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Custom Installations for Windows 95: The Basics

Archived content. No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

This chapter provides information about customizing Windows 95 and using login scripts for automated installation of Windows 95.

You can use the Server-based Setup program to install source files and create setup scripts to automate all kinds of Window 95 installations. After using Server-based Setup to create a basic setup script, you can use a text editor to customize setup scripts for your site.

On This Page

To install Windows 95 source files on the network
Custom Installations of Windows 95: The Issues
Customizing Windows 95 with Setup Scripts
Using Server-Based Setup to Create Custom Scripts

To install Windows 95 source files on the network

  • Run Server-based Setup (NETSETUP.EXE), as described in Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."

You have several options for customizing Windows 95 when users install Windows 95 using source files on a server. The most basic options include the following:

  • Create custom MSBATCH.INF files. The custom setup scripts contain predefined settings for all the options that can be specified during Setup, and can contain instructions for installing additional software.

  • Create user profiles and system policies to customize the desktop and system settings, or to restrict users' abilities to change the configuration.

The following table compares the customization methods formerly used for Windows for Workgroups versus the methods prescribed for Windows 95.

Comparison of Customization Methods

Windows for Workgroups

Windows 95

SETUP.SHH to customize system settings

MSBATCH.INF settings

SETUP.INF to copy additional files or to force Setup options

MSBATCH.INF settings

CONTROL.INF to list incompatible TSRs or force selection of devices or network clients

NETDET.INI for NetWare TSRs; built into Setup for all others

APPS.INF to create PIFs for applications

APPS.INF (same format)

WRKGRP.INI to control workgroup membership

WRKGRP.INI (similar format, with a new entry for Windows 95 features)

[New.Groups] in SETUP.INF for custom program groups

System policies to customize the desktop contents

setup /p to restore program groups; manually copying .GRP files to restore desktop contents

GRPCONV.EXE to convert program groups or restore default menus, as described in Chapter 6, "Setup Technical Discussion"

SYSTEM.INI, WIN.INI, or CONTROL.INI to modify system or desktop settings

For upgrades from Windows 3.x, custom settings are migrated; for the rare cases in which there is no equivalent in the user interface or in system policies, you can still modify INI files

After a setup script and other customization files are created, Windows 95 can be installed automatically by running Setup at each client computer, using the name of the setup script as a command-line parameter. Setup can be run from any of the following:

  • A login script

  • From server-based system management software

  • From a batch file that contains the appropriate setup command line, distributed on floppy disk or by electronic mail

Custom Installations of Windows 95: The Issues

In Windows 95, you cannot modify the default INF files to customize the setup process or the final Windows 95 installation. Instead, Windows 95 provides more flexible, easier to use methods that rely principally on MSBATCH.INF and system policies to control installation options or manage the final configuration.

To take advantage of user profiles, the client computers must be running a 32-bit, protected-mode network client, such as Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks or Client for Microsoft Networks. Additional issues for using user profiles and system policies are described in Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

To take advantage of WRKGRP.INI for restricting workgroup choices, the file should be stored in the shared directory that contains the Windows 95 source files. For shared installations, WRKGRP.INI should be stored in the shared Windows directory on the server.

The following list summarizes the items that cannot be customized or the screens that cannot be skipped during Windows 95 Setup.

Setup Components That Cannot Be Skipped or Customized

Dialog box or message

Comment

MS-DOS Uninstall

This message appears if Setup detects MS-DOS Uninstall information on the computer. You cannot turn off this display or automate a response.

OS/2 Detected

This message appears if Setup detects that a version of OS/2 is installed on the system. You cannot turn off this display or automate a response.

Quit All Windows Programs

This message appears if Setup detects that other programs are running. You cannot turn off this display or automate a response. This message always appears if Setup is run using a Windows-based network management tool such as Microsoft Systems Management Server.

Not Enough Disk Space

This message appears if there is not enough hard disk space to support the specified installation type. You cannot turn off this display from a setup script. However, to avoid this message, start Windows 95 Setup using the setup /id switch.
Caution: Setup will fail during installation if it runs out of disk space.

Checking Your Hard Disk

This information message always appears. You cannot turn off this display, but no response is required.

Preparing Directory

This information message always appears. You cannot turn off this display, but no response is required.

Analyzing Your Computer

This information message always appears. You cannot turn off this display, but no response is required.

Customizing Windows 95 with Setup Scripts

You can specify custom settings for Windows 95 installations by creating a custom file in MSBATCH.INF format and using this setup script for installation. The default setup script is stored with the source files on the server. Custom setup scripts can be stored in users' home directories or in other central locations.

There are several ways to create a custom setup script:

  • Use Server-based Setup (NETSETUP.EXE) to specify many custom settings

  • Use Batch Setup (BATCH.EXE in the Windows 95 Resource Kit utilities) to specify most settings

  • Create or edit a file in MSBATCH.INF format to specify all possible custom settings

These methods are described in the following sections.

Tip: The Windows 95 Resource Kit utilities include generic setup scripts for a variety of cases. These scripts can be used as is or modified to automate Windows 95 Setup.

Using Server-Based Setup to Create Custom Scripts

You can use the Make Script button in Server-based Setup to create a default setup script. This option can only be used to create a setup script, not to edit an existing script. To edit an existing script, you must use a text editor, as described in "Editing MSBATCH.INF for Custom Settings" later in this chapter.

To create a custom setup script using the Server-based Setup program

  1. In Server-Based Setup, click the Make Script button.

  2. In the Save As dialog box, specify the filename for this setup script, and specify the path where the script is to be stored, and then click OK.

    Cc751083.rk05_01(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  3. Use the SBS Default Properties dialog box to specify custom settings, as described in the following table. For information about each of these .

The following table summarizes what is set when a particular option is checked in the SBS Default Properties dialog box. For more information about each of these options when specified in a setup script, see Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters."

Server-Based Setup Options for Custom Scripts

Option

Description and related script setting

Setup Options [Setup]:

 

Automated Install

Specifies whether to allow user input during Setup; sets Express=1.

Setup Mode

Selects Compact or Custom as the Setup type; sets the InstallType= value.

Create an Emergency Boot Disk

Ensures that Setup will create a startup disk; sets EBD=1. The user will be prompted to insert a floppy disk when Setup is ready to create this disk.

Install Verification

Specifies full installation or verification only; sets the Verify= value:
• Do a full installation
• Verify install but don't copy files

Enable Pen Windows Warning

Ensures that a warning appears if Setup finds an unknown version of Pen Windows; sets PenWinWarning=1.

Install Location [Setup]:

 

Install Directory

Specifies the path for where Windows 95 is to be installed; sets the InstallDir= value.

Server based Setup

Specifies where to install and how to start Windows 95.
The Store Windows item offers two options:
• On the server (for shared installations)
• On the user's hard disk (for local installations)
The Boot Device item offers three options that apply only for shared installations:
• Floppy disk
• Hard disk
• Remote-boot server
For more information about shared installations of Windows 95, see Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."

Name and Organization [NameAndOrg]:

 

Display name and organization page

Prevents the User Information dialog box from appearing during Setup; sets Display=0.

Name

Specifies a user name; sets the Name= value.

Organization

Specifies a company name; sets the Organization= value.

Network Options [Network]:

 

Display network pages during custom setup

Prevents the Network Configuration dialog box from appearing during Setup; sets Display=0.

Clients to Install

Specifies a comma-separated list of network clients to be installed; sets the Clients= value.
• VREDIR installs Client for Microsoft Networks
• NWREDIR installs Client for NetWare Networks
• NETX or VLM retains existing Novell-supplied clients
The first client in the list becomes the default client, which loads first when the computer is started.

Client for Windows Networks [VRedir]:

 

Validated Logon

Permits network logon only if the user has a valid account on the domain; sets ValidatedLogon=1.

Logon Domain

Specifies a Microsoft network domain name; sets the LogonDomain= value.

Client for NetWare Networks [NWRedir]:

 

Preferred Server

Specifies a NetWare server name; sets the PreferredServer= value.

First Network Drive

Specifies a drive letter; sets the FirstNetDrive= value.

Protocols [Network]:

 

Protocols to Install

Specifies a comma-separated list to set the Protocols= value. The following values install the standard protocols provided with Windows 95:
• NWLINK indicates IPX/SPX-compatible protocol
• NETBEUI indicates Microsoft NetBEUI
• MSTCP indicates Microsoft TCP/IP
The first protocol in the list becomes the default protocol, which also sets LANA 0.

IPX/SPX-compatible protocol [NWLink]:

 

Frame Type

Selects a frame type; sets the FrameType= value. The recommended setting for this is Auto unless you are absolutely certain of the frame type.

NetBIOS support

Installs support for NetBIOS over IPX; sets NetBIOS=1.

Microsoft TCP/IP [MSTCP]:

 

DHCP

Enables DHCP for configuring TCP/IP; sets DHCP=1.

IP Address

Specifies an IP address for the computer in the form ###.###.###.###; sets the IPAddress= value.

Subnet Mask

Specifies a subnet mask in the form ###.###.###.###; sets the SubnetMask= value.

WINS

Specifies whether WINS servers are used for name resolution and how WINS is configured; sets the WINS= value. The following are the possible choices:
• Disable WINS
• Enable WINS; get parameters from DHCP
• Enable WINS resolution (you must type WINS addresses)

Primary WINS

Specifies an IP address for a WINS server in the form ###.###.###.###; sets the PrimaryWINS= value.

Secondary WINS

Specifies an IP address for a WINS server in the form ###.###.###.###; sets the SecondaryWINS= value.

Scope ID

Specifies a scope ID string; sets the ScopeID= value.

Enable DNS

Enables the use of DNS servers or LMHOSTS files for name resolution; sets DNS=1.

Hostname

Specifies a host name for the computer (usually the same as the value of ComputerName=); sets the Hostname= value.

Domain

Specifies the DNS domain name for this computer; sets the Domain= value.

DNS Server search order

Specifies a comma-separated list of DNS servers in the order to be searched, each in the form ###.###.###.###; sets the DNSServers= value.

Domain search order

Specifies a comma-separated list of DNS domain suffixes; sets the DomainOrder= value.

LMHOST Path

Specifies the path where the LMHOST file is stored; sets the LMHostPath= value. Notice that you must also check the Enable DNS option to use LMHOSTS.

Gateways

Specifies a comma-separated list of gateways to be used, each in the form ###.###.###.###; sets the Gateways= value.

Net cards [ netcard ]:

 

Net cards to install

Specifies a comma-separated list of network adapter driver names, which sets the Netcards= value.
Note: In general, this value should not be defined in a setup script; you should let Windows 95 Setup use detection to identify and configure network adapters.

Services [Network]:

 

Services to install

Specifies a comma-separated list of network services to be installed; sets the Services= value. For File and Printer Sharing services, specify one of the following values:
• VSERVER installs support for Microsoft networks
• NWSERVER installs support for NetWare networks

File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks [NWServer]:

 

SAP Browsing

Enables SAP Advertising for this computer; sets Use_SAP=1.

Browse Master

Enables Workgroup Advertising for this computer, and specifies the browser master role for this computer; sets the BrowseMaster= value. The following choices are possible:
• This machine can be a browse master
• This machine cannot be a browse master
• This machine is the preferred browse master

File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks [VServer]:

 

LMAnnounce

Allows computers running Microsoft LAN Manager to see this computer; sets LMAnnounce=1.

Browse Master

Specifies the computer's browser master role; sets the MaintainServerList= value. The following choices are possible:
• Auto (the computer can be a browse master if required)
• Enabled (this computer is the browse master)
• Disabled (this computer cannot be a browse master)

Identification [Network]:

 

Computer Name

Specifies a unique name on the network; sets the ComputerName= value.

Workgroup

Specifies a unique name on the network; sets the Workgroup= value.

Description

Specifies any string, with no commas; sets the Description= value.

Access Control [Network]:

 

Security Type

Defines the type of security to be used to protect shared resources, and the type of pass-through security agent, if user-level security is specified; sets the Security= value. The following choices are possible:
• Share (for share-level security)
• User-level — Windows NT domain
• User-level — Windows NT computer
• User-level — NetWare server

Pass-through Agent

Specifies the server or domain that is to provide pass-through validation for user-level security; sets the PassThroughAgent= value.

System Components [System]:

 

Various device types

Specifies the related INF section name for installing and configuring a specific device. This includes Advanced Power Management, locale, machine, pen windows, tablet, keyboard, monitor, display, and mouse devices.
Note: The recommended method for installing and configuring all these devices is for Windows 95 Setup to use detection.

Most Recently Used Paths [InstallLocationsMRU]:

 

Most Recently Used Path

Specifies UNC names for up to four paths that can be displayed in dialog boxes that request the location of files during Setup.

Tip for Ensuring User Logon Capabilities in Setup Scripts

By default, Windows 95 Setup preserves the network identification information from the user's previous networking configuration, including the logon domain or preferred server. However, in cases where this configuration information is not already defined, you must specify settings in the setup script.

If users are installing Windows 95 from a server that requires logon validation, make sure the custom setup script defines the correct logon server. For a computer that will run Client for Microsoft Networks and use the Windows NT network for network logon validation, you should define values for LogonDomain= and ValidatedLogon= in the [VRedir] section. For a computer that will run Client for NetWare Networks, define a correct value for PreferredServer= in the [NWRedir] section.

If the appropriate values aren't defined in a setup script, the user might not have the validated access required to complete the final Setup steps for installing printers and other actions.

Using BATCH.EXE to Create Setup Scripts

Batch Setup (BATCH.EXE) is a Windows-based program that makes it easy to create setup scripts that can be used to automate Windows 95 installation. By running Batch Setup and completing the options, you create a file in MSBATCH.INF format that can be used to run Windows 95 Setup with minimal user intervention.

This tool is especially useful when you are testing alternate configurations and need to run Setup repeatedly. Batch Setup can be used to define all options in a setup script; however, unlike Server-based Setup, it cannot be used to install source files or create machine directories for a shared installation.

You can run Batch Setup from the ADMIN\RESKIT\APPTOOLS\BATCH directory on the Windows 95 compact disc, or you can copy the files from this directory to your local hard disk. The following summarizes the suggested method for running and using Batch Setup.

To use Batch Setup (recommended method)

  • From the Start menu, click Run. Type batch.exe and then complete all the options to create a customized setup script.

    For assistance in completing any options, see the online Help for Batch Setup.

After you create the setup script, you can run Windows 95 Setup by specifying the name of the script as a command-line parameter, as described in "Running Custom Setup Scripts" later in this chapter. Depending on how many options you completed in Batch Setup, you might not have to provide any additional input while installing Windows 95.

For more information, see the BATCH.HLP and README.TXT files in the BATCH directory. For a description of the parameters in the file created by Batch Setup, see Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters." If you want to modify the file that is created, follow the guidelines for editing setup scripts, as described in "Editing MSBATCH.INF for Custom Settings" later in this chapter.

Editing MSBATCH.INF for Custom Settings

After you have used Server-based Setup or BATCH.EXE to create a setup script in MSBATCH.INF format, you can edit and save this file with a text editor to create alternate or more detailed setup scripts.

To edit MSBATCH.INF

  1. Use a text editor such as Notepad to open the MSBATCH.INF file.

  2. Edit the file, and save it in text-only format.

The following are the editing guidelines for MSBATCH.INF:

  • Each section starts with a unique section name enclosed in brackets ([ ]).

  • Any sections other than those defined in Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters" are not evaluated by Windows 95 Setup.

  • Each section can contain one or more entries. The typical entry consists of a key word and a value separated by an equal sign.

  • Key words within a section do not have to be unique, but each key word and its value should follow the guidelines for that key word, as defined in Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters."

  • A comment can be included anywhere on a line by starting the comment with a semicolon.

Tip for Defining Custom Entries in Setup Scripts

Use the Custom Setup option to install Windows 95 on a single computer. You can define all the optional components and other items you want installed for other similar computers at your site.

After Windows 95 is completely installed on this single computer, you can use any text editor to copy the [OptionalComponents], [Setup], [NameAndOrg], and [System] sections from SETUPLOG.TXT in the computer's root directory. Add this information to define settings for the same sections in the custom setup script.

This is especially useful for defining entries for [OptionalComponents] or when many computers require the same [System] settings. Some settings for the [Network] section can also be copied from SETUPLOG.TXT.

Customizing Setup for Accessibility Requirements

Users who require accessibility aids to work with Windows can experience problems with Windows 95 Setup, because their accessibility aids are not available while Setup is running.

As the system administrator, you can assist users in such cases by creating setup scripts that define all options so that Setup can run without user intervention. In such cases, be sure to include the Windows 95 Accessibility Options among the optional components to be installed with Windows 95.

The following suggestions can help individuals who require accessibility aids but do not have a system administrator to create a setup script. In such cases, you have two options, depending on whether you want to create the script while running Windows 3.x or MS-DOS:

  • If you are running Windows 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups, use BATCH.EXE to create a setup script

  • If you are running MS-DOS, create or edit the AUTOMATE.INF setup script provided with the Windows 95 Resource Kit utilities

When you install Windows 95 over an earlier version of Windows, Setup automatically moves your Startup group and other Program Manager groups for use under Windows 95. So any accessibility options in your previous Startup group will start automatically under Windows 95 after Setup is completed.

Whichever method you choose for creating the script, you can use it to control Windows 95 installation automatically, by using it with the setup command, as described in "Running Custom Setup Scripts" later in this chapter. For information about the accessibility options that can be installed automatically with Windows 95, see Appendix I, "Accessibility."

To use Batch Setup to create a hands-free setup script

  1. Run Batch Setup, as described in "Using BATCH.EXE to Create Setup Scripts" earlier in this chapter.

  2. In the Windows 95 Batch Setup window, type the Setup Identification information.

  3. Click the Installation Options button.

  4. In the Windows 95 Installation Options dialog box, click the Type Of Installation list and select Custom.

    You can make any other changes you want. However, the recommended method is to accept all the default settings and let Windows 95 Setup complete the actions automatically.

  5. Click the Set button.

  6. In the Batch Setup Administrative Options dialog box, make sure the option named Don't Stop During Setup is selected. Then click OK.

  7. In the Windows 95 Batch Setup window, click the Optional Components button.

  8. In the Available Areas list in the Windows 95 Optional Components dialog box, click Accessories. Then in the Available Components list, click Accessibility Options so that it is checked.

    You can use the same method to add any additional components to be installed with Windows 95. Then click OK.

  9. When you finish setting all the options you want, click the Done button. In the Save As dialog box, specify the path and filename for saving this script.

    For networking components, the recommended method is to allow Windows 95 Setup to install and configure components automatically.

To edit AUTOMATE.INF to create a hands-free setup script

  1. Use any text editor to edit a copy of the AUTOMATE.INF sample script provided in the SAMPLES directory with the Windows 95 Resource Kit utilities. You can also create this script by typing the entries in the sample script following this procedure.

  2. Change entries to specify your correct time zone, product identification number, and user name. To make these changes, delete the semicolon at the start of the line, and type the correct text between quotation marks.

    For a list of correct values for time zones, see Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters."

    Your product identification number is the CD Key number on the Windows 95 compact disc case or the number provided ono your Certificate of Authenticity.

  3. Under the [Optional Components] section, include this entry:

    "Accessibility Options"=1
    

The following shows an example of the entries defined in AUTOMATE.INF:

[Setup]
Express=1
InstallType=1
EBD=0
;TimeZone="" ;remove semicolon and add correct zone in quotes
;pid="" ;remove semicolon and type the product ID
vrc=0 ;saves old files without warning you

[NameandOrg]
Display=0
Name="" ;type your username between the quotes

[Network]
Display=0

[OptionalComponents]
"Accessibility Options"=1  
; add any other components to be installed in this section

Installing Other Software Using Custom Scripts

This section describes how to use INF Installer to prepare for installing other software with Windows 95 and how to add Run-Once actions that occur at the end of Setup.

Server-based Setup cannot be used to add extra components, such as Windows 95 Resource Kit utilities or applications and services from the ADMIN directory on the Windows 95 compact disc. To add such components or to add any other software that uses Windows 95 INF files, you must make sure that the source files are installed correctly, the INF files used by Windows 95 Setup are modified properly, and correct entries are added to MSBATCH.INF.

The INF Installer utility (INFINST.EXE) accomplishes these actions automatically for any software that has a Windows 95 INF file. INF Installer is part of the Windows 95 Resource Kit utilities. Before you can use INF Installer, you must use Server-based Setup to install the Windows 95 source files in a network directory, as described in Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."

To use INF Installer to add components in MSBATCH.INF

  1. From the ADMIN\RESKIT\APPTOOLS\INFINST directory on the Windows 95 compact disc, copy INFINST.EXE to the Windows directory on your computer.

  2. From the Start menu, click Run, and then type infinst

  3. In the INF Installer window, click the Set Path button and type the UNC path name for the Windows 95 source files on the network.

  4. To add a component's INF and other files to the Windows 95 source files, click the Install INF button, and then browse for the path name for the current location of the component's INF, executable, and supporting files.

INF Installer copies the files listed in the component's INF file and makes the following modifications in the MSBATCH.INF file that's in the Windows directory on the server that contains the Windows 95 source files:

  • If the component is a network service, then the device ID as specified in the INF file is added to the services= entry in the [Network] section.

  • If the component is an application, the components listed in the INF file are added as comments in the [OptionalComponents] section.

    Note: : For any component to be installed using this setup script, you must manually remove the semicolon before the entry for the component name.

If you want to add to the Run-Once operations that occur the first time Windows 95 starts, you can define entries for these actions in MSBATCH.INF. In addition, you must make sure that the required files are available with the Windows 95 source files, or are otherwise available on a shared resource that users installing Windows 95 have access to. For software components that have Windows 95 INF files, you can use INF Installer to prepare files to be included with Windows 95 Setup. You must also add these entries in the setup script:

  • Create an AddReg= entry in the [Install] section for each software component that you want to run during the Run-Once part of Setup. For example:

    [install]
    AddReg=myprogram.addreg
    

    For more examples of [Install] section entries, see Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters."

  • In the related [software] section, add the following kind of entry for the operation:

    [myprogram.addreg]
    HKLM,Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\RunOnce\reg_values
    

The following shows the Run-Once entry from MSMAIL.INF that causes the setup routine for Microsoft Mail to run after Windows 95 is installed:

[MSMailAddReg]
HKLM,Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion
\RunOnce\Setup,"%EmailRunOnce%",,"%25%\mlset32.exe"

Important: To create definitions in MSBATCH.INF for Run-Once statements or other actions, you must provide the precise Registry settings that the program uses to read or write to the Registry. This requires programmatic understanding of the software, or you must use values provided by the software manufacturer.

If you want to add other software as part of Windows 95 installation, but that software does not have a Windows 95 INF file, you must use a system management tool for software distribution, such as Microsoft Systems Management Server.

Tip: Avoid using relative path names in setup scripts so that you can make sure the commands are run from the correct directory.

Customizing Detection for NetWare Networks

This section describes the format of NETDET.INI, which is used to detect NetWare components and TSRs during Windows 95 Setup. You can use this information to add custom entries for detecting components on NetWare networks and defining actions to be taken during Setup based on detection results.

Note: If you do not need to modify the default detection behavior for setting up Windows 95 on NetWare networks, you can skip this section.

The NETDET.INI and related NETOS.DLL files are stored in the PRECOPY2.CAB file on the Windows 95 floppy disks or compact disc. The version used by Windows 95 Setup is stored in the Windows directory on the local computer. If you modify this file, you can place the revised version of NETDET.INI in the Windows directory on the server that contains the Windows 95 source files.

Each component section in NETDET.INI consists of one or more detection entries, and one or more event entries. A detection entry has the following format:

detectionN=method1[,method2...]

Alternate detection entries can be used to define different actions to be taken, depending on how a component is detected. For example, a TSR detected in memory but not in a batch file might require different actions from the actions required when an entry for the TSR is found in AUTOEXEC.BAT. For example:

detection0=mcb
detection1=autoexec.bat
full_install0=migrate
full_install1=prevent

Each method# parameter in the detection statement defines a detection method, as listed in the following table. Setup assumes that the component has been detected if one method detects it.

Detection method

Meaning

assumed

Always detected; used to force an action unconditionally

autoexec.bat

Detected in an uncommented line in AUTOEXEC.BAT

config.sys

Detected in an uncommented line in CONFIG.SYS

custom_dll

Detected by calling external DLL detection code

mcb

Detected by checking the list of TSRs maintained by MS-DOS in the memory control blocks (MCB)

mcb_nobat

Detected in the MCB chain but not in AUTOEXEC.BAT

system.ini

Detected in an uncommented line in SYSTEM.INI

The special detection method custom_dll requires two additional entries: detection_dll, which contains the filename of the DLL to be loaded, and detection_call, which contains the name of the entry point consistent with the following typedef:

typedef BOOL (WINAPI *LPDCALL)(LPSTR)

Adding custom entries based on this detection method requires that you have sufficient programmatic understanding of the calls made in the relevant DLLs. For an example of required entries for custom_dll, see the example entry for VLM later in this section.

The NETDET.INI file includes one or more event entries grouped by numerical suffixes that match the suffixes in detection entries (that is, N must be 0 or 1). Each event entry contains a list of actions to be performed if the associated detection action was successful. The following shows the form of event entries:

eventN=action1[(parameter)][,action2[(parameter)]...]

The event name is the name of the Setup code for handling installation of components related to the detected TSR or NetWare component. The following list shows the defined events.

Event

Meaning

protstack_installN

The protected-mode protocol will be installed

nwredir_installN

The protected-mode network client will be installed

full_installN

The protected-mode protocol and network client will be installed

The following table lists the defined action codes related to events in NETDET.INI.

Action code

Meaning

none

Do not do anything (NOP)

prevent

Recommend against using during recommendation phase

remove

Comment out using REM in AUTOEXEC.BAT or a batch file called from AUTOEXEC.BAT

unremove

Remove REM comment from AUTOEXEC.BAT or a batch file called from AUTOEXEC.BAT

migrate

Comment out using REM in AUTOEXEC.BAT, and add to WINSTART.BAT

unmigrate

Remove REM comment in AUTOEXEC.BAT, and remove from WINSTART.BAT

install_devnode(devnode)

Cause specified device node to be installed

uninstall_devnode(devnode)

Cause specified device node to be removed

gen_install(section)

Cause action in an install section to run (see the example for Source Routing for NetWare later in this section)

Notice that the event named prevent is a special case that is used during the recommendation phase when Setup is determining which new Windows 95 components can be installed without interfering with TSR dependencies defined in NETDET.INI. If a component is detected by the defined method and the prevent action is associated with the related event, then Setup will recommend against the usual Setup action for the event.

The following shows some examples of entries in NETDET.INI:

;;;;;; VLM 4.x ;;;;;;;;
; prevents installation of Client for NetWare Networks
; if Novell NDS is used
[VLM]
detection0=custom_dll
detection_dll=NETOS.DLL
detection_call=NW_IsNDSinUsefull_install0=prevent 

;;;;;; Btrieve ;;;;;;;;;;
[Brequest.exe]
detection0=mcb; installs all protected-mode components
full_install0=migrate; if Btrieve is present

;;;;;; NOVELL NETBIOS ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
; installs NETBIOS over IPX if Novell NETBIOS is present
[NETBIOS]
detection0=mcb
full_install0=remove,install_devnode(NWNBLINK)

;;;;;;;;;; SOURCE ROUTING FOR NETWARE ;;;;;;;;;
; adds cache size for Source Routing
[ROUTE]
detection0=mcb
full_install0=remove,gen_install(NWSRCR)

[NWSRCR]
AddReg=NWSRCR.reg

[NWSRCR.reg]
HKLM,System\CurrentControlSet\Services\VxD\NWLINK,cachesize,,"16"
HKLM,System\CurrentControlSet\Services\VxD\NWLINK\Ndi\params
\cachesize,"",,"16"

Running Custom Setup Scripts

The following procedure describes how to run Windows 95 Setup from a setup script.

To run Windows 95 Setup using a setup script with minimal user action
  1. Start the computer running the existing network client software.

  2. Connect to the server or drive that contains the Windows 95 source files.

    The network administrator can include this step in the login script to avoid user action.

  3. Change to the directory where the Windows 95 Setup files are located.

  4. At the command line, run Windows 95 Setup by specifying the batch file that contains the setup script, using this syntax:

    setup msbatch.inf
    

    If MSBATCH.INF exists in the Windows directory on the server containing the Windows 95 source files, Setup uses it by default. Otherwise, for example, you would type setup e:\mybatch.inf to run Setup using a setup script named MYSCRIPT.INF on drive E. To use a script in the SCRIPTS directory on a server named NTSVR1, you would type setup \\ntsvr1\scripts\mybatch.inf (provided, of course, that your operating system software can interpret UNC path names).

    – Or –

    Include the entire statement for running Windows 95 Setup in the login script, so that the user does not have to type anything at the command prompt.

When you run Windows 95 Setup in this way, Setup takes all settings from the custom script. For information not defined in the setup script, Windows 95 Setup migrates settings from an earlier version of Windows 3.x on the computer, uses built-in defaults, or prompts the user to provide information.

After copying files, Windows 95 Setup restarts the computer and begins the Run-Once setup operations (printer setup, program group conversions, and so on). When these operations are finished, Windows 95 is completely installed.

When the user quits Windows 95 Setup at this point, Setup writes all changes to the Registry. The user can restart the computer and log on with the usual logon name and password.

The network administrator can automate this process by providing each user with a floppy disk that contains the necessary files for starting the computer, connecting to the network, and running Windows 95 Setup with a custom setup script.

Customizing Windows 95 with WRKGRP.INI Files

You can use a file named WRKGRP.INI to specify a list of workgroups that users can choose to join. You can use WRKGRP.INI in these ways:

  • To help reduce the proliferation of workgroup names on the network

  • To control the workgroup choices that users can make

  • To specify defaults for the NetWare preferred server or Windows NT domain on a per-workgroup basis

The WRKGRP.INI file is stored in the Windows directory on the server that contains the Windows 95 source files.

Windows 95 Setup uses the values defined in WRKGRP.INI to set Registry values in the workgroup, logon domain, preferred server, and other values. The same values are used to control options available for users to select in the Network option in Control Panel. The WRKGRP.INI file contains the following sections.

Section

Description

[Options]

Specifies the recognized options for workgroups

[Workgroups]

Contains a list of workgroups from which the user can choose

In Windows 95, for each workgroup, you can specify the domain, preferred server, and so on, that everyone in a workgroup will use, depending on the network providers used.

The following table describes the format of the Windows 95 WRKGRP.INI file.

WRKGRP.INI Settings

Section or entry

Description

[Options] section:

 

ANSI=true | false

Specifies whether the workgroups need to be converted from an OEM character set to ANSI. Default is false.

Required=true | false

Specifies whether users can type their own workgroup name or forces them to choose from those listed.

ForceMapping=true | false

Specifies whether users can change the workgroup, logon domain, or preferred server that are set by a mapping.

Mapping= NP1, NP2, NP3,...
(comma-separated list of network providers)

Specifies a comma-separated list of the network providers to which workgroups can be mapped. Also specifies the order in which values will be listed in the [Workgroups] section. Implicitly, this specifies where in the Registry to store settings. This parameter is optional. By default, workgroups map to domain, preferred server.

Default= NP1 default,NP2 default, NP3 default,...

Specifies the default mapping for workgroups listed in the [Workgroups] section that don't have a mapping defined. This allows you to add a single entry to an existing Windows for Workgroups WRKGRP.INI file to get minimal mapping functionality. The format is the same as for specifying a mapping in [Workgroups].

[Workgroups] section:

 

workgroup = optional_mapping

Specifies a workgroup that users can choose and its mappings will automatically be defined in the order specified in Mapping=. There can be a workgroup= entry in the file for every workgroup that users can choose. Each name of a workgroup must be followed by an equal sign (=) for the workgroup name to be interpreted correctly.

The entry that defines the network providers for each workgroup has the following format in the [Workgroups] section:

workgroup_name = mapping1 , mapping2 , mapping3 ,...

By default in Windows 95, workgroups can be mapped to both Windows NT domains and NetWare preferred servers. (This is because Windows 95 includes network providers for these two networks.) For example:

MktMain=MktDom1,master1

This example specifies that the workgroup named MktMain has these two mappings: MktDom1 is the logon domain for the Windows NT network, and Master1 is the preferred server for the NetWare network.

Administrators can specify the 32-bit, protected-mode network providers that can be mapped for a workgroup by setting the Mapping= parameter in the [Options] section of WRKGRP.INI. For example, if the network uses two network providers (MSNP32 for Microsoft networks and NWNP32 for NetWare networks), the following is defined in WRKGRP.INI:

[options]
mapping=msnp32,nwnp32

The order specified in the Mapping= entry also specifies the order of items in the [Workgroups] section.

You can also use the Default= entry to specify a default mapping for workgroups that do not have an explicit mapping. This allows you to use an existing WRKGRP.INI created for Windows for Workgroups 3.11, and add one entry to take advantage of Windows 95 functionality. For example, add the entry Default=MktDom1,Master1 to use the servers described in the previous example as the default mapping.

If a WRKGRP.INI exists, the Workgroup field in Windows 95 Setup and the Network option in Control Panel both show all the workgroups listed in WRKGRP.INI. Users can choose a workgroup from the list or type a workgroup name. If Required=true in WRKGRP.INI, the user must choose from the list.

In WRKGRP.INI, ForceMapping= controls whether mapped values can be changed in the Windows 95 user interface. For example, if ForceMapping=true and the user selects a workgroup that is mapped to a domain, the user cannot change the value in the Logon Domain box in the Network option in Control Panel and in the logon dialog box.

Note: If Windows 95 Setup finds the WRKGRP.INI file in the Windows 95 source files, it copies the file to the shared Windows directory.

Customizing Windows 95 with Profiles and Policy Files

You can predefine settings in user profiles and system policy files to control user actions. For example:

  • You can enforce a mandatory desktop configuration by installing a mandatory user profile (USER.MAN) in users' home directories. (On NetWare networks, this is the MAIL subdirectory for each user.)

  • You can control the user's security privileges, network access, and desktop configuration if you install system policy files on the logon server. This is the PUBLIC directory on a NetWare server or the NETLOGON directory on the primary domain controller for a Windows NT domain.

To take advantage of these features in Windows 95, you must define the user profile and system policy settings to be used. Then place these files in the appropriate directories before users run Windows 95 Setup. When users log on to Windows 95, the profiles and policies will be used automatically.

For information about creating and using user profiles and system policy files, see Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies." For an example of setup script statements that enable user profiles, group policies, and remote administration, see Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters."

Overview of Push Installations

A push installation uses Windows 95 Setup with a setup script, plus login scripts and user accounts on a NetWare or Windows NT network, to create an automated, mandatory installation scheme for installing Windows 95 on multiple computers. This allows you to install Windows 95 remotely, without actually going to the computer being upgraded.

You will probably want to create an automated push installation scheme if you are responsible for installing Windows 95 on more than 50 computers.

After you use Server-based Setup to set up the source files on one or more servers and create setup scripts, you can perform push installations in these ways:

  • Use a login script that includes a statement to run Setup with a setup script, automatically installing Windows 95 when each user logs on. Details are provided in the following sections.

  • Insert an object in an electronic mail message that will start Windows 95 Setup with a setup script when the user clicks the object.

  • Use Microsoft Systems Management Server to run Windows 95 Setup with a setup script as a mandatory job, as described in Appendix E, "Microsoft Systems Management Server."

  • Use network management software from other vendors to install Windows 95 based on the setup scripts you create. Refer to the documentation for your network management software for information about performing remote installation of software.

Push installation example for migration of shared Windows 3.x.

Because Windows 95 installation and management methods differ significantly from Windows 3.x, it might be helpful to look at an example of how one type of corporate installation can make the move to Windows 95. The following example focuses on migrating shared installations to Windows 95.

In the corporation in this example, Windows 3.x was installed in shared directories on the network (using setup /a). Workstations each contain a hard disk, where the swap file, TEMP directory, and hardware-specific SYSTEM.INI file are stored. Windows 3.x components were installed in each user's home directory. All workstations run NetWare real-mode networking with ODI drivers. When users log on to the network, the login script runs WINSTART.BAT, which copies the workstation's SYSTEM.INI to the user's home directory and starts Windows. All applications are also stored on and run from servers.

To migrate to Windows 95 using push installations that maintain similar functionality for users on shared installations, the administrator does the following:

  1. Install Windows 95 source files and create machine directories for each computer, as described in Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95." This step includes using INF Installer to prepare any supporting software that uses Windows 95 INF files, and manually copying any additional networking or applications software to the shared Windows 95 directory on the network.

  2. Create the setup script that specifies any custom settings, as described in Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters." This should include installing all protected-mode networking components, so that both the administrator and user can take advantage of Windows 95 protected-mode networking features.

  3. Create system policies, including setting policies that enable user profiles.

    Alternately, you can enable user profiles using setup script statements, as defined in Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters." This is the only method for enabling group policies.

    At each client computer, run a login script with statements to do the following:

    • Copy the contents of the user's home directory to C:\WINDOWS.

      This should include copying the Windows 3.x .GRP, .INI, and REG.DAT files that define the user's personal preferences and working environment. In this case, make sure that the Windows 3.x REG.DAT file includes registration settings for all the shared applications that users run at your site.

      Note: This process is related to the particular configuration used in the example; this is not a required process for creating shared installations or using push installation methods to install Windows 95.

    • Run Windows 95 Setup with a custom setup script.

      You can set installdir=c:\windows to define the machine directory in the setup script.

In this example, Windows 95 Setup installs the shared Windows 95 files on the local hard disk and in the machine directory for the client computer. The settings in the Windows 3.x .GRP, .INI. and REG.DAT files are migrated automatically to the Registry. Notice that in this case, where user profiles are enabled, the current version of USER.DAT file is also stored automatically in the user's home directory when the user logs off. This copy of USER.DAT is the user profile that is then copied to the current machine directory wherever the user logs on.

To install Windows 95 on the local hard disk of client computers, the steps for the administrator are similar to those in the preceding example. However, no machine directories are created for the computers. The following section discusses specific issues related to login scripts for local installations of Windows 95.

Using Login Scripts for Push Installation

Push installation from login scripts can be used on computers running MS-DOS or Windows 3.x with the following real-mode network clients:

  • Microsoft Workgroup Add-on for MS-DOS

  • LAN Manager 2.x real-mode network client

  • Novell® NetWare® real-mode network client (NETX or VLM)

  • Windows for Workgroups real-mode and protected-mode network clients

The following sections describe how to use a common Upgrade account rather than changing every user's login script to install Windows 95. This method avoids activating the Setup process again after Windows 95 has been installed. However, using a common Upgrade account might not work in some corporate environments, where INI files are copied to users' directories based on the user name specified at logon. In such cases, if Windows 95 is installed using an Upgrade account, each user's application settings will not be migrated to Windows 95. In such cases, you can add statements to setup scripts to copy the related INI files to C:\WINDOWS as part the installation process.

Other methods you can use with login scripts to avoid the problem of running Setup a second time include adding a statement to the login scripts to check the MS-DOS version with alternate actions defined when the version is Windows 95.

To use the method described in this section for push installations (for either protected-mode or real-mode network clients), you must do the following in addition to installing the Windows 95 source files and creating setup scripts:

  • For Windows for Workgroups computers, create a STARTUP.GRP file that contains the command line for starting Windows 95 Setup, as described in "Preparing a STARTUP.GRP File" later in this chapter.

  • Create the login scripts that will be used to start the installation process.

  • Create the special user accounts that will be used to run the login scripts.

A push installation actually begins when the user logs on to the client computer.

Important: If the login script processor stays in memory after starting Windows 95, and if the computer is not correctly configured to use extended memory, then there might not be sufficient memory available to run Setup. However, the method presented here for using a STARTUP.GRP file with Windows for Workgroups avoids memory problems in push installations. For login scripts on NetWare networks, you can use an exit command that runs Windows 95 Setup after the login script is complete.

You can also remove unnecessary TSRs and device drivers to increase the available memory before Setup begins. For information about how to define statements in a setup script for changing the system configuration as part of installation, see Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters."

Preparing a STARTUP.GRP File

If you are upgrading computers that run Windows for Workgroups, you can create a special Startup group that is used just once to run the login script.

The use of the Startup group is only mandatory when the user is running Windows for Workgroups 3.11 with logon validated performed by Windows NT Server. In this case, the user starts Windows for Workgroups, which loads the protected-mode protocols and processes the login script. The login script runs in a VM; although Windows 95 Setup cannot be run in a VM, the login script can be used to create a modified STARTUP.GRP file that causes Setup to run as a Windows-based application after the login script finishes running.

Note: For computers that use a real-mode network client, login scripts can run Windows 95 Setup directly, without using a special STARTUP.GRP.

Only computers that use a protected-mode network client need to use the STARTUP.GRP method to run Setup from within Windows for Workgroups.

To prepare for push installations to upgrade earlier versions of Windows

  1. Run Windows for Workgroups on a computer.

  2. If the Startup group is not present, use the File New command in Program Manager to create a Startup group.

  3. In the Startup group, use the File New command to create an Upgrade icon that contains the following command line:

    source_drive:setup [source_drive:msbatch_format.inf]
    

    If the setup script is named MSBATCH.INF and is in the Windows directory in the source files, you do not need to specify the script name on the command line. Otherwise, specify the drive and script name. For example:

    k:\setup k:\myscript.inf
    

    Specify the same source drive used in the login script statements, as described in the following sections on preparing the server for push installations.

  4. Copy the STARTUP.GRP file to the shared directory on the server that contains the Windows 95 source files.

  5. Delete the group or icon that you just created, so that it is no longer stored on the computer where you are working.

  6. In the MSBATCH.INF file, add the following statements to make sure that STARTUP.GRP is replaced after Setup:

    [install]
     renfiles=replace.startup.grp
     
     [replace.startup.grp]
     startup.grp, startup.sav
     
     [destinationdirs]
     replace.startup.grp=10
    
Preparing Login Scripts for Push Installations

This section presents some information about creating login scripts that use an Upgrade account for installing Windows 95 on client computers. Some of the login script statements described in this section are related to using the STARTUP.GRP file for Windows for Workgroups, as described in "Preparing a STARTUP.GRP File" earlier in this chapter.

Tip: Avoid using relative path names in login scripts and setup scripts so that you can ensure the commands are run from the correct directory.

Also, for shared installations, after Windows 95 Setup is complete, make sure that all path statements in users' login scripts point to Windows 95, and not Windows 3.x or MS-DOS directories.

Login scripts for Microsoft real-mode network clients.

For a computer running MS-DOS or Windows 3.1 with a Microsoft real-mode network client, the login script should be similar to the following:

net start full
net use drive_letter: \\server\distshare
drive_letter:setup drive_letter:msbatch.inf

If the client computer is running on a LAN Manager or Windows for Workgroups network, the login script must contain a net start full statement. On a Windows for Workgroups network, the real-mode network client for Windows for Workgroups or Windows 3.1 also requires the entry lmlogon=1 in the [Network] section of SYSTEM.INI. This ensures that the full network redirector is loaded and the user is validated for network logon. Other login script issues are discussed in the following section.

Login scripts for Windows NT networks.

For client computers running MS-DOS or Windows 3.1 on a Windows NT network where an Upgrade account is to be used to install Windows 95, the login script for must contain the following kinds of entries:

net use source_drive \\ntserver\distshare 
source_drive:setup source_drive:msbatch.inf

If this login script will be used to upgrade computers that are currently running Windows for Workgroups, the login script must contain the following kinds of entries to use a STARTUP.GRP:

net use source_drive \\ntserver\distshare
rename windowsdir\startup.grp *.sav
copy path\startup.grp windowsdir\startup.grp

Value

Description

Source_Drive

Maps a drive letter for the server containing the source files. This must be the same drive letter as specified in the STARTUP.GRP file. Check the lastdrive= setting in CONFIG.SYS to make sure that the drive letter specified on the preceding command line is a valid logical drive letter. If it is not, the network connection will not be made, and the Setup process will fail.

\\NTServer\DistShare

Specifies the Windows NT computer that contains the Windows 95 source files.

WindowsDir

Specifies the relative path to the user's Windows directory.

Path

Specifies the path to the Startup group file.

User_Windows

Specifies the relative path to the user's Windows directory that will contain STARTUP.GRP. Use the relative drive and directory designation ( . ) instead of the actual path to the Windows directory (for example, C:\WINDOWS). Do not use the WinDir environment variable, because WinDir is not an accessible environment variable in the script.

For example, for a computer running Windows for Workgroups, the login script could be similar to the following:

net use k: \\ntserver\distshare
rename .\startup.grp *.sav
copy \winnt\system32\repl\import\scripts\startup.grp .\startup.grp
exit

Login scripts for installing Windows 95 on NetWare networks.

The login script for client computers running MS-DOS or Windows 3.1 must contain the following kinds of entries:

attach nwserver/DistShare:
map source_drive:nwserver/DistShare
source_drive:setup source_drive:msbatch.inf

Value

Description

Source_Drive

Specifies the same drive letter as specified in the Startup group

NWServer/DistShare

Specifies the NetWare server that contains the Windows 95 source files

For example, for a computer running MS-DOS or Windows 3.1 with a real-mode network client, the login script could be similar to the following:

attach nwserver1/win95
map k:nwserver1/win95
k:setup k:msbatch.inf
Setting Up a Windows NT Server for Push Installations

This section summarizes the procedures for running login scripts from a Windows NT server for push installations.

To prepare the server for push installations on a Windows NT network

  1. Run Server-based Setup, and install the Windows 95 source files in the shared directory on the Windows NT Server, as described in Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."

  2. Create an MSBATCH.INF file to meet your installation requirements, and copy this file into the Windows 95 source directory on the server.

    Using User Manager for Domains on a computer running Windows NT Server, create a user account named Upgrade, and specify upgrade as the password. Also, make sure the following options are selected for the Upgrade user account:

    • User Cannot Change Password

    • Password Never Expires

    By default, the user account is created in the domain where you logged on to the network. To create the user account in another domain, you must select that domain before creating the account. If your users log on to multiple domains, create the Upgrade user account in each domain.

  3. Create the login scripts that run Windows 95 Setup. For examples that use the Upgrade user account, see "Preparing Login Scripts for Push Installations" earlier in this chapter.

  4. Assign the login script to the Upgrade user account. The login script must be placed in the winnt\SYSTEM32\REPL\EXPORT\SCRIPTS directory on the computer running Windows NT Server.

    The replication service replicates this from the export server to the import server, so the file is copied to winnt\SYSTEM32\REPL\IMPORT\SCRIPTS on the server.

Setting Up a NetWare Server for Push Installations

This section summarizes the procedures for running login scripts from a NetWare server for push installations.

To prepare the server for push installations on a NetWare network

  1. Run Server-based Setup, and install the Windows 95 source files in the shared directory on the NetWare server, as described in Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."

  2. Create an MSBATCH.INF file to meet your installation requirements, and copy this file into the directory that contains the Windows 95 source files on the network.

    On the NetWare server, create a user account named Upgrade and specify upgrade1 as the password. Also, set the types of options for this account as described in the following list.

    • Allow User To Change Password = NO

    • Force Periodic Password Changes = NO

  3. Assign the Upgrade user account to the preferred server to which users have access.

  4. Create a login script and assign it to the Upgrade user. The login script must be placed in the appropriate directory on the server where users will log on. For examples of login scripts that use the Upgrade user account, see "Preparing Login Scripts for Push Installations" earlier in this chapter.

Running Login Scripts for Push Installations

Push installations from login scripts are the same whether you are running a network client with MS-DOS, Windows 3.1, or Windows for Workgroups. If you are using an Upgrade account, as described earlier, these are the requirements:

  • For computers running Windows for Workgruops, the Upgrade account has been created on the Windows NT domain or NetWare server, with a corresponding Upgrade login script, as described in the previous section.

    The Upgrade login script contains these principal entries:

    • The net use statements to connect to the appropriate shared directory for the Windows 95 source files (or similar statement for starting the network and connecting to the server on a NetWare network).

    • Statements to start Windows 95 Setup. These statements might involve renaming the user's Startup group and copying the alternate Startup group from the server, as described in "Preparing a STARTUP.GRP File" earlier in this chapter.

    • An exit statement that closes the login script so that Setup can continue.

To run a login script for a push installation

  • Tell users to log on to the network using the Upgrade user account and the upgrade password.

    When a user logs on, the Windows 95 installation process begins automatically, using the settings in the MSBATCH.INF file specified in the login script.

After copying files, Windows 95 restarts the computer and begins the Run-Once operations (group conversions, and so on). When the Run-Once operations are finished, Windows 95 is completely installed. Notice that this stage requires the user to log on to the network, so all configuration values must be specified in the setup script to support correct logon and to allow Windows 95 Setup to connect to shared resources containing Windows 95 source files.

When the user quits Windows 95 at this point, Setup writes all changes to the Registry. The user can restart the computer and log on using the usual logon name and password.

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