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Windows 95 on Other Networks: The Basics

Archived content. No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

This chapter provides details about installing and running Windows 95 on other networks. This chapter also includes information about host (that is, mainframe) connectivity for Windows 95.

Note: Be sure to read the Windows 95 README.TXT and SETUP.TXT notes on networking. Also check the Microsoft WinNews forums on online services for specific information about your network and about particular network adapters.

Integrated networking support is a key feature of Windows 95. The new architecture that supports multiple network providers means that it's easier to install and manage support for a single network or multiple networks simultaneously using Windows 95 than in earlier versions of Windows. Windows 95 can support configuration on a single computer of as many 32-bit, protected-mode network clients as you want and one 16-bit, real-mode client using the network provider interface of Windows 95.

Windows 95 includes two protected-mode network clients (Client for Microsoft Networks and Client for NetWare Networks), plus built-in support for several types of 16-bit, real-mode network clients. In most cases, you also need to use supporting software from the network vendors in the following list:

  • Artisoft® LANtastic® version 5.0 and later

  • Banyan® VINES® version 5.52 and later

  • DEC™ PATHWORKS™ version 5.0 and later

  • IBM® OS/2® LAN Server

  • Novell® NetWare® version 3.11 and later

  • SunSoft™ PC-NFS® version 5.0 and later

On This Page

Tip for Using Protected-Mode Network Clients from Other Vendors
Windows 95 on Other Networks: The Issues
Installing Support for Other Networks: An Overview
Using Real-Mode WinNet16 Drivers
Artisoft LANtastic
Banyan VINES
DEC PATHWORKS
IBM OS/2 LAN Server
SunSoft PC-NFS
Host Connectivity and Windows 95

Tip for Using Protected-Mode Network Clients from Other Vendors

The network provider interface defines a set of APIs used by Windows 95 to access the network for actions such as logging on to the server, browsing and connecting to servers, and so on. Microsoft has made this set of APIs widely available to network vendors so that they can develop new protected-mode network providers that are compatible with Windows 95.

For example, when a Banyan VINES 32-bit network provider becomes available, then Windows 95 can support Microsoft networks, Novell NetWare, and Banyan VINES connectivity at the same time through the Network Neighborhood.

Contact your network vendor to determine when protected-mode software for Windows 95 will be available for your network.

Multiple network support in Windows 95 consists of these components:

  • Win32 WinNet API

  • Multiple provider router and service provider interface

  • Network providers, including the WinNet16 interface, as described in "Using Real-Mode WinNet16 Drivers" later in this chapter

For information about the system components that provide multiple network support, see Chapter 32, "Windows 95 Network Architecture." For information about networking printing and support for printing when using a 16-bit network client, see Chapter 23, "Printing and Fonts."

Windows 95 on Other Networks: The Issues

Although you can run any number of 32-bit network clients simultaneously, you can only run a single 16-bit, real-mode network client.

The network software should be installed and running on the workstation when you start Windows 95 Setup to install Windows 95, so that Setup can detect the network and install support for it automatically.

If your network vendor does not provide a 32-bit, protected-mode client that is compatible with Windows 95, and if you don't (or can't) run Client for Microsoft Networks in addition to your other network client, you cannot take advantage of the protected-mode networking features of Windows 95. For example:

  • You won't gain the performance advantages of 32-bit, protected-mode network components, including Plug and Play networking support, long filenames, client-side caching, automatic reconnections, and other performance enhancements.

  • You can't use the Windows 95 unified logon and user interface for navigating the network, or use the Windows 95 network management tools.

  • You can't use user profiles for management of desktop configurations.

Specific issues for particular 16-bit network clients— including whether support for a particular network includes browsing in Network Neighborhood and whether you can also use a 32-bit, protected-mode client such as Client for Microsoft Networks simultaneously with that network — are presented in the section describing that network.

If support for your network's 16-bit client is not included with Windows 95, contact your network vendor to obtain a Windows 95 INF file.

Support for FTP NFS protocols can be installed by using the Network option in Control Panel. The required components (client, network provider, and so on) must be obtained from FTP.

Installing Support for Other Networks: An Overview

This section describes how to install Windows 95 with network support from another vendor. For installation details related to your specific network, see the section for that network.

Installing Network Support During Windows 95 Setup

If you want to install Windows 95 on a computer that already has networking support from a network vendor other than Microsoft or Novell NetWare, you should be sure the network client from that vendor is installed correctly under MS-DOS, Windows version 3.1, or Windows for Workgroups.

The network software should be running when you start Windows 95 Setup. If Setup detects a network adapter but the computer is not running network software when you install Windows 95, then Setup installs Client for Microsoft Networks by default. Although in most cases the Network option in Control Panel provides the same controls for adding and removing networking components after Windows 95 Setup is complete, Microsoft recommends that you install networking support during Windows 95 Setup.

Note: For computers running multiple network clients, Windows 95 Setup can install but cannot remove support for networks from other vendors.

To add a network client while running Windows 95 Setup

  1. Make sure that the network client from your vendor is already installed under MS-DOS, Windows 3.1, or Windows for Workgroups. The network software should be running when you start Windows 95 Setup.

  2. Start Windows 95 Setup as described in Chapter 3, "Introduction to Windows 95 Setup," and choose the Custom setup type.

  3. When the Network Configuration screen appears during Setup, your network client should appear in this list automatically, because Setup should detect the network you are running. If the list is correct, click OK to continue with Setup.

    If you need to add the network client manually, click the Add button. Then double-click Client in the Select Network Component Type dialog box. In the Select Network Client dialog box, click the appropriate network vendor in the Manufacturers list, and click the name of the client in the Network Clients list. Then click OK.

    Note: Support for DEC PATHWORKS 5.x is installed as a protocol together with Client for Microsoft Networks, so DEC PATHWORKS does not appear in the Select Network Client dialog box. For information about installing support for this product, see "DEC PATHWORKS" later in this chapter.

  4. Because the network client keeps track of the network adapter and protocols, no protocols or adapters should be listed in the Network Configuration dialog box.

    If you want to install Client for Microsoft Networks in addition to the network client from your vendor, follow the steps described in "Installing Client for Microsoft Networks with Other Networks" later in this chapter. Otherwise, click the Next button and continue with Windows 95 Setup.

  5. After Windows 95 is installed, check AUTOEXEC.BAT to make sure that all commands point to the correct directory for your network software.

On computers running multiple clients, Windows 95 Setup stores all real-mode networking components, including PROTOCOL.INI, in the Windows directory. On computers running a real-mode client as the primary network, the networking components are left in place. The settings in PROTOCOL.INI affect only real-mode NDIS drivers. Changing these values has no effect on protected-mode NDIS drivers. If you need to change settings in PROTOCOL.INI, use the Network option in Control Panel whenever possible. For information about PROTOCOL.INI entries, see Chapter 8, "Windows 95 on Microsoft Networks."

All the Setup options for installing and configuring network support described in this chapter can be defined in custom setup scripts for automatic installation. To install Windows 95 using setup scripts, the Windows 95 source files must be placed on a server using Server-based Setup, and custom setup scripts must be created, as described in Chapter 4, "Server-Based Setup for Windows 95." For information about installing support for another network client in custom setup scripts, see Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters."

Installing Client for Microsoft Networks with Other Networks

If you want to install the 32-bit, protected-mode Client for Microsoft Networks in addition to a network client from another vendor, follow these steps. For information about configuring and using this network client, see Chapter 8, "Windows 95 on Microsoft Networks."

Note: Artisoft LANtastic cannot be used together with a 32-bit, protected-mode networking client such as Client for Microsoft Networks. This client can only be installed as the sole network client on the computer.

To install Client for Microsoft Networks after another network has been installed

  1. Start Windows 95 Setup as described in Chapter 3, "Introduction to Windows 95 Setup," and choose the Custom setup type.

    – Or –

    After Setup, double-click the Network option in Control Panel.

  2. In the Network Configuration dialog box, click the Add button. In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, double-click Client.

  3. In the Select Network Client dialog box, click Microsoft in the Manufacturers list, and click Client for Microsoft Networks in the Network Clients list. Click OK.

  4. Usually hardware detection detects the correct network adapter and selects the corresponding driver. If you must add a network adapter, follow the steps in Chapter 7, "Introduction to Windows 95 Networking."

  5. In the Network Configuration dialog box, double-click the network adapter in the list of components. Verify the settings in the properties for the network adapter. Then click OK. For information, see Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion." See also the documentation for your network adapter to verify its software settings.

    Setup automatically installs a protected-mode version of any protocol that the installed network clients are using. If you need to install another protocol, follow the steps in Chapter 7, "Introduction to Windows 95 Networking."

  6. Click Next to continue with Setup.

    – Or –

    If you are adding support after Windows 95 has been installed, you must shut down and restart the computer.

Using Real-Mode WinNet16 Drivers

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In addition to multiple 32-bit Windows 95 network providers, Windows 95 can also support a single 16-bit WinNet driver. This is the basic configuration that must be used for a network product that does not offer a 32-bit network provider.

If the 16-bit network provider from another network vendor does not provide a browsing scheme, Network Neighborhood will be empty in Windows 95, indicating that this is not a browsable network. You must use the Map Network Drive dialog box for network access. Also, notice that a drive connected through the Windows 95 user interface is accessible in all VMs. A connection made at a command prompt, however, will be available in that VM only and will not be available throughout the Windows 95 user interface.

The following list summarizes the components for the 16-bit, real-mode network drivers.

Component

Description

WINNET16.DLL

Provides a 32-bit to 16-bit thunk and translation between the 32-bit Windows 95 network provider interface and the 16-bit WinNet API.

winnet16.DRV

A 16-bit Windows 3.x network driver that provides a basic Map Network Drive dialog box.

network.VXD
(or .386)

A Windows 3.x virtual device driver that allows virtualized access to the real-mode network software for all virtual machines (including the winnet16.DRV).

Real-mode network software

This can include proprietary network adapter drivers, protocol drivers, client (redirector), and network utilities loaded through CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT (or other batch file).

Artisoft LANtastic

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Windows 95 can be installed to run with Artisoft LANtastic version 5.x. or later client software. You must install Artisoft LANtastic by letting Windows 95 Setup detect this client while installing Windows 95. You cannot install support for this client after installation is complete.

LANtastic servers will not appear in Network Neighborhood. You can connect to servers at the command prompt.

Artisoft LANtastic can be configured only as the primary network. Additional 32-bit network providers, such as Client for Microsoft Networks or Client for NetWare Networks, are not possible in this case.

To set up Windows 95 with an Artisoft LANtastic real-mode network client

  1. Make sure that the LANtastic server is not running. The LANtastic server cannot be run during Windows 95 Setup.

  2. Make sure that the LANtastic client is already installed under MS-DOS, Windows 3.1, or Windows for Workgroups. The network software should be running when you start Windows 95 Setup. Then follow the steps in "Installing Support for Other Networks: An Overview" earlier in this chapter. No other steps are required.

To connect to a LANtastic server when running Windows 95

  • You must type the complete server name and share name in a Map Network Drive dialog box or at the MS-DOS Prompt.

The following table shows the entries required in configuration files when Artisoft LANtastic real-mode network support is installed with Windows 95.

Configuration file

Entries

AUTOEXEC.BAT

@echo off
path c:\windows;c:\windows\command;c:\dos;
prompt $p$g
rem lh c:\dos\share.exe
call c:\lantasti\startnet.bat

CONFIG.SYS

dos=high,umb
device=c:\windows\himem.sys
device=c:\windows\emm386.exe noems
devicehigh=c:\windows\setver.exe
rem - By Windows 95 Setup - stacks=9,256
files=100
rem - by Windows 95 Setup - buffers=30
fcbs =16,8

PROTOCOL.INI

[NDISHLP$]
drivername=ndishlp$
bindings=
[PROTMAN$]
drivername=protman$
[DATA]
version=v4.00.166
netcards=

SYSTEM.INI

[LANTASTIC]
network_irq=15

Banyan VINES

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Windows 95 can be installed and run with Banyan VINES version 5.52(5) or later. Banyan VINES servers do not show up in Network Neighborhood. You can use the Map Network Drive dialog box in Windows 95 to connect to servers.

Banyan VINES as the primary network.

If real-mode support for Banyan is installed using a Banyan LAN driver, Windows 95 can support Banyan as the primary network. Banyan is also providing a 32-bit network client to be available after the release of Windows 95. Contact your vendor's sales support representative for information about the availability and features provided with this new client.

Banyan VINES as an additional 16-bit Windows 95 client.

If Banyan is installed with an NDIS 2 network adapter driver, then Banyan can be installed as an additional 16-bit network client, and you can install 32-bit, protected-mode clients such as Client for Microsoft Networks or Client for NetWare Networks.

To set up Windows 95 with Banyan VINES real-mode network client support

  • If you are running on an Ethernet network, make sure that the Banyan VINES client is already installed under MS-DOS, Windows 3.1, or Windows for Workgroups. The network should be running when you start Windows 95 Setup. Then follow the steps in "Installing Support for Other Networks: An Overview" earlier in this chapter. No other steps are required.

    – Or –

  • If you are running on a token-ring network, run Windows 95 Setup and choose the Custom setup type. In the Network Configuration dialog box, add Banyan Token Ring as the network client. Setup cannot detect Banyan as a token-ring network client.

Note: If you are running Banyan VINES with monolithic drivers, you must use the PCCONFIG utility provided by Banyan to change Banyan drivers to NDIS drivers. Make sure that the section name matches the driver name.

The following table shows the entries required in configuration files when Banyan VINES real-mode network support is installed with Windows 95, depending on whether Banyan VINES is installed as the primary network only (connecting to a Banyan server) or is installed with Client for Microsoft Networks. These entries are for NDIS drivers.

Banyan VINES as Primary Network

Configuration file

Entries

AUTOEXEC.BAT

cd \banfiles
ban
ndisban ; ndtokban for token ring
redirall
netbind
arswait
z:login
c:
cd\

CONFIG.SYS

device=c:\banfiles\protman.dos /i:c:\banfiles
device=c:\banfiles\ndis2driver eg: exp16.dos

PROTOCOL.INI

[PROTOCOL MANAGER]
drivername=protman$
[VINES_XIF]
drivername=ndisban$ ; ndtokban$ for token ring
bindings=MS$EE16
[MS$EE16]
drivername=EXP16$
interrupt=5
ioaddress=0x300
iochrdy=late

Banyan VINES with Client for Microsoft Networks

Configuration file

Entries

AUTOEXEC.BAT

c:\windows\net initialize
cd \banfiles
ban
ndisban ; ndtokban for token ring
redirall
c:\windows\net start
arswait
z:login
c:
cd\

CONFIG.SYS

rem device=c:\banfiles\protman.dos /i:c:\banfiles
rem device=c:\banfiles\ndis2driver eg: elnkii.dos

PROTOCOL.INI

[NDISBAN$] ; NDTOKBAN$ for token ring
drivername=NDISBAN$ ; NDTOKBAN$ for token ring
bindings=ELNKII$
[NWLINK$]
drivername=NWLINK$
frame_type=4
cachesize=0
bindings=ELNKII$
[NETBEUI$]
drivername=NETBEUI$
lanabase=0
sessions=10
ncbs=12
bindings=ELNKII$
[ELNKII$]
drivername=ELNKII$
transceiver=external
interrupt=2
ioaddress=0x280
maxtransmits=12
datatransfer=pio_word
xmitbufs=2
[PROTMAN$]
priority=ndishlp$
drivername=protman$
[NDISHLP$]
drivername=ndishlp$
bindings=ELNKII$

DEC PATHWORKS

Windows 95 can be installed and run with DEC PATHWORKS version 5.x. You must install Client for Microsoft Networks plus the DEC PATHWORKS protocol (there is no DEC PATHWORKS real-mode client). DEC PATHWORKS uses NDIS 2 network adapter drivers. Also, the Windows 95 AUTOEXEC.BAT file must contain a startnet.bat line to refer to the batch file used to start DEC PATHWORKS.

To install support for DEC PATHWORKS 4.1, you must install support for Windows for Workgroups 3.11 before running Windows 95 Setup. This software is available from the DECPI forum on CompuServe. This is not necessary for installing support for DEC PATHWORKS 5.x.

If you are running DEC PATHWORKS 5.x, Windows 95 Setup detects the network. And, if you are using an NDIS, DLC, ODI, built-in DEPCA or Etherworks™ 3 data-link layer, Windows 95 Setup converts the configuration to NDIS drivers; Setup does not support X.25 or asynchronous data-link layers.

DEC is providing a 32-bit network client to be available after the release of Windows 95. Contact your vendor's sales support representative for information about the availability and features provided with this new client.

After Windows 95 is installed, you can use Network Neighborhood to browse DEC PATHWORKS servers running version 5.x. You can also use the standard Windows 95 methods for connecting to printers. Long filename support is possible only if you are connecting to a DEC PATHWORKS server version 5.0 or greater.

Also, if you are upgrading from Windows 3.1, you must install additional network components supplied by DEC; these are provided on the Windows 95 compact disc and installed automatically by Windows 95 Setup.

To set up Windows 95 with DEC PATHWORKS real-mode support

  1. In Windows 95 Setup, choose the Custom setup type.

  2. Install Client for Microsoft Networks, as described in "Installing Client for Microsoft Networks with Other Networks" earlier in this chapter.

  3. In the Network Configuration dialog box, click Add, and then double-click Protocol in the Select Network Component Type dialog box.

  4. In the Select Network Protocol dialog box, click Digital Equipment (DEC) in the Manufacturers list, and click a DEC PATHWORKS protocol in the Network Protocols list, depending on the server version number and whether you are running on a token-ring or Ethernet network. Click OK. Then click the Next button to continue with Setup.

Note: For DEC PATHWORKS 5.x, you can use a DECnet™ protocol, or you can use NetBEUI or Microsoft TCP/IP.

The following table shows the entries required in configuration files when DEC PATHWORKS real-mode network support is installed with Windows 95.

Configuration file

Entries

AUTOEXEC.BAT

c:\windows\net start
@echo off
prompt $p$g
path c:\windows;c:\windows\command;c:\dos;c:\set temp=c:\dos
c:\pw\startnet.bat

CONFIG.SYS

dos=high,umb
device=c:\windows\himem.sys
device=c:\windows\emm386.exe noems
devicehigh=c:\windows\setver.exe
rem - By Windows 95 Setup - stacks=9,256
files=100
rem - by Windows 95 Setup - buffers=30
fcbs =16,8

PROTOCOL.INI

[DLL$MAC]
drivername=DLL$MAC
lanabase=0
bindings=DEPCA$
[NWLINK$]
drivername=NWLINK$
frame_type=4
cachesize=0
bindings=DEPCA$
[NETBEUI$]
drivername=NETBEUI$
lanabase=1
sessions=10
ncbs=12
bindings=DEPCA$
[DEPCA$]
drivername=DEPCA$
maxmulticast=8
maxtransmits=16
adaptername=DE100
interrupt=5
ioaddress=0x200
ramaddress=0xd000
[PROTMAN$]
priority=ndishlp$
drivername=protman$
[NDISHLP$]
drivername=ndishlp$

IBM OS/2 LAN Server

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Windows 95 can be installed and run with these versions:

  • IBM OS/2 LAN Server version 1.3 CSD

  • IBM OS/2 LAN Server versions 1.2, 1.3, 2.0, and 4.0

Note: If OS/2 LAN Server is installed using an OS/2 LAN Server LAN driver, Windows 95 can support OS/2 LAN Server as a primary network only. In this case, you cannot also install Client for Microsoft Networks as an additional network client.

Users can connect to servers using the Map Network Drive dialog box or command prompt. For OS/2 LAN Server servers to appear in Network Neighborhood for browsing, at least one computer in the LAN Server domain must be running File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks and acting as the Browse Master (as described in Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing"). Also, the workgroup name for the computer running File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks must match the LAN Server domain name.

When support for OS/2 LAN Server is installed for use with Client for Microsoft Networks, aliasing is not supported.

If you are using custom setup scripts to install Windows 95 on multiple computers, make sure that at least one computer running Windows 95 in the LAN Server domain is already configured as the Browse Master. Also, make sure that the [Network] section of the custom setup script includes a correct value for workgroup=LANServer_domain.

To set up Windows 95 with IBM OS/2 LAN Server real-mode network client support

  • Make sure that the OS/2 LAN Server client is already installed. The network should be running when you follow the steps in "Installing Support for Other Networks: An Overview" earlier in this chapter. No other steps are required. However, you probably want to specify the LAN Server domain name as the workgroup name under Windows 95.

SunSoft PC-NFS

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Windows 95 can be installed and run with SunSoft PC-NFS version 5.0. SunSoft servers will not appear in Network Neighborhood. You can use the Map Network Drive dialog box to connect to servers.

SunSoft PC-NFS as the primary network.

If SunSoft PC-NFS is installed using a SunSoft PC-NFS LAN driver, Windows 95 can support SunSoft PC-NFS as the primary network. Additional 32-bit network providers are not possible in this case.

SunSoft PC-NFS as an additional 16-bit Windows 95 client.

If SunSoft PC-NFS is installed with an NDIS 2 network adapter driver or with an ODI driver, then SunSoft PC-NFS can be installed as an additional 16-bit network client, and you can install 32-bit, protected-mode clients such as Client for Microsoft Networks or Client for NetWare Networks.

If you obtain supporting SunSoft PRO NFS components from the network vendor, you can use Microsoft TCP/IP with this client.

To set up Windows 95 with SunSoft PC-NFS real-mode network client support

  • Make sure that the SunSoft PC-NFS client is already installed under MS-DOS, Windows 3.1, or Windows for Workgroups. The network should be running when you follow the steps in "Installing Support for Other Networks: An Overview" earlier in this chapter. No other steps are required.

The following table shows the entries required in configuration files when SunSoft PC-NFSreal-mode network support is installed with Windows 95, depending on whether PC-NFS is installed as the primary network only, or installed with Client for Microsoft Networks.

SunSoft PC-NFS as Primary Network

Configuration file

Entries

AUTOEXEC.BAT

set tz=pst8pdt
set path=c:\nfs;c:\dos;c:\net
rem c:\net\net start
c:\lanman\netbind
set nfsdrive=c
set nfspath=c:\nfs
set tn_dir=c:\nfs\telnet
c:\nfs\prt *
c:\nfs\net init.
c:\nfs\rtm

CONFIG.SYS

rem device=c:\net\ifshlp.sys
lastdrive=z
device=c:\nfs\pcnfs.sys
device=c:\nfs\sockdrv.sys
device=c:\lanman\protman.sys /i:c:\lanman
device=c:\lanman\nfs-ndis.sys
device=c:\lanman\exp16.dos

SunSoft PC-NFS with Client for Microsoft Networks

Configuration file

Entries

AUTOEXEC.BAT

c:\windows\net start
set tz=pst8pdt
set path=c:\nfs;c:\dos;c:\net
set nfsdrive=c
set nfspath=c:\nfs
set tn_dir=c:\nfs\telnet
c:\nfs\prt *
c:\nfs\net init.
c:\nfs\rtm

CONFIG.SYS

rem device=c:\net\ifshlp.sys
lastdrive=z

Host Connectivity and Windows 95

Host connectivity in this section refers to connecting to legacy IBM mainframe computers, the mid-range IBM AS/400® computers, DEC VAX®/VMS, UNIX, and HP® 3000 computers. Host terminal emulation applications running in Windows 95 require network protocols to connect to their respective hosts.

The common network protocols used to support host connectivity include the following:

  • IPX/SPX. The IPX/SPX-compatible transport provided with Windows 95 is compatible with Novell NetWare IPX/SPX, and can be installed to support host connectivity using terminal emulation programs and gateways supporting an IPX/SPX interface.

  • NetBEUI. The NetBEUI protocol provided with Windows 95 supports a NetBIOS programming interface and conforms to the IBM NetBEUI specifications. It also includes performance enhancements related to NetBIOS 3.0. Microsoft NetBEUI can be installed on computers running Windows 95 to provide NetBIOS support for host connectivity using terminal emulation programs and gateways supporting a NetBIOS interface.

  • TCP/IP. The TCP/IP protocol provided with Windows 95 is a complete implementation of the most common and accepted protocol available. It allows connectivity between interconnected networks with different operating systems and hardware architectures such as UNIX, IBM mainframes, and Microsoft networks. Usually, host connectivity with the TCP/IP protocol is provided using Telnet services such as TN3270 connecting to legacy mainframes, TN5250 connecting to an IBM AS/400, and using gateways supporting a TCP/IP interface. Microsoft TCP/IP supports the Windows Sockets 1.1 interface.

  • DLC. Data Link Control (DLC) protocol is used primarily to access IBM mainframe computers. This protocol is not used for general networking with Windows 95. Host terminal emulation programs use this protocol directly to communicate with IBM mainframe computers.

For information about using Microsoft NetBEUI, the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol, and TCP/IP, see Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion."

Windows 95 includes a real-mode version of the DLC protocol. This section discusses how to install the Microsoft DLC protocol for host connectivity, and how Windows 95 upgrades over existing DLC configurations. This section also provides tips for using terminal emulation applications and connectivity through gateways.

Using DLC for Connectivity

For direct connection and communication with a mainframe computer that uses DLC, the DLC protocol must be installed on the client computer that is running Windows 95. The Microsoft DLC protocol works with either token-ring or Ethernet network adapter drivers.

Microsoft DLC is also used to provide connectivity to local area printers connected directly to the network. For example, DLC can be used for printing to a printer such as a Hewlett-Packard HP® LaserJet® 4Si that uses an HP JetDirect® network adapter to connect directly to the network (rather than to a port on a print server). The DLC protocol must be installed and running on the print server for the printer. Computers sending print jobs to a print server for a DLC network printer do not need the DLC protocol — only the print server requires DLC. To take advantage of the DLC protocol device driver, you must create a network printer in the Printers folder.

The following sections describe how to install the Microsoft DLC protocol and how to configure it with Novell NetWare ODI drivers and IBM LanSupport.

Note: Windows 95 contains the most up-to-date Microsoft DLC protocol. Make sure you are running the latest version, which is available from Microsoft TechNet and the Support Online site at http://support.microsoft.com/.

Installing and Configuring Real-Mode Microsoft DLC

Architecture for real-mode DLC with NDIS 2 network adapter drivers

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This section describes how to install the real-mode NDIS 2 Microsoft DLC protocol to bind with an NDIS 2 network adapter driver. This is an NDIS 2 protocol that, when installed, is bound to an NDIS 2 network adapter driver. The Windows 95 protected-mode protocols use the NDIS2SUP.VXD module to coexist with and run over the real-mode NDIS 2 network adapter drivers.

When you install Windows 95, Windows 95 Setup detects whether the computer already has the Microsoft DLC protocol installed; if so, Setup migrates the protocol and its settings to Windows 95. Otherwise, you can add Microsoft DLC as a protocol after Windows 95 is installed.

Note: You must install the version of Microsoft DLC provided with Windows 95. You cannot use the Microsoft DLC INF file from Windows for Workgroups 3.x to install this protocol; Windows 95 uses a new INF file format.

You can also install Microsoft DLC using setup scripts, as described in Appendix D, "MSBATCH.INF Parameters."

To install the Microsoft DLC protocol on a computer running Windows 95

  1. In the Network option in Control Panel, click Add.

  2. In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, double-click Protocol.

  3. In the Select Network Protocol dialog box, click Microsoft in the Manufacturers list, and then click Microsoft DLC in the Network Protocols list. Then click OK.

  4. Shut down and restart the computer for the changes to take effect.

  5. Make sure that there is only one net start entry in AUTOEXEC.BAT, because Setup automatically adds an entry to support DLC, even if such an entry already exists.

The properties in the following table are set by default for real-mode Microsoft DLC. You can use the Network option in Control Panel to change these default values, or to set values for other parameters that you might use, in the Advanced properties for Microsoft DLC protocol.

Value

Description

Saps

Indicates the number of SAPs that can be opened simultaneously. The range for SAPs is 1 to 255 inclusive. The default is 3.
For a description of SAPs, see the IBM Local Area Network Technical Reference. For more information about adjusting the SAPs value, see the entry for Stations.

Stations

Indicates the number of link stations that can be opened simultaneously. The range for stations is 1 to 255 inclusive. The default is 20.
Each application requires a certain number of SAPs and stations. Because each SAP or station takes up memory, you should provide only enough for your application to run.

Swap

Turns on address bit-swapping when it is enabled and Microsoft DLC is bound to an Ethernet driver. The default is 1 (enabled).

Usedix

Sets the frame format. By default, this value is 0 (disabled), which is the correct value for 802.3 Ethernet format. Set this value to 1 for Ethernet DIX 2.0 (Ethertype 0x80D5) format. Ethernet DIX frames have an extra type-field.

The default values for Swap and Usedix are appropriate for most token-ring LAN environments. If the computer has an Ethernet adapter, then you should set the correct values for these parameters in the Advanced properties for Microsoft DLC. If you previously used the IBM DXME0MOD.SYS driver, use the following table to map the XMIT_SWAP parameter to set values for the two Microsoft DLC parameters.

DXME0MOD.SYS

Microsoft DLC Parameters

xmit_swap

Swap

Usedix

0

1

0

1

1

1

2

0

0

3

0

1

The following example shows some typical settings in AUTOEXEC.BAT and PROTOCOL.INI for Microsoft DLC with an Intel EtherExpress PRO LAN NDIS 2 network adapter driver on an Ethernet network. Notice that the [Msdlc$] section is added automatically by Windows 95 when the protocol is installed.

Sample Configuration File Settings for Microsoft DLC with NDIS 2 Adapters

Filename

Required settings

AUTOEXEC.BAT

net init
msdlc.exe
net start

PROTOCOL.INI

[netbeui$]
DriverName=NETBEUI$
Lanabase=0
sessions=10
ncbs=12
Bindings=EPRO$
[nwlink$]
DriverName=nwlink$
Frame_Type=4
cachesize=0
Bindings=EPRO$
[epro$]
DriverName=EPRO$
INTERRUPT=10
ioaddress=0x300
[protman$]
priority=ndishlp$
DriverName=protman$
[ndishlp$]
DriverName=ndishlp$
Bindings=EPRO$
[data]
version=v4.00.000
netcards=EPRO$,*PNP8132
[msdlc$]
DriverName=msdlc$
stations=20
saps=3
swap=0
usedix=1
Bindings=EPRO$

Configuring Microsoft DLC with ODI Drivers

Architecture for real-mode DLC with ODI network adapter drivers

rk10_14

For computers that are running Microsoft DLC with ODI drivers using the Novell-supplied ODINSUP.EXE file, Windows 95 Setup installs over this configuration and leaves entries for ODINSUP and MSDLC in AUTOEXEC.BAT. Microsoft does not provide direct support for Microsoft DLC used with ODINSUP.EXE.

If you must run a real-mode network redirector or TSR (NETX.EXE, VLM.EXE, and so on), you need to configure Microsoft DLC by binding the Microsoft DLC protocol to an ODI network adapter driver, as shown in the illustration. Otherwise, install Microsoft DLC over NDIS 2 with the protected-mode Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks.

The following table shows settings used to configure Microsoft DLC with ODI drivers.

Configuration File Settings for Real-Mode Microsoft DLC over ODI Drivers

Filename

Required settings

AUTOEXEC.BAT

lsl ;Novell-supplied component
mlid_driver.com ;Novell-supplied component
odinhlp.exe ;Windows 95 component
odinsup.exe ;Novell-supplied component
msdlc.exe ;Windows 95 component
net start netbind ;Windows 95 component

NET.CFG

Protocol ODINSUP
Bind EPROODI
BUFFERED
Link Driver EPROODI
Port 300
Frame Ethernet_802.2
Frame Ethernet_802.3
Frame Ethernet_II
Frame Ethernet_Snap

PROTOCOL.INI

[protman$]
priority=ndishlp$
DriverName=protman$
[ndishlp$]
DriverName=ndishlp$
Bindings=
[data]
version=v4.00.000
netcards=
[nwlink$]
Frame_Type=4
cachesize=0
DriverName=nwlink$
[msdlc$]
DriverName=msdlc$
xstations0=0
xstations1=0
stations=20
saps=3
xsaps0=1
xsaps1=1
swap=0
usedix=1
Bindings=EPROODI
[EPROODI]
Drivername=EPROODI
INTERRUPT=10
ioaddress=0x300

Upgrading Existing IBM LanSupport Installations

If you are using DLC support supplied by IBM to connect to host computers, Windows 95 Setup can detect IBM DLC; it leaves the installation intact and configures Windows 95 to run over that configuration. Although support for IBM DLC can be installed using the Network option in Control Panel, the required components must be provided by your network vendor.

This section describes two typical IBM LanSupport configurations, using DXMC0MOD.SYS and DXME0MOD.SYS.

DXMC0MOD.SYS, the monolithic IBM DLC driver.

For this configuration, Windows 95 Setup does one of two things:

  • If the computer is running NetWare, Setup keeps the DXMC0MOD.SYS driver and related settings, and installs the Generic ODI driver plus Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks, or keeps the real-mode client, as described in Chapter 9, "Windows 95 on NetWare Networks."

  • If the computer is running DXMC0MOD.SYS and no other networking components, Setups keeps the DXMC0MOD.SYS driver and does not install any Windows 95 networking components.

The following shows a sample configuration for IBM DXMC0MOD.SYS with Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks.

Example of Configuration Settings for DXMC0MOD.SYS with ODI Drivers

Filename

Required settings

AUTOEXEC.BAT

lsl ; Novell-supplied component
lansup ; Novell-supplied component
odihlp.exe ; Microsoft component

CONFIG.SYS

device=path\dxmaood.sys ;IBM-supplied component
device=path\dxmcomod.sys ;IBM-supplied component

DXME0MOD.SYS, the NDIS driver for IBM DLC.

For this configuration, Windows 95 Setup does one of three things:

Architecture for real-mode DLC with NDIS 2 network adapter and IBM LanSupport

rk10_15

  • If the computer is running DXME0MOD.SYS and no other networking components, Setup keeps the DXME0MOD.SYS driver and does not install any Windows 95 networking components.

  • If the computer is running DXME0MOD.SYS and Novell NetWare, Setup installs an NDIS network adapter driver plus Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks, and leaves the DXME0MOD.SYS driver intact.

  • If the computer is running DXME0MOD.SYS with the IBM DOS LAN Requestor, Setup installs an NDIS 2 adapter driver, keeps the DXME0MOD.SYS driver, installs Client for Microsoft Networks, and removes the IBM DOS LAN Requestor redirector components.

The following shows a sample configuration for IBM DXME0MOD.SYS with Client for Microsoft Networks using an NDIS 2 adapter driver. The same basic kinds of settings are used for a computer running Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks with an NDIS 2 adapter driver.

Example of Settings for DXMCE0MOD.SYS with Client for Microsoft Networks

Filename

Required settings

AUTOEXEC.BAT

net start netbind

CONFIG.SYS

device=c:\windows\protman.dos /i:c:\windows
device=c:\windows\epro.dos ;ndis2 driver
device=c:\lsp\dxma0mod.sys ;IBM-supplied
device=c:\lsp\dxme0mod.sys ,,3 ;IBM-supplied
device=c:\windows\ndishlp.sys ;Windows 95

PROTOCOL.INI

[protman$]
priority=ndishlp$
DriverName=protman$
[ndishlp$]
DriverName=ndishlp$
Bindings=EPRO$
[data]
version=v4.00.000
netcards=EPRO$,*pnp8132
[netbeui$]
DriverName=NETBEUI$
Lanabase=0
sessions=10
ncbs=12
Bindings=EPRO$
[nwlink$]
DriverName=nwlink$
Frame_Type=4
cachesize=0
Bindings=EPRO$
[EPRO$]
DriverName=EPRO$
INTERRUPT=10
ioaddress=0x300
[DXMAIDXCFG]
dxme0_nif=dxme0.nif
dxmj0mod_nif=dxmj0mod.nif
smcdosjp_nif=smcdosjp.nif
smcdosjp2_nif=smcdosjp.nif
smcdosat_nif=smcdosat.nif
smcdosat2_nif=smcdosat.nif
smcdosmc_nif=smcdosmc.nif
smcdosmc2_nif=smcdosmc.nif
[ETHERAND]
DriverName=DXME0$
Bindings=EPRO$

Using Gateways for Connectivity

When your network uses a gateway to communicate with a host computer, the client computer running Windows 95 communicates with the gateway computer just as it does with any other computer on the network. The gateway computer translates requests from the client into a form that can be understood by the host, then communicates with the host, and returns the information to the client. In this configuration, the client computer can connect to the gateway using any protocol that the gateway supports. The gateway uses some form of the DLC protocol to communicate with the host.

The following table shows commonly used gateways and the supported operating systems.

Gateway

Operating system

Microsoft SNA Server 2.0 and 2.1

Microsoft Windows NT 3.x

NetWare for SAA

Novell NetWare 3.x and 4.x

Wall Data Rumba Gateway

Microsoft Windows 3.x

Attachmate® Gateway 4.0 or higher

MS-DOS

DCA™ IRMALAN Gateway

MS-DOS

EICON

MS-DOS and Windows 3.x

Many of the gateways in the preceding table have MS-DOS versions, which run only under MS-DOS, not under Windows. Windows 95 does not support running the MS-DOS – based gateways in a VM. For information about support for a particular gateway under Windows 95, contact your gateway vendor.

Using TCP/IP for Host Connectivity

Many utilities and terminal emulation programs from other vendors allow direct communication with a mainframe or host computer using a TCP/IP protocol stack. The protected-mode version of Microsoft TCP/IP included with Windows 95 relies on the Windows Sockets version 1.1 interface. Any terminal emulation program or utility that you use to connect to a mainframe or host computer over Microsoft TCP/IP must support Windows Sockets 1.1.

If you want to connect to a host computer using Telnet or TCP/IP and you are running an application that emulates an IBM 3270 or 5250, or a DEC VT xx computer terminal, you can use Microsoft TCP/IP. Before configuring Windows 95 for Microsoft TCP/IP, make sure that the emulation application supports Windows Sockets 1.1 as a TCP/IP interface option.

If your emulation software requires a TSR to communicate with another vendor's TCP/IP protocol stack, you must remove the TSR and reconfigure the emulation software for Windows Sockets in order to communicate using Microsoft TCP/IP in Windows 95. To determine the proper configuration with Windows Sockets, see the documentation for the emulation software. If the application does not support Windows Sockets 1.1, contact the application vendor to obtain a version that does; otherwise, do not use Microsoft TCP/IP.

Using Terminal Emulation Applications

Terminal emulation applications offer several different connectivity options for connecting to a host IBM AS/400, or DEC VAX computer. This section describes configuration and other issues related to using terminal emulation programs.

Connecting to a NetWare for SAA gateway.

For most emulation applications, configuring Windows 95 with the Microsoft IPX/SPX-compatible protocol enables connectivity to a NetWare for SAA gateway or to any gateway supporting IPX/SPX connectivity. If you are using a token-ring network with source routing, use the Network option in Control Panel to make sure that Microsoft IPX/SPX-compatible protocol appears in the list of network components. In Advanced properties for the protocol, set the Source Routing property to a 16-entry cache size.

If this configuration does not work well, configure Windows 95 to use a Novell-supplied real-mode NetWare client.

Connecting to a Windows NT SNA 2.0 or 2.1 server.

Windows 3.x client software supports connectivity to a Windows NT SNA 2.0 or 2.1 server. The Windows NT 32-bit client for SNA should not be used; it was designed to work only with client computers running Windows NT Workstation.

Connecting to an AS/400 with IBM PC Support software.

You can use Windows 95 to connect to an AS/400 using the IBM PC Support software. To do so, configure the PC Support application for Basic Mode; do not use Extended Mode. If the PC Support application was configured to connect using DLC, make sure that Microsoft DLC or IBM LanSupport is already installed on the computer.

You can also use Windows 95 to connect to an AS/400 using the NetWare for SAA gateway and the IBM PC Support application. Configure the PC Support application for Basic Mode; do not use Extended Mode. The IBM-supplied DOS16M.386 file is not compatible with Windows 95.

If Windows 95 is configured to use the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol, then you must create a WINSTART.BAT batch file in the Windows directory and add entries in this file to run PCSWIN.COM and STRNRTR.EXE (the Novell-compatible router). If you encounter problems using the protected-mode IPX/SPX-compatible transport with the Novell-compatible PC Support router, then configure Windows 95 to use the Novell-supplied NETX or VLM client with IPXODI, as described in Chapter 9, "Windows 95 on NetWare Networks."

Connecting to host computer using a coaxial adapter.

If you are using a coaxial connection with a coaxial adapter (CUT/DFT) supplied by IBM or another vendor, use the real-mode drivers provided with the adapter or emulation software for setting up hardware. No 32-bit drivers are available for connectivity with this type of adapter.

For information about using TCP/IP with IBM 3270 terminal emulation, see "Using TCP/IP for Host Connectivity" earlier in this section.

Troubleshooting Connection Problems with Microsoft DLC

If you encounter problems using the real-mode Microsoft DLC protocol, check the following items:

  • When adding the Microsoft DLC protocol, make sure that there is only one net start entry in AUTOEXEC.BAT. Setup adds an entry for Microsoft DLC, even if an entry already exists. Also, make sure that AUTOEXEC.BAT is configured properly, as described in "Installing and Configuring Real-Mode Microsoft DLC" earlier in this chapter.

  • Do not make direct entries or changes in PROTOCOL.INI for Microsoft DLC. Instead, make all changes in the Advanced properties for Microsoft DLC by using the Network option in Control Panel. If you make changes directly in PROTOCOL.INI, then the next time you change any values by using the Network option in Control Panel, all settings in PROTOCOL.INI for Microsoft DLC will be overwritten.

  • Some terminal emulation applications use TSRs to communicate with the Microsoft DLC protocol. If your emulation application uses a TSR that runs from AUTOEXEC.BAT, then make sure that the entry for the TSR still exists (usually, the TSR entry occurs after the msdlc and net start lines). Windows 95 Setup removes or comments out many TSRs.

  • The option named Set This Protocol To Be The Default Protocol in the Advanced properties for Microsoft DLC does not provide any functionality. This option should not be checked, because Microsoft DLC does not use LANA settings.

  • Real-mode Microsoft DLC is an NDIS 2 protocol, so the network adapter must have an NDIS 2-compatible network adapter driver for use with Windows 95. Windows 95 includes many compatible drivers, but some Windows 95 drivers for certain PCI and PCMCIA cards do not have a corresponding NDIS 2 driver to allow loading real-mode Microsoft DLC.

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