of your partition, and partition size depends on the file system you use. By default, most computers use just one partition.

For information about dividing your disk into partitions, consult the Windows 98 Resource Kit.

The table below illustrates the larger partition size and smaller cluster size available through the FAT32 file system. Partitions larger than 2 gigabyte (GB) are not supported with FAT16, and partitions smaller than 512 MB are not supported with FAT32.

Partition size

FAT16 cluster size

FAT32 cluster size

32 MB (megabytes)

2 KB (kilobytes)

128 MB

2 KB

256 MB

4 KB

512 MB

8 KB

4 KB

1 GB (gigabyte)

16 KB

4 KB

2 GB

32 KB

4 KB

3 GB–7 GB

4 KB

8 GB– 16 GB

8 KB

16 GB– 32 GB

16 KB

Larger than 32 GB

32 KB

If your hard disk is smaller than 2 GB and your computer uses the FAT16 file system, you may not see much improvement if you convert to FAT32. But you may want to convert to FAT32 if your hard disk is between 2 GB and 2 terabytes (TB) and you want to improve its efficiency.

The FAT32 file system has the following advantages over FAT16:

  • It allows programs to open more quickly, on average, 36% faster. 

  • It uses a smaller cluster size, resulting in more efficient use of disk space — on average, 28% more disk space. 

  • It allows a hard disk of up to 2 TB to be formatted as a single drive, eliminating the need to partition the hard disk. 

  • It can relocate the root directory and use backup copies of the FAT, making your computer less vulnerable to crashes. 

Converting to FAT32

You can use the FAT32 conversion tool to easily convert your hard disk to the FAT32 file system. However, before you convert file systems, you should read the following information carefully:

  • If you didn't make a Windows 98 Startup Disk, you should create one by following the steps in the "Using the Startup Disk" section earlier in this chapter before you convert to FAT32. 

  • You shouldn't convert any drives on which you also want to run an operating system that doesn't support FAT32. Also, if you're running Windows 98 and another operating system in a dual-boot environment, converting your primary disk drive to FAT32 may cause the other operating system to be unusable. This is true even if the other operating system is installed on a different drive. 

  • If anti-virus software is running, it may detect the request to update the partition table and boot record and prompt you to allow the updates. If this occurs, instruct the anti-virus software to allow the updates. 

  • Once you convert to FAT32, you can't compress stored information or convert back to FAT16 unless you use a third-party partition management utility designed for that purpose. 

  • If you have a removable disk that you use with another operating system, don't convert to FAT32. 

  • Hibernate features may not work on a FAT32 drive. Hibernate features are those that allow some computers to enter a suspend state, with all power turned off. 

  • If you convert your hard drive to FAT32, you cannot uninstall Windows 98. 

  • Although most programs are not affected by the conversion from FAT16 to FAT32, some older disk utilities that depend on FAT16 don't work with FAT32 drives. Contact your disk utility manufacturer to see if there is an updated version that is compatible with FAT32. 

A FAT32 drive can be shared across a network by MS-DOS, Windows 3.1, Windows 95, Windows NT® Workstation version 4.0, and Windows NT Server version 4.0. In addition, MS-DOS version 7.1 (the version that ships with Windows 98) also supports FAT32.

To convert your file system to FAT32 

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Drive Converter (FAT32)

  2. Click Next when you've finished reading the information. 

  3. In Drives, click the drive to be converted, and then click Next

    A message appears, reminding you that previous versions of MS-DOS, Windows, and Windows NT can't gain access to FAT32 drives. 

  4. Click OK to continue, or click Cancel to quit the Drive Converter wizard. 

    The Drive Converter wizard searches for anti-virus programs or disk utilities that are incompatible with FAT32. If the wizard finds any incompatible programs, you can click Details to display a description of the problem. If no incompatible programs are found, click Next

  5. If you want to back up your files before converting to FAT32, click Create Backup. If you don't have the Windows 98 Backup program installed, you're prompted to install it. 

  6. When you're ready to continue, click Next, and then click Next again. 

    Your computer restarts, and the conversion begins. It may take an hour or more to complete the defragmentation and conversion processes on large or very full drives. 

    After the conversion completes, a message appears telling you whether the conversion was successful or unsuccessful. 

    Caution Your anti-virus software may detect that the partition table and boot record have changed and offer to "repair" them for you. Don't perform this repair. If you do, your computer boot record or partition table will be changed, and your drive and all of the data on it may become inaccessible. 

  7. If the conversion was successful, click Finish. The conversion is complete. 

    If the conversion was unsuccessful, a message explains why the conversion failed. 

Defragmenting Your Hard Disk

The Disk Defragmenter utility rearranges the data on your disk so that each file is stored in contiguous blocks, rather than being scattered across different areas of the disk. This defragmentation of stored information helps to speed disk performance. The time required for defragmentation depends on the size of your hard disk and the amount of data on the disk.

To defragment your hard drive 

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Disk Defragmenter

  2. In the Select Drive dialog box, select the hard disk you want to defragment. 

  3. Close any open programs, and then click OK

    Defragmentation begins. 

Using Your Computer on a Network

This section describes how to connect your computer to a network, share folders and printers, and use the Dial-Up Networking feature.

For information about connecting to the Internet, see "Internet Setup," later in this chapter.

Connecting to a Network

If the Network Neighborhood icon is on your Windows 98 desktop, your network connection is already set up, and you can skip this section.

A network is made up of client and server computers. A computer that connects to the network and uses shared resources is called a client. A central computer that contains shared information is called a server. This section explains setting up a client computer.

To connect to a network, you need the correct hardware installed in your computer. This includes a network adapter (network card or other device) and cables.

Along with additional hardware, your computer must have certain software components to communicate with the network. Software needed to connect a computer to a network includes the following:

  • Client software, which allows your computer to connect to servers. 

  • A protocol, which is essentially the language your computer uses to communicate over the network. Several protocols are available. Two computers must use the same protocol to communicate with each other. 

  • Service software, which allows such functions as file and print sharing. 

Before proceeding, you need to know which types of software to use. Ask your network administrator about client software and configuration options. Windows 98 also automatically detects and installs the other components you need in order to connect to the network. Windows 98 also automatically detects and installs TCP/IP networks during setup.

If you're connecting to another type of network, or if you're not connecting during Windows 98 installation, use the following procedure. This procedure assumes that your computer is already physically connected to the network — for instance, by network cable. You can also connect computers by serial or parallel cable.

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For more information about individual connections, look up "Direct Cable Connection" on the Index tab in Windows Help.

To connect your computer to a network 

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Network

  2. In the Network dialog box, click Add

  3. Click Client, and then click Add

    A list of client software appears. 

  4. In the Manufacturers list, click the name of the manufacturer of your network software. 

  5. In the Network Clients list, select the client software you are using, and then click OK

    The client software is added to your computer. 

  6. On the Configuration tab, select your client, and then click Properties

  7. Enter the configuration options for your network, and then click OK

    If you don't know the options for your network, contact your network administrator. 

  8. Click OK, and then click OK again. 

    The client software is installed and your computer restarts. 

Sharing Folders and Printers

If you set up a Microsoft or Novell network client, you can share your documents — and any printers attached to your computer — with other people on the network. To use file and print sharing, you must first choose which of two types of access you want to give other users.

  • Share-level control is the default access setting. It lets you require a password for each shared resource. 

  • User-level control lets you specify who has access to each shared resource, but it does not let you require a password. 

To change from share-level control to user-level control 

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Network

  2. Click the Access Control tab, and then click User-level access control

  3. In Obtain list of users and groups from, type the name of the domain or server you want to use, and then click OK

    You may be prompted to supply additional information about the domain or server you specified. 

  4. Restart your computer. 

To set up file- and print-sharing services 

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Network

  2. In the Network dialog box, click File and Print Sharing

  3. Select the check box(es) for the sharing options you want, click OK, and then click OK again. 

    A message prompts you to insert your Windows 98 CD or Setup disks so that File and Print Sharing can be installed. You must restart your computer before the new settings will take effect. 

After you've set up file- and print-sharing services, you can share a folder or printer.

To share a folder with share-level access control 

You can also use this procedure to share an entire disk drive. Instead of selecting a folder, select a drive icon.

  1. In My Computer, right-click the folder you want to share, and then click Sharing

  2. In the Properties dialog box, click the Sharing tab, and then click Shared As

  3. In Share Name, type a name for the folder. 

    In Comment, you can type a brief comment or description of the folder. 

  4. In Access Type, click Read Only, Full, or Depends on Password

    Regardless of which type of access you select, you have the option of adding a password. 

  5. Type a password if you want to use one, and then click OK

  6. Retype the password, and then click OK

    The folder or printer icon changes to a folder or a printer with a hand, indicating that the item is now shared. 

To share a folder with user-level access control 

  1. In My Computer, right-click the folder you want to share, and then click Sharing

  2. On the Sharing tab, click Shared As

  3. In Share Name, type a name for the folder. 

    In Comment, you can type a brief comment or a description of the folder. 

  4. Click Add

  5. In the Add Users dialog box, click the name(s) of the person(s) to whom you want to grant permissions. 

    You can scroll the list of users, or you can simply type the name and the list will scroll automatically. If you want to grant the same permissions to everyone connected to your network, leave The World selected. 

  6. Click the type of access permissions you want to give the selected user(s). 

    Read Only means the user has the ability to read, but not change, files. 

    Full Access means the user has the ability to read, delete, and change files. 

    Custom means the user has a combination of privileges that you specify. 

  7. When you're finished adding users and permissions, click OK

To share a printer with share-level access control 

  1. In My Computer, double-click the Printers folder. 

  2. Right-click the printer you want to share, and then click Sharing

  3. On the Sharing tab, click Shared As

  4. In Share Name, type a name for the printer. 

    In Comment, you can type a brief comment or a description of the printer. 

    In Password, you can type a password that a user must type to use the printer. 

  5. Click OK

    If you typed a password, retype the password to verify it. Click OK

To share a printer with user-level access control 

  1. In My Computer, double-click the Printers folder. 

  2. Right-click the printer you want to share, and then click Sharing

  3. On the Sharing tab, click Shared As

  4. In Share Name, type a name for the printer. 

    In Comment, you can type a brief comment or a description of the printer. 

  5. Click Add

  6. In the Add Users dialog box, click the name(s) of the person(s) to whom you want to grant permissions. 

    You can scroll the list of users, or you can simply type the name and the list will scroll automatically. If you want to grant the same permissions to everyone connected to your network, leave The World selected. 

  7. Click Full Access

    The name(s) of the person(s) you have chosen will be moved to the box on the right side of the screen. 

  8. When you're finished adding users and permissions, click OK

Using files and printers controlled by other computers

If you have correct permissions, you can use files and printers that are shared on other computers.

To use a shared folder or printer 

  1. Double-click Network Neighborhood

  2. Double-click the icon for the computer that controls the folder or printer you want to use. 

    If the computer you are looking for is not in your workgroup or domain, first click Entire Network, and then double-click the appropriate workgroup or domain. 

  3. To use a shared folder or printer, double-click its icon. 

Using Dial-Up Networking

If the Dial-Up Networking icon doesn't appear in the My Computer window, you must install the component.

You can use a phone line and your modem to connect to your office network or an Internet service provider (ISP). By using Dial-Up Networking, you can use any shared resource (such as e-mail or a folder) to which you have access.

For you to connect two computers through Dial-Up Networking, both computers must have modems installed, both computers must have Dial-Up Networking set up, and the computer to which you want to connect must be set up as a server.

If there's no Dial-Up Networking icon in the My Computer window, you can use the following procedure to install it.

To install Dial-Up Networking 

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Add/Remove Programs

  2. Click the Windows Setup tab, click Communications, and then click Details

  3. Select the Dial-Up Networking check box, and then click OK. Click OK again, and then follow the instructions that appear on your screen. 

Important After you install Dial-Up Networking on the computer you want to dial into, be sure to share the folders you want to use.

With Dial-Up Networking you can create an individual icon for each phone number you call. For example, you could have an icon for your employer's server and one for MSN. When you set up a new connection, an icon is created in the Dial-Up Networking folder.

To create a connection 

  1. Double-click My Computer, and then double-click Dial-Up Networking

  2. Double-click Make New Connection, and then follow the instructions in the Dial-Up Networking wizard. 

The behavior of each connection is controlled by the properties of the icon. To view or modify these properties, right-click the icon, and then click Properties.

The Server Types tab should indicate the server this connection will dial, as specified by your network administrator. The following settings usually work:

  • The default setting, PPP, is correct for most servers, including most Internet servers and newer Netware servers. 

  • If you're connecting to an older Netware server, select NRN. 

  • If you're connecting to a Unix network, select CSLIP or SLIP, as directed by the network administrator. 

  • If you're connecting to a Windows for Workgroups or Windows NT 3.51 server, select that server type. 

For most connections, the default settings on the rest of the tab are correct.

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For more information about networking, look up the following topics in Windows Help:

  • "Dial-Up Networking" on the Index tab. 

  • "Dial-Up Networking" under Troubleshooting, Windows 98 Troubleshooters on the Contents tab. 

  • "Modem" under Troubleshooting, Windows 98 Troubleshooters on the Contents tab. 

Setting Up an Internet Connection

Using the Internet Connection wizard, you can quickly set up an Internet account and connection. After you set up a connection, you can also use the wizard to set up e-mail, newsgroups, and directory services.

To connect to the Internet, you need a modem or you need to have a network card installed in your computer. When you have a modem, you connect to the Internet through your phone line. When you have a network card, you connect through the network cable system.

If you're connecting via modem, you sign up with an Internet service provider or an online service. An Internet service provider (ISP) is a company that provides Internet connections. An online service — a subcategory of ISPs — provides the Internet connection and many additional services. Well-known online services include The Microsoft Network (MSN) and America Online® (AOL).

Using the Internet Connection Wizard

If your computer isn't connected to the Internet, the Connect to the Internet icon appears on your desktop. You can start the wizard by simply double-clicking Connect to the Internet, or you can use the procedure below.

To start the Internet Connection wizard 

  • Click Start, point to Programs, point to Internet Explorer, and then click Connection Wizard

    The Internet Connection wizard starts. 

The wizard's second screen offers three connection options. Read the section that applies to your situation and follow the instructions in the wizard.

Option 1: Setting up a new Internet account

When you use the Internet Connection wizard to set up a new ISP, the wizard retrieves a list of providers from the Microsoft Internet Referral system. You can then click the name of an ISP, and you'll see a page with more information about that ISP.

Option 2: Connecting to an existing Internet account

Use this option if you've already set up an account with an ISP, but you've never connected using this computer. This includes using a local area network (LAN), such as your employer's network, for your Internet connection. If you want to set up a connection through a local area network, contact your network administrator.

Option 3: Don't show the Internet Connection wizard again

Use this option if you've already set up an Internet connection on your computer.

Setting Up E-mail, Newsgroups, and Internet Directory Services

The Internet Connection wizard may prompt you for information about e-mail or Internet Directory Services. These wizard screens appear when you create a new Internet connection or open Microsoft Outlook Express for the first time.

You can use Outlook Express to send and receive e-mail over the Internet. You can use Outlook Express to view Usenet newsgroups. And you can use the Internet Directory Service to record your address information in many phone book-like resources on the Internet.

Before using the wizard to set up these features, you need the following information from your ISP:

  • Your e-mail address, for example: 

    yourname@mycompany.com 

  • Identification requirements, such as a Secure Password Authentication or a user ID and password. 

  • The type and name of the server that processes your incoming mail. For example, your incoming mail might be processed by a POP3 type server named "SERVER99." 

  • The name of the server that processes your outgoing mail. For example, it may also be "SERVER99." 

  • The name of your Internet news (NNTP) server and its log-on requirements, if any. For example, it may also be "SERVER99." 

  • The name of your Internet directory (LDAP) server and its log-on requirements, if any. 

Configuring Your Internet Connection

When you set up Internet connections, an icon for each connection is created in the Dial-Up Networking folder, which you can find in My Computer. If you connect to multiple ISPs, you'll create multiple icons in this folder. Each connection may have different dialing properties, including different phone numbers, a different user name and password, or other settings. This section describes how to manually change three of those settings: protocols, IP addresses, and DNS addresses.

Changing Your Internet Protocol

Essentially, a protocol is the language that two computers use to communicate. Most ISPs use the PPP protocol when connecting your computer to the Internet. Some ISPs use other protocols, such as SLIP or CSLIP. Your ISP should tell you what protocol to use or provide you with a setup program that selects a protocol automatically.

To change your Internet protocol 

  1. In the Dial-Up Networking folder, right-click the icon for the connection you want to change. 

  2. In the shortcut menu that appears, click Properties

  3. Click the Server Types tab. 

  4. In Type of Dial-Up Server, select an Internet protocol from the list, and then click OK

    Note If you're using a modem to connect to the Internet, you can speed up the initial connection process by clearing the checkboxes for Log on to a network, NetBEUI, and IPX/SPX Compatible. 

Entering Your IP Address Manually

Every computer connected to the Internet has an IP address, a unique number that identifies one computer to the others. When you connect, your ISP usually grants your computer an IP address automatically. In some cases, though, you need to enter the IP address manually. Your ISP should tell you if this is the case and provide you with an IP address.

To enter an IP address manually 

  1. In the Dial-Up Networking folder, right-click the icon for the connection you want to change. 

  2. In the shortcut menu that appears, click Properties

  3. Click the Server Types tab. 

  4. Click TCP/IP Settings, and then select Specify an IP address

  5. In IP address, type the IP address provided by your ISP, and then click OK

Entering Your DNS Address Manually

To find addresses on the Internet, your computer needs to connect to a Domain Name Server (DNS), which assigns IP addresses. In most cases, a DNS address is automatically assigned by your ISP. If your ISP requires that you set the DNS address on your computer, you need to enter the address manually.

To enter a DNS address manually 

  1. In the Dial-Up Networking folder, right-click the icon for the connection you want to change. 

  2. In the shortcut menu that appears, click Properties

  3. Click the Server Types tab. 

  4. Click TCP/IP Settings, and then select Specify name server addresses

  5. In Primary DNS, type the DNS address provided by your ISP. You can also enter a secondary DNS address, if needed. Click OK when finished. 

Logging On Manually to an ISP

After you've made a connection to an ISP, you log on to its network automatically in most cases. An ISP using an older server may require that you use a terminal window to log on manually. Your ISP will tell you if you need to do this.

To set a connection for opening a terminal window 

  1. In the Dial-Up Networking folder, right-click the icon for the connection you want to change. 

  2. In the shortcut menu that appears, click Properties

  3. On the General tab, click Configure

  4. Click the Options tab, select an option in Connection control, and then click OK

Every time you use this connection, the Terminal Screen appears. In this screen, the ISP prompts you for information (such as a pre-assigned user name and password). You'll type the appropriate information after each prompt. The ISP then connects you to the Internet. If you frequently use this connection, you can automate the logon process by using a script.

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For information about using a script, look up "script files, Dial-Up Networking" on the Index tab in Windows Help.

Printing

In Windows 98, you can use the Add Printer wizard to quickly set up printers, select default printers, and change printer settings. The wizard guides you step-by-step through printer setup.

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For additional information about printing, look up "Printing" on the Contents tab in Windows Help. For step-by-step assistance with identifying and correcting a printing problem, see "Print" under Troubleshooting on the Contents tab in Windows Help.

Setting Up a Printer

Before you begin, make sure your printer is correctly connected to your computer, that the power is on, and that you know the make and model of the printer. If you're planning to use a printer shared over a network, you may also need to know the path (for example, \\accounting\printer1). You can also browse for the printer in Network Neighborhood and then double-click the printer icon to set it up.

Note If any printers are already set up, their icons appear in the Printers folder. To view the Printers folder, click the Start button, point to Settings, and then click Printers.

To set up a printer 

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Printers, and then double-click Add Printer

    Follow the instructions on your screen. The remaining steps vary depending on whether you choose to set up a local printer or a network printer.

    • In most cases, if you're setting up a printer that's attached to your computer, you should choose LPT1 as the port. 

    • If you're setting up a network printer, you're prompted to type the network path or queue name. If you don't know this information, click Browse to locate the printer, or ask your network administrator. 

  2. When you finish, the icon for your printer appears in the Printers folder. Your printer is ready for use. 

Determining the Default Printer

Your print jobs are always sent to the default printer unless you specify otherwise. In the Printers dialog box, the default printer has a check mark beside its icon. You can change your default printer at any time.

To set a default printer 

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Printers

  2. Right-click the icon of the printer you want to set as the default. 

    A shortcut menu appears. 

  3. Select Set as Default

Printing a Document

After you set up a printer, you can easily print your documents. In many programs, the Print command is available on the File menu.

To print an open document 

  • On the File menu, click Print

Frequently Asked Questions

The following list of frequently asked questions (FAQ) provides a quick way for you to find answers to common questions about Windows 98. For the latest information about these and other Windows 98 issues, visit the Support Online Web site at the following address:

http://support.microsoft.com/support 

Printing

Do I have to add a printer during Setup?

If during Setup you're asked to add a printer, you can skip this step by clicking Cancel. You can add a printer later by using the Add Printer wizard.

For information about adding a printer after Windows is installed, see "Setting Up a Printer," earlier in this section.

Why won't my document print?

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For step-by-step assistance with identifying and correcting a printing problem, see "Print" under Troubleshooting on the Contents tab in Windows Help.

How can I troubleshoot my network printing setup?

If you're having trouble printing to a network printer, you should perform the following checks:

  • Make sure you have the appropriate permissions to access the network printer. You may need to ask your network administrator to give you the proper rights. 

  • Make sure you use the correct syntax when typing the printer name. You must use two backslashes to begin a printer share name. For example, a printer share name could look like this: \\accounting\printer1 

Desktop Options

How can I change to the single-click option?

By default, you open files and folders by double-clicking their icons. If you prefer more Web-like navigation, you can easily change to single-click browsing. To change your browsing options, you change your desktop style. For more information about desktop styles, see "Choosing a Desktop Style" in Chapter 4, "Customizing Your Desktop."

What is the Active Desktop?

Using the Active Desktop, you can display Web content as your wallpaper. The content can include Web pages, documents, or channels. Whether you use a Web or Classic style desktop, you can use the Active Desktop feature. For more information, see "Using the Active Desktop" in Chapter 4, "Customizing Your Desktop."

Can I make my desktop look and act like Windows 95?

You can turn off any or all of the following features: single-clicking, the Active Desktop, Channel Bar, and Web-like folder view. For information about turning these features off, see Chapter 4, "Customizing Your Desktop."

Next, you need to hide the Active Desktop, if it's showing. To hide the Active Desktop, you right-click a blank area of the desktop, point to Active Desktop, and then click to clear the View As Web Page check mark.

Finally, you need to hide any toolbars displayed on the taskbar and in windows. To remove a toolbar from the taskbar, right-click a blank area on the taskbar, point to Toolbars, and then click the name of the toolbar.

The Internet

Why does the Internet Connection wizard open?

The Internet Connection wizard collects information required for you to use the Internet. The wizard may open the first time you open a Web page or HTML file. To read more about the wizard, see "Setting Up an Internet Connection," earlier in this chapter.

Why am I getting a "Navigation Canceled" message?

If you aren't connected to the Internet, you might receive this message when you try to jump to a Web page or use the Search Explorer Bar. See "Why do I receive an error message when I'm connecting to a Web page?" for more solutions.

Why do I receive an error message when I'm connecting to a Web page?

Occasionally, the Web page you want to view won't open. When this happens, you receive an error message in a dialog box or on a Web page. For example, you may receive the error "HTTP/1.0 404 Object Not Found," which means that the Web page you're trying to view may not exist.

Often, the only alternative is to try connecting to the site at a later time, but there are other solutions you can try:

  • Update the page by clicking Refresh

  • Click Back to return to the page you were just viewing, and then click the link to the page you want to view. 

  • If you typed an address for a Web site, check for errors. 

  • Display a different site. If you can connect to another site, the Web page you originally tried to visit either doesn't exist or is malfunctioning. 

  • If you can't connect to any Web site, then the problem is probably with your Internet connection. Make sure you're still connected to your ISP and that your modem is working. 

What's a channel?

A channel is a Web site designed to deliver content from the Internet to your computer. A content provider determines when and what information is available for each channel. To view the content in a channel, you click one of the channel buttons on the Channel Bar.

The Channel Bar displays all of the channels installed on your computer. You don't have to subscribe to a channel to view it, but the channel is added to the Channel Bar if you do subscribe. When you first install Windows 98, the Channel Bar appears on your desktop. If you close the Channel Bar at any time, you need to add it back to your desktop.

For information about channels, see Chapter 4, "Customizing Your Desktop."

What's a subscription?

A subscription is a way to have Windows 98 automatically check your favorite Web pages for new content. You select how and when you are notified — Windows 98 automatically delivers the new content to your computer on a regular basis.

What's the difference between a subscription and a channel?

A subscription is a tool for automatically downloading any Web page, including channels, to your computer according to a schedule that you set up. A channel is a kind of Web site specially designed to deliver content to your computer. You can follow a content delivery schedule suggested by the content provider, or you can set up your own schedule by subscribing to the channel.

For more information about using subscriptions and channels, see Chapter 4, "Customizing Your Desktop."

General Issues

Why can't I find a certain feature?

Many Windows 98 features — such as games, accessibility options, WebTV for Windows, Backup, and multimedia tools — are optional components. If you can't locate a feature, it may not have been installed during Windows installation. To install an option after Windows 98 is already installed, double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon in Control Panel, click the Windows Setup tab, select the item(s) to install, and click OK.

What's the Favorites folder?

Favorites is a folder in which you can store shortcuts to Web pages, subscriptions, folders, and files that you frequently use. You can easily open Favorites from the Start menu.

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For information about managing Favorites, look up "Favorites" on the Index tab in Internet Explorer Help.

How do I use My Documents?

My Documents, which is new to your desktop for Windows 98, is the default storage location for documents you create. For example, if you create a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, Excel saves the spreadsheet in My Documents unless you specify another location.

To change the default storage location for a program's files, see the program's documentation.

What's the Users icon in Control Panel?

The new Users icon in Control Panel allows you to view, modify, and delete the user profiles on your computer. User profiles are settings — desktop appearance, Start menu, passwords, and so on — unique to each person using your computer.

How do I start Windows in troubleshooting mode?

You can start your computer in safe mode, a minimal version of Windows useful for troubleshooting hardware and driver problems. If you press CTRL at startup (after power-on tests but before Windows 98 starts), a list of startup choices appears. Safe mode is one of the choices on this list.

In safe mode, Windows 98 uses default settings (VGA monitor, no network connection, a Microsoft Mouse driver, and the minimum device drivers required to start Windows). You won't have access to CD-ROM drives, printers, or other devices. Safe mode enables you to troubleshoot major problems by allowing you to start Windows, change settings, and then restart Windows to see if the problem has been corrected.

What's IEEE 1394?

IEEE 1394 is a connection standard to allow the control of various hardware — including VCRs, stereos, and so on — through your computer. It's not the same as the Universal Serial Bus (USB) standard.

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For more information, look up "IEEE 1394 devices, ports" on the Index tab in Windows Help.

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