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Overview of the Deployment Process

Archived content. No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

This chapter is for administrators who are responsible for corporate implementation of Windows 95. It provides an overview of the major steps in the deployment process. Chapter 2, "Deployment Strategy and Details," contains the details about how to make decisions and perform actions listed in the overview.

Notice that some tasks may or may not be necessary for your particular organization.

For step-by-step instructions on conducting the installation, see Chapter 3, "Introduction to Windows 95 Setup" and Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations," in the Windows 95 Resource Kit.

The deployment process for Windows 95 consists of several distinct phases, including the following:

  • Reviewing Windows 95

  • Preparing the Planning and Support teams

  • Identifying the preferred network-client configuration

  • Performing lab tests of the client configuration

  • Planning the pilot rollout

  • Conducting the pilot rollout

  • Finalizing the rollout plan

  • Rolling out Windows 95

For each phase, this chapter contains a section outlining in checklist form the required tasks for that deployment phase. Chapter 2, "Deployment Strategy and Details" provides details for performing each task according to the deployment phase.

The following sample shows how to read a deployment checklist for any phase.

Description of the Deployment Phase

Task

Team

Start week

Duration

1: Summary of the task.

Who will perform this task?

When does the team begin this task?

How long will it take to complete?

The following teams, made up of employees from your organization, are responsible for performing the tasks described in deployment checklists:

  • The Executive team includes the deployment project manager (usually the head of the Information Systems department) and members of the executive committee of the corporation. This team must include one or more individuals with decision-making authority over company policies and procedures.

  • The Planning team includes the deployment project manager, key Installation team members, and a representative from the Support and Training teams.

  • The Installation team includes technicians and individuals who will be conducting the installation. This team must include a specialist in 32-bit applications who can evaluate the proposed Windows 95 configuration for compatibility.

  • The Support team includes staff of the help desk or Support department, and select individuals from the Planning team. This team develops a plan for supporting Windows 95 during and after deployment, integrating new methods and processes as needed into the existing support scheme.

  • The Training team includes individuals responsible for user training.

At certain phases, you may choose to vary the makeup of the teams by adding or omitting individuals.

Reviewing Windows 95 Features: An Overview

When implemented, Windows 95 can yield significant benefits to your organization in terms of reduced costs and increased system control. Because many decisions — starting with the decision to acquire Windows 95 — depend on these and other anticipated benefits, becoming familiar with the features and benefits of Windows 95 is the first step in deployment planning. See the following checklist for sources of information on Windows 95 features and benefits.

Reviewing Windows 95 Features

Task

Team

Start week

Duration

1: Read Introducing Microsoft Windows 95, available from Microsoft Press (ISBN 1-55615-860-2) or the Windows 95 Reviewer's Guide (available from WinNews forums on the Internet and other online services).

Executive, Planning

Week 1

7 days

2: Review total cost of ownership, migration, and productivity studies published by analysts such as Gartner Group, Inc. if appropriate Use these studies to assess the impact of Windows 95 on your business's bottom line.

Executive, Planning

Week 1

14 days

3: Acquire additional copies of the Windows 95 Resource Kit for review during the deployment process.

Planning

Week 2

1 day

Preparing the Teams: An Overview

After the review of Windows 95 features and benefits, the next step is to prepare the Planning, Installation, and Support teams for the deployment process. If you did not fully staff the Planning team for the review phase, assemble the people you need for both the Planning and Installation teams at this time. Then gather the equipment and tools to be used in planning the Windows 95 implementation and arrange for Support team training. The following checklist outlines the processes of assembling the Planning and Installation teams and its resources and coordinating Support team training.

Preparing the Teams

Task

Team

Start week

Duration

1: Assign the project manager, if appropriate (usually this is the head of the Information Systems department).

Planning

Week 2

2: Select key Planning and Installation team members, if appropriate. Make sure to include an applications specialist, for evaluating 32-bit applications.

Planning, Installation

Week 2

5 days

3: Acquire Windows 95 (the compact disc version is preferred because it contains system administration tools).

Planning

Week 2

1 day

4: Identify your client and server hardware and software configurations on the network.

Planning

Week 3

5 days

5: Set up a testing lab.

Planning

Week 2

1 day

6: Acquire test computers for use as the network server and clients. Choose computer models that are typical of those used in your organization.

Planning

Week 2

5 days

7: Install the applications software and line-of-business tools in the lab to simulate the network environment. Also identify the mission-critical and noncritical business and other applications typically used in your organization. Create a checklist for evaluating the compatibility and performance of these applications during testing.

Planning

Week 3

3 days

8: Review detailed discussions of product features in the "Guided Tour for Administrators" in the Windows 95 Resource Kit; study Part 2, "Installation," of the Resource Kit to prepare for configuration planning.

Planning, Installation

Week 3

3 days

9: Study the entire Windows 95 Resource Kit. As an option, obtain Windows 95 TrainCast instructional videotapes from Microsoft. As another option, arrange for the team and other individuals, as appropriate, to attend training at a Microsoft Authorized Technical Education Center and participate in the Microsoft Certified Professional program to prepare for supporting Windows 95.

Support

Week 3

10 days

10: As an option, read Inside Windows 95 from Microsoft Press, for technical details on the internal operation of Windows 95.

Planning, Installation, Support

Week 2

10 days

Deciding on the Preferred Client Configuration: An Overview

With the Planning and Installation teams assembled and educated about Windows 95 capabilities, the next task for these teams is to determine the preferred configuration for client computers on the network. (For the purposes of this discussion, "client computer" refers to any computer running Windows 95, including computers that act as peer servers by running File and Printer Sharing services.) The teams will use this configuration for evaluation and testing, prior to full implementation of Windows 95 in your organization.

The tables in this section summarize options to consider in planning your preferred configuration. Using the information in these tables, evaluate the available features and the related alternatives before making a decision. Microsoft recommends that you begin your evaluation with the "ideal" configuration, that is, a configuration that uses all of the most powerful features of Windows 95. Then gradually modify this configuration, adding or removing features, until you achieve a configuration that more closely fits your company's needs. When you have identified the preferred configuration, document the configuration layout and the selected features to make sure you install and test the correct configuration.

To learn more about product features as they relate to your system configuration, see Chapter 2, "Deployment Strategy and Details," or the related chapters of the Resource Kit.

The following table presents an overview of configuration layout decisions and feature options for the ideal network client. An additional table lists features which Microsoft recommends for implementation by all organizations; these features define how Windows 95 will be installed and administered in your organization. The final table shows optional features that may be useful in some organizations.

Configuration Layout Decisions

Configuration option

Decisions and issues

Location of Windows files
To maximize performance, security, or hard disk space on the client computer

Depends on your need to maximize central security and administration versus performance on the client computer. Also depends on the hardware platform of the client computer.
Options:
• Run Windows 95 on the client computer for best performance and reduced network traffic.
• Run Windows 95 from the server to save hard disk space on client computers and make it easier to upgrade components or drivers later, especially for multiple computers.
• Run completely from the server for the highest degree of security or for diskless workstations.
For information, see Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."

Key Features of the Ideal Network Client

Preferred feature

Decisions and issues

Use 32-bit, protected-mode network client software
To provide the best network performance and functionality

Depends on the compatibility of your required applications. Options vary based on your network. For example, for Novell® NetWare® networks:
• Protected-mode Client for NetWare Networks is the preferred client, because of the performance and increased functionality, and because it's easy to install and configure.
• Real-mode Novell NETX or VLM clients may offer slightly better compatibility with some network utilities.
• A real-mode network client for another network can also be used with Client for NetWare Network.
For information, see Part 3, "Networking."

Use 32-bit, protected-mode protocols
To provide the best network performance and functionality

Depends on compatibility with your choice of client. Options depend on your choice of protocol. For example, for IPX/SPX:
• Microsoft IPX/SPX-compatible protocol is preferred (with or without IPX over NetBIOS).
• Keep real-mode IPXODI for use with a real-mode Novell-supplied client.
• Both the real-mode and Microsoft protected-mode implementations can be used if some of your applications (such as TSRs) require the real-mode protocol.
For information, see Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion."

Use the latest network adapter drivers
To provide improved performance and the ability to both load and unload the network and notify the rest of the system, use NDIS 3.1 drivers, which support Plug and Play

Depends on the availability and compatibility of the new driver. The 32-bit, protected mode drivers offer vastly improved performance and reliability over older versions. For PCMCIA cards, the 32-bit drivers are extremely easy to manage.
Options:
• Always use the newest drivers available; implemented by default.
• Manually choose to keep using an older driver, including ODI drivers, if new drivers are not available.
For information, see Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion."

Use the new Windows 95 user interface
To provide ease of use and maximum functionality in accessing Windows 95 features

Depends on timing or preference rather than functionality because the new user interface is significantly more functional and efficient. But, if a rapid migration is required, and training is not immediately available, the Windows 3.1 user interface can be used temporarily.
Options:
• Use the new user interface; this is preferred and installed by default.
• Install the Windows 3.x File Manager and Program Manager.
For information, see Chapter 22, "Application Support."

Recommended Windows 95 Features for Client Configurations

Windows 95 feature

Decisions and issues

Use system policies
To enable centralized administration capabilities of Windows 95 or add control of the user's desktop

Choose this feature to enable centralized administration or add control.
Options:
• Use System Policy Editor to define policies at any time.
• For computers running a shared copy of Windows 95 from a server, configure the shared installation directory with a limited set of components for Windows 95. This is not a recommended choice.
For information, see Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

Use user profiles
To allow multiple users to use a single computer with their own settings or, conversely, to allow personalized settings per user on multiple computers

Choose this feature to maintain consistent desktop and environment settings on a user-specific basis. Enabling user profiles causes a slight delay during logon.
Options:
• Users can control changes to their user profiles and update them as they want.
• Administrators can predefine a mandatory profile for specific users, that can only be changed by the administrator.
For information, see Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

Enable remote administration
To allow an administrator to remotely manage the file system, network sharing, or Registry of the individual computers

Install this service to allow remote administration. To use it, you must use a 32-bit network client and also enable user-level access.
For information, see Chapter 16, "Remote Administration."

Use setup scripts (batch files) for installation
To allow automated installation on client computers

Choose this feature if you must install Windows 95 on more than five computers.
Server-based Setup offers an easy to use, graphical tool for creating setup scripts. You can also manually create a script with additional options by creating a text file with the appropriate entries.
For information, see Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations," and Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters."

Set up for push installation
To allow the administrator to push the installation from the server without touching the client computer

Choose to use a push installation, based on the location and number of computers you must upgrade.
Options:
• Edit the login script to run a setup script.
• Use a tool such as the Microsoft Systems Management Server to facilitate the setup.
For information, see Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations," and Appendix E, "Microsoft Systems Management Server."

Use peer resource sharing services
To allow a client computer to share files and resources such as printers and CD-ROM drives with other computers

Choose this feature based on your site's security needs. If users are allowed to share local resources on their computers, then peer resource sharing can save network traffic and hard disk space on the server. For central control or to prevent users from turning on this feature, use system policies.
This feature can only be installed on computers that use a 32-bit, protected-mode network client.
For information, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

Use user-level security
To implement control for a variety of services beyond network resource access, including File and Printer Sharing, Remote Registry, backup agents, and other network and system management functions

Choose this feature to enable users to specify the users and groups who have access to local shared resources (including the Registry). Validation by a Windows NT Server or a NetWare server can also be required before access to any resources is possible under Windows 95.
Options:
• Users can specify access rights to shared resources for individuals and groups.
• Access is validated based on user accounts on a Windows NT domain or a Novell NetWare bindery.
• User-level security is required for remote administration of the Registry and for network access to full user profiles.
• Optionally, share-level security can be used to protect files on Windows NT networks or Windows 95 peer networks.
For information, see Chapter 14, "Security."

Other Optional Windows 95 Features

Windows 95 feature

Decisions and issues

Use Microsoft Exchange Mail
To have a unified inbox for messages, faxes, and so on

Depends on whether you have an existing mail system and whether you want the added integration of messaging services offered by Microsoft Exchange.
Options:
• Install all or part of Microsoft Exchange during the installation.
• Run your existing mail client as usual.
For information, see Chapter 26, "Electronic Mail and Microsoft Exchange."

Use Windows 95 mobile computing features
To enable Windows 95 features that support mobile computing or switching between portable and docking-station configurations

Depends on the particular hardware and the working needs of mobile-computing users. Some of these features are not installed by default but can be specified during Setup or installed later:
• Dial-Up Networking client software for dial-up connection to popular servers
• Windows 95 Briefcase for synchronizing files between computers, and Direct Cable Connection for directly linking two computers, plus other built-in communications applications
• Remote mail and deferred printing, for working away from the main office
• Automatic configuration for PCMCIA cards, and for all components with Plug and Play-compliant hardware
• User profiles to provide a custom desktop for each user, no matter where users log on to the network
For information, see Chapter 19, "Devices," and Chapter 28, "Dial-Up Networking and Mobile Computing."

Use other Windows 95 value-added features
To enable other Windows 95 ease-of-use innovations and capabilities such as The Microsoft Network and Microsoft Fax

Depends on your existing services and needs. In general, if client computers have the hard disk space and use a utility or an application with the same capabilities from another vendor, you should install the new features and test their value.
These features are not installed by default but can be specified during Setup or installed later:
• Microsoft Fax for fax receipt and transmission
• The Microsoft Network for online services
For information, see Chapter 26, "Electronic Mail and Microsoft Exchange," Chapter 27, "Microsoft Fax," and Chapter 29, "The Microsoft Network."

Performing the Lab Test: An Overview

Using the preferred client configuration specified in the previous phase, proceed with installing the configuration in the lab for testing and evaluation. Because only the client-computer configuration is being installed (server installation is described in the following section), this test only determines whether the preferred configuration performs as expected, and whether it is compatible with your current applications and processes.

Depending on how the test installation proceeds, it may be necessary to modify the configuration, by either adding or removing selected features. If more than one configuration is being considered, side-by-side evaluations of different configurations can be performed to help determine which one works best.

The following checklist outlines the tasks in performing the lab test of the client configuration. These tasks apply for each computer used to install a client configuration. For step-by-step instructions on installing and selecting features, see Chapter 3, "Introduction to Windows 95 Setup."

Performing the Lab Test

Task

Team

Start week

Duration

1: Make sure that the computer meets your company's standards and the Windows 95 minimum standards for operation — at least a 4-MB 386DX or better. If not, perform the hardware upgrades now.

Installation

Week 4

0.1 day

2: Defragment the hard disk and scan it for viruses.

Installation

Week 4

0.1 day

3: Back up and verify key data and configuration files, such as INI, AUTOEXEC.BAT, and CONFIG.SYS files. Also back up the Windows and DOS directories, and all files in the root directory. Make a system startup disk containing COMMAND.COM, SYS.COM, and FDISK.EXE.

Installation

Week 4

0.1 day

4: Ensure that the current network client software is functioning properly and, referring to the checklist of inventoried applications, make sure that all important applications operate correctly.

Installation

Week 4

1 day

5: Install Windows 95 on the test computer in the lab, using the preferred client configuration identified in the previous phase.

Planning, Installation

Week 4

1 day

6: Test the installation:
• Can you connect to and browse the network?
• Can you print both locally and across the network?
• Can you perform the core operations of each application locally and on the network (including opening, closing, and printing)?
• Can you shut down successfully?

Planning, Installation

Week 4

2 days

7: Optionally, if you have several test computers, compare your old client configuration under Windows 3.x and your new preferred configuration. How do the two compare in terms of the following:
• Functionality for administering the computer?
• Performance for local disk and network actions?
• Ease of use for performing common tasks?
• Stability of the computer under stress?
• Compatibility with applications and hardware?

Installation, Planning

Week 5

2 days

8: If the specified client configuration did not work as expected, modify and document the differences until a working preferred client configuration is installed.

Planning, Installation

Week 5

As required

9: Perform a complete restoration of operating system files and system capabilities for your old client configuration on the computer running Windows 95.

Installation

Week 5

1 day

10: Evaluate the restoration process for problems. Document the process and the modifications made.

Installation, Planning

Week 5

0.5 day

11: Have all team members participate in installing the preferred configuration on a variety of hardware.

Installation, Planning

Week 5

3 days

Planning the Pilot Rollout: An Overview

In this phase, appointed teams determine the best methods for automatically installing the specified configuration for a pilot or trial rollout. Planning for this pilot program involves creating the automated installation process, determining the logistics of testing, and preparing a training plan for users. The following checklist outlines the tasks in planning the pilot rollout.

Planning the Pilot Rollout

Task

Team

Start week

Duration

1: Use Server-based Setup to install Windows 95 source files on a server. Make setup choices based on your client configuration, including whether you will run a shared copy of Windows 95 from the server, or run Windows 95 locally on the client computer. Perform the following steps:
• Set up the distribution server
• Set up the client from the network
See Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95," for step-by-step instructions. Document any changes to this process.

Planning, Installation

Week 6

1 day

2: Create and test an automated installation by creating a setup script to predefine settings for Setup. Document the key parts of the setup script that vary by installation.

Planning, Installation

Week 6

2 days

3: Determine and test how you will push the installation from the server without having to touch the client computers. (See Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations") Options:
• Modify login scripts on the server.
• Use management software such as Microsoft Systems Management Server.
• Send a setup script (batch file) that runs Windows 95
Setup as an embedded link in an electronic mail message.
Document the process for the rest of the Installation team.

Planning, Installation

Week 6

3 days

4: Evaluate the Windows 95 installation process for opportunities to upgrade or improve your organization's existing technology infrastructure. For example, a system management software tool can help you administer computers on the network more easily, and it can help with the push installation process.

Planning, Executive

Week 7

2 days

5: Document in checklist form the logistics of the pilot installation, such as the total time for installation, the new software or tools to be purchased, the group selected as the pilot users, and the scheduling of specific installations. Use this prior to the rollout to make sure you are completely prepared.
Document goals for the pilot rollout to be used as evaluation criteria for rating the success of the rollout.

Installation, Planning

Week 7

3 days

6: Send a memo to your users to clearly explain how the installation process will affect their daily work schedule and describe the differences they will see after the installation is completed.

Planning

Week 7

1 day

7: Develop a user training course (or hire a training vendor to prepare one). Use the Windows 95 Help and Introducing Microsoft Windows 95 (supplied with the Windows 95 distribution disks) to "jump-start" your training efforts.

Planning, Support, Training

Week 6

5 days

8: Establish a support plan for the pilot user group. This includes the names and phone numbers of persons to contact for assistance, a short list of the top questions and answers, and troubleshooting tips.

Planning, Support

Week 7

5 days

9: Set up the lab or classroom with computers for training.

Training

Week 7

2 days

10: Edit the Windows 95 Help file (if appropriate) to include any company-specific information. Repeat this after the pilot rollout is completed.

Planning, Support

Week 8

4 days

Conducting the Pilot Rollout: An Overview

The goal of the pilot program is to test your automated installation in everyday use among a limited group of users (for example, between 15 and 50). This process helps to identify problems that may impede or delay the deployment process, and helps to determine what resources you'll require for the final, company-wide rollout. It's important to make the pilot rollout as successful as possible because it sets the tone for the rest of the deployment process. If pilot users are satisfied, their enthusiasm can influence others to cooperate, which in turn helps the rest of the process to move smoothly.

The following checklist outlines the tasks in conducting the pilot rollout. Use the same pilot user group and follow the same tasks when rolling out 32-bit applications.

Conducting the Pilot Rollout

Task

Team

Start week

Duration

1: Select a pilot user group that is willing and able (particularly in terms of their workload) to handle the installation process.

Planning

Week 8

2 days

2: Train the users.

Training

Week 8

5 days

3: Back up the Windows and DOS directories and the files on the root directory of the test computers.

Installation

Week 9

5 days

4: Following the logistics checklist prepared in the previous phase, perform the installation in the same manner that you expect to install Windows 95 throughout the company. Compare your results against goals and evaluation criteria (developed in the previous task) for this process.

Installation

Week 9

10 days

5: Have your technicians on-site for the initial installations to document the process and problems and to support the users. Have other technicians monitor time and all measurable factors in the installation process. Record these measurements for later evaluation.

Support

Week 9

15 days

6: Ensure that all computers are "up and running" as expected. Make note of possible improvements to the installation, training, or support, where appropriate.

Planning, Installation, Support

Week 11

3 days

7: Survey members of the pilot user group about their satis-faction with the installation process and take feedback on what could have been done better.

Planning

Week 12

3 days

8: Continue to monitor the pilot installation for a week to make sure that everything continues to run smoothly.

Support, Planning

Week 11

5 days

9: Prepare a checklist of issues to resolve for the final rollout. Include in this checklist the areas identified in step 6 as needing improvement, comments from the user survey, and the results of comparing your rollout goals and evaluation criteria against actual performance.

Support, Planning

Week 11

5 days

10: If the pilot program did not run smoothly or user feedback was poor, conduct additional pilot installations until the process works well.

Planning, Installation

Week 12

See "Planning the Pilot Rollout: An Overview"

Finalizing the Rollout Plan: An Overview

The results of the pilot installation provide the basis for developing a final plan for rollout. Using the actual time and resource requirements from the smaller-scale pilot rollout, teams make projections for time and resources, corresponding to the company-wide scope of the final rollout. If additional resources are required, identify these and acquire them at this time. In addition, update company policies and standards regarding computer and network use to accommodate the Windows 95 implementation.

Finalize the Rollout Plan

Task

Team

Start week

Duration

1: Determine your rollout goals — specifically the number of computers on which you will install Windows 95 and the time expected for completion. During preparation for final rollout, check off items on this list as they are resolved.

Planning, Executive

Week 12

5 days

2: Budget the resources, in terms of personnel and tools, required to meet your goals.

Planning

Week 12

3 days

3: If necessary, present the budget and obtain approval for the resources and the rollout process.

Executive, Planning

Week 13

2 days

4: Hire and train the extended Installation team and purchase the additional software or tools needed.

Training, Installation

Week 13

10 days

5: Update the company's hardware and software standards lists.

Planning

Week 13

2 days

6: Update the company's policies and practices manuals or guidelines for use of computers and the network.

Planning

Week 13

2 days

7: Notify your users that company standards and policies for computer use will be enforced prior to the installation and that they must bring their computers into compliance.

Planning

Week 13

1 day

8: If appropriate, edit the Windows 95 Help file to add company-specific Help for line-of-business applications, and to remove unwanted information about the capabilities you plan to disable in Windows 95.

Planning, Support

Week 14

3 days

9: For each computer, create a template as a database for documenting and tracking any system problems or deficiencies that require further attention.

Installation

Week 13

2 days

10: Post the updated template to a central network location.

Installation

Week 13

2 days

Rolling Out Windows 95: An Overview

After the extensive research, planning, testing, and analysis performed in the previous phases, the deployment teams arrive at the final phase — rolling out the Windows 95 installation to the entire company. Although each prior phase was critical to the overall success of the deployment process, only this phase can fulfill the purpose of the entire planning process, by delivering the substantial new benefits of Windows 95 to your broadest base of users. At this phase, weeks of preparation pay off in a smooth migration of all your users to an operating system that is more powerful, more robust, and easier to use.

The following checklist outlines the tasks required for the final rollout of Windows 95.

Rolling Out Windows 95

Task

Team

Start week

Duration

1: Set up the distribution servers by using the Server-based Setup and configuring the system policy files.

Installation

Week 15

1 day

2: Customize the server installation by adding or removing the appropriate files, including the MSBATCH.INF file.

Installation

Week 15

2 days

3: Notify the users of the upcoming installation.

Planning

Week 15

1 day

4: Train the users on Windows 95.

Training

Week 16

As required

5: If needed, upgrade the hardware on the client computers and remove any software not complying with company policy.

Installation

Week 16

As required

6: If needed, back up critical data and configuration files on the client computers.

Installation

Week 16

As required

7: If needed, defragment the client hard disks.

Installation

Week 16

As required

8: Optionally, you can temporarily reset the user password and ID for each computer, to allow your technicians easy access to the client computer and make sure that the login scripts and environment operate correctly.

Planning

Week 17

As required

9: Ensure that the client computers are fully operational and the real-mode network, if present, is running.

Installation

Week 17

As required

10: Prepare the client computers for the push installation process: edit the login scripts; run the management software; or send the setup script, by electronic mail, to the user.

Installation

Week 18

As required

11: Initiate the installation by having the user log on, double-click the setup script file, and so on.

Installation

Week 18

As required

For details of each task in the deployment checklists, see Chapter 2, "Deployment Strategy and Details." For step-by-step instructions on how to set up, maintain, and use Windows 95 in a corporate environment, see the appropriate chapters of the Resource Kit.

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