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Microsoft Exchange: The Basics

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This chapter describes the electronic mail and messaging features of Windows 95, including the Microsoft Exchange client. Microsoft Exchange provides a central place for sending and receiving messages within a workgroup and to and from other messaging services, such as electronic mail, faxes, and online services.

Windows 95 includes the Microsoft Exchange client, an advanced messaging application that retrieves messages into one inbox from many kinds of messaging service providers, including Microsoft Mail, The Microsoft Network, and Microsoft Fax. Its integration with Microsoft Fax software allows you to send rich-text documents as faxes or mail messages. Setting up Microsoft Exchange to communicate with service providers is as easy as connecting to different printers in a network environment.

With Microsoft Exchange client, you can do the following:

  • Send or receive electronic mail in a Windows 95 workgroup

  • Include files and objects created in other applications as part of messages

  • Use multiple fonts, font sizes and colors, and text alignments in messages

  • Create a Personal Address Book or use address books from multiple service providers

  • Create folders for storing related messages, files, and other items

  • Organize and sort messages in a variety of ways

    Send and receive messages to and from the following service providers:

    • Microsoft Mail

    • The Microsoft Network (online service)

    • Microsoft Fax

    • Other messaging services that use messaging application programming interface (MAPI) service providers

On This Page

Microsoft Exchange: The Issues
Overview of Microsoft Exchange and Windows 95 Messaging
Setting Up the Microsoft Exchange Client
Using the Microsoft Exchange Client
Working with Documents
Using Multiple Microsoft Exchange Profiles
Accessing a Microsoft Mail Workgroup Postoffice Remotely
Technical Notes on the Microsoft Exchange client and MAPI
Upgrading to Microsoft Mail Server
Upgrading to Microsoft Exchange Server
Microsoft Mail Gateways

Microsoft Exchange: The Issues

Before installing and configuring electronic mail on a network, you should decide the following issues:

  • What electronic mail system will you use? Do you want to communicate with others in a workgroup, or with people on the Internet or other online services? For communicating within one workgroup, Windows 95 provides a complete Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice and a wizard for setting it up. For communicating among workgroups, you will need to upgrade to Microsoft Mail Server, as described in "Upgrading to Microsoft Mail Server" later in this chapter.

  • If you use the built-in Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice, where will it be located, and who will administer it? The postoffice can reside on any computer in the workgroup. For best results, that computer should have ample hard disk space to contain message files, be accessible to users at all times, and have at least 8 MB of memory (RAM).

    To begin with you should allow approximately 2 MB of storage on the mail server. As the number of users and the size of stored mail messages increases, you will need to increase storage for the postoffice. When you have more than 20 users, consider using a dedicated computer for the workgroup postoffice.

    Be sure to determine the location of the postoffice before you configure Microsoft Exchange. If you choose Microsoft Mail during Setup, Windows 95 runs the Inbox Setup wizard at the end of Setup, but you cannot fully configure Microsoft Exchange if you have not created a postoffice. After Windows 95 Setup, you can configure the Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice by running the Microsoft Workgroup Postoffice Admin wizard in Control Panel. For information, see "Using the Microsoft Exchange Client with Microsoft Mail Services" later in this chapter.

  • Which service providers, such as Microsoft Fax, do users need to connect to? Requirements for connecting to service providers vary depending on the type of service. For example, connecting to The Microsoft Network requires that the user has a modem, Dial-Up Networking, a phone line, and an account from The Microsoft Network. You choose the service providers you want during Setup or afterward in the Mail And Fax option in Control Panel or from within Microsoft Exchange. For details, see "Setting Up the Microsoft Exchange Client" later in this chapter.

  • Do you want users to connect to service providers from their individual computers or from the network? For security purposes, a network administrator might want to restrict users from communicating with other service providers from their computers. If you want users to connect to service providers through a gateway on a network server, you must purchase a gateway and an electronic mail system that allows you to connect to a gateway. For example, if you are running Microsoft Exchange with Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice, you must upgrade the workgroup postoffice to Microsoft Mail Server and purchase a gateway. For information, see "Upgrading to Microsoft Mail Server" and "Microsoft Mail Gateways" later in this chapter.

  • Will users connect to the postoffice from a remote site? If so and you are using the Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice, you need to create a Dial-Up Networking connection to the postoffice and configure a remote access server for dial-up clients. For information, see Chapter 28, "Dial-Up Networking and Mobile Computing."

Note: If you install the Microsoft Exchange client and Microsoft Schedule+ 1.0, you will lose group scheduling capabilities.

Overview of Microsoft Exchange and Windows 95 Messaging

The Microsoft Exchange client can communicate with any electronic mail system or messaging application that has a MAPI service provider, which is similar to a personal gateway. It specifies all the connection and addressing settings needed to communicate with a mail server on one end and with the Microsoft Exchange client on the other end.

MAPI is a set of API functions and OLE interface that allows messaging clients, such as Microsoft Exchange, to interact with various message service providers, such as Microsoft Mail and Microsoft Fax. MAPI helps Microsoft Exchange manage stored messages and define the purpose and content of messages. For more information about MAPI, see "Technical Notes on the Microsoft Exchange client and MAPI " later in this chapter.

The Microsoft Exchange client includes an OLE-compatible rich-text editor used for reading and composing messages; it supports the use of bullets, multiple font sizes and colors, and text alignments in messages.

If you install the Microsoft Exchange client, Windows 95 provides several MAPI service providers. To install the Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice to work with Microsoft Exchange, you must select it as a separate component under Microsoft Exchange during Windows 95 Setup or afterward by using the Add/Remove Programs option in Control Panel.

Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice.

This postoffice is a workgroup edition of the Microsoft Mail Server, allowing one computer to host the postoffice and allowing other users to access that postoffice to send and receive mail. The workgroup postoffice provides the same features as the full Microsoft Mail Server, with the following exceptions:

  • No mail exchange with users of other postoffices

  • No access to Microsoft Mail gateways

  • Simplified administration tools

Personal Address Book MAPI service provider.

This common address book can store electronic mail addresses and other personal messaging information such as names, phone and fax numbers, and mailing addresses from multiple messaging service providers. A Personal Address Book is accessible from applications that use MAPI.

Personal Folder (.PST) MAPI service provider.

The Personal Folder stores messages, forms, documents, and other information in a series of hierarchical folders. A Personal Folder acts as a universal inbox and outbox where users can send and receive messages from multiple service providers.

Microsoft Mail Services MAPI service provider.

This service provider connects the Microsoft Exchange client to either the Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice or a Microsoft Mail Server (acquired separately) postoffice. To connect a computer running Windows 95 to the Microsoft Mail Server postoffices, the postoffices must reside on a network file server (such as Windows NT 3.5 or Novell®NetWare®) that supports the MS-DOS driver redirector.

See "Using the Microsoft Exchange Client with Microsoft Mail Services" later in this chapter for information about configuring and using the Microsoft Exchange client with a Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice.

Microsoft Fax MAPI service provider.

This service provider allows the Microsoft Exchange client to send and receive faxes in the same way as electronic mail. You can receive faxes in the same universal inbox as your mail, and use the same Personal Address Book for both mail and fax recipients. For more information, see Chapter 27, "Microsoft Fax."

The Microsoft Network MAPI service provider.

This service provider allows the Microsoft Exchange client to send and receive mail on The Microsoft Network, an online service accessible from the Windows 95 desktop. For more information, see Chapter 29, "The Microsoft Network."

Internet Mail MAPI service provider.

This service provider allows the Microsoft Exhchange client to send and receive mail directly on the Internet or other networks using the Simple Mail Transport Protocol (SMTP) and the Post Office Protocol 3 (POP3) over TCP/IP. This product is available as part of Microsoft Plus! for Windows 95. For information, contact your Microsoft sales representative.

CompuServe Mail MAPI service provider.

This service provider allows the Microsoft Exchange client to send and receive mail using the CompuServe Mail Services. To use this service provider, you must have an account with CompuServe. For more information, contact CompuServe.

Microsoft Exchange Server MAPI service provider.

This service provider will allow the Microsoft Exchange client to connect to the Microsoft Exchange server, which is a client-server messaging system that runs on Windows NT Server. This Microsoft product will be available after the first release of Windows 95.

Installing the Microsoft Exchange server will provide the Microsoft Exchange client with specific functionality, including the following

  • Inbox Assistant, a set of server-based rules for filtering, forwarding, replying to, and deleting messages

  • Out of Office Assistant, a set of server-based rules for automatically forwarding and replying to mail when users are working away from the office

Setting Up the Microsoft Exchange Client

Installing and configuring the Microsoft Exchange client consists of the following steps:

  • Install the Microsoft Exchange client either during Windows 95 Setup or afterward in the Add/Remove Programs option in Control Panel or by double-clicking the Inbox on the Windows 95 desktop. The Microsoft Exchange client is installed automatically if you choose to install Microsoft Fax, The Microsoft Network, or Microsoft Mail in the Get Connected dialog box during Setup. For information, see Chapter 3, "Introduction to Windows 95 Setup." You can also install the Microsoft Exchange client after Windows 95 Setup in the Add/Remove Programs option in Control Panel.

  • Choose the electronic mail system to which you will connect the Microsoft Exchange client.

  • Set up a mail postoffice. If you choose the built-in Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice and you are upgrading from previous Windows for Workgroups Mail or Microsoft Mail 3.2 postoffices, you will not need to set up a new Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice.

  • Set up the Microsoft Exchange client by running the Inbox Setup wizard either during Windows 95 Setup or afterward in the Mail And Fax option in Control Panel.

  • Choose the service providers you want during setup of the Microsoft Exchange client, or afterward in the Mail And Fax option in Control Panel or in the Microsoft Exchange client.

Important: If a Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice or another postoffice has not yet been set up when a user runs the Inbox Setup wizard, the Microsoft Exchange client can be only partially configured. After setup, the postoffice administrator can configure the Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice for all users in the workgroup in the Microsoft Mail option in Control Panel. When those users run the Microsoft Exchange client for the first time, the postoffice location automatically appears in the postoffice location box.

To install the Microsoft Exchange client after Setup

  1. In the Add/Remove Programs option in Control Panel, double-click the Windows Setup tab.

  2. In the Components list, click Microsoft Exchange, and then click OK.

    – Or –

    Double-click the Inbox on the Windows 95 desktop.

    The Inbox Setup wizard guides you through the configuration steps. If you choose to add Microsoft Mail Services to Microsoft Exchange, the wizard prompts you for the postoffice location (path name), user name, and password.

    If you have already created a postoffice, added users to it, and shared it with all users on the network, the postoffice name and location automatically appear in the dialog box without requiring the user to type them. In this way, setting up the Microsoft Exchange client with the Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice is seamless for all users in the workgroup except the postoffice administrator. For information about setting up a Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice, see "Using the Microsoft Exchange Client with Microsoft Mail Services" later in this chapter.

  3. After the wizard has finished, shut down and restart Windows 95 for the changes to take effect.

To add a service provider

  • Double-click the Mail And Fax option in Control Panel, and then click Add.

    – Or –

  1. From the Tools menu in Microsoft Exchange, click Options.

  2. In the Options properties, click the Services tab, and then click Add.

  3. In the Add Services To Profile dialog box, click the service providers you want, and then click Add.

    Cc751105.rk26_09(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    The services you select determine which specific DLLs are enabled when the Microsoft Exchange client is started. For example, if the Microsoft Mail service is added, the MSFS32.DLL file in the Windows SYSTEM directory is loaded. (To find out which DLLs are loaded for a service, click the name of that service in the Microsoft Exchange properties, then click the About button.)

    The service providers each provide a setup wizard that prompts you for any required configuration information. For information about Microsoft Mail, see the section describing this service later in this chapter, and see Chapter 27, "Microsoft Fax," and Chapter 28, "Dial-Up Networking and Mobile Computing."

Tip When you're troubleshooting Windows 95 mail issues, first remove additional service providers (except Personal Address Book and Personal Folder), and then add back each service provider, one at a time.

Using the Microsoft Exchange Client

This section describes how to use the Microsoft Exchange client, including discussions about Personal Address Book, Personal Folder, and sorting and viewing messages.

To start the Microsoft Exchange client

  • On the Windows 95 desktop, double-click the Inbox.

    – Or –

    On the Programs menu, click Microsoft Exchange.

Note: The Microsoft Exchange client opens in single-pane view if you start it by double-clicking the Inbox on the Windows 95 desktop. In single-pane view, folders and messages appear in one window. Clicking the Show/Hide Folder List button on the toolbar in Microsoft Exchange switches to double-pane view. In double-pane view, you can drag and drop messages into folders.

The Microsoft Exchange client automatically downloads mail from all service providers when you first open your Inbox. Consequently, if you have added multiple service providers to the Microsoft Exchange client, it might take several minutes to connect to and download mail from each of them.

After you open the Microsoft Exchange client, you can choose to download mail from service providers one at a time or from all of them at once. You can also set time intervals for downloading mail from each service provider in the properties for each of them.

To download mail after you open the Microsoft Exchange client

  • On the Tools menu, click Deliver Now Using, and then point to each service provider from which you want to download mail. If you installed only one service provider, the option on the Tools menu is named Deliver Now.

Using the Personal Address Book

The Microsoft Exchange client creates a Personal Address Book for each user when the Inbox Setup wizard is run for the first time. The Personal Address Book contains the names and addresses of people to whom users commonly send electronic mail and fax messages. Users can add names and addresses to the Personal Address Book from other electronic address books, such as the Postoffice Address List that comes with the Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice. Users can also modify the Personal Address Book (they cannot modify address books from other service providers, such as The Microsoft Network).

With the Personal Address Book, you can do the following:

  • Find and select names within different address books.

  • Modify names and addresses.

  • Copy addresses from other address books into the Personal Address Book.

  • Add custom addresses to send messages to other messaging services, such as The Microsoft Network.

  • Define groups of recipients (distribution lists) to which you want to send the same message.

Tip You can address a mail message to selected recipients from within the Personal Address Book dialog box by selecting a name, and then clicking New Message on the File menu.

To find and select names within a Personal Address Book

  1. In Microsoft Exchange, click the Tool menu, and then click Address Book.

  2. In the Address Book dialog box, click Personal Address Book in the Show Names From box. The names in the Personal Address Book are displayed in the list box to the left.

  3. To find a name, type it in the blank box above the list. The cursor automatically moves to that name in the list.

  4. If you can't find a name, click the Edit menu, and then click the Find button. In the Find dialog box, type letters that are part of the name you want to search for, and then click OK.

To modify names and addresses in the Personal Address Book

  1. In the Address Book dialog box, click the Personal Address Book in the Show Names From box, and then double-click a name in the list.

  2. In the properties for that name, change the address, phone, business, and other information, and then click OK.

To add names and addresses to a Personal Address Book from another address book

  1. In the Address Book dialog box, click a different address book in the Show Names From box.

  2. In that address book's list of names, click a name, click the File menu, and then click Add To Personal Address Book.

To add a custom name and address to the Personal Address Book

  1. In the Personal Address Book, click New Entry on the File menu.

  2. In the New Entry dialog box, click the type of address you want to add to the Personal Address Book.

    For example, if the person is a member of The Microsoft Network, select The Microsoft Network. In the Microsoft Network address dialog box, type the Member ID and Name.

    Each messaging service has a different address dialog box. For example, if you select Internet, you must enter the SMTP and Alias of the recipient.

    All messaging services include dialog boxes named Notes, Business, and Phone in which you can store additional information about the recipient.

To create a personal distribution list

  1. In Microsoft Exchange, click the Tools menu, and then click Address Book.

  2. In the Address Book dialog box, click File, and then click New Entry.

  3. In the New Entry dialog box, double-click Personal Distribution List.

  4. In the Distribution List dialog box, type a name for the personal distribution list, and then click the Add/Remove Members button.

  5. In the Edit Personal Distribution List Members box, type a name or select it from the displayed address book, and then click Members to add it to the personal distribution list. You can add as many names as you want. When you are finished, click OK.

  6. In the Distribution List dialog box, click OK to add the personal distribution list to the Personal Address Book.

To address a message to a personal distribution list

  1. In Microsoft Exchange, click the Tools menu, and then click Address Book.

  2. In the Address Book, click Personal Address Book in the Show Names From box.

  3. In the Personal Address Book's list of names, select the name of the personal distribution list, click the File menu, and then click New Message.

    A message form appears with the name of the personal distribution list in the To: box.

To select name(s) when composing a message

  1. In Microsoft Exchange, click the Compose menu, and then click New Message.

  2. In the new message form, click the Select Names button on the toolbar.

  3. In the Select Names dialog box, click a name, and then click OK to address the message.

Configuring Addresses and Delivery Options

You can control how a message is addressed and delivered by specifying the following address and delivery options:

  • The address book to be displayed first when selecting mail recipients

  • The address book to search first when looking for names that have been added manually

  • The address book in which to store personal names

  • The Personal Folder to which messages are delivered

  • The order in which service providers should send outgoing messages

To configure address options in the Microsoft Exchange client

  1. In Control Panel, double-click the Mail And Fax option, and then click the Addressing tab.

    – Or –

    From the Tools menu in Microsoft Exchange, click Options, and then click the Addressing tab.

  2. In Addressing properties, click an address book in the option named Show This Address List First.

  3. Click an address book in the option named Keep Personal Addresses In.

  4. To specify the search order of address books, click an address book in the option named When Sending Items, and then click the up or down arrows to the right of the list box to set the order by which the Microsoft client searches address books.

To configure delivery options in the Microsoft Exchange client

  1. In Control Panel, double-click the Mail And Fax option, and then click the Delivery tab.

    – Or –

    From the Tools menu in Microsoft Exchange, click Options, and then click the Delivery tab.

  2. In Delivery properties, choose a Personal Folder File in the option named Deliver New Items To The Following Location.

  3. To specify a second delivery location in case a network connection to a file server is temporarily lost, type the name of a secondary Personal Folder File in the Secondary Location box.

  4. To specify an order in which service providers send messages, click a service provider in the option named Recipient Addresses Are Processed By, and then click the up or down arrows to the right of the list box to set the order in which service providers send messages.

Personal Folder Files

A Personal Folder File, located on a local computer, stores mail messages, forms, and other information in a series of hierarchical folders. The Personal Folder functions as your universal inbox and outbox for sending messages to and receiving messages from service providers.

When you upgrade to Windows 95 from Windows for Workgroups Mail or Microsoft Mail 3.2, Windows 95 runs a Migration wizard to convert the primary message files (.MMF) to a Personal Folder File (PST format). During Setup, Windows 95 looks first in the Windows subdirectory and then in the MSMAIL subdirectory for an .MMF file. It considers the first .MMF file it finds as the primary .MMF file and converts it. After Setup, you can convert additional .MMF files to Personal Folder format by using the Import Mail Data option in the Microsoft Exchange client. You can also use this option to convert previous Personal Address Books (.PAB files).

To convert .MMF or .PAB files in the Microsoft Exchange client

  1. In the File menu, click Import.

  2. In the Specify File To Import dialog box, type the path to the .MMF or .PAB file you want to import, and then click Open.

  3. In the Import Mail File dialog box, verify that the .MMF or .PAB is the one you want to import, and then click OK.

The wizard leaves your original .MMF and .PAB files intact and copies the messages into the current Personal Folder or Personal Address Book.

Important: The Microsoft Exchange client, unlike the Microsoft Exchange Server, does not support shared or replicated sets of folders to let large groups of people share documents and messages, and create rich views on them. If you have previous shared folders, they cannot be converted in the Microsoft Exchange client. You will lose the mail in these shared folders when you upgrade to Windows 95 unless you import the shared folders to another .MMF file.

You can add as many Personal Folder Files as you need. For example, you might want to create one Personal Folder File for archived messages and one for current messages. Or you could choose to have one Personal Folder File for messages from a specific service provider. However, no matter how many service providers you add to the Microsoft Exchange client, you need only one Personal Folder File.

To add a Personal Folder File in the Microsoft Exchange client

  1. In the Tools menu, click Options.

  2. In the Options dialog box, click the Services tab, and then click Add.

  3. In the Add Service To Profile dialog box, click Personal Folder, and click OK.

  4. In the Create/Open Personal Folder dialog box, type a filename for the Personal Folder File, and then click Open.

    rk26_42

  5. In the Create Microsoft Personal Folders dialog box, type a name for the Personal Folder File. This name will appear in the Microsoft Exchange client Inbox. Click the type of encryption you want, and then type a password. Click OK.

    Notice that Compressible Encryption is selected by default. The Personal Folder also supports password protection to maintain the privacy of your electronic mail.

To help you manage the size of a Personal Folder, Windows 95 provides a Personal Folder compression feature. Choosing to compress a Personal Folder eliminates the empty spaces created when you delete messages.

To compress a Personal Folder in the Microsoft Exchange client

  1. From the Tools menu, click Services, and then click a Personal Folder File.

  2. In the Personal Folders dialog box, click Compact Now.

Note: Because a Personal Folder is a file in the Exchange subdirectory, it can be backed up in the same way as other files in Windows 95.

Sorting and Viewing Messages

The Microsoft Exchange client provides a number of ways for you to organize and manage electronic mail messages and other information. When you first use Microsoft Exchange, messages are arranged according to the date and time they were received, the sender's name, their subject, and size. You can reorganize how messages are arranged in a single folder or all folders in the following ways:

  • Create a series of folders to keep groups of messages in each.

  • Sort messages within a folder by category, such as the message subject title, the sender's name, and so on.

For information about performing these tasks, see the online Help for the Microsoft Exchange client.

Using Message Finders

A message finder is a separate window that works in the same way as a filter to find messages that meet a particular set of criteria. When set up, a finder can run continuously, alerting you when matching messages arrive. The selection criteria for finding messages are the same as for filtering messages.

To view a message finder window

  1. From the Tools menu, click Find.

  2. Specify the criteria you want to use to find messages. Click Advanced to find messages according to its size, date, importance, or sensitivity.

Note: You can add OLE fields to the columns you want to view, or you can sort, filter, and search on these fields (in addition to the normal messaging properties). For more information about OLE in Windows 95, see Chapter 22, "Application Support."

Working with Documents

You can attach files, messages, or objects to a mail message in Microsoft Exchange. You can also drag and drop files into Microsoft Exchange, or drag and drop files attached to messages to other drives, folders, or documents on a local or networked computer. To use this OLE functionality, you must be in double-pane view. A button is provided on the Microsoft Exchange client toolbar to switch between single and double-pane view.

To attach files, messages, or objects to messages in the Microsoft Exchange client

  • In a Microsoft Exchange message, click the Insert menu, and then click File, Message, or Object.

To drag and drop files attached to messages

  • In the Microsoft Exchange Inbox, double-click the file and drag it to another folder in the Microsoft Exchange client or to a drive or folder in My Computer or Network Neighborhood. Windows 95 saves the file as an .MSG file.

Note: To drag and drop files to another folder, the Microsoft Exchange client must be in double-pane view.

To drag and drop files into a message in the Microsoft Exchange client

  • In My Computer or Network Neighborhood, double-click a file and drag it into an open Microsoft Exchange message or folder.

Tip You can use Microsoft Exchange folders as an alternate way to store and sort files. Consider creating a hierarchy of folders to store and categorize files, creating a personalized document library. You can create more elaborate and customized views in the Microsoft Exchange client than is possible in the Windows 95 file system.

Using Multiple Microsoft Exchange Profiles

The Microsoft Exchange client maintains one or more separate profiles for each user. A profile contains default settings for how messages are delivered to and from a mailbox. Individual users create a profile when they run the Inbox Setup wizard for the first time. Other profiles can be added after running the wizard. The process of creating a profile is invisible to all but advanced users or network administrators.

With Microsoft Exchange profiles, several users, each with an individual set of preferences, can share the same computer to send and receive mail. A single user can also switch between profiles, for example, between one for the office and one for a remote site. If a user is connected to multiple service providers, a profile securely stores any required passwords, allowing the user to log on to multiple mail systems with one password.

The following illustration shows four profiles for three people sharing the same computer. One person has two profiles — one for use on the road and one for the office.

Cc751105.rk26_03(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

To add a profile in the Microsoft Exchange client

  1. In Control Panel, click the Mail And Fax icon, and then click Show Profiles.

  2. In the Microsoft Exchange Profiles dialog box, click Add. This starts the Inbox Setup wizard, which leads you through the steps for creating a profile.

Users who share a computer, or who have multiple profiles, can select the profile to use when starting Windows 95.

To choose which profile to use at startup

  1. From the Tools menu in the Microsoft Exchange client, click Options.

    Cc751105.rk26_05(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  2. In General properties, click the option named Prompt For A Profile To Be Used if you want to choose a profile each time you start Microsoft Exchange.

  3. Click the option named Always Use This Profile if you want to specify a default profile.

    Note: To switch between profiles when running Microsoft Exchange, you must quit Microsoft Exchange and then choose a new profile when restarting.

    Cc751105.rk26_29(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  4. Specify where you want the workgroup postoffice to be located, and then Click Next.

  5. In the Administrator Account Details dialog box, type information about the postoffice administrator, including name and mailbox name, and a password to restrict administration of the postoffice to the administrator. Click Next to finish creating the postoffice.

    Cc751105.rk26_30(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Important: Create only one postoffice for your workgroup, or your users will not be able to send mail to each other.

The Microsoft Workgroup Postoffice Admin wizard also allows you to manage the postoffice in the following ways:

  • Add users to the postoffice

  • Change user information, including replacing forgotten passwords

The workgroup postoffice manager library, WGPOADMN.DLL, is the software component that supports administrative functions such as adding or deleting users and changing passwords.

To administer a postoffice

  1. In Control Panel, click the Microsoft Mail Postoffice icon, and then click Administer An Existing Workgroup Postoffice.

  2. In the space provided, type the password assigned to the administrator during setup of the postoffice, and then click Next.

  3. To add users to your postoffice, click Add User. To change user information, such as a telephone number or a password, select a name from the list box, and then click Details.

Cc751105.rk26_33(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

To allow users within a workgroup to access the Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice, you must share the directory where the postoffice resides. You can share the directory through Windows Explorer in the same way you share other resources.

To share a Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice

  1. In Windows Explorer, right-click the folder for your workgroup postoffice.

  2. From the File menu, click Properties, and then click the Sharing tab.

  3. In the Sharing folder, click Shared As and verify the name of the postoffice in the Share Name field. You can also add a comment in the Comment field. Other people will see the comment when they look at a list of computers on the network.

  4. Under Access Type in the Sharing folder, be sure to click Full Access if you want all users in your workgroup to access the postoffice.

    – Or –

    To restrict access to the postoffice by requiring a password, click Depends On Password, and then type a password in the Full-Access Password field.

For information about user-level security, see Chapter 14, "Security."

When you configure Microsoft Mail using the Inbox Setup wizard, the wizard prompts you for a password. You can then specify whether the Microsoft Exchange client should save the password and automatically enter it when you start mail. This means that someone else using your computer can access your mail. You can change your mailbox password and require that Microsoft Mail ask for your password each time you log on to Windows 95.

To change your mailbox password in the Microsoft Exchange client

  1. From the Tools menu, point to Microsoft Mail Tools, and then click Change Mailbox Password.

  2. In the Change Mailbox Password dialog box, type the old and new passwords, and then verify the new password. Then click OK.

Note: The proceding procedure is for users to change their mailbox passwords on the built-in Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice. If you are using the Microsoft Exchange client with another electronic mail system, the exact procedure will vary.

To require that Microsoft Mail prompt you for a password

  1. In Control Panel, double-click the Mail And Fax icon.

  2. In Services properties, double-click Microsoft Mail.

  3. In Microsoft Mail properties, click the Logon tab.

  4. In the Logon dialog box, make sure the option named When Logging On, Automatically Enter Password is cleared.

Postoffice Directory Structure

A Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice temporarily stores a message until a user retrieves it. It stores only one copy of each mail message, even when a message is addressed to multiple recipients. When sent to multiple recipients, a message has a reference count in it, which is decremented each time a recipient retrieves the message. The message itself is removed when the reference count drops to 0.

All subdirectories within the Microsoft Mail database must be present for it to function correctly. The following table lists the subdirectories and describes their purpose:

WGPO Subdirectory

Description

ATT

Encrypted file attachments.

CAL

Microsoft Schedule+ calendar files.

FOLDERS

Public and private folders (with a filename extension of .FLD) for use by MS-DOS workstations. (Folders on Windows for Workgroups workstations are located in their .MMF files on the workstations.) Notice that public folders are created in this subdirectory, but the Microsoft Exchange client cannot view their contents.

GLB

Global system files for Microsoft Mail. These files contain local user logon information and control files to generate mail files.

HLP

Help files.

INF
TPL

Postoffice-defined templates. INF contains information files and TPL contains templates. ADMIN.INF and ADMIN.TPL contain template information for local postoffice users.

KEY

Index files that contain pointers to header records in the mailbag (.MBG) files.

MAI

Mail messages stored in encrypted form until the recipients' workstations retrieve them.

MBG

Mail headers that point to the mail (.MAI) files. For each file in this directory, there is a matching index (.KEY) file.

MEM

A list of the workgroup postoffice's members.

MMF

Mail message files.

NME

Pointer files for the name alias address lists. ADMIN.NME and ADMINSHD.NME list members of the postoffice address list.

P1

Temporary storage for external programs.

GRP
LOG
USR
XTN

Settings for multiple postoffice configurations. These subdirectories are useful only if you upgrade to the Microsoft Mail Server. In that case, USR is used to list user names and group names for the other network, and XTN is used to list other external information. LOG contains output log files. GRP contains public and private group pointer files.

Setting Up Microsoft Mail on Other Network Servers

You can connect computers running Windows 95 and Microsoft Exchange to a Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice located on a Windows NT 3.5 server, Novell NetWare server, or any other independent network file server. Setting up a Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice on a Windows NT or Novell NetWare server is identical to setting up such a postoffice to work with Windows for Workgroups.

Setting Up a Microsoft Mail Workgroup Postoffice on a Windows NT Server

The following sections explain the concepts and procedures related to setting up and administering Mail in Windows NT.

Creating a Workgroup Postoffice

This section explains how to create a workgroup postoffice (WGPO). The person who creates the WGPO should plan to manage it. Creating the WGPO requires that you complete the following actions:

  • Verify that there is enough disk space on the computer where you will install it.

  • Create the WGPO and an account for the administrator.

  • Share the WGPO so that all users in your workgroup can use it.

Planning for Disk Space

Before creating a WGPO, verify that your computer meets the following requirements.

On the computer where the WGPO will be installed, there must be:

  • 360K of available disk space for an empty postoffice.

  • 16K of available disk space for each user account.

On each user's computer, there must be:

  • Enough available disk space for each user's mailbox, depending on the number and type of messages stored in a mailbox. A typical small mailbox requires about 100K of disk space; a large mailbox can use several megabytes of disk space.

Creating the Postoffice and the Administrator Account

After you verify that the computer has enough disk space to create a WGPO, you can create a WGPO and an administrator account. The administrator account is the first account you create in the WGPO. After you create the administrator account, you can modify it, but you cannot remove it.

This section describes how to create the WGPO on a computer running Windows NT Workstation or Windows NT Server. If you want to create the WGPO on a network server, see Microsoft Windows NT Server 3.5 System Guide.

Important: The computer where you create a WGPO must be turned on at all times so that users can exchange mail.

You should create only one WGPO per workgroup. Only the users connected to the same WGPO can communicate with each other.

To create a WGPO and the administrator account

  1. Start Mail.

    If a WGPO has not been assigned to your workgroup, Mail starts the workgroup postoffice Manager and causes the Welcome To Mail dialog box to appear, as described Microsoft Windows NT Server 3.5 System Guide.

  2. In the Welcome To Mail dialog box, click the Create A New Workgroup Postoffice, and then click OK.

    A message reminds you that there should be only one WGPO in a workgroup and that you will be responsible for managing any new WGPO you create.

  3. To create a new postoffice, choose the Yes button.

    To return to the Welcome To Mail dialog box so that you can connect to an existing postoffice, choose No.

    In the Create Workgroup Postoffice dialog box, select a location for the WGPO. You can create the WGPO either on your hard drive or on a network server:

    • To create the WGPO on your hard drive, select a drive from the Drives box and a directory from the Create WGPO In list, and then click OK.

    • To create the WGPO on a network server, click the Network button, and then select a server and shared directory from the dialog box. Then click OK.

  4. In the administrator Account Details dialog box, fill in the appropriate information to create the administrator account.

    When you fill in this dialog box, type names that are easy to read. You can use extended characters (such as letters with accents), but it is not recommended. Only alphanumeric characters are allowed in the Mailbox and Password boxes. The Postoffice Manager is not case-sensitive; that is, "BLAKER," "BlakeR," and "blaker" are considered to be the same.

    Click OK.

  5. When the message reminds you to share the WGPO directory that you just created, click OK.

Important: If you are not able to create a WGPO, it is probably because you don't have enough disk space or, if you are creating the WGPO on a server, because you don't have write permission on that server. In either case, the solution is to find another location with enough disk space and where you have sufficient privileges to create the WGPO.

Sharing the Workgroup Postoffice

After you create a WGPO, you must share the WGPO directory that contains the data files with all users on the postoffice.

To share a workgroup postoffice on a Windows NT Workstation computer

  1. Open File Manager, and select the WGPO directory.

  2. From the Disk menu, click Share As.

  3. In the Share Name box, type a name for the postoffice. The default name is WGPO.

  4. If you want to, you can enter a comment in the Comment box.

    This comment appears in the Connect Network Drive dialog box.

  5. In the User Limit box, set a limit on the number of users who can connect to the shared directory at the same time.

    By default, no limit is set.

  6. Click the Permissions button and give all members of the postoffice Full Control access to the WGPO share.

    For information about setting permissions, press F1 while the Access Through Share Permissions dialog box is displayed.

  7. In the New Share dialog box, click OK.

    In the File Manager window, the WGPO directory is shown as a shared directory.

To share a WGPO on a Windows NT Server computer

  1. Create a directory on the Windows NT Server computer where the WGPO will be located. This can be a primary or backup domain controller.

  2. Share the directory you just created. Make sure you don't share the parent directory.

  3. Provide full access permissions to the directory.

  4. Create a WGPO as explained in "Creating a Workgroup Postoffice."

After you create a WGPO, the Postoffice Manager command appears on the Mail menu when you start Mail. This command appears only on the computer where you create the WGPO. After you create a WGPO and an administrator account, you can use the Postoffice Manager to manage the WGPO in the following ways:

  • Add users to the WGPO

  • Modify existing user accounts

  • Remove users from the WGPO

  • Manage the disk space where the WGPO is stored

For more information, see Microsoft Windows NT Server 3.5 System Guide.

Setting Up a Microsoft Mail Workgroup Postoffice on a NetWare Server

To use a Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice with a Novell NetWare network, you need to create a WGPO on a NetWare server and grant full trustee rights to the WGPO directory.

To create a WGPO on a NetWare server

  1. Create a directory on the NetWare server where the WGPO will be located.

  2. Grant full trustee rights to this directory.

  3. Use the Control Panel to set up NetWare support in Windows NT, as described Microsoft Windows NT Server 3.5 System Guide.

  4. Restart Windows NT.

  5. Log on to your NetWare server.

  6. Use File Manager to assign a drive letter to the NetWare directory where you want to create the WGPO.

  7. Create the WGPO as explained in "Creating a Workgroup Postoffice."

Accessing a Microsoft Mail Workgroup Postoffice Remotely

With the Microsoft Exchange client and Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice, you can send and receive mail while working away from the office. While offline, you can compose or reply to mail, and then using a modem, telephone line, and Dial-Up Networking, you can establish a remote connection to your organization's network or to your computer, and send and receive mail.

Remote preview of mail.

After you dial in to the network, you can use Microsoft Mail to preview just the headers of new mail messages. That is, you can see who has sent you a message, the subject of the message, the size of the message, and the estimated time it will take to download it. This saves you time and disk space by allowing you not to download unnecessary files. You can also use remote mail when connected to Microsoft Mail on the LAN.

Selective download.

After you retrieve headers, you can mark messages to download or to delete. You can stay on the line after retrieving headers, or call later to download selected messages.

Dial-Up Networking.

The Microsoft Exchange client relies on Dial-Up Networking to connect remotely to postoffices. Because Windows 95 supports the TCP/IP, IPX/SPX, and NetBEUI protocols, you can use Dial-Up Networking to dial into many types of remote access servers to access your postoffice. For information, see Chapter 28, "Dial-Up Networking and Mobile Computing."

Offline use.

You can compose and address mail offline, that is, while disconnected from a network. Messages are queued up in the Microsoft Exchange outbox until the next time you connect. You can also download a copy of the Microsoft Mail Post Office Address List onto a portable computer for addressing messages when working at a remote site.

Scheduled connections.

You can dial in as needed to retrieve mail remotely, or you can set up scheduled connections to dial in at a specific time or at regular intervals.

Modem sharing through TAPI.

Microsoft Exchange uses the Windows 95 telephony applications programming interface (TAPI) to dial and retrieve mail remotely. TAPI allows applications to share a modem by arbitrating modem requests among applications. For example, configuring a modem to receive incoming faxes does not prevent you making a call to download mail. Microsoft Exchange also uses the TAPI Dialing Properties tool to handle multiple locations, hotel dialing prefixes, and credit card calls. For more information, see Chapter 25, "Modems and Communications Tools."

Configuring Microsoft Mail for Remote Access

This section describes how to configure the Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice for remotely accessing the network. Other mail applications might also allow remote access; however, the configuration procedures will differ.

Before you configure Microsoft Mail for remote access, you need to do following:

  • Install Dial-Up Networking.

  • Install a modem.

  • Configure the server on which the postoffice resides for remote access. For information, see Chapter 28, "Dial-Up Networking and Mobile Computing."

To configure Microsoft Mail for remote access, you need to do the following:

  • Define a Dial-Up Networking connection to that postoffice. The Dial-Up Networking New Connection wizard is launched when you define a new connection.

You can set the following remote access features in Microsoft Mail properties:

  • Whether you want remote preview of mail messages

  • When you want to initiate and terminate a remote session

  • Whether you want to schedule an automatic connection time

  • Whether you want to remotely connect to a postoffice with a modem on startup

To configure Microsoft Mail for remote access

  1. In Control Panel, double-click the Mail And Fax icon, click Microsoft Mail, and then click Properties.

    – Or –

    From the Tools menu in Microsoft Exchange, click Services. In the Services dialog box, click Microsoft Mail, and then click Properties.

  2. In Microsoft Mail properties, click the Dial-Up Networking tab and specify a Dial-Up Networking connection for a remote access session. To define a new connection, click Add Entry. The Dial-Up Networking New Connection wizard prompts you for the necessary information.

    Cc751105.rk26_22(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  3. In Microsoft Mail properties, click Connection, and then make sure the option named Remote Using A Modem And Dial-Up Networking is checked.

    Cc751105.rk26_44(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    If you want to work offline to compose or read mail messages before or after making a remote connecting, click Offline. This step should usually be done after logging on to Windows 95.

  4. In Microsoft Mail properties, click the Remote Configuration tab. The option named Use Remote Mail option is selected by default. If you clear this option, Microsoft Mail automatically downloads mail after you have connected.

    Cc751105.rk26_20(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  5. In Microsoft Mail properties, click the Remote Session tab and specify whether you want a remote session to start and end when you open and close Microsoft Mail, or to do so under other conditions.

    Cc751105.rk26_21(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Defining Scheduled Sessions

You can schedule a remote session with Microsoft Mail by specifying a time and connection method. The scheduled sessions are stored in the Microsoft Exchange profile. You can specify up to 16 scheduled sessions, including the following:

  • Sessions at a specific date and time

  • Sessions at prescribed intervals

  • Sessions at specific times on specific days of the week

To define a scheduled session

  1. In Microsoft Mail properties, click the Remote Session tab, and then click the Schedule Item Delivery button.

    – Or –

    In the Tools menu in Microsoft Exchange, click Microsoft Mail, and then click Schedule Remote Mail Delivery.

  2. In the Remote Scheduled Sessions dialog box, click Add.

  3. In the Add Scheduled Session dialog box, click the Dial-Up Networking connection you want to use to establish the remote connection, and then specify the time for a scheduled session. If you choose Every, then you must specify a prescribed time interval.

    Notice that if you click Weekly On, the dialog box contents change so you can specify a date and time.

Selecting Messages to Download

After you review headers for mail messages in remote mail, you can mark messages for selective downloading.

To mark messages in the Microsoft Exchange client

  1. In the Tools menu, click Remote Mail, and then click Microsoft Mail. You can also click other service providers if you have added them to Microsoft Exchange.

  2. In the Remote Mail For Microsoft Mail dialog box, click the messages you want to preview.

  3. Click the Edit menu, and then click Mark To Retrieve.

Technical Notes on the Microsoft Exchange client and MAPI

The Windows 95 messaging subsystem architecture provides power and flexibility. The core of the subsystem is MAPI, an industry standard that enables applications in Windows 95 to interact with many different messaging systems using a single interface. The MAPI architecture defines messaging clients, such as Microsoft Exchange, that interact with various messaging service providers, such as Microsoft Mail and Microsoft Fax, through MAPI, as shown in the following diagram:

Cc751105.rk26_01(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

MAPI divides messaging applications into four components:

  • MAPI subsystem

  • Messaging clients

  • Messaging service providers

  • Messaging systems

MAPI subsystem.

Messaging client applications communicate with service providers through the MAPI subsystem. The client interface interacts with the MAPI subysystem to access MAPI-compliant service providers.

The client interface is one of two major functional interfaces in MAPI; the other is the service provider interface. Messaging applications that require messaging services call functions in the client interface. For example, client applications can call MAPI functions to send, receive, save, and read messages. These functions are sent to the MAPI subsystem, which calls corresponding functions within the provider interface. Service providers then implement service-provider functions to perform the indicated actions for the client. The message spooler queues outgoing messages and routes incoming messages to the proper message store folder.

Messaging clients.

Messaging client applications communicate with MAPI service providers through MAPI interfaces. Messaging client applications can be divided into three general categories:

  • Messaging-aware applications include messaging functions as an added but not required feature, supporting the application's main purpose. An example of a messaging-aware application is Microsoft Word, which can add messaging functions by adding a Send Message command to its File menu.

  • Messaging-enabled applications require some form of messaging functionality in order to meet the application's main purpose. Examples of messaging-enabled applications are the Microsoft Exchange client, Microsoft Mail, and cc:Mail™.

  • Messaging-based workgroup applications go beyond basic electronic mail. They require full access to all the messaging services, including the message store providers, address book providers, and transport providers. Examples of this type of application are Microsoft Schedule+ and the public folders on a Microsoft Exchange Server.

For information about creating a messaging client, see the Win32 Software Development Kit for Windows 95 and Windows NT and the MAPI 1.0 Developer's Guide.

Messaging service providers.

A messaging service provider can include multiple message stores, address books, and messaging transport providers.

  • Message store providers supply message storage, organization, and retrieval facilities for a messaging system.

  • Address book providers supply message addressing and distribution list facilities to the messaging client.

  • Messaging transport providers move messages between messaging clients or messaging stores.

MAPI selects between message store and messaging transport providers, as necessary, and merges the address books presented to it, so the client application sees one combined address book interface. Other vendors can add or replace messaging service providers to enable the Microsoft Exchange client to work with their mail systems.

Upgrading to Microsoft Mail Server

You can upgrade your Windows 95 postoffice to a full Microsoft Mail Server postoffice by using the Microsoft Mail Post Office Upgrade product, which includes software, documentation, and licensing to extend the connectivity of your workgroup. The Microsoft Mail Server postoffice provides the following additional features:

  • Executable and Help files that are not available in the Windows 95 Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice

  • Postoffice support for connections to external postoffices or gateways

  • An ADMIN account not created in Windows 95 mail

  • Default ADMIN.TPL and ADMIN.INF files created in Microsoft Mail Server for adding the predefined extended user information in the workgroup postoffice structure

  • An administration utility (ADMIN.EXE) used to manage and configure the postoffice from any workstation on the network

  • Support files for external postoffice mail transfer through a network or modem

  • A routing program, EXTERNAL.EXE, that routes mail between multiple postoffices and gateways

  • Client software for Windows 3.1, MS-DOS, and Apple® Macintosh® operating systems

The Microsoft Mail Post Office Upgrade product includes the following components:

  • Software to upgrade a workgroup postoffice to a full Microsoft Mail Server postoffice

  • Advanced administration tools, including tools for routing, directory synchronization, network group names, user access privileges, and mail log files, and for deleting old mail and old Mail accounts

  • The EXTERNAL.EXE component, which provides the process for connecting postoffices (by means of a physical or asynchronous link) with the platform for remote access

  • Client software for Windows 3.1, MS-DOS, Macintosh, and IBM® OS/2® Mail.

If you want to set up a Windows 95 Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice to route mail between two or more postoffices, you need to do the following:

  • Purchase the Microsoft Mail Post Office Upgrade for each workgroup postoffice being connected, and then follow the directions provided in the product.

  • Set up a dedicated MS-DOS – based computer to act as the router. It will be running the EXTERNAL.EXE program included in the Post Office Upgrade. Note that this MS-DOS – based computer needs networking software to connect to your postoffice servers. If the postoffices are stored on computers running Windows 95, then this computer needs a copy of Microsoft Windows for Workgroups Add-On for MS-DOS. If your postoffices are on Novell NetWare servers, then the computer running MS-DOS needs Novell client software for MS-DOS.

  • If the postoffices are not on the same LAN, you need a dedicated MS-DOS – based computer to run EXTERNAL.EXE at each site, plus a modem for communicating with the other sites. Note that Microsoft also offers versions of EXTERNAL.EXE that run on IBM OS/2 or Windows NT servers.

Upgrading to Microsoft Exchange Server

A next-generation client-server messaging system known as Microsoft Exchange Server will be available from Microsoft after the first release of Windows 95. Microsoft Exchange Server provides advanced electronic mail, scheduling, groupware applications, and custom application development. Microsoft Exchange Server includes MAPI drivers that extend the capabilities of the Windows 95 Microsoft Exchange client. For example, when Microsoft Exchange is connected to an Exchange Server, you can access a replicated "public folder," create custom forms and shared documents, schedule meetings with others, manage time and tasks, and create custom electronic forms for use in business.

Microsoft Exchange Server will require a computer running Windows NT Server version 3.5 or higher. It also includes a built-in X.400 gateway, plus support for SMTP and for Microsoft Mail for Intel® and Apple Macintosh computers. For more information about Microsoft Exchange Server, contact your Microsoft sales representative.

Microsoft Mail Gateways

Many large organizations have multiple electronic messaging systems. In your organization, you might need to communicate with workgroups or organizations using electronic mail systems other than Windows 95 mail, such as cc:Mail, HP® Openmail, or IBM PROFS®. Microsoft offers a complete line of advanced gateways that provide reliable and sophisticated connectivity between Microsoft Mail Server and virtually any other electronic mail system within your organization.

Gateways ensure that messages always get across to their intended recipients. Addressing messages remains an easy process because people using other mail systems will be listed in your Microsoft Mail global address list — all you need to know is the name of the person you need to communicate with.

Microsoft offers gateways for the following:

X.400

IBM PROFS

SNADS

SMTP

MHS

AT&T Easylink™

MCI MAIL

Fax

 

Note: Microsoft Exchange Server will provide built-in support for X.400 and Internet Mail (SMTP). Users who upgrade to Microsoft Exchange Server will not need to purchase gateways for X.400 or SMTP.

Microsoft gateways support key features such as messaging backboning and message encapsulation.

  • Messaging backboning lets organizations leverage their existing messaging resources by using these systems as high-performance bridges — or messaging backbones — between multiple Microsoft Mail sites.

  • Message encapsulation makes it possible for users to place graphics, charts, sound, and video objects directly in mail messages for richer communication. Moreover, these complex messages can be sent across messaging backbones between distant sites without any loss of data integrity.

To connect a workgroup postoffice to another workgroup postoffice, you must purchase Microsoft Mail Postoffice Upgrade for each postoffice. To connect to another message system, such as X.400 or SMTP, you'll need to install both Microsoft Mail Postoffice Upgrade plus the appropriate gateway software.

Note: You will need at least one dedicated computer to act as the mail router, or the EXTERNAL.EXE program. Some gateways might require additional dedicated computers to connect to host systems. Before proceeding, you should determine your requirements by obtaining gateway datasheets.

Each message system can connect to the workgroup postoffice by using one or more specific gateways. The following table is a partial list of the Microsoft gateways needed for various message systems. If you use one of the message systems listed in this table, you need to purchase the appropriate gateway.

Microsoft Mail Gateways for Message Systems

Message system

Microsoft Mail gateway

ARCOM 400 Swiss PTT

X.400

AT&T® Easylink Services

X.400

AT&T Mail

X.400 or AT&T Gateway

Atlas 400

X.400 (NF mark from Afnor)

Banyan® Mail

MHS or X.400

Beyond Mail

MHS

cc:Mail

X.400, MHS, SMTP, or Office Vision

CompuServe

SMTP or MHS

The Coordinator

MHS

Data General® CEO

X.400

DaVinci Systems™

MHS

DEC™ All-In-1™

X.400, PROFS, SNADS, or SMTP

DEC VMS™ Mail

X.400 or SNADS

Dutch PTT

X.400

Envoy 100/Gemdes

X.400

Fax

Fax

Fischer International EMC2

X.400 or SNADS

Gold 400 UK

X.400

Higgins

MHS

IBM AS/400® Office

SNADS1

IBM System/36™

PROFS/OV

IBM CMS NOTES

PROFS

IBM DISOSS

SNADS

IBM OfficeVision/MVS™

SNADS1

IBM PROFS

PROFS

Computer Sciences Infonet®

X.400

Internet

SMTP

Lotus® Notes®

MHS2

Microsoft Mail for AppleTalk®

Microsoft Mail connection

NCR® Corporation

X.4003

Novell NetWare

MHS

Retix®

X.400

Soft-Switch Central

SNADS

Sprint TeleMail

X.400

Telebox 400 German PTT

X.400

Touch

X.400

Unisys®

X.400

UNIX® SMTP

SMTP4

UUCP

SMTP5

Verimation Memo

SNADS

WANG® Office

MHS, X.400, or PROFS

1 Or through PROFS Distribution Manager if you have a VM host.

2 Or the MS Mail-Notes Gateway by Corporate Software.

3 Or in some cases, the AT&T Gateway

4 SMTP is a part of TCP/IP, not UNIX. You can also have SMTP origination to a VAX or IBM host.

5 Requires connectivity to an SMTP host that acts as a router to UUCP.

Microsoft Gateway to Fax

Using Microsoft Gateway to Fax, you can send several types of items — such as electronic mail messages, text files, and graphic attachments — in a single fax. You can use this product to transmit attachments in any of three different formats: ASCII (text), black and white .PCX, or .DCX (graphics).

Microsoft Gateway to Fax includes the following features:

  • Ability to view incoming fax messages, scaling them to one-eighth of their full-sized view, and rotating pages 90 or 180 degrees.

  • Easy setup and administration.

  • Improved error reporting and support for the high performance GammaFax board, in addition to the Intel® SatisFAXtion® and Connection Coprocessor boards.

  • Verification of file type attachments before transmitting outgoing faxes, ensuring their format is supported by the fax board (ASCII, .PCX, or .DCX). If not, the message is returned to the sender.

Microsoft Mail Gateway to MHS

MHS is a messaging system commonly found in Novell NetWare networks. With Microsoft Mail Gateway to MHS, users can route mail between Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffices and sites using MHS. Encapsulation technology preserves the following across the MHS backbone:

  • Address information

  • OLE objects

  • Binary file attachments

The Microsoft Mail Gateway to MHS includes the following features:

  • Address mail routed to MHS mail users in a familiar Microsoft Mail format.

  • Add individual MHS users to the Microsoft Mail Personal Address Book.

  • Send or receive an unlimited number of attachments in one message and the attachments can be any type of text or binary files.

  • Address MHS users and add them to personal address lists without calling on system administration resources.

  • Support error logging for MHS activity.

  • Provide compatibility with most popular MHS mail systems, including Da Vinci Systems Mail version 1.8, The Coordinator version II, Lotus® cc:Mail version 3.2, and any fully MHS 1.5-compatible system, such as Novell Global Messaging.

Microsoft Mail Gateway to X.400

Microsoft Mail Gateway to X.400 offers transparent backboning using an X.400 network. It links geographically dispersed local area networks into a single mail network. It connects local area networks, mainframes, minicomputers, and microcomputers with X.400. This gateway uses the X.400 gateway to connect to an unlimited number of message transfer agents (MTAs) and functions as a relay between them. This gateway also provides X.400 over an 802.x LAN.

Microsoft Mail Gateway to X.400 includes the following features:

  • Provides OSI LAN connectivity, eliminating the need for costly additional software, hardware, or communications lines.

  • Supports multiple simultaneous active sessions for higher overall throughput and accepts up to two incoming calls while sending a message.

  • Accepts local area and wide area network connections simultaneously for more flexibility.

  • Uses encapsulation, or "tunneling," to exchange messages containing text, multimedia objects, binary files, and directories with other Microsoft Mail users across X.400 backbones without losing information or data integrity.

  • Provides easy configuration and maintenance with a new full-screen utility, which administrators can use to view and print log files and configuration parameters.

  • Assign users arbitrarily — even multiple X.400 addresses — without shutting down the gateway with Advanced Address Mapping.

  • Adds a new address simply by filling out the address template provided. Reads friendly names on mail from other X.400 systems instead of lengthy X.400 O/R addresses. X.400 addresses can be added to the Microsoft Personal Address Book.

Microsoft Mail Gateway to X.400 complies with international X.400 standards in the following ways:

  • Acts as a fully functional CCITT 1984 X.400 MTA and being able to communicate with 1988-compliant MTAs

  • Supports NIST, ENV 41202 (A/311) X.400 profiles

  • Conforms to OSTC

  • Has Afnor Certification

The gateway offers the following bodypart support:

  • Supports bodypart 0 (IA5), including translation tables for Norwegian, German, and Swedish, in addition to standard International Reference Version (IRV) for improved interoperability between European X.400 systems.

  • Supports bodypart 5 (T.61/Teletex) for extended character support.

  • Includes new bodypart 13 support (ISO 6937) to seamlessly carry text in attached files with accented characters not supported through the standard IA5 text character set.

  • Supports binary attachments using bodypart 14, so attachments can be sent to other systems without losing any information.

Microsoft Mail Gateway to SMTP

With Microsoft Mail Gateway to SMTP, users can send and receive Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) messages as easily as Microsoft Mail.

This gateway is easy to maintain. Administrators can use the standard Microsoft Mail administration program to control access to the gateway and to use the full-traffic and error-logging support to isolate problems and optimize routing. Global directory synchronization provided by the product can reduce directory maintenance by automatically updating Microsoft Mail directories with user addresses from other electronic mail systems in the organization.

You can link Microsoft Mail systems transparently using SMTP. Encapsulation lets users send mail messages containing text, binary files, multimedia objects, and directory updates over a messaging backbone without any loss of data integrity. This gateway automatically encapsulates all binary file attachments and messages with extended characters.

Microsoft Mail Gateway to SMTP supports the following major standards:

  • TCP/IP

  • RFC 821 SMTP

  • RFC 822 ARPA Internet Text Messaging Standard

  • RFC 1154 Encoding Header Field for Internet Messages

  • Incoming and outgoing encapsulated attachments

Microsoft Mail IBM PROFS and OfficeVision Gateway

With this gateway, PROFS and OfficeVision users send mail to Microsoft Mail users using standard PROFS and OfficeVision or CMS NOTE addressing formats. Users on PROFS and OfficeVision systems can respond to a message from either system using the Reply option and receive automatic acknowledgment of registered mail delivery.

Microsoft Mail IBM PROFS and OfficeVision Gateway includes the following features:

  • Flexible and reliable architecture to improve connectivity. A mainframe component creates a virtual machine (VM) and identifier for the Remote Spooling Communication Subsystem (RSCS). A standard Network Job Entry (NJE) RSCS link connects Mail to the VM. Multiple LANs can be connected to single or multiple VM nodes.

  • Transparent exchange of scheduling information. When PROFS and OfficeVision users receive meeting requests or meeting notes from Microsoft Schedule+, they appear as familiar PROFS and OfficeVision meeting requests and vice versa. Free and busy times of PROFS and OfficeVision users can be periodically downloaded to the LAN for scheduling purposes.

  • Extensive file support between systems to help mainframe and personal computer users work together more effectively. VM users can send files to Microsoft Mail users using SENDFILE, DISK DUMP, PUNCH, and PRINT formats. In addition, Microsoft Mail attachments appear as files in the VM user's Virtual READER.

  • Generic Routing Facility (GRF) to make the gateway easy to administer and troubleshoot. All Microsoft Mail users appear to PROFS and OfficeVision users as if they are on a single VM node. (The ability to define a VM node per Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice still exists, even if GRF is being used.) Using message size restrictions, administrators can limit the size of messages transmitted.

  • Distribution Manager adds document-exchange features and links Microsoft Mail to a variety of host systems. It offers the ability to exchange messages and documents with other messaging systems that use the Document Interchange Architecture (ZIP packet protocol), such as OfficeVision/MVS, OfficeVision/400™, PS/CICS, System/36, remote PROFS and OfficeVision using DISOSS, and (through gateways) DEC® All-In-1, WANG Office, and Verimation Memo.

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