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Windows 95 on NetWare Networks: The Basics

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This chapter presents information for installing and configuring Windows 95 on Novell® NetWare® networks.

Note: For computers that use Microsoft Client for NetWare, all the files required for networking are included with Windows 95. However, Windows 95 does not include any Novell-supplied components required for real-mode NETX and VLM. For information about obtaining updates for Novell-supplied files, see "Obtaining Current Novell-Supplied Files" later in this chapter.

For information about configuring Novell-supplied components and running NetWare utilities, consult your Novell documentation. For information about licensing requirements, see your Novell NetWare license agreement.

Windows 95 runs on NetWare workstations that use Novell NetWare versions 2.15, 2.2, 3.x, and 4.x servers. You can use several different networking clients, as described later in this section:

  • The new 32-bit, protected-mode Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks

  • Novell NetWare 3.x real-mode networking client (NETX)

  • Novell NetWare 4.x real-mode networking client (VLM)

Note: In the Windows 95 Resource Kit, NETX is used to refer to the Novell NetWare workstation shell for NetWare version 3.x; VLM (Virtual Loadable Module) is used to refer to the workstation shell for version 4.x.

Whichever client you choose, you can use the built-in features and commands in Windows 95 to perform most common network operation and administration tasks. Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks can process login scripts, and also supports all 16-bit NetWare 3.x and most 4.x command-line utilities for both users and administrators, so that you can use these utilities in the same way as with NETX or VLM clients running under MS-DOS or an earlier version of Windows.

Windows 95 provides complete 32-bit, protected-mode software for running on NetWare networks, including a network client (sometimes called the redirector or requestor), an IPX/SPX-compatible protocol, network adapter drivers, and administrative tools. With Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks in Windows 95, users can access NetWare server services, browse and connect to NetWare servers, and queue print jobs by using either the Windows 95 network user interface or NetWare utilities.

Whichever network client you use, the following networking features are available in Windows 95 to support computers running on NetWare networks:

  • Automatic setup and customization of Windows 95 on NetWare workstations, as described in Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations."

  • Running a shared network copy of Windows 95 for remote-boot workstations and other shared installations, as described in Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."

  • System policies to enforce desktop and system settings for individual or multiple computers, as described in Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

  • Backup agents for Cheyenne® ARCserve and Arcada® Backup Exec, plus an agent for Simple Network Management Protocols (SNMP), as described in Chapter 16, "Remote Administration."

  • Complete integration of network resources in Network Neighborhood, and common controls such as the Open or Save As dialog boxes, as described in Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

  • Password caching for network connections and user-level security with pass-through validation to NetWare servers, as described in Chapter 14, "Security."

  • Printing to NetWare print queues using Point and Print. Also, the Win32-based Microsoft Print Services for NetWare Networks, available on the Windows 95 compact disc, can be used to despool print jobs from NetWare print queues to printers connected to computers running Client for NetWare Networks. For information, see Chapter 23, "Printing and Fonts."

The following sections describe the different features available, depending on whether you choose to run Windows 95 using the Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks or using a Novell-supplied NETX or VLM client.

On This Page

Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks: The Benefits
Novell-Supplied NetWare Clients: The Benefits
Windows 95 on NetWare Networks: The Issues
Setting Up Windows 95 for NetWare Networks: an Overview
Using Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks
Using a Novell NetWare Client
Technical Notes for Windows 95 on NetWare Networks
Troubleshooting Windows 95 on NetWare Networks

Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks: The Benefits

Architecture for Client for NetWare Network

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If you are installing Windows 95 to run on a NetWare network, Microsoft recommends that you use the Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks, which provides a 32-bit, protected-mode redirector. Client for NetWare Networks can be installed to coexist with Client for Microsoft Networks or a 16-bit network client, or it can be used as the sole network support for Windows 95. For technical information about these optional configurations, see Chapter 32, "Windows 95 Network Architecture."

Using Client for NetWare Networks provides the following benefits.

A high-performance system using no conventional memory.

Client for NetWare Networks uses only 32-bit protocols, drivers, and supporting files. This client is designed to be used in a multitasking environment and provides the robust performance available for all protected-mode components in Windows 95, using no conventional memory space. On large block transfers over the network, Client for NetWare Networks is up to 200 percent faster than Windows 3.x with the VLM client. For most network operations that are a mix of reading and writing, Client for NetWare Networks is 50 to 200 percent faster, depending upon the mix of I/O operations.

Protected-mode peer resource sharing services.

This includes the ability to share resources such as a CD-ROM drive as a network resource. To use Microsoft File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks, the computer must be running Client for NetWare Networks. For more information, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

Interoperation and logon with NetWare 2.15, 3.x, and 4.x servers.

This includes support for running NetWare login scripts. Client for NetWare Networks can access servers running NetWare 2.15 and above, NetWare 3.x servers (which are bindery-based), and NetWare 4.x servers using bindery emulation. Windows 95 provides a script processor for running login scripts.

Support for packet-burst protocol for faster data transfer.

Client for NetWare Networks with peer resource sharing supports burst-mode NCPs, a sliding window implementation. This feature can also be disabled, as described in Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

Automatic reconnection for lost server connection

When servers are available again after the loss of a NetWare Core Protocol (NCP) connection, Windows 95 reconnects automatically and rebuilds the user's environment, including connection status, drive mappings, and printer connections. (Novell-supplied AUTO.VLM only reconnects servers.) This also means that the client is not affected if the server is down or the network cable is not working.

Large Internetwork Packet (LIP) protocol support.

LIP works to increase the speed of data transmission when communication occurs over a router. Previously, if a server identified a router between itself and the client, the packet size was set to 576 bytes (including 64 bytes of header information). Using LIP, the client and server can negotiate the packet size used when communication occurs through a router. With LIP, the packets can be set to a maximum of 4202 bytes, based on the maximum physical packet size of the server. LIP is enabled between computers running Client for NetWare Networks and NetWare 3.12 – 4.x servers or any computer running Microsoft File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks.

Support for all documented MS-DOS and NetWare APIs defined by Novell.

This includes support for all NetWare 3.x APIs defined in Novell NetWare Client SDK. NetWare-aware applications that use only these documented APIs are compatible with Client for NetWare Networks. For more information, see "Client for NetWare Networks Technical Notes" later in this chapter.

Enhanced performance and new networking features.

These features, which are made available when using protected-mode networking components, are described in detail elsewhere in the Windows 95 Resource Kit:

  • Client-side caching for network information and complete Plug and Play support, as described in Chapter 7, "Introduction to Windows 95 Networking."

  • Remote network access to NetWare networks, as described in Chapter 28, "Dial-Up Networking and Mobile Computing."

  • User profiles for system configuration, as described in Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

  • Long filenames on the local computer, on computers running File and Printer Sharing Services for NetWare Networks, and on NetWare 3.x and 4.x volumes configured to use the OS/2 namespace. For information, see "Configuring NetWare Servers to Support Windows 95" later in this chapter.

Novell-Supplied NetWare Clients: The Benefits

Architecture for Novell real-mode clients (Novell-supplied components appear in bold.)

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Windows 95 can be installed to use Client for Microsoft Networks in conjunction with a NETX or VLM client, or a Novell-supplied real-mode network client can be used as the sole network support in Windows 95. For technical information about these optional configurations, see "Using a Novell NetWare Client" later in this chapter.

Windows 95 provides new and improved support over Windows 3.x for computers that use NetWare clients supplied by Novell, including the following.

Improved network adapter driver support.

Windows 95 networking components can be installed to work with Open Datalink Interface (ODI) network adapter drivers. This is the preferred configuration with a Novell-supplied NetWare client, and is also supported with Client for NetWare Networks. You can install Windows 95 to run with the IPX monolithic protocol stack (IPX.COM), although it is strongly recommended that you upgrade to a newer NetWare version using ODI drivers. Windows 95 can also run on NetWare networks using Datapoint Corporation ArcNet® network adapters.

Protected-mode IPX/SPX-compatible protocol.

You can use the Microsoft implementation of this protocol for network connectivity with other computers running the IPX/SPX protocol with Windows 95, Windows NT, or MS-DOS operating systems. Windows 95 also provides protected-mode NetBIOS over IPX to support NetBIOS-compliant applications, providing better performance and reduced network traffic. Alternatively, you can use the real-mode Novell-supplied driver, NETBIOS.EXE, in conjunction with the Novell-supplied real-mode client.

Compatibility with native NetWare services and commands.

Users can run native NetWare services and commands without special configuration changes in Windows 95. This includes support for NDS, NetWare IP, NCP packet signatures, 3270 emulators, TSRs, and NetWare login scripts. (Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks does not support NDS, NetWare IP, or NCP packet signatures.)

Windows 95 on NetWare Networks: The Issues

In most cases, Windows 95 Setup automatically installs Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks if it detects NetWare networking components on the computer. To install Windows 95 with Novell-supplied networking support, you must use a custom setup script that specifies the network client you want, or choose Custom and then select a Novell-supplied network client. For instructions on how to install Windows 95 with a Novell-supplied client, see "Using a Novell NetWare Client" later in this chapter.

Choosing the Network Client

Microsoft Client for NetWare does not support the use of NetWare domains or the distributed name server called NetWare Naming Service (NNS). NNS is installed as an add-on product that is supported by NetWare 3.x servers. NNS uses a domain model for NetWare servers by grouping them and distributing the domain's account list to all servers in the domain. Users running NETX or VLM can log on to servers that run NNS, but cannot use NNS tools while running Windows 95.

You might choose not to use Client for NetWare Networks in these cases:

  • If you want to take advantage of NetWare NCP Packet Signature for enhanced protection of servers and client computers using NCP, then you must use VLM, because Client for NetWare Networks does not support this feature.

  • If your site needs to use NetWare IP, you should use NETX or VLM. Client for NetWare Networks does not support NetWare IP, and you cannot use Microsoft TCP/IP to communicate with NetWare servers using NetWare IP.

  • If you use 3270 emulators that rely on DOS-helper TSRs or need 3270 emulation for applications in MS-DOS sessions, you should use NETX or VLM.

  • If you are using custom VLM components such as PNW or Novell utilities such as NWADMIN or NETADMIN, you should use VLM.

  • If your site needs to use NetWare Directory Services (NDS), you should use VLM. Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks does not support this feature in the first release of Windows 95.

Conversely, you might choose not to use the Novell-supplied client and instead use Client for NetWare Networks in these cases:

  • If you want the performance advantages of 32-bit, protected-mode network clients and network adapter drivers, including complete Plug and Play support

  • If you want to take advantage of the Windows 95 unified logon and user interface for navigating the network, plus the Windows 95 network management tools

  • If you want to take advantage of long filenames, client-side caching, automatic reconnections, and other performance enhancements provided in Client for NetWare Networks

  • If you want to take advantage of user profiles to manage desktop configurations

  • If you want to take advantage of Windows 95 peer resource sharing without running another network client

Choosing Protocols on NetWare Networks

The Microsoft 32-bit IPX/SPX-compatible protocol is an NDIS 3.1-compliant, routable protocol that conforms to the IPX specification, which requires routable datagram packets. This protocol can use Novell NetWare servers configured as routers (and other IPX routers) to transfer packets across LANs to access resources on other computers running any IPX/SPX protocol. With the Microsoft IPX/SPX-compatible protocol, it is not necessary to load the Novell-supplied VIPX.386 driver.

  • The Microsoft IPX/SPX-compatible protocol is installed automatically if you install Client for NetWare Networks. However, if you configure Windows 95 to maintain the existing NetWare client and protocol software, you can later try using the protected-mode protocol provided with Windows 95. For details about installing and configuring the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol and NetBIOS over IPX, see Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion."

  • You can install both protected-mode and real-mode IPX drivers on the same adapter with ODI drivers. Notice, however, that you cannot install or use the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol to run over an IPX monolithic configuration or over ArcNet.

Client for NetWare Networks does not support NetWare IP. Microsoft TCP/IP, which is fully compliant with the standard RFCs specifying TCP/IP, cannot be used to provide TCP/IP support on NetWare networks. NetWare IP uses other protocol implementations for IP functionality, so that the two protocol suites cannot communicate with each other.

Although Microsoft TCP/IP cannot be used as the supporting protocol for Client for NetWare Networks or for Novell-supplied networking clients, Microsoft TCP/IP can be installed to support other networking clients on the same computer. Use this configuration when TCP/IP-based communications are used on the internetwork. To connect to the Internet using Microsoft TCP/IP, you do not have to install another network client in addition to Client for NetWare Networks.

Configuring NetWare Servers to Support Windows 95

This section presents information about installing Windows 95 source files on NetWare servers, automating Setup for NetWare workstations, support for long filenames on NetWare servers, and where to place user profiles and system policy files on NetWare servers.

Installing Windows 95 Source Files on NetWare Servers

The Windows 95 master files can be placed on a NetWare server to be used as source files for installing Windows 95 locally on NetWare workstations, or to be used as a shared copy for running Windows 95 across the network. To create a directory structure and place the Windows 95 source files on a server, you must run Server-based Setup (NETSETUP.EXE), the administrative setup program provided on the Windows 95 compact disc. (This is roughly equivalent to setup /a in Windows 3.x and Windows for Workgroups.)

To set up Windows 95 source files on a NetWare server

  1. On the network administrator's computer, log on to the NetWare file server where you want to place the Windows 95 source files.

    This should be a network computer that is running a local copy of Windows 95 and that is used only by support personnel for network maintenance. Make sure you log on with security privileges that allow you to create directories and copy files to the file server.

  2. On the administrator's computer, run castoff all to ensure that server-to-workstation or workstation-to-workstation messages do not affect Setup.

  3. Follow the procedures for copying Windows 95 source files to a server in Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95."

Automating Setup for NetWare Workstations

You can create automatic installation procedures for installing Windows 95 on multiple workstations. The steps include the following:

  • Creating setup scripts for installing Windows 95 on computers connected to NetWare networks, specifying the network client and supporting components, plus defining other software components to be installed

  • Defining user and computer settings to be used in setup scripts for specific NetWare workstation configurations

  • Creating login scripts to set up Windows 95 automatically on NetWare workstations when users log on

For a complete description of the procedures for preparing and managing automatic installation of Windows 95 on multiple computers, see Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations."

Supporting Long Filenames on NetWare Servers

Computers running Windows 95 can use long filenames on NetWare 3.x and 4.x volumes configured to use the OS/2 namespace, which emulates an HPFS volume. Filenames on such NetWare volumes have a maximum length of 254 characters and use an 8.3 truncation on the first instance of the filename. For example:

longfilenameold.tst --> LONGFILE.TST
longfilenamenew.tst --> LONGFIL0.TST

To enable long filenames on a NetWare volume

  1. At the NetWare server console prompt, type the following lines:

    load os2
    add name space os2 to volume sys
    
  2. Then add the following line to the STARTUP.CNF file:

    load os2
    
  3. Shut down the file server. Then copy the file OS2.NAM from the NetWare distribution disks or compact disc to the same disk and directory that contains SERVER.EXE on the NetWare file server.

  4. Restart the NetWare file server.

If you have problems with this procedure, contact Novell for more information.

When you use long filenames for files on a NetWare volume while running Windows 95, the following exceptions occur:

  • You cannot use a combination of short names and long names for a path used in an MS-DOS Prompt window

  • You cannot use cd in an MS-DOS Prompt window to switch directories using first a long filename, then using a trunctated name, or vice versa

  • You cannot use dir in an MS-DOS Prompt window to check a directory on a NetWare server if you used a truncated name to switch to that directory

To avoid these problems, use Windows Explorer. Otherwise, avoid long directory names if you do a lot of work at the command prompt.

NetWare 3.11 servers experience problems with applications that open a large number of files. Error messages report these problems as sharing or lock violations, or report a "file not found" error when you know the file exists, or report other errors in opening files. Novell supplies a patch for this problem, which you can obtain from the Novell forum on CompuServe®.

However, if you have not applied the patch, this problem affects how NetWare 3.11 servers handle long filenames, even if the OS/2 namespace is enabled. To avoid such problems, Windows 95 Setup only enables long-filename support with NetWare servers version 3.12 or higher.

If the NetWare patch has been applied at your site, you can ensure support for long filenames with all NetWare servers by setting SupportLFN=2 in the following Registry key:

Hkey_Local_Machine \System \CurrentControlSet \Services \VxD \Nwredir

The possible values for this Registry key are the following:

  • 0, which indicates that long filenames are not supported on NetWare servers.

  • 1 (the default), which indicates that long filenames are supported on NetWare servers version 3.12 and greater.

  • 2, which indicates that long filenames are supported if the NetWare server supports long filenames. This can include NetWare 3.11 servers where the patch has been applied.

These values can also be set globally using system policies. The related policy name is Support Long Filenames under the policies for Client for NetWare Networks.

Supporting Pass-Through Security for Peer Resource Sharing

If computers running Windows 95 will be providing File and Printer Sharing Services for NetWare Networks, then the NetWare server providing access validation must be configured with a special WINDOWS_PASSTHRU account. This special account is used to support pass-through validation for user-level security.

For more information about configuring and managing pass-through and user-level security for Windows 95 on NetWare networks, see Chapter 14, "Security."

Placing Profile and Policy Files on NetWare Servers

User profiles, which consist of the user-specific information in the Registry, can be used to ensure a consistent desktop for individual users who log on to multiple computers, or for multiple users logging on to the same computer. User profiles can be used on a NetWare network with computers configured to use Microsoft Client for NetWare Network. When a user account is created on a NetWare server, a subdirectory of the MAIL directory is created automatically for that user. Because a Mail directory is always available for each user, Windows 95 uses these individual directories to store user profiles. If you want to use user profiles to enforce a mandatory desktop, place the related USER.MAN file in the users' MAIL directories.

If you are using system policies to enforce specific desktop or system settings, the appropriate CONFIG.POL file must be stored in the SYS:PUBLIC directory on each NetWare server that users use as a preferred server. Windows 95 automatically downloads policies from this file.

For more information about using user profiles or creating system policies, see Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

Setting Up Windows 95 for NetWare Networks: an Overview

If you are administering a NetWare network, the move to Windows 95 will involve incremental planning, testing, and gradual implementation of Windows 95 on many computers on the network. Typically, the administrator will take awhile to complete the following tasks:

Install Windows 95 on a single workstation, and experiment with various configuration alternatives, including the following:

  • Windows 95 protected-mode network client vs. Novell real-mode client

  • Protected-mode NDIS 3.1-compliant MS-DOS vs. real-mode Open Datalink Interface (ODI) drivers

  • Protected-mode IPX/SPX-compatible protocol vs. existing IPX

  • Using a sole client vs. adding Client for Microsoft Networks

This task includes experimenting with the typical applications used at your site and working over the network to assess the performance, reliability, and robustness available under Windows 95.

  1. Prepare an implementation strategy, as summarized in Chapter 1, "Deployment Planning Basics."

    Test the selected configuration of network clients, protocols, and drivers on a small network. This could include any combinations of the following:

    • Windows 95 installed over an existing 16-bit, Novell-supplied workstation client, using ODI drivers

    • Windows 95 added to an existing Windows 3.x-and-NetWare installation, using Client for NetWare Networks and protected-mode network components

    • Windows 95 as a new installation using all protected-mode components, including both Client for NetWare Networks and Client for Microsoft Networks, plus peer resource sharing support

  2. Create default user profiles, system policies, and setup scripts, and perform other customization tasks for automatic installation and configuration, based on the inventory and implementation strategy.

  3. Test automatic installation on a small network.

  4. Prepare and implement the strategy for rollout on the larger network.

To support Novell NetWare integration with Windows 95, any computer on which you are installing Windows 95 should be connected to a NetWare server when you start Windows 95 Setup. This requires that the computer be configured with either an ODI driver (recommended) or the monolithic IPX driver, in addition to either NETX or VLM to access resources on a NetWare server.

Windows 95 Setup detects whether a Novell NetWare workstation shell is running on the computer. If Setup finds at least version 3.26 of NET*.COM, it automatically configures networking for NetWare networks. During the detection phase, Windows 95 Setup also tries to determine whether the computer is using real-mode TSRs that cannot be replaced (such as DOSNP.COM, TCP/IP client software, or 3720 emulators).

After detection is complete, Windows 95 Setup prepares to install protected-mode networking support based on Client for NetWare Networks, unless detection has found incompatible software components or the user specifies that network support should be based on Novell-supplied components. The new Windows 95 protected-mode components are not installed automatically if detection finds the following:

  • The computer is using VLM with NetWare 4.x NDS. In this case, Setup leaves all existing networking components in place.

  • Certain TSRs are present that require ODI. In this case, Setup installs Client for NetWare Networks, but configures it to run over ODI.

  • Certain TSRs are present that are not compatible with the protected-mode client, but can use the new implementation of the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol. In this case, the real-mode network client and adapter drivers are left in place, but Setup installs the new protocol.

  • Certain TSRs are present that are not compatible with Client for NetWare Networks or other protected-mode components. In this case, Setup leaves all existing real-mode networking components in place.

To install Client for NetWare Networks and other protected-mode networking components, Setup might perform the following actions:

  • Comment out NetWare-related TSRs in AUTOEXEC.BAT that are not required with Client for NetWare Networks or other Windows 95 components

  • Move certain TSRs from AUTOEXEC.BAT to WINSTART.BAT so that this software can be loaded at the appropriate time during system startup

  • Install new 32-bit, protected-mode versions of networking components such as protocols and network adapter drivers

  • Comment out entries from SYSTEM.INI that are not required when using protected-mode networking components

  • Configure settings in the Registry related to support for NetWare networks

The actions for software detection and installation of new networking components are defined in a file named NETDET.INI in the Windows directory. Installation actions are defined in NETDET.INI for the software listed in the following table. For a complete and current list, see NETDET.INI in your Windows directory.

Software detected

Windows 95 Setup default action

Btrieve® (BREQUEST.EXE)

Installs Client for NetWare Networks, with all protected-mode components

DOSNP.EXE

Keeps the real-mode IPX protocol in place

LAN Workplace®

Installs Client for NetWare Networks, but keeps the real-mode ODI network adapter and IPX protocol in place

Novell NetBIOS TSR

Installs the Microsoft IPX/SPX-compatible protocol and enables NetBIOS support

NACS/NASI (NASI.EXE)

Retains all existing Novell-supplied networking components

For information about the format of entries in NETDET.INI and how to customize this file, see Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations."

Windows 95 Setup automatically configures settings for network adapters and protocols. The specific issues for configuring drivers and protocols depend on whether the computer is using Client for NetWare Networks or a Novell-supplied workstation shell.

Using Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks

The redirector provided by Client for NetWare Networks (NWREDIR.VXD) is a file system driver that supports the NCP file sharing protocol for NetWare 2.15 and above, NetWare 3.x, and NetWare 4.x. Client for NetWare Networks also supports Microsoft File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks (NWSERVER.VXD, the NCP peer server provided with Windows 95).

This section describes how to set up and configure Client for NetWare Networks, and provides some supporting technical notes on supporting files.

For the architectural details of this configuration, see Chapter 32, "Windows 95 Network Architecture." For information about logging on to a NetWare server, browsing NetWare resources, and using File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

Setting Up Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks

When using Client for NetWare Networks, you do not need to load any Novell-supplied drivers or components. This client runs with the Microsoft IPX/SPX-compatible protocol and NDIS-compliant, protected-mode drivers, which Windows 95 Setup installs automatically when you select this client.

When Windows 95 is installed with Client for NetWare Networks, Windows 95 Setup automatically moves any relevant NET.CFG settings to the Windows 95 Registry. You can configure the related settings using the Network option in Control Panel. You can also configure the MS-DOS and the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol, as described in Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion."

If you did not install Client for NetWare Networks during Windows 95 Setup, you can switch to this client any time after Windows 95 is installed, as described in the following procedure. You can also install Client for NetWare Networks and configure related options when installing Windows 95 using custom setup scripts, as described in Chapter 5, "Custom, Automated, and Push Installations."

Tip: To display the Network option without opening Control Panel, right-click the Network Neighborhood icon on the desktop. Then click Properties on the context menu.

To add Client for NetWare Networks after Windows 95 is installed

  1. In the Network option in Control Panel, examine the list of installed components.

    If the computer currently has NETX or VLM installed, then select that NetWare Workstation Shell client in the list of installed components, and click Remove. Also, select and remove the IPXODI protocol if it appears in the list.

  2. Click Add, and then double-click Client in the Select Network Component dialog box.

  3. In the Select Network Client dialog box, click Microsoft in the Manufacturers list, and then click Client for NetWare Networks in the Network Clients list. Then click OK.

You must shut down and restart the computer for the changes to take effect.

Setup automatically installs and configures all related components. Windows 95 Setup also adds the value lastdrive=32 to the parameters for the network client in the Registry. This value makes room for entries in a table to store drive information. For Microsoft networking, the last drive would be set to Z (or 26), but NetWare allows six additional entries in its drive table. The extra drives are used only by NetWare-aware applications; these drives are not available to users.

Configuring Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks

This section presents information for configuring and using Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks, including the following topics:

  • Configuring protected-mode NDIS MS-DOSs for Client for NetWare Networks

  • Configuring Client for NetWare Networks with ODI MS-DOSs

  • Running NetWare utilities with Client for NetWare Networks

For information about configuring logon options for Client for NetWare Networks, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

Configuring Protected-Mode Network Adapter Drivers for Client for NetWare Networks

When you install Client for NetWare Networks, a 32-bit, protected-mode, NDIS 3.1-compliant network adapter driver is installed automatically, unless the computer is running software cited in the table in "Setting Up Windows 95 for NetWare Networks: an Overview" earlier in this chapter. If you configure Client for NetWare Networks to use ODI drivers instead, you can switch to the protected-mode drivers at any time.

Although it is possible to run Client for NetWare Networks over ODI drivers, Microsoft recommends that you install a 32-bit, protected-mode network adapter driver to take advantage of the performance improvements offered by these drivers, as described in Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion."

For a shared installation, you must use protected-mode drivers if the computers will run Client for NetWare Networks.

Depending on when you install Client for NetWare Networks, you might have to install the 32-bit, protected-mode network adapter driver before you can install the network client. Setup prompts you to do this if it is necessary.

To switch to a 32-bit, protected-mode network adapter driver

  1. In the Network option in Control Panel, double-click the network adapter in the list of installed network components.

  2. In the properties for the adapter, click the Driver Type tab.

  3. Click the option named Enhanced Mode (32-bit And 16-bit) NDIS Driver, and then click OK. Then shut down and restart the computer.

Configuring Client for NetWare Networks with ODI Network Adapter Drivers

Architecture for protected-mode client with ODI drivers; Novell-supplied components appear in bold.

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You might choose to keep existing ODI drivers when using Client for NetWare Networks. The best reason for doing this is if your users need to run a TSR that requires IPX/SPX support and that is used by applications created for both Windows and MS-DOS. In this case, the TSR should be loaded by placing an entry just after the IPXODI statement in either AUTOEXEC.BAT or in WINSTART.BAT (which is the batch file used to start TSRs to be used by Windows-based applications).

Using an ODI driver instead of an NDIS 3.1 driver with Client for NetWare Networks has the following drawbacks:

  • There is some use of conventional memory, and overall performance on the network is not as good as can be realized with NDIS 3.1 drivers.

  • There are no Plug and Play capabilities for the networking components.

  • You cannot use this configuration to run a shared installation of Windows 95.

However, you do retain the following benefits from using an ODI driver with Client for NetWare Networks instead of a real-mode network client:

  • Support for long filenames

  • Automatic reconnection for lost server connections

  • Dial-up networking for remote access

  • Client-side caching for network information

If you want to use the current ODI driver instead of a Windows 95 NDIS network adapter driver, you can select that driver using the Network option in Control Panel. For more information about using ODI drivers, see "Configuring Windows 95 with ODI Drivers" later in this chapter. For information about the related files, see "Obtaining Current Novell-Supplied Files" later in this chapter.

To use ODI drivers with Client for NetWare Networks

  1. In the properties for the network adapter, click the Driver Type tab.

  2. Click the option named Real Mode (16-bit) ODI Driver, and then click OK. Then shut down and restart the computer.

Note: Shared installations that use Client for NetWare Networks cannot use real-mode ODI drivers. In this case, protected-mode networking components can be used.

Client for NetWare Networks Technical Notes

This section presents some technical issues you should be aware of when using Client for NetWare Networks, including a summary of configuration settings and required support files, and configuration notes, plus notes about NetWare API support and running NetWare utilities with Client for NetWare Networks.

Summary of Settings for Client for NetWare Networks

The following table lists the required and possible settings for CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files if you install Client for NetWare Networks.

Configuration File Settings for Client for NetWare Networks

Filename

Required settings

autoexec.bat

None

startnet.bat1

None

config.sys

None

1 The STARTNET.BAT file is a startup batch file created when VLM is installed, and is called from AUTOEXEC.BAT. This file is not required with Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks.

Notice that LOGIN.EXE is not loaded from any configuration file. Windows 95 Setup removes this entry automatically. Also, if either NETX or VLM is initialized from AUTOEXEC.BAT or another batch file, then Client for NetWare Networks will not be loaded. No real-mode drivers are needed if a network adapter driver appears in the list of installed components in the Network option in Control Panel.

The following table summarizes the minimum settings that you should see in the Network option in Control Panel if you install Client for NetWare Networks.

Required Network Settings for Client for NetWare Networks1

Network component

Configuration options

Client for NetWare Networks

If the computer will be downloading system policies or user profiles from NetWare servers, Client for NetWare Networks should be selected in the Primary Network Logon box.
In the General properties for Client for NetWare Networks, Preferred Server should show the name of the NetWare server to be used for initial logon. If login scripts are used, the option that enables login scripts should be checked.

Network adapter

In the General properties for the adapter, the driver type should be Enhanced Mode (32-bit and 16-bit) NDIS.1

IPX/SPX-compatible protocol

In its Advanced properties, the Frame Type should be Auto. If any network applications at your site require support for NetBIOS over IPX, that option should be checked in the NetBIOS properties.

1You can also specify 16-bit ODI drivers. You do not need to load such drivers from CONFIG.SYS or another configuration file.

Required Support Files for Client for NetWare Networks

The following table summarizes the support files required for Client for NetWare Networks. All of these files are found in the Windows SYSTEM directory and are provided with Windows 95; no Novell-supplied components are required. For more information about these components, see Chapter 32, "Windows 95 Network Architecture."

Required Files for Client for NetWare Networks1

File

Description

netware.drv

Emulates a WinNet driver required by some NetWare-aware applications that check for this file, such as Lotus Notes®. Notice that this file is supplied with Windows 95, and is not the same as the similarly-named Novell-supplied file. (The Windows 95 version is approximately 2K in size.)

nwlink.vxd

Provides the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol.

nwlsproc.exe, nwlscon.exe

Optionally, provides the 32-bit login script processor and console used by Client for NetWare Networks.

nwnet32.dll

Provides common NetWare networking functions for the 32-bit network provider and print provider.

nwnp32.dll

Provides access to NetWare network resources using Windows Explorer, Network Neighborhood, and so on. This 32-bit network provider for NetWare networks is the service provider interface to the Multiple Provider Router.

nwpp32.dll

Provides the print provider interface to the print router in SPOOLSS.DLL. This 32-bit print provider supports the ability to print to NetWare printing resources.

nwredir.vxd

Provides a 32-bit file system driver (redirector) to support applications that use the NCP file sharing protocol.

1These files are all supplied on the Windows 95 product disks. The NETWARE.DRV file in this configuration is a replacement for an identically named Novell-supplied file.

The following tables summarize entries that are changed automatically in configuration files when Client for NetWare Networks is installed with Windows 95.

AUTOEXEC.BAT Additions for Client for NetWare Networks

dosagent

winagent

 

AUTOEXEC.BAT Deletions for Client for NetWare Networks

bnetx
brequest
emsnetx
emsnet5
emsnet4
emsnet3
int2f
ipxodi

ipx
lsl
msipx
netbios
net3
net4
net5
netx

odihlp
odinsup
startnet
vlm
xmsnet3
xmsnet4
xmsnet5
xmsnetxp

SYSTEM.INI Additions for Client for NetWare Networks

[Boot]
networks32=nwnp32

 

 

SYSTEM.INI Deletions for Client for NetWare Networks

[386enh]
network=
uniquedospsp=
pspincrements=
timercriticalsection=
reflectdosint2a=

[Boot]
network.drv=

[boot.description]
network.drv=

NET.CFG Deletions for Client for NetWare Networks

msipx

 

 

Files Renamed in Windows or SYSTEM Directories1

nwuser.exe
netware.drv
netware.hlp

nwgdi.dll
nwpopup.exe

vnetware.386
vipx.386

1 Files are renamed filename.ex~.

Client for NetWare Networks Configuration Notes

This section presents some configuration notes for Client for NetWare Networks.

  • When Windows 95 attempts to connect to a NetWare server, it first silently tries to use the user's logon name and password to make the connection. If you use system policies, you can set a policy that turns off this behavior for Client for NetWare Networks. For information, see Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

  • Client for NetWare Networks is always bound only to the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol. This is the only protocol this network client can use. If you require an additional protocol for your network, such as TCP/IP, you must install an additional network client, such as Client for Microsoft Networks.

    Notice, however, that you can install Microsoft TCP/IP to connect to the Internet without installing an additional network client.

  • Windows 95 automatically provides a real-mode NetWare-compatible network client for use in emergency startup and recovery situations. It is not a full-featured, robust network client and, therefore, does not support features such as long filenames, automatic reconnection to servers, and the packet-burst (burst-mode) protocol. For more information about Safe Mode with Networking, see Chapter 35, "General Troubleshooting."

  • With Client for NetWare Networks, you cannot map drives for individual VM sessions; drive mappings are always global. This is the equivalent of the behavior specified in earlier versions of Windows by the SYSTEM.INI setting NWShareHandles=True (when using NETX or VLM). Notice, however, that with Client for NetWare Networks, each VM can have a different current directory on network drives, unlike earlier versions of Windows.

  • If you are using File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks, then CONFIG.SYS should not have a LastDrive= statement.

  • The NWPopUp messaging utility is not supported with Client for NetWare Networks. You can use WinPopup to broadcast pop-up messages, as described in Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion."

Additional Settings for Client for NetWare Networks

This section describes some additional settings that can be added to the Registry for Client for NetWare Networks or for File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks. For information about how to add Registry values, see Chapter 33, "Windows 95 Registry."

Setting maximum IPX packet size for the LIP protocol.

You can set a global value for the maximum IPX packet size for the LIP protocol. To do this, add a Registry entry named MaxLIP and specify a binary or DWORD value that is the greatest value allowed on any one network segment. This global setting is also used on the local network. For example, if a client on a token-ring segment (which allows 4K packet sizes) communicates over an Ethernet segment (which allows 1.5K packets) to a server on another token-ring segment, the size specified for MaxLIP should be limited to the lowest packet size allowed.

Add MaxLIP as an entry under the following Registry key:

Hkey_Local_Machine \System \CurrentControlSet \Services \VxD \Nwredir

To continue the earlier example, you would specify a value for 1.5K (0x000005DC in hexadecimal). The actual optimal value depends on the frame-header size, which is the IPX portion of the packet. You might want to experiment to get the right size but, in general, specifying a size that is too small is better than too large, because you want to make sure that the echo packet goes through on the first try.

Turning off support for packet-burst protocol.

If you want to turn off support for the packet-burst protocol (which is enabled by default for File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks), set SupportBurst=0 in the following Registry key:

Hkey_Local_Machine \System \CurrentControlSet \Services \VxD \Nwserver

Setting the shell version for .OVL files.

The versions of NetWare available for the United States that run on x86-based computers use Novell-supplied IBM*.OVL (overlay) files to present the NetWare shell. This is the default assumed by Windows 95. However, other locales use other versions of .OVL files to account for different architecture. For example, NetWare 3.x J (for Japan) uses the following overlay files for various computer types.

Overlay file

Computer architecture

pc98$run.ovl

NEC® PC9800

dosv$run.ovl

IBM® PC-compatible

j31$run.ovl

Toshiba® J3100

fmr$run.ovl

Fujitsu® FMR

ps55$run.ovl

IBM Japan

For real-mode clients, alternate .OVL files are specified in NET.CFG as the SHORT MACHINE TYPE. For Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks, alternate .OVL files can be specified as the ShellVersion value in the following Registry key:

Hkey_Local_Machine \System \CurrentControlSet \Services \VxD \Nwredir

The default value is MDOS\0V7.00\0IBM_PC\0IBM\0, where \0 indicates a binary zero (null value). This value represents the four concatenated strings returned by the INT 21 function 0xEA. You must replace the last string (0IBM) with the one used to generate the *$RUN.OVL name. The value in the Registry must have a binary type; however, you can enter the required combination of raw ASCII and binary data in the Enter Binary Data dialog box.

NetWare API Support in Client for NetWare Networks

Client for NetWare Networks includes built-in support for MS-DOS – based APIs defined by Novell for NetWare 3.x, as summarized in the following table.

API for MS-DOS

Description

INT21H

Used by applications for NetWare information, bindery services, and so on

INT64 and INT7A

Used by applications to submit IPX/SPX requests

Client for NetWare Networks supports MS-DOS – based API calls documented in Novell NetWare Client SDK. If problems occur with applications that make proprietary or undocumented API calls, then you should use a real-mode Novell-supplied client. Also, please report this problem to both Microsoft and the application vendor.

The Windows 3.x APIs for NetWare consist of a series of DLLs provided by Novell with the version 3.x WinNet16 driver for the VLM client. The 16-bit Novell-supplied DLLs for Windows can run with Client for NetWare Networks. This ensures that Windows-based applications and utilities that are NetWare-aware will run with Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks.

If any of your applications requires one or more of these DLLs when running on a Novell-supplied client (NETX or VLM), then you must also run the same DLLs when using that application under Client for NetWare Networks.

The NetWare DLLs are described in the following list.

API for Windows

Description

nwcalls.dll

APIs for NCP communication between the file server and the client computer

nwgdi.dll

NetWare Graphical Device Interface

nwipxspx.dll

APIs for IPX/SPX communication

nwlocale.dll

APIs for localization of applications

nwnetapi.dll

Network API support for NDS

nwpsrv.dll

Print server services APIs

These Novell-supplied DLLs are not provided with Windows 95. They are provided by Novell with NetWare versions 3.12 and 4.x, and are updated on CompuServe and other electronic forums. Also, you must follow the directions provided in your Novell documentation to install these files. For information about obtaining the most recent files, see "Obtaining Current Novell-Supplied Files" later in this chapter.

Running NetWare Utilities with Client for NetWare Networks

In addition to the 32-bit, protected-mode graphical tools built into Windows 95, you can use the 16-bit command-line utilities provided with NetWare for managing and sharing resources.

With Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks, you can run all NetWare 3.x utilities that reside on the NetWare server, such as SYSCON. You can run most NetWare 4.x utilities when you are using Client for NetWare Networks, except those that require NDS, such as NWADMIN, CX, and NETADMIN. You can also run NetWare 2.x file and printer utilities. However, you cannot use the VLM NWUSER utility with Client for NetWare Networks.

Tip: To use Novell-supplied utilities such as SYSCON, map the SYS:PUBLIC directory in the login script.

To run NetWare 3.x utilities in Windows 95

  1. Map a drive to the volume containing the NetWare utilities by using statements in a login script or by using the Map Network Drive dialog box.

    When you use Map Network Drive, you can make this a persistent connection by clicking the Reconnect At Logon box.

  2. From the Start button, point to Programs, and then click MS-DOS Prompt to start an MS-DOS session.

  3. Switch to the mapped network drive, and then run the utilities in the usual way.

Using a Novell NetWare Client

Windows 95 can run with the NetWare NETX and VLM client software. Before installing Windows 95, make sure that you have the necessary Novell-supplied files for Windows support, which can be obtained from Novell.

Caution: Novell-supplied components for using the NetWare client with Windows 95 require that you log on to the appropriate NetWare server before starting Windows 95. As with earlier versions of Windows, you should not log on to a NetWare server from within Windows 95.

Instead, log on to the server from AUTOEXEC.BAT or from a batch file that is called from AUTOEXEC.BAT. You should also continue to load the necessary MS-DOS – based TSR programs using AUTOEXEC.BAT or STARTNET.BAT.

For information about where a logon command should be placed in system startup files, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

The following section describes how to set up and configure Windows 95 with a Novell-supplied client.

Setting Up Windows 95 with a Novell-Supplied NetWare Client

To help you ensure successful installation of Windows 95, make sure that the Novell-supplied NetWare client software is running before you start Windows 95 Setup. To verify that the Novell-supplied software is running, make sure you can successfully connect to and use resources on a NetWare server. Running the Novell-supplied software helps to ensure that Setup can detect the network configuration for successful installation of Windows 95.

Also, if you currently use IPX.COM, you should upgrade to the latest versions of NetWare client software that use ODI drivers before installing Windows 95. For information about using ODI drivers versus monolithic IPX.COM, see "Configuring Network Adapter Drivers for Novell NetWare Clients" later in this chapter.

Installing Windows 95 with a Novell NetWare Client

This section presents the procedures for installing Windows 95 to run with a Novell-supplied client, depending on various installation situations:

  • Installing Novell-supplied NetWare client support during Windows 95 Setup

  • Installing Client for Microsoft Networks in addition to a Novell-supplied NetWare client

  • Installing a Novell-supplied NetWare client after installing Windows 95 with no network support

Note: The method for installing VLM support is different if VLM support was not installed previously under Windows 3.x, as described in "VLM Technical Notes" later in this chapter.

Also notice that, if the NetWare client software is not running at the time Windows 95 is installed, you must configure Windows 95 manually after Setup to work in conjunction with the NetWare client software.

By default, Windows 95 Setup automatically installs Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks if it detects NetWare software, except in the cases described in "Setting Up Windows 95 for NetWare Networks: an Overview" earlier in this chapter. You can select the Custom setup type and specify that the Novell-supplied software be retained during Setup. In this case, Windows 95 will use the existing networking configuration specified in NET.CFG for protocols, adapter drivers, and other values.

To select the Novell-supplied NETX client support during Windows 95 Setup

  1. Start the computer as usual, making sure that the Novell-supplied network software is running. Then run Windows 95 Setup, and select Custom as the Setup type.

  2. When the Network Configuration dialog box appears, select Client for NetWare Networks in the list of components, and then click Remove.

  3. Click Add, and then double-click Client in the Select Network Component Type dialog box.

  4. In the Select Network Client dialog box, click Novell in the Manufacturers list, and click Workstation Shell 3.X [NETX] in the Network Clients list. Then click OK.

    If you also want to use Client for Microsoft Networks, follow the steps in the next procedure.

  5. Click the Next button in the Network Configuration dialog box.

    If you want to use only the NETX client, you do not need to specify settings for your network adapter driver or protocols. Setup automatically adds support for the ODI adapter and IPXODI (or for IPX.COM) by reading NET.CFG.

  6. Continue with Windows 95 Setup.

Note: You cannot install Client for Microsoft Networks as an additional network client if you are installing Windows 95 to run with an IPX monolithic configuration.

To install Client for Microsoft Networks with a Novell NetWare client

  1. In the Network Configuration dialog box, click Add, and then double-click Client.

  2. In the Select Network Client dialog box, click Microsoft in the Manufacturers list, and click Client for Microsoft Networks in the Network Clients list. Then click OK.

To determine whether the correct adapter driver is installed

  1. In the Network option in Control Panel, double-click the network adapter (or IPX Monolithic) in the list of components.

  2. In the properties for the network adapter, click the Driver Type tab.

  3. Make sure the Real Mode (16-bit) ODI driver is selected.

To install a Novell NetWare client with no previous networking

  1. Run the Novell-supplied installation program to install a NetWare client.

  2. In the Network option in Control Panel, click Add, and then double-click Client in the Select Network Component Type dialog box.

  3. In the Select Network Client dialog box, click Novell in the Manufacturers list, and click the workstation shell that you want (NETX orVLM) in the Network Clients list. Then click OK.

Switching Back to NETX from Client for NetWare Networks

If you install the protected-mode Client for NetWare Networks and later decide to return to your original Novell NetWare NETX configuration, follow these steps.

Important: Be sure to use the Network option in Control Panel to remove Client for NetWare Networks, and then to configure Windows 95 to use NETX or VLM.

For details about adding or returning to VLM, see "VLM Technical Notes" later in this chapter.

To return to NETX after installing Client for NetWare Networks

  1. In the Network option in Control Panel, select Client for NetWare Networks, and then click Remove.

  2. Click Add, and then double-click Client.

  3. In the Select Network Client dialog box, click Novell in the Manufacturers list, and click Workstation Shell 3.X [NETX] in the Network Clients list. Then click OK.

    Windows 95 automatically installs IPXODI support.

  4. Click OK in Network properties, and provide a disk or a location for any files that Windows 95 requests to complete the installation. Then shut down and restart the computer.

Usually, you will have to reinstall Novell-supplied files at this stage, because Windows 95 Setup previously replaced these files with versions required by Client for NetWare Networks. You must also make sure that NET.CFG is present and contains correct settings, and that the required settings are present in CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT. See your Novell documentation for information about these required settings.

Configuring Network Adapter Drivers for Novell NetWare Clients

This section presents some technical information related to the network adapter drivers used when configuring Windows 95 to run with Novell-supplied network clients. The topics include configuring Windows 95 with ODI drivers, monolithic IPX, or ArcNet network adapters, and setting options in NET.CFG.

NET.CFG, the Novell NetWare configuration file, is an ASCII text file that specifies various settings for the adapter, protocol, and client. For information about the format and contents of NET.CFG, consult your Novell documentation.

Configuring Windows 95 with ODI Drivers

The Open Datalink Interface (ODI) specification was defined by Novell and Apple® Computer to provide a protocol and a consistent API for communicating with a network adapter driver and to support the use of multiple protocols by a network adapter driver.

Note: Microsoft recommends that you use ODI drivers when running Windows 95 with a Novell-supplied network client. Novell also recommends using ODI-based client software rather than monolithic IPX drivers.

Architecture for ODI driver.

rk09_15

ODI consists of the following components.

An ODI-compliant version of the IPX/SPX protocol.

This component provides the network protocol for communicating between NetWare clients and servers. With NETX or VLM clients, this must be the Novell-supplied IPXODI.COM (you can also use the Microsoft IPX/SPX-compatible protocol for other network clients).

The Link Support Layer (LSL).

This component, provided in the Novell-supplied LSL.COM file, sets the foundation for network adapter drivers to communicate with multiple protocol drivers, and vice versa.

The ODI driver.

Also called the Multiple Link Interface Driver (MLID), the ODI-compliant network adapter driver is created by the adapter manufacturer. This component usually identifies the name of the supported adapter in the filename, such as NE2000.COM for the Novell NE-2000 adapter, 3c5x9.COM for the 3Com® EtherLink® III adapter, and EXP16ODI.COM for the Intel® EtherExpress™ 16 adapter. Windows 95 supports using such drivers, but these drivers are not included with Windows 95.

For information about required files, see "Obtaining Current Novell-Supplied Files" later in this chapter.

Tips for Installing Windows 95 with ODI Drivers

Before you install Windows 95 on a computer, the real-mode IPXODI network should be configured and working properly using your Novell-supplied installation program. Test to confirm that there are no errors when loading the Novell-supplied files LSL.COM, IPXODI.COM, the ODI driver, and NETX.EXE, or when accessing resources on NetWare servers. If these components are running on the computer when Windows 95 is installed, Windows 95 Setup detects the drivers, identifies the network adapter, and automatically configures Windows 95 to run with the ODI drivers.

If Windows 95 Setup cannot identify the ODI driver being used, you might have to configure the network adapter driver manually. In this case, click Have Disk in the Select Network Adapter dialog box in the Network option in Control Panel. You must provide a file for the correct IPXODI support driver to match the type of network adapter used, using a file supplied by Novell or the adapter manufacturer.

Setting Network Adapter Options in NET.CFG

Because a computer using ODI drivers can have multiple ODI drivers and multiple protocols loaded and bound, the networking software uses NET.CFG to identify the network adapters, protocol configuration, and binding information. NET.CFG is responsible for configuring the network environment for a Novell-supplied client, and is used to configure custom parameters for NETX, IPX, NetBIOS, or the general NetWare environment. To configure any options, edit NET.CFG as described in your Novell documentation.

Monolithic IPX (IPX.COM) does not require a settings file because there is only one protocol and one network adapter driver bound together in a specific way. The IPX.COM file contains all network adapter configuration information.

NetWare began using SHELL.CFG as the configuration filename with monolithic IPX and is now using NET.CFG for ODI. NET.CFG is the preferred file to use and has some specific uses for ODI. Neither SHELL.CFG nor NET.CFG is required for a NetWare client computer. If these files do not exist, default settings are used. If both SHELL.CFG and NET.CFG exist, both are processed (first SHELL.CFG, then NET.CFG).

If you are using ODI drivers, the Novell-supplied LSL.COM file uses information from NET.CFG to configure the ODI driver before the NETX workstation shell does. For the LSL driver to load and initialize information from NET.CFG, the proper NET.CFG file should reside in the same directory as LSL.COM and the Novell-supplied NETX.EXE network client. To verify that there is not more than one NET.CFG file present on a computer, type dir /s net.cfg at the command prompt (or from the Start button, click Find and search for NET.CFG).

Network adapter configuration information is contained in a Link Driver section in NET.CFG, where you can specify the network adapter's interrupt, I/O address, memory address, frame types, and protocols. For example, the following example shows NET.CFG entries for an SMC® Ethercard Plus Elite 16 adapter:

show dots=on
file handles=60
preferred server=nw_311
link driver smc8000
int 5
port 240
mem d000
frame ethernet_802.3

The following table describes selected information commonly found in NET.CFG under the Link Driver section. For information not found in NET.CFG, default settings for the network adapter are assumed. For more information, consult your Novell documentation.

Network Adapter Driver Settings in NET.CFG

NET.CFG setting

Description

DMA

DMA channel number. Can assign up to two DMA channels by designating them DMA #1 x and DMA #2 y.

FRAME

Alternate Media Access Control (MAC) layer frame encapsulations for the network adapter. The default is ETHERNET_802.3 if not specified. Frame types are the following:
ETHERNET_802.3 ETHERNET_SNAP
ETHERNET_802.2 TOKEN_RING
ETHERNET_II TOKEN_RING_SNAP

INT

IRQ number. Can assign up to two IRQs by designating them IRQ #1 x and IRQ #2 y.

MEM

Memory address in upper memory area (UMA). Can assign up to two UMA addresses by designating them MEM #1 x and MEM # y.

NODE ADDRESS

New 12-digit MAC address assigned to the network adapter.

PORT

I/O port address. Can assign up to two I/O port addresses by designating them PORT #1 x and PORT #2 y.

PROTOCOL

Protocols to be used with ODI drivers. You do not need to specify this in NET.CFG if NETX is running only IPX and no other protocol. If other protocols are running, you must specify the protocol, protocol ID, and the frame type.

SLOT

Network adapter slot number (MCA, EISA).

Configuring Windows 95 for Monolithic IPX

Although the monolithic IPX legacy configuration is supported in Windows 95, Novell recommends that the ODI client software be used instead of dedicated IPX drivers. Notice particularly the following exceptions for monolithic IPX:

  • If you want to install Windows 95 with monolithic support, all networking components must be installed and working before you install Windows 95.

  • If you want to use Client for NetWare Networks with ODI drivers, you should first upgrade your Novell-supplied networking software to a recent version of the ODI client software.

  • You cannot install any Windows 95 protected-mode networking components if you are using the IPX monolithic configuration.

  • You cannot install monolithic support under Windows 95 if the workstation has Novell-supplied VLM software installed.

Caution: Microsoft strongly recommends upgrading to 32-bit, protected-mode software for a computer running Windows 95 on NetWare networks.

If you must use Windows 95 on monolithic IPX, then configure the real-mode monolithic IPX network and verify that it is working properly before installing Windows 95. Test to confirm that there are no errors when loading IPX.COM and NETX.EXE or when accessing resources on NetWare servers.

Architecture for monolithic IPX.

rk09_16

The monolithic implementation of the IPX protocol, IPX.COM, includes a single driver file that contains both the IPX/SPX protocol stack and the network adapter driver for communicating with the network adapter. IPX.COM must be configured for each computer based on the network adapter and its hardware configuration (IRQ, I/O address, RAM address in the upper memory area, and DMA channel). IPX.COM is generated from the IPX.OBJ file and a particular network adapter driver file (netcard.OBJ) using the NetWare SHGEN or WSGEN programs.

To add monolithic IPX after Windows 95 is installed

  1. In the Network option in Control Panel, select all installed networking components, and then click Remove.

  2. Click Add, and then double-click Adapter in the Select Network Component Type dialog box.

  3. From the Manufacturers list in the Select Network Adapters dialog box, click Novell. From the Network Adapters list, click Novell IPX Monolithic Driver. Then click OK.

  4. Shut down and restart the computer for the changes to take effect.

An entry will appear for Novell IPX Monolithic Driver in the list of installed components in the Network option in Control Panel. For information about required files, see "Obtaining Current Novell-Supplied Files" later in this chapter.

Configuring Windows 95 with ArcNet Network Adapters

Windows 95 supports connectivity to Novell NetWare servers and other computers running Windows 95 over an ArcNet network. To configure Windows 95 to support NetWare over ArcNet, you must use NETX or VLM with real-mode IPX drivers on ArcNet network adapters, with NetBIOS support. This is true whether you are using a monolithic IPX driver or an ODI ArcNet driver.

You cannot use the Windows 95 IPX/SPX-compatible protocol or Client for Microsoft Networks with ODI drivers. If you are running Client for Microsoft Networks to connect to other Microsoft networking computers on an ArcNet network, you must also install NDIS 2 network adapter drivers and another protocol used in the network, such as NetBEUI. (Notice that in this configuration, you cannot also access a NetWare network.)

If the ArcNet driver and NetWare workstation shell are running when Windows 95 is installed, Windows 95 Setup detects the configuration and automatically installs the proper components. However, if the computer is using a generic ArcNet driver or if Windows 95 is unable to detect an ArcNet driver, you might have to configure Windows 95 manually to run on an ArcNet configuration. You will also need to install the ODI ArcNet Support transport with NetBIOS. If Windows 95 Setup can detect the configuration properly, this network protocol is installed automatically for an ODI ArcNet driver.

NETX Technical Notes

This section describes specific notes related to using the Novell-supplied NetWare 3.x client software with Windows 95.

Using NETX with Client for Microsoft Networks

When running NETX with Windows 95, you keep all the same functionality that you had when running with MS-DOS or Windows 3.x. You also gain the features described in "Windows 95 on NetWare Networks: The Basics" earlier in this chapter.

If you are using NETX as the network client, you might also choose to install the 32-bit, protected-mode Client for Microsoft Networks if you want to connect to other Microsoft network computers, such as computers running Windows for Workgroups 3.x, LAN Manager, or Windows NT.

When you run the NetWare NETX client with Windows 95 in this configuration, you should continue to load the necessary Novell-supplied client components and MS-DOS – based TSR programs (LSL, ODI driver, IPXODI, and NETX) in AUTOEXEC.BAT or STARTNET.BAT, just as you did with MS-DOS or Windows 3.1. Windows 95 Setup automatically adds the configuration settings if they are not present. For information about required configuration settings, see your Novell documentation.

Notice that this configuration requires a Microsoft Windows NT Client Access license if the computer will be connecting to servers running Windows NT Server. For information, see Chapter 8, "Windows 95 on Microsoft Networks."

Architecture for Novell-supplied NETX with Client for Microsoft Networks; components shown in bold are supplied by Novell.

Cc751087.rk09_06(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

In this configuration, the Novell-supplied version of NETWARE.DRV is installed and loaded only for applications that call it directly. Because this driver is not used by Windows 95, all access to NetWare resources occurs by using the Windows 95 user interface, not the NETWARE.DRV dialog boxes provided by Novell. The NW16.DLL component translates 32-bit network calls to 16-bit network calls that can be passed to VNETWARE.386.

Note: You cannot install Client for Microsoft Networks as an additional networking client if you are using the IPX monolithic configuration.

Using NETX as the Sole Client

This configuration is for use in either of these cases:

  • The IPX monolithic configuration is used.

  • You do not need to connect to other computers running Windows for Workgroups 3.x, LAN Manager, or Windows NT. Of course, you can connect to computers running Microsoft File and Printer Sharing Services for NetWare.

To use only NETX client support, use the Network option in Control Panel to remove Client for NetWare Networks and Client for Microsoft Networks, if either of these clients is installed. Then add the Novell NetWare (Workstation Shell 3.X [NETX]) client, as described in "Installing Windows 95 with a Novell NetWare Client" earlier in this chapter.

Architecture for Novell-supplied NETX as the sole client; components shown in bold are supplied by Novell.

Cc751087.rk09_07(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

The following table lists the required settings for CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files if you use NETX as the sole network client.

Configuration File Settings for NETX as the Sole Client

Filename

Required settings

config.sys

lastdrive=drive letter

autoexec.bat1

lsl.com
odi_driver
ipxodi.com
netx.exe
q: ; that is, lastdrive+1
login
c:

1 Or this could be the name of a batch file called from AUTOEXEC.BAT.

The following table summarizes the minimum settings that you should see in the Network option in Control Panel if you use NETX as the sole client.

Network Settings for NETX as the Sole Network Client

Network component

Options

NetWare (Workstation Shell 3.X [NETX])

Novell NetWare (Workstation Shell 3.X [NETX]) should appear in the list of installed components. All other settings are configured in NET.CFG.

Network adapter

In the General properties for the adapter, the option named Real Mode (16-bit) ODI Driver should be checked.

Novell IPXODI

Settings are configured in NET.CFG.

Setting the LastDrive Parameter for NETX

Windows 95 uses the value of the LastDrive= entry in the Registry (or CONFIG.SYS) to allocate enough storage space in the internal memory structures to recognize drive letters for devices. For example, a setting of LastDrive=Z tells Windows 95 to recognize drive letters from A to Z.

Windows 95 uses all drive letters up to the letter assigned as the last drive. NetWare servers use all the drive letters following the last drive. For example, if LastDrive=P is specified, you can assign drive letters D through P for networks other than NetWare (assuming drive C is the only physical hard disk drive in the system). In this same example, NetWare begins mapping NetWare volumes with Q.

Unlike Windows 95 for Workgroups, Windows 95 does not update the value of the LastDrive= if a value is already set. If no value is specified in CONFIG.SYS, Windows 95 adds LastDrive=E to the Registry.

Setting Show Dots and File Access Limits

A NetWare file server does not include the directory entries dot (.) and double dot (..) as MS-DOS and Windows 95 do. However, the NetWare workstation shell version 3.01 or later can emulate these entries when applications attempt to list the files in a directory.

To turn on the Show Dots feature

  • If you have problems listing files or deleting directories, add the following line to the beginning of NET.CFG:

    show dots=on
    

By default, NetWare client software allows you access to only 40 files at a time. When you are running many applications under Windows 95, it is possible to exceed this limit, so you will want to increase the settings for file limits.

To increase the file access limit

  1. Add the following line to the beginning of NET.CFG:

    file handles=60
    
  2. Add the following to CONFIG.SYS for the local computer:

    files=60
    

VLM Technical Notes

VLM, the network client provided with Novell NetWare version 4.x, provides the same support and behavior under Windows 95 as it does under MS-DOS or Windows 3.1. In addition, you gain the benefits described in "Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks: The Benefits" earlier in this chapter.

If the computer is using VLM, you should still load the Novell-supplied client components and TSR programs, and log on from either AUTOEXEC.BAT or STARTNET.BAT. Login scripts also work in the same way they do with MS-DOS and Windows 3.x. After Windows 95 starts, you can use the Windows 95 user interface to make drive and printer connections, or you can run NetWare utilities by running NWUSER or other commands at the command prompt. Notice, however, that you cannot use NDS names in Windows 95 dialog boxes.

Installing Windows 95 with the VLM client requires special steps if an earlier version of Windows is not installed, as described in this section. This section also presents specific notes related to using the Novell-supplied NetWare 4.x client software with Windows 95.

Setting Up Windows 95 with VLM

If you install Windows 95 into the existing Windows directory on a computer where VLM is already configured to run with an earlier version of Windows, then to install VLM support, follow the steps described in "Installing Windows 95 with a Novell NetWare Client" earlier in this chapter.

However, if you are installing Windows 95 into a new directory, or if you are installing it on a computer that has only the MS-DOS operating system (but no earlier version of Windows), you must follow special steps to set up the computer properly. This is because Windows support for VLM requires software supplied only through the Novell-supplied VLM installation program. Follow the instructions under the procedure in this section that most closely describes your configuration.

Windows 95 Setup tries to detect VLM by looking for an NLS directory. If NLS is present, it begins installing Windows 95 for VLM. If the NLS directory is not present but you select the VLM client to install in Setup, Windows 95 Setup asks you to first install VLM using the Novell installation program. Then you can continue with Windows 95 Setup.

Important: Automatic logon for the NetWare network from AUTOEXEC.BAT needs to be configured before running Windows 95 Setup; otherwise, your login script will not be run under Windows 95 (and therefore any mapped drives will not be available).

If you already run VLM with Windows 3.x and install Windows 95 over Windows 3.x

  • Start the computer as usual, and make sure that the Novell software is running. Then run Windows 95 Setup and choose support for Novell NetWare 4.0, as described in "Installing Windows 95 with a Novell NetWare Client" earlier in this chapter.

    – Or –

  1. After Setup is complete, in the Network option in Control Panel, select Client for NetWare Networks (if this has been installed), and then click Remove.

  2. Click Add, and then double-click Client.

  3. In the Select Network Client dialog box, click Novell in the Manufacturers list, and click the option named Novell NetWare (Workstation Shell 4.0 and above [VLM]) in the Network Clients list. Then click OK.

  4. If you want to install Client for Microsoft Networks at this time, you can repeat the steps in the Select Network Client dialog box to install it. Then shut down and restart the computer.

If you already run VLM with Windows 3.1 and install Windows 95 in a new directory, or if you are running VLM with MS-DOS

  1. Start the computer as usual, making sure that the Novell-supplied network software is running. Then run Windows 95 Setup, and select Custom as the Setup Type.

  2. When the Network Configuration dialog box appears, select Client for NetWare Networks in the list of components (if this has been installed), and then click Remove.

    Note: If you were logged into NDS when Setup was started, then VLM appears in this list and you can skip the following steps.

  3. Click Add, and then double-click Client in the Select Network Component Type dialog box.

  4. In the Select Network Client dialog box, click Novell in the Manufacturers list, and click Novell NetWare (Workstation Shell 4.0 And Above [VLM]) in the Network Clients list. Then click OK.

    Setup partially configures Windows 95, and then prompts you to run the Novell Workstation Shell Install program after Windows 95 has been installed.

  5. Setup places information in AUTOEXEC.BAT that instructs you to run the Novell Workstation Shell Install program, after the Copying Files phase is complete. Complete this step to install the Novell-supplied support for Windows.

    Note: Setup also places the entry device=vnetbios in SYSTEM.INI, which causes a blue screen to appear when you restart the computer. You can ignore this screen.

  6. Restart the computer again, and let Windows 95 start normally.

In the Network option in Control Panel, you will see that Setup has added Novell NetWare (Workstation Shell 4.0 And Above [VLM]) as a network client. Information in NET.CFG is used to configure the other network components.

For information about required files, see "Obtaining Current Novell-Supplied Files" later in this chapter.

Using VLM with Client for Microsoft Networks

If you are using VLM as the network client, you might also choose to install the 32-bit, protected-mode Client for Microsoft Networks if you want to connect to other Microsoft networking computers, such as computers running Windows for Workgroups 3.x, LAN Manager, or Windows NT. The following illustration describes this configuration.

Architecture for Novell-supplied VLM with Client for NetWare Networks; Components shown in bold are supplied by Novell.

Cc751087.rk09_09(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

In this configuration, the Novell-supplied version of NETWARE.DRV is not used by Windows 95. It is installed and loaded only for applications that call it directly. All access to NetWare resources is through the Windows 95 user interface, not the NETWARE.DRV dialog boxes. The NWUSER utility calls NETWARE.DRV directly to bring up the central NetWare Version 3.0 WinNet16 dialog box.

Notice that this configuration requires a Microsoft Windows NT Client Access License if this computer will be connecting to servers running Windows NT Server. For more information, see Chapter 8, "Windows 95 on Microsoft Networks."

Using VLM as the Sole Client

This configuration can be used if you do not need to connect to other computers that are running Windows for Workgroups 3.x, LAN Manager, or Windows NT. (Of course, you can connect to a Windows 95 computer running Microsoft File and Printer Sharing for NetWare.)

The following illustration summarizes this configuration.

Architecture for Novell-supplied VLM as the sole client; Components show in bold are supplied by Novell.

Cc751087.rk09_11(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

The following table lists the required settings for CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files if you use VLM as the sole network client.

Configuration File Settings for VLM as the Sole Client

Filename

Required settings

config.sys

lastdrive=drive_letter

autoexec.bat

startnet.bat

startnet.bat

lsl.com
odi driver
ipxodi.com
vlm.exe
f: ; that is, first network drive in net.cfg
login
c:

The following table summarizes the minimum settings that you should see in the Network option in Control Panel if you install Windows 95 with VLM as the sole client.

Network Settings for VLM as the Sole Client

Network component

Options

NetWare (Workstation Shell 4.X [VLM])

Novell NetWare (Workstation Shell 4.X [VLM]) appears in the list of installed components. All other settings are configured in NET.CFG.

Network adapter

In the General properties for the adapter, the Real Mode (16-bit) ODI Driver option should be checked.

Novell IPX ODI

Settings are configured in NET.CFG.

Setting the LastDrive Parameter for VLM

Windows 95 uses the value of the LastDrive= entry in the Registry to allocate enough storage space in the internal memory structures to recognize drive letters for devices. For example, a setting of LastDrive=Z tells Windows 95 to recognize drive letters from A to Z.

The Novell-supplied NetWare 4.x redirector handles the LastDrive= entry the same way that Windows 95 does. That is, both the NetWare 4.x redirector and Windows 95 allow drive letters to be used to connect to redirected network drives up through the drive letter specified by the LastDrive= entry.

The NetWare 4.x redirector uses the First Network Drive= entry in the NET.CFG file to identify the first network drive that can be mapped. For more information about this setting, consult your Novell documentation.

Technical Notes for Windows 95 on NetWare Networks

This section contains information about obtaining current Novell-supplied files and technical notes on the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol and Microsoft TCP/IP.

Obtaining Current Novell-Supplied Files

If your computer is not configured with the necessary NetWare software, or if you don't have the support files that Windows 95 Setup requires to configure your computer, several sources are available for these files.

Important: Use the latest available version of Novell-supplied driver files. At the release of Windows 95, the following were some of the current files posted on the Novell forum on CompuServe: DOSUP9, WINDR2; WINUP9, and VLMUP9.

To obtain current NetWare software files

  • Check with your NetWare network administrator or your local Novell representative to see if the latest client files are available locally.

    – Or –

    Over the Internet, obtain files from ftp.novell.com.

    – Or –

    Check the Novell Files forum on CompuServe by typing go novlib at a system prompt. Novell posts revisions of NetWare client software and drivers on this forum.

Required Support Files for Novell-Supplied Clients

In addition to the base Novell-supplied NetWare client software required to communicate with a NetWare server, some additional NetWare support files are necessary for the Novell-supplied components to work properly in the Windows 95 environment. When Windows 95 is configured to support a Novell NetWare client, Setup checks to see if the required supporting files for Windows are in the Windows directory. If the files are not in the Windows directory, Setup asks for a disk or network drive location for these files.

The required Novell-supplied supporting files for NetWare connectivity under Windows are shown in the following list.

Novell-Supplied Files for Windows Support

File

Description

netware.drv,
netware.hlp

Windows-compatible network driver and associated help file to provide access to network redirector functionality from 16-bit applications. Notice that this must be the version 2.x WinNet16 driver for the NETX client. Also, the Novell-supplied version of NETWARE.DRV for NETX is approximately 124K in size; for VLM, the size is approximately 144K or 162K, depending on the version.

nwpopup.exe

NetWare messaging utility. Used to receive messages and alerts from a NetWare server.

vnetware.386

Virtual device driver providing virtualization services for the NetWare redirector in the Windows environment and across VMs.

vipx.386

Virtual device driver providing virtualization services for the NetWare IPX protocol for the Windows environment and across VMs.

nw16.dll1

A thunk layer for passing 32-bit calls to 16-bit NETX APIs.

1 Required for VLM, but not for NETX.

Required Support Files for ODI Drivers

A computer using Novell-supplied ODI and the IPX/SPX protocol requires certain files, depending on whether you choose to keep the Novell-supplied client when installing Windows 95 on a NetWare network.

Windows 95 drivers:

 

 

vnetbios.386

 

 

Novell-supplied NETX drivers:

 

 

ipxodi.com
lsl.com
netware.drv
netware.hlp

netx.exe
nwpopup.exe
vipx.386
nnetware.386

A network adapter driver such as ne2000.com

Novell-supplied VLM drivers:

 

 

Version 4.0 or later of netx.vlm

Version 1.02 or later of VLM client supporting files

Required Files for ODI Drivers with Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks

Windows 95 drivers:

 

 

msodisup.vxd1
ndis.vxd
nwlink.vxd

nwnblink.vxd
nwnet32.dll
nwnp32.dll

nwredir.vxd
odihlp.exe
vnetbios.386

Novell-supplied drivers:

 

 

lsl.com

A network adapter driver such as ne2000.com

 

1 MSODISUP.VXD is the ODI support layer that maps NDIS 3.1 protocols to an ODI driver, and ODIHLP.EXE is the real-mode stub that allows LSL to complete its binding process in real mode.

Required Support Files for Monolithic IPX

After Windows 95 is installed on a monolithic IPX configuration, the required drivers include the following files, which must all be supplied by Novell:

ipx.com
netware.drv

netware.hlp
netx.exe

vnetware.386
vipx.386.

Required Support Files for ArcNet Drivers

This configuration is similar to configuring Windows 95 to run with a monolithic IPX driver, except that Novell-supplied ODI drivers are used. The drivers used in this configuration include the following files, which must all be supplied by Novell:

smc8000.com (ODI driver)
lsl.com
ipxodi.com

netware.drv
netx.exe

vnetware.386
vipx.386

Search Mode with Windows 95 on NetWare Networks

Many applications, when started, also open a number of other files (such as overlay files and data files) that are used as application resources. To find these files, older NetWare-aware applications, such as the FILER version 3.x NetWare utility, look for files in NetWare search drives in these ways:

  • Using the PATH environment to search for executable files

  • Using a NetWare search path to find supporting files, such as required data files

Under Windows 95, the search mode defines how files are found, depending on the network client you use, as described in the following table.

Client

Search mode

Client for NetWare Networks

Search from a drive mapped to the server where the utility is stored

Novell-supplied NETX

Search from any local drive or any network drive

Novell-supplied VLM

Search from any network drive. Cannot search from a local drive

If you see an error message that a supporting file could not be found, the search mode is not set properly, or you are not opening the application from the correct place. For example, in FILER, the message might be: "System message library file SYS$MSG.DAT could not be opened." In such a case, you will have to set the search mode.

Note: Most newer NetWare-aware applications and utilities, such as SYSCON, do not use search mode to find auxiliary files.

To set the search mode in Windows 95

  1. From the File menu in System Policy Editor, click Open Registry. Then click the icon for Local Computer.

    For more information about using System Policy Editor in Registry mode, see Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

  2. Click Network, click Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks, and then click Search Mode.

  3. Specify a setting based on the table following this procedure. Then shut down and restart the computer.

You can also use system policies to define the search mode for multiple computers.

Search Mode has five settings: Modes 1 (also shown as 0), 2, 3, 5, and 7. (Modes 4 and 6 are not used currently.) Check your application documentation to determine whether the application only reads its supporting files, or reads and writes to them. The search mode applies to all applications that use it, so select the mode that works for most programs.

Search mode

Meaning

0 or 1

Uses the default search mode. Client for NetWare Networks will look in the search drives only when no path is specified in the application and after the default directory has been searched.

2

Causes Client for NetWare Networks not to look in any search drives to find supporting files. The application will behave as if you were running it without networking. If the application has a defined directory path for searching and opening files, the application searches for the files in that path. NetWare calls this mode "Do not search."

3

The same as Mode 1, except that if the application has no defined directory path to search and open files, Client for NetWare Networks looks in the search drives only if the open request is a read-only request. NetWare calls this mode "Search on Read-Only opens with no path."

5

Causes Client for NetWare Networks to always look in the search drives, even if the application specifies a path. NetWare calls to this mode "Search on all opens."

7

The same as Mode 5, except that Client for NetWare Networks looks in the search drives only if the open request is a read-only request. NetWare calls this mode "Search on all Read-Only opens."

Troubleshooting Windows 95 on NetWare Networks

This section presents troubleshooting tips for some common problems that might occur, depending on whether you are running Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks or a Novell-supplied network client.

For more troubleshooting tips related to system logon and browsing on NetWare networks, and for File and Printer Services for NetWare Networks, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

Troubleshooting Client for NetWare Networks

This section discusses some common problems that might occur while installing, configuring, or using Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks.

As a general troubleshooting step, make sure that the version of NETWARE.DRV is a size of about 2K. If it is much larger, remove Client for NetWare Networks in the Network option in Control Panel, and then reinstall it.

No network is available after Windows 95 starts.

Verify that Client for NetWare Networks is installed. Use the Network option in Control Panel to view a list of installed clients, protocols, and services. Verify that the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol is in the list of installed components.

The login script does not run.

Make sure the correct preferred server is set and that Enable Login Script Processing is checked in the properties for Client for NetWare Networks.

NetWare servers can't be found.

You might not be able to see NetWare servers if you are using an incorrect frame type for the servers. To ensure that you are using the correct frame type for the server, verify the frame type set in the Advanced properties for the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol in the Network option in Control Panel. You can switch the setting from Auto to the specific frame type used on the server.

Client for NetWare Networks supports NetWare 4.x bindery emulation. Be sure that the bindery context you set for your NetWare server directory includes the Windows 95 users who should have access to the servers. To view and set your bindery context on NetWare 4.x servers, load the SERVMAN NetWare loadable module (NLM) and then view and set the SET BINDERY CONTEXT parameter. Or, you can type set at the command prompt to view the miscellaneous SET parameters. For more information, see your NetWare 4.x server documentation.

You are asked for a Windows 95 password and a NetWare password at each logon.

Client for NetWare Networks asks for a Windows 95 password after you log on to the network because the user name and password for your NetWare preferred server differs from your Windows 95 password. If you don't want to be prompted for a second password, make the passwords the same for both the NetWare preferred server and Windows 95.

Access to NetWare servers is denied.

By default, Client for NetWare Networks uses the credentials provided for preferred server authentication to access other NetWare servers. To see files on NetWare servers for which you have access, synchronize your credentials on all the NetWare servers, using the Novell SETPASS command at the command prompt.

Troubleshooting Windows 95 Using Novell NetWare Clients

This section describes some common problems that might occur when running a Novell-supplied client with Windows 95.

As a general troubleshooting step, make sure that the NETWARE.DRV file version 3.03.94.280 or later for VLM is present, plus version 2.02 or later for NETX. If necessary, restore this file from the Novell-supplied installation source.

  • Check the version numbers of all Novell-supplied NetWare workstation shell components, including IPX, NETX, VLM, LSL, IPXODI, and the ODI driver files. Make sure the latest versions are being used.

    To get the version number for the Novell-supplied software you are using, run driver_namei or driver_name? at the command prompt. For example, type netx i to get the version number for the Novell-supplied NET*.COM or NET*.EXE file.

    If you are not using the latest software, upgrade as described in "Obtaining Current Novell-Supplied Files" earlier in this chapter.

  • Check for multiple instances of the NetWare files, specifically the ODI driver and NET.CFG. If there are multiple instances, remove all but the most recent version.

  • Verify that IPXODI is binding to the network adapter by running the NetWare NVER utility, using the same settings as NET.CFG and the same [link driverODI_driver] name. If IPXODI is not bound to the network adapter, change the entries in NET.CFG to correct this problem.

  • For a monolithic configuration, verify that the configuration does not use the /o# switch on IPX.COM or the config option= statement in SHELL.CFG.

  • If the user is running a shared copy of Windows 95, verify that the home directory and shared Windows directory are the first two items in the path.

Setup requires Novell Workstation Shell Installation Program.

If, during installation, Setup fails to load Novell drivers and displays a message that it requires the Novell Workstation Shell Install Program for installing the VLM network client with Windows 95, follow the instructions presented in "VLM Technical Notes" earlier in this chapter.

You cannot attach to the NetWare file server after installing Windows 95.

Verify the frame type being used by the NetWare server. If the NetWare server is using a different frame type from the one configured for the computer running Windows 95, the user cannot see the server. The Novell-supplied IPXODI protocol binds only to the first logical board, which is the first frame type in the link driverODI_driver section in NET.CFG.

To correct this problem, manually edit NET.CFG so that the correct frame type is first in the link driverODI_driver section.

You cannot see other computers running Windows 95 or NetWare server.

  • Determine which frame type is used at your site, and then verify that the correct frame type you want to use on the network are listed in NET.CFG. The frame type that IPXODI will use must be first or must be set explicitly.

  • Verify that the correct NET.CFG is being processed by LSL.COM. To do this, check the local drive for other NET.CFG files. There should be only one, and it should be in the same directory as the NetWare driver files. If you are loading these files from AUTOEXEC.BAT or another batch file, modify the batch file to change to this directory, run the necessary ODI drivers, and change back to the directory you want. This ensures that the current directory is the same as the location of the LSL.COM file when it is being loaded.

  • Verify that NET.CFG contains the correct settings for the network adapter. If necessary, restore this file from a correct backup version, or edit it to include correct settings.

  • Verify that you are running the latest version of the Novell-supplied ODI drivers and support files. Check with your network adapter manufacturer to determine whether a newer ODI driver is available.

  • Verify that both client computers are running the same protocols. If the client computers are on different sides of a router, make sure that an IPX/SPX-compatible protocol is being used on both computers.

You cannot access the login drive after installing Windows 95.

A common misconception is that users must log on to their NetWare server using the drive letter F. However, this is not true. For a client computer using the NETX workstation shell, the NetWare login drive is the next drive letter available after the LastDrive= statement in the Registry.

You can alter the LastDrive= statement to change the login drive, but you must leave enough drives before the LastDrive= that Windows 95 can use for its own connections.

Computer doesn't run after installing VLM support under Windows 95.

If a message says that the system cannot find a device file needed to run Windows, make sure that the VLM client has been installed using the Network option in Control Panel. This step ensures that the correct VLM information is placed in SYSTEM.INI. (The Novell-supplied installation program for VLM sets the path in SYSTEM.INI to the Windows SYSTEM directory rather than to VMM32.)

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