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Installing Exchange Server 5.5 on Windows 2000 Server Quick Start Guide

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Updated : June 14, 2001

March 2000

This Quick Start Guide for Exchange Server 5.5 assumes that you have either installed Microsoft Windows® 2000 on a clean computer, or you have upgraded an existing installation of Windows 95, Windows 98, or Microsoft Windows NT Workstation, to Windows 2000.

For more information on migrating Exchange Server 5.5 to Windows 2000, including information on Microsoft Windows 2000 Active Directory Connector and Exchange disaster recovery, download the Upgrading Exchange Server 5.5 to the Windows 2000 Platform white paper.

You'll find the following topics on this page:

  • Requirements

  • Planning

  • Upgrading

  • New Installations

  • Clustering

  • Exchange Connectors

Requirements

Windows 2000 supports the following versions of Exchange Server:

  • Exchange Server 5.5 Standard Edition with Service Pack 3 (SP3)

  • Exchange Server 5.5 Enterprise Edition with SP3

Versions prior to Exchange Server 5.5 are not supported on the Windows 2000 Server Platform.

Planning

Choosing the Edition and Role of Windows 2000
It is important to note that Windows 2000 does not support upgrading editions. For example, you cannot upgrade a Windows 2000 Server to Advanced Server or vice versa. To avoid reinstalling Exchange Server in the future, be sure to use the Windows 2000 edition that will accommodate the needs of your organization today and in the future.

Exchange Server can run on a server that is configured as a domain controller or member server. Exchange Server running on a Windows 2000 backup domain controller (BDC) can be upgraded to a Windows 2000 domain controller and if necessary then demoted to a member server role by removing the Active Directory service using DCPROMO. Windows 2000 domain can be in either mode and Exchange Server will operate. Mixed mode allows a Windows NT 4.0 BDC in a Windows 2000 domain.

Upgrading Multiple Servers

It is recommended that you upgrade the primary domain controller (PDC) first. Then you can upgrade member servers and backup domain controllers. Exchange Servers can interoperate regardless of the operating system.

To minimize server down time, upgrade local servers only after successfully upgrading the bridgehead and gateway servers.

Connecting to Legacy Systems

Windows 2000 may not provide connectivity with particular network protocols. In this case, you may want to keep Exchange Server on at least one computer running Windows NT 4.0.

For more information, download the Upgrading Exchange Server 5.5 to the Windows 2000 Platform white paper.

Avoiding Potential Service Conflicts

Windows 2000 Active Directory uses the standard LDAP port 389 for access. By default, Exchange Server also uses this port. You must reassign the port for Exchange Server to grant LDAP access to its directory.

For more information, read 224447, XADM: How to Change LDAP Port Assignments in Exchange Server.

Before You Start

Upgrading or installing Exchange Server in a Windows 2000 environment should be a relatively uncomplicated task. To be sure the upgrade process proceeds smoothly, review the complete Upgrading Exchange Server 5.5 to the Windows 2000 Platform white paper before starting the upgrade. It is also strongly recommended that you:

  • Be sure that proper backup and recovery procedures are in place.

  • Be sure that the required Exchange service packs are installed and available.

  • Consult the Microsoft Knowledge Base Web site for the latest technical information.

Upgrading

After you have determined the order in which you are upgrading and the appropriate edition of Windows 2000 for each computer, you are ready to proceed. Follow these steps:

  1. Run the Windows 2000 upgrade.

  2. Be sure that DNS is configured properly. See the Windows 2000 Online Documentation for more details.

For more information see:

218158, Upgrading to Windows 2000 Upgrades Existing Novell Client

242157, XCON: TP4 Transport Protocol No Longer Supported Under Windows 2000

169668, XCON: X.25 Support for SAT Cards

169667, XCON: X.25 Support for CIREL Cards

235669, XADM: Exchange Server 5.5 Setup Fails on Windows 2000 Server

224447, XADM: How to Change LDAP Port Assignments in Exchange Server

240135, XFOR: 5.5 Migration Wizard Fails When Creating Windows NT Accounts in Windows 2000 Domain

233400, XGEN: Using Windows 2000 Encrypted File System to Encrypt Mdbdata Folder and Contents

New Installations

Performing a new installation of Exchange Server on Windows 2000 can present a few more issues to consider.

Running Setup

Windows 2000 Terminal Services is a part of Windows 2000. If the service is enabled, you must run Exchange setup using Add/Remove Programs in the Control Panel. This puts the server in installation mode.

Important: During Exchange setup, Windows 2000 may warn you that the application may not be compatible. It is safe to ignore the message and continue Exchange setup. This happens because Exchange Server SP3 is not installed yet.

Security and Accounts

  • Be sure that the service account you are using for Exchange is a member of your local administrator group or at least a member of the Power Users group on the local computer.

  • Be sure to log on to the domain from the server on which you are running setup.

To set up Microsoft Exchange Server with Internet Mail Service on a new Windows 2000–based server, follow the same rules as the upgrade. However, for a new server, you must consider the basic Windows 2000 configuration issues.

  • Be sure DNS is configured properly. See the Windows 2000 Online Documentation for more information.

  • Be sure to use proper security credentials and account memberships when installing Exchange.

  • If installing on a Windows 2000 domain controller, be sure that the SMTP service is removed or disabled.

  • Install Exchange Server SP3.

  • Configure Exchange and Internet Mail Service.

For more information see:

247407, XADM: The Network Path Was Not Found When Installing Exchange Server 5.5 on a Computer Running Windows 2000 Server

235669, XADM: Exchange Server 5.5 Setup Fails on Windows 2000 Server

240135, XFOR: 5.5 Migration Wizard Fails When Creating Windows NT Accounts in Windows 2000 Domain

224447, XADM: How to Change LDAP Port Assignments in Exchange Server

233400, XGEN: Using Windows 2000 Encrypted File System to Encrypt Mdbdata Folder and Contents

Clustering

Upgrading a Cluster
To upgrade a computer running Exchange Server 5.5 on Windows NT 4.0 with Clustering Service to Windows 2000 with Windows Clustering, first install Exchange Server 5.5 SP3 on the active node. After the service pack installation has completed successfully, install the service pack on the inactive node. Windows 2000 Advanced Server and Datacenter Server provide clustering support.

To upgrade a computer running Exchange Server 5.5 SP3 on Windows NT 4.0 with Clustering Service to Windows 2000 with Windows Clustering:

  1. Shut down the inactive node.

    Do one of the following:

    • If you are installing Windows 2000 from a CD, you are asked if you would like to upgrade to Windows 2000. Choose Yes.

    • If you are installing from a network share, run Winnt32.exe, and choose Upgrade to Windows 2000.

  2. After the successful completion of the installation on the primary node, upgrade the second node to Windows 2000.

It is not possible to upgrade a computer running Exchange Server 5.5 on Windows NT 4.0 with Clustering Service on the Alpha platform to Windows 2000 because Windows 2000 no longer supports the Alpha platform. For more information about this topic, please see the Microsoft's Support for 32-bit Alpha-based Products page on the Windows NT Server Web site.

It is possible to transfer the Exchange databases from the Alpha-based cluster to an i386-based cluster. For details, see 155216, XADM: How to Move Exchange Server to a New Computer with the Same Name.

New Installation

To install Exchange Server 5.5 on a server with Windows Clustering, you need to already have Windows 2000 Advanced Server or Datacenter Server installed, and Windows Clustering installed and configured with a shared physical disk, IP address, and network name. Consult the Windows 2000 Online Documentation for information on configuring Windows Clustering.

Important: Microsoft Outlook® Web Access is not supported with Exchange Server 5.5 running in a clustered environment.

Once both nodes are running Windows Clustering, you are ready to install Exchange on the first node. Follow the instructions in Cluster.doc located on the Exchange Server 5.5 Enterprise CD in the folder:

\Docs\Word_docs\Clustering

After Exchange Server 5.5 is installed on both nodes, install Exchange Server 5.5 SP3 on the active node.

After the service pack installation has completed successfully on the active node, install the service pack on the inactive node.

Exchange Connectors

Internet Mail Service (IMS)
Windows 2000 provides a native SMTP service. Installing the SMTP service on a computer running Windows 2000 Server and Exchange Server and using Internet Mail Connector causes the connector to fail to start, which disrupts Internet mail delivery.

Exchange cannot use the Windows 2000 SMTP service to send or receive Internet mail, so you must remove the Windows 2000 SMTP service in order to allow the Exchange IMS to start.

To remove the SMTP service:

  1. In Control Panel, click Add/Remove Programs.

  2. Click Add/Remove Windows Components.

  3. Select the Internet Information Services (IIS) check box, and then click Details.

  4. Clear the SMTP Service check box, and then click OK.

You can use the Windows 2000 SMTP service as a transport choice for inter-site replication between Windows 2000 domain controllers. You can also use it for general SMTP mail functionality. Disabling this service does not affect the ability of Windows 2000 to use SMTP protocols for inter-site replication or general SMTP mail functionality. The Exchange IMS makes the service available directly to any application including Windows 2000 Active Directory replications.

Performance Considerations. The upgrade of a Windows NT 4.0 domain controller to a Windows 2000 domain adds new tasks for the server that did not exist under Windows NT 4.0, mainly management of the Active Directory services. When using a single server, it is important to note that the memory and processor overhead will increase when upgrading to Windows 2000. Depending on the overall performance requirement, a memory or processor upgrade may be required to bring performance to acceptable levels. For multi-server organizations, running the IMS on a non-domain controller server yields better performance because the server is free from the intensive Active Directory service overhead.

Dial-Up Connections. If Exchange Server 5.5 SP3 in installed, upgrading Exchange servers with IMS dial-up connection should pose no problem to IMS.

However, the IMS dial-up mechanism may encounter a problem finding the Phonebook entry. This is described in 236910, XIMS: Cannot Open IMS Dial-Up Connections Tab on Windows 2000 Server Computer and 247063, XFOR: DNS Error Installing Internet Mail Service on Windows 2000 Standard Server.

Novell GroupWise Connector

Upgrade. If you are using Novell Client for Windows NT version 4.7, the Windows 2000 setup program automatically upgrades your existing client to the new Windows 2000–compatible version.

Windows 2000 includes a scaled-down version of the Novell client and installs it to ensure compatibility. However, this version has a few limitations. For full functionality, obtain a complete version of the client from Novell and install it after the upgrade concludes. The scaled down version that's included with Windows 2000 is also supplied and supported by Novell. This version does provide e-mail and basic Novell GroupWise connectivity.

For more information see 218158, Upgrading to Windows 2000 Upgrades Existing Novell Client.

New Installation. Installing Exchange Server and Novell GroupWise connector on Windows 2000 requires connectivity to Novell GroupWise.

Connectivity to Novell GroupWise is provided by the Microsoft Gateway (and Client) Service for NetWare or the Novell NetWare Client for Windows 2000. Although the Microsoft client provides basic administrative and connectivity support, you may choose to install the Novell client because it includes more advanced management features and tools.

X.400 Connector

Upgrading computers running Exchange Server that provide X.400 mail connectivity to another computer running Exchange Server or to a foreign mail system should not require any special consideration, unless the TP4 protocol is being used for any of the X.400 connections.

TP4 protocol support is not available in Windows 2000. The TP4 protocol cannot be used on a Windows 2000–based server. In an Exchange messaging environment, replacing TP4 with TCP/IP is the only alternative.

In very rare cases, TP4 is required to maintain X.400 connectivity to older X.400 foreign systems or to Microsoft Mail X.400 gateways. Unfortunately, there is no work-around for such scenarios. You must either upgrade to TCP/IP or maintain this connector on an operating system that supports it, such as Windows NT 4.0. It is strongly recommended that you migrate any connection using TP4 to TCP/IP to maintain future support.

Windows 2000 setup detects the presence of TP4 and instructs the user to remove the protocol before setup can proceed.

To remove TP4 from Windows NT:

  1. Open Network in Control Panel.

  2. Click the Protocols tab, click TP4, and then click Remove.

  3. Restart the server and start the upgrade.

For more information, see 242157, XCON: TP4 Transport Protocol No Longer Supported Under Windows 2000.

X.400 on X.25 Networks

If you are using X.400 mail connectivity over the X.25 protocol, be sure to confirm that Windows 2000 supports your X.25 adapter(s). The following EICON adapters are compatible with Windows 2000.

  • Eicon Card C20

  • Eicon Card C21

  • Eicon Card P92

  • Eicon Card S50

  • Eicon Card S51

  • Eicon Card S52

  • Eicon Card S90

  • Eicon Card S91

  • Eicon Card S94

If you are using an earlier version of an EICON adapter or a version that is not listed here, see the Windows 2000 Hardware Compatibility List.

If your adapter does not appear on the HCL, contact EICON for information on updated drivers.

The following Knowledge Base articles relate to X.25:

169668, XCON: X.25 Support for SAT Cards

169667, XCON: X.25 Support for CIREL Cards

182758, XCON: X.25 Cards Supported Through Direct Hardware Interface

Microsoft Mail, Lotus cc:Mail, and Lotus Notes

Lotus cc:Mail connectivity is not affected by migrating Exchange Server to Windows 2000. Message connectivity and directory synchronization with cc:Mail requires direct network connections to the cc:Mail post office, as well as the ability to run the cc:Mail-supplied Import and Export programs in either the old 16-bit version or the new 32-bit version release. None of this has changed in Windows 2000. The Microsoft Exchange 5.5 cc:Mail connector does not require any special configuration after the upgrade or in the case of new install.

Microsoft Mail messaging and directory synchronization components, including the Microsoft Mail Connector MTA, do not require any changes when upgrading or performing a new Exchange installation.

No changes are required for upgrading Exchange Server with Lotus Notes connector. The Lotus Notes client version is based on the requirements of the Lotus Notes server version. However, the Lotus Notes client version 4.6 or later is recommended.

SNADS and PROFS

SNADS and PROFS connectors are not impacted by a Windows upgrade as long as host connectivity is maintained. Consult your Microsoft SNA Server documentation for further information regarding host connectivity.

Dynamic RAS Connector

The Dynamic Remote Access Service (RAS) connector should continue to work properly after the Windows 2000 upgrade if Exchange Server SP3 is properly installed.

For more information, see 236910, XIMS: Cannot Open IMS Dial-Up Connections Tab on Windows 2000 Server Computer.

Routing and Remote Access

Windows 2000 Routing and Remote Access provides an alternative to the Dynamic RAS connector by making all dial-up and remote connections a part of the network rather than the server running Exchange.

When using Routing and Remote Access, connections to remote sites are established through site connectors, or X.400 connectors, as any other Exchange site on a LAN. However, it is important to point out that when using Routing and Remote Access, the dial-up schedules feature in the dial-up Exchange connector is not available. In addition, depending on the initial connection latency, some link parameters on the X.400 connector require adjustment to account the initial latency.

For additional information on configuring Routing and Remote Access, see the Windows 2000 documentation.

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