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Windows 95 Setup Overview

Archived content. No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

This chapter presents requirements for installing Windows 95, provides an overview of the types of Windows 95 installations available, and presents a step-by-step description of running Windows 95 Setup to install Windows 95 on the local hard disk of a single computer.

Important Before running Windows 95 Setup, read the SETUP.TXT file on Disk 1 of the Windows 95 floppy disks or on the compact disc for information about hardware and software that might already be installed on your computer.

This section provides a brief summary of the installation steps in Windows 95 Setup, plus an overview of the new features in Windows 95 Setup.

This information is designed to provide a fundamental description of Setup for administrators who are responsible for installing Windows 95 on many computers. However, the information provided here will also help individuals who are installing Windows 95 on the local hard disk of their personal computers.

Note: In this book, "local computer" refers to a personal computer with Windows 95 system files installed on the local hard disk; a local computer running Windows 95 can also include networking software.

The term "shared installation" is used to refer to a computer that runs a shared copy of Windows 95 from a network server, with few or no Windows 95 files installed on the local workstation.

On This Page

Quick Start for Windows 95 Setup
New Windows 95 Setup Features
Installation Requirements
Options for Windows 95 Installations
Before Starting Windows 95 Setup
Starting Windows 95 Setup
Running Windows 95 Setup

Quick Start for Windows 95 Setup

The following are the basic tasks you perform when installing Windows 95 on a computer for the first time:

  1. Check that the computer's hardware is supported and meets the minimum requirements for Windows 95. Close all applications and disable unnecessary TSRs. Check and defragment the hard drive, and back up key files. These tasks are described in "Before Starting Windows 95 Setup" later in this chapter.

  2. Start Windows 95 Setup.

    How you start Setup depends on whether you are running Setup from floppy disks, a CD-ROM compact disc, or a shared network directory. For information, see "Starting Windows 95 Setup" later in this chapter.

  3. Choose the directory where you want the Windows 95 system files to be installed on the computer. If you want to preserve your existing Windows and MS-DOS operating system, you must install Windows 95 in a new directory, as described in "Gathering Information" later in this chapter.

  4. Choose the type of setup: Typical, Compact, Portable, or Custom. For most users, Microsoft recommends the Typical Setup, which installs standard options with default settings. For information, see "Deciding to Use Typical, Portable, Compact, or Custom Setup" later in this chapter.

  5. Provide identification information about your user name, computer name, and other identifiers. For information, see "Providing User Information" later in this chapter and "Specifying Computer Identification" later in this chapter.

  6. If you choose Custom Setup, you must specify the options you want to install and make other choices about the system components, including networking. For information, see "Selecting Software Components" later in this chapter, "Selecting Network Components in Custom Setup" later in this chapter, and "Changing Computer Settings in Custom Setup" later in this chapter.

  7. Create a startup disk for emergency recovery, as prompted by Windows 95 Setup. This is a highly recommended step. For information, see "Creating a Startup Disk" later in this chapter.

  8. Restart the computer after Setup copies the required files. Then, depending on the type of installation, select the local time zone and complete other tasks for configuring certain devices and software. For information, see "Copying Files and Completing Setup" later in this chapter.

Windows 95 Setup automatically guides you through each of these tasks and provides Help for any step if you need it before proceeding.

New Windows 95 Setup Features

Windows 95 Setup ensures easier installation and also offers greater flexibility and better customization options than earlier versions of Windows. The following list summarizes these improvements.

A complete Windows-based setup process.

Windows 95 Setup provides better visual feedback and greater flexibility for navigating through the setup process than was available for Windows 3.x. Windows 95 Setup runs entirely from within the Windows environment, even if an earlier version of Windows 3.x is not already on the computer. The Windows 95 Setup wizard leads users through the process of choosing all configuration options. After all choices have been made, Windows 95 Setup proceeds without further user actions.

Modular architecture for Setup.

To make installation easier and more flexible, the Windows 95 development team completely rewrote the installation code. Windows 95 Setup also incorporates the use of safe defaults and mechanisms for automatically configuring or installing all components with minimal user intervention.

Improved hardware device detection and configuration support.

Windows 95 Setup detects the hardware devices and components already configured on the computer and uses this information to install drivers and set Registry entries. Windows 95 provides more versatile detection and configuration for a wider range of devices than was available for Windows 3.x. For information, see Chapter 6, "Setup Technical Discussion."

Safe Recovery for Setup failures.

Windows 95 Setup provides a recovery mechanism in the case of Setup failure. Safe Recovery uses a log that is maintained throughout the setup process. If Setup fails — for example, due to problems during hardware detection — the last entry in the Setup log identifies where the process was interrupted. When you rerun Windows 95 Setup, it uses the log to bypass the module where the problem occurred. During Setup (and during subsequent maintenance of Windows 95), Windows 95 also creates and maintains a log of installed components. For information, see Chapter 6, "Setup Technical Discussion."

Network installation integrated with Windows 95 Setup.

These elements are summarized in "Selecting Network Components in Custom Setup" later in this chapter. For more information, see Part 3, "Networking."

Improved customization of installation.

Windows 95 provides easier, more flexible customization of Setup than was available for Windows 3.x, giving you better control for configuring desktop settings, network components, and hardware devices. System administrators can simplify installation for users by using setup scripts that define required settings. Installation of Windows 95 using setup scripts is more flexible and full-featured than for Windows 3.x, and it includes the option for hands-free "push" installation with no user intervention. For information, see Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations."

Installation Requirements

There are requirements for running Windows 95 Setup in addition to the requirements for installing and running Windows 95 on a computer. This section lists the following kinds of requirements:

  • Operating system requirements

  • Windows 95 Setup memory, disk space, and user information requirements

  • Windows 95 hardware, disk space, partition, and other requirements

Operating System Requirements

You must install the retail version of Windows 95 as an upgrade over an existing operating system. You can install Windows 95 over a number of different operating systems, including MS-DOS, Windows, and Windows for Workgroups. Windows 95 can also be installed over Novell® DR DOS® (or Novell DOS™), PC-DOS, and OS/2, and as a dual-boot operating system with Windows NT.

The minimum operating system software required to install Windows 95 is any of the following:

  • MS-DOS version 3.2 or higher, or an equivalent version from the hardware manufacturer that supports partitions greater than 32 MB

  • Windows 3.x

  • Windows for Workgroups 3.1x

  • Dual-boot OS/2 (with MS-DOS)

  • Dual-boot Windows NT (with MS-DOS)

Tip for MS-DOS Versions and Windows 95 Setup

Windows 95 Setup attempts to install Windows 95 on a computer with an operating system version equivalent to MS-DOS 3.2 only if that version can exceed the 32-MB partition limit (such as COMPAQ® version 3.31) because the operational disk space requirements for Windows 95 can exceed the 32-MB partition limitation.

The computer must have MS-DOS version 3.2 or later. Because there are many variations of MS-DOS 3.2, Microsoft recommends you upgrade to Windows 95 from MS-DOS version 5.0 or later.

To check the MS-DOS version, type ver at the command prompt.

For information about how Windows 95 Setup treats disk partitions created under other operating systems, see "Partition Requirements" later in this chapter. For information about how Windows 95 Setup deals with the boot sector and installs files for dual-boot operation with other operating systems, see Chapter 6, "Setup Technical Discussion."

Requirements for Windows 95 Setup

Usually, you need to supply very little information during Windows 95 Setup for a successful Windows 95 installation. The unique information required for a typical installation consists only of the following (which can be predefined in a custom setup script):

  • User name

  • Computer and workgroup names, if the computer is connected to the network

Windows 95 Setup needs at least 417K of conventional memory to run. The amount of disk space required for Windows 95 Setup varies, due to the types of hardware on the computer, the required drivers, and the optional components installed.

Installation option

Compact 1

Typical

New installation

30 MB

40 MB

Windows 3.1 upgrade

20 MB

30 MB

Windows for Workgroups upgrade

10 MB

20 MB

1 You might not get typical functionality for all Windows 95 features (including networking) with a compact configuration, as described in "Deciding to Use Typical, Portable, Compact, or Custom Setup" later in this chapter.

System Requirements for Windows 95

The following table describes the basic hardware requirements for running Windows 95 from the hard disk of a local computer. Windows 95 is designed for computers that use Intel x86-based processors; it cannot be installed on any other processor. Windows 95 does not have symmetric multiple processor (SMP) support and, therefore, cannot take advantage of multiple processors (as Windows NT does). For information about requirements for shared installations, see Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."

Component

Windows 95 requirement

Computer

80386DX, 20 MHz (or higher) processor
For installing Windows 95 to run from a local hard disk, a high-density floppy disk drive and hard disk drive are required.
For installing Windows 95 as a shared installation, the computer does not need a hard disk or floppy disk drive.
You cannot install Windows 95 on a 80386 computer that has a B-step processor (that is, with ID 0303).

Peripheral

Mouse or equivalent pointing device

Memory

4 MB of RAM (minimum); 8 MB (recommended)

Video display

VGA (minimum); Super VGA (recommended)

Disk space

20 MB of free hard-disk space is required for a local installation. For information about requirements for a shared installation, see Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."
The full custom installation requires a minimum of 19 MB. A compact installation requires 10 MB of disk space.
You also need a certain amount free disk space for a swap file, depending on how much RAM the computer has. As a guideline, you need at least 14 MB of memory, which can be divided between RAM and hard disk space. For example, if the computer has 4 MB of RAM, you need at least 10 MB of free disk space for a swap file. If the computer has 16 MB of memory, you will need very little disk space for a swap file.

Optional

Modem (for The Microsoft Network and other components)
CD-ROM drive
Network adapter (required for networking)
Sound card
Other multimedia hardware components

Tips for Required Disk Space with Compressed Disks

If you have disk compression software installed, the required amount of uncompressed disk space on the host drive before installing Windows 95 depends on several factors:

  • The type of compression used (Microsoft DriveSpace™ or DoubleSpace®, STAC Electronics Stacker®, and so on)

  • The available free space on other drives

  • The existence of a permanent swap file (if any), and its location

  • The amount of available free space on other drives

If the computer does not have a swap file already, you might have to resize the host drive to accommodate the swap file requirements. For more information, consult your compression software documentation; see also Chapter 20, "Disks and File Systems."

Partition Requirements

Windows 95 Setup cannot install Windows 95 unless a FAT partition exists on the hard disk. It cannot install Windows 95 on a computer that has only HPFS or Windows NT file system (NTFS) partitions. Windows 95 Setup reads most partitioning schemes and writes to the master boot record, unless disk partitioning schemes from other vendors are used.

The following table describes how Windows 95 Setup handles different types of disk partitions. For more information, consult the documentation for the related operating system.

Partition type

How Windows 95 Setup handles such partitions

MS-DOS (Fdisk and other vendors' partitioning software)

Windows 95 Setup recognizes and begins installation over existing MS-DOS FAT partitions, if the partition is large enough to accommodate Windows 95 files (including swap files).
Windows 95 supports MS-DOS Fdisk partitions on removable media drives such as the Iomega® Bernoulli Box™ drives.
Windows 95 recognizes and translates disk partitioning schemes created by other vendors' partitioning software, including Disk Manager DMDRVR.BIN and Storage Dimensions SpeedStor® SSTOR.SYS.

Windows NT

Windows 95 cannot recognize information on an NTFS partition. Windows 95 can be installed on Windows NT multiple-boot systems if enough disk space is available on a FAT partition. On a Windows NT multiple-boot system, Windows 95 Setup can either install Windows 95 on an existing FAT partition with MS-DOS and, optionally, Windows 3.x, or you must partition and format free space on the hard disk in a FAT partition, then perform a new installation onto this new FAT partition.

OS/2

You must run Windows 95 Setup from MS-DOS. If it is not already present on the computer, you must first install MS-DOS and configure the computer for dual-booting with OS/2.

Windows 95 works with disk compression drivers, including those in the following list. For more information, see Chapter 20, "Disks and File Systems."

  • Microsoft DriveSpace and DoubleSpace

  • Stacker versions 3.0 and 4.x

  • AddStor® SuperStor™

If you use other disk compression software, see the Windows README file, or contact your product support representative to determine compatibility.

Options for Windows 95 Installations

As either an individual user or a network administrator, you can choose from various options for Windows 95 installations:

  • Run Windows 95 Setup from MS-DOS or Windows 3.x

  • Install a typical, compact, or custom version on a desktop computer, or install Windows 95 for a portable computer

  • Install Windows 95 system files locally or run a shared copy from a server

  • Create customized and automated installations

  • Use Windows 95 features to maintain or update an installation

These options are described in the following sections.

Deciding to Run Setup from MS-DOS or Windows

Windows 95 Setup is a protected-mode, 16-bit, Windows-based application. There are two different scenarios in which Windows 95 Setup can be run:

  • From within Windows 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups 3.1x

  • From MS-DOS at the command prompt (not from the MS-DOS Prompt under Windows)

The preferred method for running Windows 95 Setup is from within Windows 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups. Run Windows 95 Setup from MS-DOS when neither Windows 3.1 nor Windows for Workgroups is installed on the computer, but MS-DOS, OS/2, Windows NT, or Windows 3.0 is installed.

Setup detects whether Windows 3.1 or any version of Windows for Workgroups is installed on the computer, and, if it finds one of them, it offers to install Windows 95 in the same directory in order to upgrade the existing installation. If you choose to install in the same directory, Windows 95 Setup moves the configuration settings in SYSTEM.INI, WIN.INI, and PROTOCOL.INI, plus file associations from the Windows 3.x Registry into the Windows 95 Registry, so all applications and networking settings will work automatically in the new Windows 95 environment. Also, Windows 3.x Program Manager groups are converted to directories in the PROGRAMS directory, so that they can be displayed on the Windows 95 Start menu.

Note: You must choose to install Windows 95 in a new directory if you want to preserve the existing MS-DOS or Windows installation. In this case, you might have to reinstall most Windows-based applications before they can function properly in the new environment.

Dual-boot capabilities are not enabled by default. For information about installing Windows 95 on computers with other operating systems and for information about configuring dual-boot options, see Chapter 6, "Setup Technical Discussion."

Deciding to Use Typical, Portable, Compact, or Custom Setup

In Windows 95 Setup, you can choose from several types of installation option. The choice you make dictates the size of the Windows 95 installation on the computer (and, of course, the number of features installed) and the amount of control the user has in customizing the installation.

Setup type

Description

Typical

The default option, recommended for most users with desktop computers. Performs most installation steps automatically for a standard Windows 95 installation with minimal user action. You need to confirm only the directory where Windows 95 files are to be installed, provide user and computer identification information, and specify whether to create a startup disk.

Portable

The recommended option for mobile users with portable computers. Installs the appropriate set of files for a portable computer. This includes installing Briefcase for file synchronization and the supporting software for direct cable connections to exchange files.

Compact

The option for users who have extremely limited disk space. Installs the minimum files required to run Windows 95.

Custom

The option for users who want to select application and network components to be installed, and confirm the configuration settings for devices. Installs the appropriate files based on user selections. This type of Setup is recommended for experienced users who want to control various elements of Windows 95 Setup.

The following table compares many of the differences in components installed for Typical and Portable installations. Notice that for Custom Setup, the options selected by default are the same as for a Typical installation. For Compact Setup, no optional components are installed.

Optional component

Typical

Portable

Accessibility Options

Audio Compression

Backup

Briefcase

X

Calculator

X

X

CD Player

Character Map

Clipboard Viewer

Defrag

X

X

Desktop Wallpaper

Dial-Up Networking

X

Direct Cable Connection

X

Disk Compression Tools

X

Document Templates

X

Games

HyperTerminal

X

X

Media Player

X

Microsoft Exchange

Microsoft Fax

Microsoft Mail Services

Mouse Pointers

Net Watcher

Object Packager

X

Online User's Guide

Paint

X

Phone Dialer

X

X

Quick View

X

X

Screen Savers

X

X

Sound and Video Clips

Sound Recorder

System Monitor

The Microsoft Network

Video Compression

X

X

Volume Control

Windows 95 Tour

X

WordPad

X

Deciding Between Local and Shared Installation

Windows 95 can run on the local hard disk of a computer or as a shared copy on the server for network workstations.

Windows 95 files are distributed in the following three forms for installation on computers that already have other operating systems in place:

  • Windows 3.0 (or higher) upgrade on CD-ROM

  • Windows 3.0 (or higher) upgrade on 3.5-inch high-density disks

  • MS-DOS upgrade on 3.5-inch high-density disks

To install Windows 95 on a local computer

  • Insert the first floppy disk or compact disc into the drive, and make that the active drive. Then double-click SETUP.EXE in File Manager, or type setup at the command prompt.

    For a step-by-step description of the installation process, see "Starting Windows 95 Setup" later in this chapter.

Depending on the license agreement at your site, you can also copy the Windows 95 source files to a shared network directory. Users can connect to this directory and run Windows 95 Setup.

You can also configure servers to support installing and running shared installations of Windows 95 in one of the following three ways:

  • On a computer with a local hard disk, with system files stored on and running from the server

  • On a computer with only a floppy disk drive, with system files stored on and running from the server

  • From a Novell NetWare® server to support diskless workstations that remote boot from a startup disk image on the server

In these cases, most or all of the Windows 95 program files reside on the server instead of the workstation. For more information, see Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."

Deciding to Use Customized or Automated Setup

You can choose any combination of methods for configuring custom versions of Windows 95:

  • Create custom setup scripts based on the MSBATCH.INF format. Custom setup scripts contain predefined settings for all Setup options, and they can contain instructions for installing additional software.

  • Define WRKGRP.INI files to control users' choices for workgroups to join on the network.

  • Enable user profiles and create system policies to restrict users' abilities to change the system configuration.

You can use setup scripts to create an automated mandatory installation scheme for installing Windows 95 on multiple computers from Windows 95 source files on servers. The following methods are possible:

  • Use a login script to run Setup from a custom setup script, automatically installing Windows 95 when each user logs on.

  • Use Microsoft Systems Management Server to run Windows 95 Setup with a custom setup script as a mandatory action.

  • Use network management software from another vendor to install Windows 95 automatically based on custom setup scripts.

For more information, see Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations."

In this chapter, notations in the margin indicate the MSBATCH.INF section name and option that you can specify to customize a particular part of Setup in a script. For more information about setup script entries, see Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters."

Deciding to Use Maintenance or Repair Setup

If Setup encounters an error or stops during hardware detection so that you have to run Windows 95 Setup again, the Safe Recovery option in Setup automatically skips previous problems so that Setup can be completed. You can also use Safe Recovery to repair damaged or corrupt installations. For more information, see "Beginning Windows 95 Setup and Safe Recovery" later in this chapter and Chapter 6, "Setup Technical Discussion."

If you run Windows 95 Setup after the operating system is installed, Setup asks if you want to verify the existing installation. You can use this feature to verify or repair the files that make up the Windows 95 operating system. You might be able to restore damaged files without completely reinstalling Windows.

Also, you can create an emergency startup disk during Windows 95 Setup, which you can use to start the computer in case of configuration problems. For information, see "Creating a Startup Disk" later in this chapter.

Windows 95 provides a variety of maintenance applications for adding, removing, and configuring Windows 95 components. Many of these applications are summarized in the following table:

Icon

Application

Description

 

RK03_25

Add/Remove Programs

Installs or removes applications created for Windows 95; runs Windows 95 Setup to add or remove components; or creates a startup disk. To run this wizard, click the Add/Remove Programs icon in Control Panel.

 

RK03_26

Add New Hardware

Installs hardware device drivers. To run this wizard, click the Add New Hardware icon in Control Panel.

 

RK03_27

Display

Installs and configures display drivers. To run this option, click the Display icon in Control Panel.

 

RK03_28

Printer

Installs and configures printers. To run this wizard, click the New Printer icon in the Printers folder.

 

RK03_29

Modems

Installs and configures modems. To run this wizard, click the Modems icon in Control Panel.

 

RK03_30

Network

Installs and configures network components. To run this option, click the Network icon in Control Panel.

Before Starting Windows 95 Setup

You should consider the following questions before proceeding with Windows 95 Setup on an individual computer:

Is the hardware supported?

Check the Windows 95 README file and SETUP.TXT on the installation disks for any notes related to your computer hardware. If any specific computer component is not supported, Windows 95 selects a generic driver or uses the existing driver installed on the computer. If you install support manually for a hardware component that doesn't appear in the installation dialog boxes, select the model that your hardware can emulate or that is of the closest type. (All supported hardware components are listed when you run the Add New Hardware wizard, as described in Chapter 19, "Devices.")

Do the computer components meet the minimum requirements?

Read "Installation Requirements" earlier in this chapter, and check your computer hardware and software components. Verify that all components meet the minimum requirements.

Are all unnecessary TSRs and time-out features disabled?

Disable all TSRs and device drivers loaded in CONFIG.SYS or AUTOEXEC.BAT (or in any batch files called from AUTOEXEC.BAT), except those required for partition or hard disk control, network drivers, or any driver required for operation of a device such as video, CD-ROM, and so on.

Some portable computers (such as the IBM ThinkPad®) automatically suspend operation after a specified time-out interval, or when the cover is closed. You should disable this feature while Windows 95 Setup is running.

Is the installation drive checked and defragmented?

Windows 95 Setup automatically runs ScanDisk to check the integrity of the drive where Windows 95 is to be installed. However, you might want to check and defragment the hard disk drive thoroughly before beginning Setup, using your usual defragmentation software.

Also, be sure to defragment all compressed drives, because a highly fragmented compressed drive reports more available disk space than is available. If you use disk compression software other than DriveSpace or DoubleSpace, be sure to run the disk-checking utility provided with your compression software. For information, see the documentation provided with the compression software.

Tip When you run Windows 95 Setup, ScanDisk performs a quick check of the hard disk. You can skip this quick check (for example, if the computer uses disk compression software from another vendor) by using the /iq or /is switch with the setup command, as described in "Using Setup Command-Line Switches" later in this chapter. If you choose to skip automatically running ScanDisk, be sure to use another utility to check the integrity of the hard disk before running Setup.

Are all key system files backed up?

Any time you upgrade an operating system, backing up critical business or personal data is a prudent precaution. The files you should back up before installing Windows 95 include the following:

  • All initialization (.INI) files in the Windows directory

  • All Registry data (.DAT) files in the Windows directory

  • All password (.PWL) files in the Windows directory

  • All Program Manager group (.GRP) files in the Windows directory

  • All critical real-mode drivers specified in CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT

  • CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT in the root directory

  • Proprietary network configuration files and login scripts

Does the networking software work correctly?

Make sure that the network software is running correctly before you start Windows 95 Setup. Windows 95 uses the settings from the existing network configuration to set up the new configuration. Check the Windows 95 README file for additional notes related to your networking software.

Starting Windows 95 Setup

The Windows 95 Setup program (SETUP.EXE) is found on the Windows 95 installation disks, or it can be stored on a shared network resource. For information about the installation media, see "Options for Windows 95 Installations" earlier in this chapter.

This section describes methods for starting Windows 95 Setup on computers that will run Windows 95 from the local hard disk after installation. For information about setting up a computer to run a shared copy of Windows 95, see Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."

Caution: Except for TSRs required for partition or hard disk control, network drivers, or device drivers such as CD-ROM, no TSRs or Windows-based applications should be running when you start Windows 95 Setup. Close any such applications before continuing with Setup.

To start Windows 95 Setup from Windows 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups

  1. Start your computer in the usual way, and run Windows.

  2. If you are installing Windows 95 from floppy disks, insert Disk 1 in the drive and make that the active drive in File Manager.

    – Or –

    If you are installing Windows 95 from CD-ROM, put the compact disc in the drive and make that the active drive.

    – Or –

    If you are installing Windows 95 from source files on a network server, connect to that server and switch to the shared network directory that contains the Windows 95 source files.

  3. Double-click SETUP.EXE in the directory of the Windows 95 installation files.

    – Or –

    From the File menu, choose Run, and then type setup and press ENTER.

  4. Follow the instructions on-screen, as described in the following sections of this chapter.

To start Windows 95 Setup from MS-DOS

  1. Start your computer in the usual way.

  2. If you are installing Windows 95 from floppy disks, insert Disk 1 in the drive and make that the active drive. For example, type a: if the disk is in the A drive.

    – Or –

    If you are installing Windows 95 from CD-ROM, put the compact disc in the drive and make that the active drive.

    – Or –

    If you are installing Windows 95 from source files on a network server, connect to that server and switch to the shared network directory that contains the Windows 95 source files.

  3. At the command prompt, type setup, and then press ENTER.

  4. Follow the instructions on-screen, as described in the following sections of this chapter.

To start Windows 95 Setup from a network computer using a setup script

  1. Log on to the network, running the existing network client.

  2. Connect to the server that contains the Windows 95 distribution files.

  3. At the command prompt, run Windows 95 Setup by specifying the batch file that contains the setup script, using this syntax:

    setup msbatch.inf

    For example, type setup \\ntserver\win95\mybatch.inf to run Setup using a setup script named MYBATCH.INF that is stored in the WIN95 directory on a server named NTSERVER. For more information, see Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations."

Note: If Windows 95 is installed from a server, the location of that network directory is stored in the Registry. When you add a device or require additional support files to run Windows 95, Setup automatically attempts to retrieve the files from that same location on the server. This eliminates the need to maintain a permanent network connection on the computer and makes it easier to modify the configuration of a computer in a networked environment.

Using Setup Command-Line Switches

Windows 95 Setup provides options to control the installation process. These options, or switches, are specified on the command line as arguments for the setup command (such as setup /d). Similar to MS-DOS command arguments, the specific option is preceded by a forward slash (/) character (not the backslash used to specify directory arguments).

Windows 95 Setup can be run with the setup command with the following switches.

Switch

Meaning

/?

Provides help for syntax and use of setup command-line switches.

/C

Instructs Windows 95 Setup not to load the SmartDrive disk cache.

/d

Instructs Windows 95 Setup not to use the existing version of Windows for the early phases of Setup. Use this switch if you have problems starting Setup that might be due to missing or damaged supporting files for Windows.

/id

Instructs Windows 95 Setup not to check for the minimum disk space required to install Windows 95.

/ih

Runs ScanDisk in the foreground so that you can see the results. Use this switch if the system stalls during the ScanDisk check or if an error results.

/iL

Loads the Logitech mouse driver. Use this option if you have a Logitech Series C mouse.

/iq

Instructs Windows 95 Setup not to perform the ScanDisk quick check when running Setup from MS-DOS. You probably want to use this switch if you use compression software other than DriveSpace or DoubleSpace.

/is

Instructs Windows 95 Setup not to run the ScanDisk quick check when starting Setup from Windows. You probably want to use this switch if you use compression software other than DriveSpace or DoubleSpace.

/nostart

Instructs Windows 95 Setup to copy a minimal installation of the required Windows 3.x DLLs used by Windows 95 Setup, and then to exit to MS-DOS without installing Windows 95.

script_filename

Instructs Windows 95 Setup to use settings in the specified script to install Windows 95 automatically; for example, setup msbatch.inf specifies that Setup should use the settings in MSBATCH.INF. For more information, see Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations."

/t: tempdir

Specifies the directory where Setup is to copy its temporary files. This directory must already exist, but any existing files in the directory will be deleted.

Tip for Accessibility Needs and Windows 95 Setup

Users who require accessibility aids with Windows might find it difficult to install Windows 95 in the usual way because accessibility aids cannot run with Windows 95 Setup.

To solve this problem, users (or their system administrator) can provide setup answers in a setup script, which is a text file that is created before running Setup. Then the user can run Setup from the command prompt using this setup script. Windows 95 Setup will run without requiring additional user input. For more information, see Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations."

Beginning Windows 95 Setup and Safe Recovery

As soon as you start Windows 95 Setup, the screen indicates that Setup is being initialized. During this earliest phase, several files needed to run Setup are copied to the local computer, and Setup runs ScanDisk to check the integrity of the hard disk. After Windows 95 Setup completes these activities, the Welcome message shows the estimated time that it will take to complete the process, plus the four basic phases of Windows 95 installation.

MSBATCH.INF

[setup]
express=1
bypasses this screen

Cc751081.rk03_01(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

To navigate in Windows 95 Setup

  • Click the Next or Back buttons on the Setup screens to navigate through choosing installation options.

    Click the Next button to accept the choices you made on the current screen and to continue to the next screen; click the Back button to return to the previous screen to make changes.

If a previous attempt to install Windows 95 has failed, Windows 95 Setup provides an option to use the Safe Recovery feature or to run a full new Setup process. If the Safe Recovery dialog box appears when you start Windows 95 Setup, you should select the Use Safe Recovery option. When you select this option, Windows 95 Setup can use built-in methods to avoid problems that occurred previously.

After you start Safe Recovery, the standard Windows 95 Setup wizard screen appears. For more information about Safe Recovery, see Chapter 6, "Setup Technical Discussion."

MSBATCH.INF

[setup]
express=1
bypasses this screen

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Technical Note on ScanDisk for Windows 95 Setup

When you run Windows 95 Setup from MS-DOS (rather than Windows), ScanDisk runs in interactive mode. If you choose not to fix errors that ScanDisk finds or if you try to exit before ScanDisk is finished, Setup will not continue. If ScanDisk finds only long filenames or lost clusters, Setup allows you to continue. By default, ScanDisk checks all drives, except the A drive if you run Setup from floppy disks.

When you run Windows 95 Setup from Windows 3.x or Windows for Workgroups, Setup runs ScanDisk in a non-interactive mode. If ScanDisk finds errors, Setup asks you to exit Windows and run ScanDisk as a standalone program. If ScanDisk finds only long filenames, Setup allows you to continue. Lost clusters are not detected, nor are mismatched FAT file systems or certain other file system problems. ScanDisk checks all physical and logical drives.

When you run Windows 95 Setup on a computer with MS-DOS DoubleSpace or DriveSpace compressed drives, ScanDisk treats these as regular compressed volumes and also checks your host volumes. If SSTOR (or any other compression software from another vendor) is in memory, then ScanDisk acts as if it doesn't see any compressed drives and treat all drives as normal FAT drives.

Running Windows 95 Setup

This section describes the procedures for installing Windows 95 on the hard disk of a computer that is not running a shared copy from a network server. The following series of tasks are described:

  • Gathering information

  • Analyzing the computer (hardware detection)

  • Selecting software components in Custom Setup

  • Selecting network components in Custom Setup

  • Specifying computer identification

  • Changing computer settings in Custom Setup

  • Creating a startup disk

  • Copying files and completing Setup

Gathering Information

Most information needed to install Windows 95 is gathered automatically by Windows 95 Setup before you are asked to do anything. The following series of tasks are presented by Windows 95 Setup to guide you through providing the information needed to install and configure the new operating system:

  • Choosing the Windows directory

  • Selecting the setup type

  • Checking disk space for Windows 95

Choosing the Windows Directory

This option is available for all setup types

If a previous installation of Windows 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups 3.x exists, Windows 95 asks you to confirm the directory where Windows 95 is to be installed. By default, the directory containing the existing Windows installation is selected.

For information about deciding whether to install Windows 95 in a new directory, see "Deciding to Run Setup from MS-DOS or Windows" earlier in this chapter.

To install Windows 95 in a new directory

  1. Click the Other Directory option, and then click the Next button.

    MSBATCH.INF

    [setup]
    InstallDir=dirname
    sets this value and bypasses confirmation

    Cc751081.rk03_04(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  2. Type a new directory name, and then click the Next button.

    MSBATCH.INF

    [setup]
    InstallDir=dirname
    bypasses this screen

    Cc751081.rk03_05(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

If you choose to install Windows 95 in a new directory, you might need to reinstall Windows-based applications because Windows 95 uses a different method from Windows 3.x for storing configuration information, and because application support files such as DLLs will be missing from the Windows 95 directory. Windows 95 Setup cannot transfer this information automatically.

Note: You cannot migrate system settings and groups under Windows 3.1 and Windows for Workgroups 3.x by copying all the .GRP and .INI files into the new installation directory. This does not work with Windows 95, because .GRP files and .INI file entries cannot be used by Windows 95 unless Windows 95 Setup migrates this information to the Registry. You must run Windows 95 Setup and install Windows 95 in the existing Windows directory to migrate .GRP and .INI file information from Windows 3.x.

Selecting the Type of Setup

Windows 95 Setup asks you to select the type of setup you want. For a description of these options, see "Deciding to Use Typical, Portable, Compact, or Custom Setup" earlier in this chapter. By default, the Typical Setup option is selected.

MSBATCH.INF

[setup]
express=1
bypasses this screen;
InstallType=0, 1, 2,
or 3 selects Compact, Typical, Portable, or Custom, respectively

Cc751081.rk03_03(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

To specify Custom Setup

  • In the Setup Options screen, click Custom, and then click the Next button.

Checking Disk Space for Windows 95

After you select the directory for Windows 95, Setup checks the hard disk, prepares the directory, and verifies that there is enough free disk space for Windows 95. If there is insufficient space on the destination drive, Windows 95 Setup warns you about the lack of space, and displays the minimum and complete installation space requirements.

If Windows 95 Setup detects that there is insufficient disk space for a normal upgrade of an existing version of Windows, you can choose to install a compact configuration of Windows 95. If you continue even though there is insufficient disk space, the installation might be incomplete. If Setup runs out of disk space, it stops and displays an error message; you must free additional disk space and then run Setup again.

Providing User Information

This option is available for all setup types

The information requested during this part of Setup is required, no matter what setup type you specified.

After completing the disk-space check, Windows 95 Setup asks you to type your name and company name. Windows 95 uses your name and company name to identify you for various operations. You must type and verify a response for Setup to continue.

MSBATCH.INF

[NameAndOrg]
name=value
org=company
sets these values;
display=0
bypasses displaying this screen

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Windows 95 Setup next requests a product identification number. You must type and verify a response for Setup to continue. The Product ID dialog box might not appear if you are installing Windows 95 from the network, depending on the requirements at your site. The product ID number can be found on your Windows 95 disks or your Certificate of Authenticity.

Analyzing the Computer

This option is available for all setup types

After you complete the user information, Windows 95 Setup prepares for the hardware detection phase. Setup can search automatically for all basic system components such as disk drives and controllers, display devices, pointing devices, and keyboards.

For Typical Setup, you can choose to skip detection for certain hardware, such as CD-ROM or multimedia devices, depending on what Setup finds during its safe-detection examination of the hardware. If Setup proposes to skip detection of certain hardware, but you know that these types of devices are attached to the computer, you can override the suggestion and have Setup detect the devices. Otherwise, skipping detection for the devices as suggested by Setup saves time during installation.

For Custom Setup, you can specify whether you want Setup to skip detecting any specific devices attached to your computer. Usually, you should let Setup detect the system hardware unless you know that the computer contains devices that cause problems during the hardware detection phase. For example, you should have Setup skip detection of a particular device if Setup failed previously while detecting that device and if Safe Recovery does not skip detecting that device when you run Setup again.

For information about specific device types supported in Windows 95, see the Manufacturers and Models lists in the Add New Hardware wizard and the Windows 95 README and SETUP.TXT files.

MSBATCH.INF

express=1
bypasses this
screen

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To have Windows 95 Setup attempt to detect all system hardware

  • On the first Analyzing Your Computer screen, click the Yes option, and then click the Next button.

To modify the list of hardware to be detected in Custom Setup

  1. On the first Analyzing Your Computer screen, click the option named No, I Want To Modify The Hardware List, and then click the Next button.

    The second Analyzing Your Computer screen appears, containing lists of the components that Windows 95 Setup proposes to detect.

  2. To avoid detecting a specific class of hardware, make sure the hardware class is not checked in the Hardware Types list.

    – Or –

    To avoid detecting a specific manufacturer and model of a hardware device (while detecting other devices in that class), make sure the related hardware type is checked, and then make sure the item you want to skip in the Manufacturer And Model list, is not checked.

    If a Hardware Type is grayed (but not checked), then you cannot change how Windows 95 Setup detects that class of hardware.

    Note: The list of CD-ROM drives shows only proprietary drives that require special installation consideration. All other CD-ROM drives are detected automatically.

  3. To begin hardware detection, click the Next button, and then click it again.

    MSBATCH.INF

    does not allow you to skip parts of detection

    Cc751081.rk03_09(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

The hardware detection process can take several minutes. The progress indicator shows what portion of hardware detection has been completed. Notice that this is also the point at which Windows 95 Setup can stall if hardware detection fails for a particular system component.

To continue if Windows 95 Setup stops during hardware detection

  1. Press F3 or click the Cancel button to quit Setup.

    If the computer does not respond to the Cancel button, restart the computer by turning it off and then back on again.

  2. Run Setup again.

    Setup prompts you to use Safe Recovery to recover the failed installation.

  3. Click Use Safe Recovery, and then click the Next button.

  4. Repeat your installation choices.

    Hardware detection runs again, but Setup skips the portion that caused the initial failure.

  5. If the computer stops again during the hardware detection process, repeat this procedure until the hardware detection portion of Setup completes successfully.

Selecting Software Components

If you are running Typical Setup, the following screen appears so that you can specify whether you want to choose the accessories and other software to be installed with Windows 95:

This screen appears for Typical Setup

Cc751081.rk03_06b(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

If you choose the option for customizing the list of components to be installed, the Select Components dialog box appears. (For Custom Setup, the Select Components screen appears automatically.) Notice that the Components list includes information about the disk space required for that component.

MSBATCH.INF

[OptionalComponents]can define the components to be installed

Cc751081.rk03_06(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

To change whether any component is installed

  1. In the Components list, select a component category, and then click the Details button.

    A dialog box appears, listing the components in the category.

    Select the component you want to install, and then click OK.

    • To add a component, make sure the component is checked.

    • To prevent a component from being installed, make sure the component is not checked.

    Cc751081.rk03_06a(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  2. Repeat this procedure for each category in the Components list on the Select Component screen.

  3. When you are satisfied with your selections, click the Next button.

Note: You can install or remove any of these components after Windows 95 is installed by using the Add/Remove Programs option in Control Panel, as described in Chapter 22, "Application Support."

Selecting Network Components in Custom Setup

This option is available only for Custom Setup

Windows 95 Setup allows you to specify network components and settings. This section summarizes the options for modifying network settings during setup. For information about network support, see Chapter 7, "Introduction to Windows 95 Networking."

Note: Windows 95 Setup provides appropriate settings based on hardware and software detection for the network components running when you start Setup. You should accept the default settings unless you know that particular settings need to be changed.

To remove a network component from the list of components to be installed

  • In the Network Configuration screen, select the component you do not want to install, and then click the Remove button.

    MSBATCH.INF

    [setup]
    network=0
    bypasses installing networking components;

    [network] settings can define networking components to be installed;

    display=0
    bypasses
    this screen

    Cc751081.rk03_11(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

To add a network component to the list of components to be installed

  1. In the Network Configuration screen, click the Add button.

  2. In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, select the type of component you want to add, and then click the Add button.

    Cc751081.rk03_12(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    Note: If you are installing a real-mode (16-bit) network client from another vendor, the Adapter, Protocol, and Service component types are not available.

  3. In the dialog box for the selected component type, select the manufacturer of the component in the Manufacturers list, and then click the appropriate version in the list of models. Click OK.

  4. To configure settings for the component you just added, click the component, and then click the Properties button.

Note: Windows 95 Setup uses default settings for all components, which you should rely on.

Important: If your computer is connected to a Windows NT domain, be sure to configure Client for Microsoft Networks to specify the correct domain for logon validation. This ensures that you can log on to your preferred domain and your network printer selections are available automatically.

If you do not specify a domain name when you are installing Windows 95 from source files on the network, Setup might not be able to access required files for completing the final stages of installation.

The following sections summarize each type of network option.

Selecting the Network Client

If you choose to add a network client, Windows 95 Setup displays a list of supported networks. Windows 95 supports the following network types, although in most cases you also need to use supporting software from the network vendor:

  • Microsoft networks, such as Windows NT, Windows for Workgroups, LAN Manager 2.x, or LAN Manager-compatible networks such as IBM LAN Server, or DEC™ PATHWORKS™

  • Artisoft® LANtastic® version 5.0 and later

  • Banyan® VINES® version 5.52 and later

  • Novell NetWare version 3.11 and later

  • SunSoft™ PC-NFS® version 5.0 and later

Note: Artisoft LANtastic cannot be used with a 32-bit, protected-mode networking client such as Client for Microsoft Networks. This client must be installed as the sole network client on the computer.

MSBATCH.INF

[network]
clients=value
defines this option, where the value is a Device ID defined in NETCLI.INF or NETCLI3.INF

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To use Microsoft networking features, you must install Client for Microsoft Networks. For information about configuring this client, see Chapter 8, "Windows 95 on Microsoft Networks." For information about installing and configuring network clients for other kinds of networks, see Chapter 10, "Windows 95 on Other Networks."

To use Windows 95 on a NetWare network, you must install supporting client software, as described in Chapter 9, "Windows 95 on NetWare Networks." If you let Setup automatically install the Microsoft 32-bit, protected-mode Client for NetWare Networks, you can take advantage of automatic reconnection to servers and client-side caching for network information, in addition to the improved performance of the protected-mode implementation.

Important: If your computer is connected to a Windows NT domain, be sure to configure Client for Microsoft Networks to specify the correct domain for logon validation. If you do not specify a valid domain, you might have problems completing the final stages of Setup if required resources are protected by Windows NT security.

Selecting and Configuring a Network Adapter

Windows 95 supports multiple network adapters (also called network interface cards, or NICs) in a manner similar to Windows for Workgroups 3.11 — that is, up to four network adapters can be supported in a single computer.

Network detection automatically determines the type of network adapter and its required resource settings. This is always the recommended method for configuring network adapters.

If you choose to add a network adapter, Windows 95 displays a list of supported network adapters. For information about technical issues for network adapters, see Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion."

MSBATCH.INF

[network]
netcards=value
defines this option, where the value is a device ID defined in the related .INF file;
in most cases, network detection is the best method for installing network adapters

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Selecting and Configuring the Network Protocols

Windows 95 Setup automatically installs the appropriate protocol for the network client you select. Microsoft provides 32-bit, protected-mode versions of these protocols:

  • IPX/SPX-compatible protocol

  • Microsoft NetBEUI

  • Microsoft TCP/IP

Protocols to support other network clients are also provided with Windows 95. For information about the three principal network protocols, see Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion."

MSBATCH.INF

[network]
protocols=value
defines this option, where the value is a device ID defined in NETTRANS.INF

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Selecting and Configuring a Network Service

Network services provide additional networking support. Microsoft provides several supporting network services for Windows 95. Services included on the Windows 95 installation disks include peer resource sharing services (File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks or File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks). These services allow other computers on the network to share file, printer, and CD-ROM resources on this computer. For more information about installing, configuring, and using these services, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

MSBATCH.INF

[network]
services=value
defines this option, where the value is a device ID defined in the related .INF file

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Additional network services, such as backup agents, a Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) agent, the Microsoft Remote Registry agent, are also provided on the Windows 95 compact disc in the ADMIN directory, as described in Chapter 16, "Remote Administration."

Specifying Computer Identification

This option is available for all setup types

The Identification screen allows you to specify how the computer is identified on the network.

MSBATCH.INF

[network]
computername=value
workgroup=value
description=value
define these options

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  • The computer name must be unique on the network, and can be up to 15 characters long with no spaces (no blank characters). The name can contain only alphanumeric characters and the following special characters:

    ! @ # $ % ^ & ( ) - _ ' { } . ~
    
  • The workgroup name can be up to 15 characters long and uses the same naming convention as the computer name. The workgroup is used to associate groups of computers together for more efficient browsing. The network administrator can provide guidelines for workgroup selection by using WRKGRP.INI, as described in Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations."

  • The computer description can be up to 48 characters long, but it cannot contain any commas (,). This text appears as a comment next to the computer name when users are browsing the network, so you can use it to describe the department or location of the computer, or the type of shared information.

Changing Computer Settings in Custom Setup

This option is available only for Custom Setup

Windows 95 Setup detects the hardware in the computer and determines appropriate default values for configuring the hardware. Usually, you should accept the values determined through hardware detection, unless you know that a manual setting must be supplied.

Note: You can select options in the Computer Settings screen for Advanced Power Management (an option on some portable computers), Regional Settings (the local language preference), and Windows User Interface (Windows 95 versus Program Manager). You can also add multilanguage support for Eastern European, Greek, or Cyrillic languages if you are installing an English or Western European version of Windows 95.

To configure system hardware options

  1. In the Computer Settings screen, click the item in the list you want to change, and then click the Change button.

    MSBATCH.INF

    [system] entries
    define these options;
    display=0
    bypasses this screen

    [setup]
    express=1 also bypasses this screen

    Cc751081.rk03_17(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    The Select Device dialog box appears. A list displays the models that are identified as compatible for the hardware detected in your computer.

    MSBATCH.INF

    [system]
    display=value
    defines this option; the value is a section name in that device's .INF file

    Cc751081.rk03_18(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  2. In the Select Device dialog box, select the model name that matches your device.

    – Or –

    If you want to display all possible entries for the selected device category, click the Show All Devices option, and then select the model that matches your device.

  3. Click OK. For information about configuring a device, see Chapter 19, "Devices."

The following chapters provide information about changing specific hardware settings. You use the same procedures during Custom Setup to change settings as are used after Windows 95 is installed.

To change this device setting

See this chapter

Display, mouse, and COMM ports

Chapter 19, "Devices"

Network adapter

Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion"

Keyboard

Chapter 34, "International Windows 95"

If Windows 95 does not have a new driver for your display adapter when upgrading over a previous version of Windows, it reports it as Standard Display Adapter (VGA) in the Computer Settings list. Later, Windows 95 displays a message stating that your display driver is invalid, however, you can select your Windows 3.1 driver from the list and continue. Although you can install Windows 3.1 display drivers (as described in Chapter 19, "Devices"), Microsoft recommends that you upgrade to Windows 95 drivers wherever possible for improved performance and reliability.

Creating a Startup Disk

This option is available for all setup types

In the Startup Disk screen, Windows 95 Setup offers to create an emergency startup disk that contains basic system files. You can use this disk to start Windows 95 when you cannot start the operating system from the hard disk. Creating the startup disk is the default option, but you can choose to bypass this step.

Important: It is strongly recommended that you create a startup disk during Windows 95 Setup. If you want to create a startup disk after Windows 95 has been installed, you can use the Add/Remove Programs option in Control Panel to create one.

MSBATCH.INF

[setup]
EBD=1
forces creation of a startup disk

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To create a startup disk

  • Click the option named Yes, I Want A Startup Disk, and then click the Next button.

Copying Files and Completing Setup

After hardware detection is complete and Windows 95 Setup has obtained all required information, the next phase of Windows 95 Setup begins. During this phase, the Windows 95 files are copied to the destination drive and directory.

MSBATCH.INF

[setup]
express=1
bypasses this screen

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If you chose to have Windows 95 Setup create a startup disk, Setup asks you to insert a floppy disk into drive A. The disk does not need to be formatted or empty, but any information you have stored on the disk will be permanently deleted. After you insert the disk, click OK to create the startup disk. Windows 95 Setup formats the disk and copies the appropriate files.

When the basic installation steps are completed, Windows 95 Setup asks you to remove any disks from the floppy disk drives. After you click OK, the computer is restarted, and the final phase of the installation process begins, which includes converting Windows Program Manager groups and migrating various system configuration settings to the Registry.

Near the end of the installation process, Windows 95 Setup asks you to complete several configuration options. These configuration options are referred to as Run-Once options, because after you have completed the installation steps for these options, that particular set of activities is not repeated again when you choose the related option in Control Panel. Some Run-Once installation procedures are described in the following sections.

For more information about this phase, see Chapter 6, "Setup Technical Discussion."

Setting the Local Time Zone

Setup prompts you to set the time zone for your location. This is an important step for network computers that need to keep time stamps synchronized.

To configure the local time zone

  • Click your location on the map.

    – Or –

    Select your time zone from the list.

MSBATCH.INF

[install]
timezone=string
defines this option

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Installing and Configuring a Printer

If you are installing Windows 95 in a new directory or on a computer that did not have a previous version of Windows, Windows 95 Setup automatically runs the Add Printer wizard the first time that Windows 95 is started after the basic installation is complete.

MSBATCH.INF

[Printers]
printer=driver,port
defines this option

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To configure a printer during Windows 95 Setup

  • In the Add Printers wizard, click Next and follow the instructions on the screen.

    – Or –

    Click Cancel if you do not want to install a printer.

If you want to install or change a printer after Windows 95 is installed, double-click the Printers folder in My Computer. For information about installing and managing printers in Windows 95, see Chapter 23, "Printing and Fonts."

If you are installing Windows 95 in the same directory as an earlier version of Windows, then your previous printer configuration is incorporated into Windows 95 and the wizard for installing printers does not run during Setup.

Configuring Microsoft Exchange

During the final stages of Windows 95 Setup, the Inbox Setup wizard runs automatically if you selected Microsoft Exchange in the Select Components screen.

If the administrator has already created a postoffice, added users to it, and shared it with all users on the network, the postoffice name and location appear in the dialog box automatically without requiring you to type this information. This makes setting up the Microsoft Exchange client with the Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice easy for all users in the workgroup. For information about setting up a Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice, see Chapter 26, "Electronic Mail and Microsoft Exchange."

To configure the Microsoft Exchange client

  1. When the Inbox Setup wizard appears, follow the instructions on the screen for configuring the Microsoft Exchange client on your computer.

  2. If you also selected Microsoft Mail Services in addition to Microsoft Exchange, the wizard prompts you for the path name for the postoffice location, your Microsoft Mail user name, and Microsoft Mail password.

Completing Windows 95 Setup

Depending on the options you selected during Setup, the hardware devices you have, or the computer you have, additional Run-Once options might need to be completed, such as the wizard for configuring MIDI devices. After all the Run-Once options are completed, all of the files are installed, and the computer is configured to run your applications.

For technical information about initializing the operating system at the completion of Setup and for a detailed description of the system startup process, see Chapter 6, "Setup Technical Discussion."

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