Export (0) Print
Expand All

Dial-Up Networking and Mobile Computing: The Basics

Archived content. No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

This chapter describes how to use Dial-Up Networking to access a network from a remote location. It also describes how other Windows 95 mobile computing tools, such as Briefcase and Direct Cable Connection, can be used to connect to desktop computers or the network.

ImportantThe dial-up server capabilities discussed in this chapter are only available if you purchase Microsoft Plus! for Windows 95. For more information contact your Microsoft sales representative.

Dial-Up Networking allows mobile users to work as if they are connected directly to the network. Establishing a network connection by using Dial-Up Networking works the same as establishing a network connection in the office — you just double-click a network resource.

Cc751107.rk28_26(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

The Windows 95 Dial-Up Networking subsystem allows mobile users to designate a computer running Windows 95 as a dial-up client or server. From a remote site, you can use Dial-Up Networking to connect the dial-up client to a Windows 95 dial-up server or other remote access servers, such as Shiva® NetModem or LanRover, Novell® NetWare® Connect, and Windows NT version 3.1 or 3.5 Remote Access Server (RAS). If the client and server are running the same network protocols, the dial-up client can connect to the network to access its resources.

Notice that a Microsoft Windows NT Client Access License is required if the computer will be connecting to servers running Windows NT Server. For information, see Chapter 8, "Windows 95 on Microsoft Networks" or contact your Microsoft reseller.

Note: Dial-up server capabilities are only available if you purchase Microsoft Plus! for Windows 95. For information, please contact your Microsoft sales representative.

Windows 95 provides the following tools to help users stay as functional as possible with the limited resources of a mobile site.

Remote mail.

With the Microsoft Exchange client and a Microsoft Mail workgroup postoffice, mobile users can dial in to the network to send and receive electronic mail, without requiring any additional client software or a special gateway server. To send and receive mail, mobile users make a Dial-Up Networking connection to another computer running Windows 95 to another remote access server connected to their workgroup postoffice. After connecting, they use Microsoft Exchange to send and receive their mail.

Direct Cable Connection.

This tool allows you to quickly and easily establish a connection between two computers by using a parallel cable or null-modem serial cable. After the connection is established, Direct Cable Connection facilitates the transfer of files from the host computer to the guest computer. The host can act as a gateway to a IPX/SPX or NetBEUI network for the guest.

Windows 95 Briefcase.

This file synchronization tool minimizes the task of keeping track of the relationships between files on a portable computer and on a desktop computer. With Briefcase, a user can simultaneously update related files.

Deferred printing.

Windows 95 supports deferred printing, which allows mobile users to generate print jobs when they are not connected to a printer. The print jobs are stored until a printer becomes available. Windows 95 detects the printer connection and automatically spools the print jobs in the background.

Dial-Up tools from other vendors.

This chapter describes how to use Dial-Up Networking with Windows NT, Shiva, and NetWare remote access servers. For information about using Windows 95 Dial-Up Networking to dial in to other remote access servers, or using other remote access software to dial in to Windows 95, contact your network vendor or software supplier.

Dial-Up Networking and Mobile Computing: The Issues

To run Dial-Up Networking, the computer must have a protected-mode client, that is, one that can use the Windows 95 protected-mode transports, or others that use NDIS and provide appropriate PPP drivers. This means that you cannot use a Novell real-mode client over Dial-Up Networking, but you can use Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks.

To use Dial-Up Networking to connect to the network, you need the following hardware:

  • One or more compatible modems as described in Chapter 25, "Modems and Communications Tools."

  • Enough available hard disk space to install Dial-Up Networking. Currently, about 2 to 3 MB of free disk space is required to install the client and server portions of Dial-Up Networking.

To use Dial-Up Networking to connect to the network, you will need to decide the following:

  • Which computers on the network will function as Windows 95 dial-up servers.

  • What kind of remote access server, other than a Windows 95 dial-up server, remote users will connect to. For example, a Windows 95 dial-up server allows only one remote connection at a time, whereas a Windows NT 3.5 remote access server allows 256 connections. Depending on the size and needs of your network, you might configure a Windows 95 dial-up client to connect to a Windows NT 3.5 server or other remote access server. For a list of the types of remote access servers that a Windows 95 dial-up client can be configured to connect to, see "Dial-Up Clients and Servers" later in this chapter.

  • What type of connection protocol your dial-up client will use to connect to the remote access server. Windows 95 provides support for Point-to-Point protocol (PPP), RAS for Windows for Workgroups 3.11 and Windows NT 3.1, NetWare Connect, and Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP). The dial-up client and the remote access server must both be running the same connection protocol. For a complete list of protocol types, see "Connection Protocols" later in this chapter.

  • What kind of local area network protocol to install on the dial-up client and server to connect the client to the network. Windows 95 supports IPX/SPX, Microsoft TCP/IP, and Microsoft NetBEUI protocols. For more information about network protocols and Dial-Up Networking, see "Local Area Network Protocols" later in this chapter.

  • Whether you want to share the resources of a Windows 95 dial-up server. To enable a dial-up client to access files and printing capabilities of a dial-up server, you must install File and Printer Sharing services in the Network option in Control Panel, and also enable Allow Caller Access when configuring either user-level or share-level security on the dial-up server. For more information, see "Configuring a Windows 95 Dial-Up Server" later in this chapter and "Using Security with Dial-Up Networking" later in this chapter.

  • What level of security you need for dial-up servers. You can enable either user-level or share-level security on a Windows 95 dial-up server. Both types of security provide password protection for the dial-up process, but do not support callback authentication. A Windows 95 dial-up client does support callback authentication when connected to other types of remote access servers, such as Windows NT Server, that supports callback authentication. For more information, see "Using Security with Dial-Up Networking" later in this chapter.

  • Whether you need additional security. Windows 95 supports hardware security tools from other vendors for dial-up access, plus authentication protocols such as CHAP and SPAP.

Overview of Dial-Up Networking

With Dial-Up Networking, you can connect from a remote site to a computer that has been configured as a remote access server, or connect to a network through the remote access server. For example, if you connect to a Windows 95 dial-up server, you can share its resources (if the Microsoft File and Printer Sharing service has been enabled), or you can use it as a gateway to a network that is running IPX/SPX and NetBEUI network protocols. As shown in the following figure a Windows 95 dial-up client can connect to a wide variety of networks because support is included for a variety of connection and network protocols.

Cc751107.rk28_27(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Different remote access servers provide different security systems to protect access to a network. The Windows 95 dial-up server uses pass-through user-level or share-level security as described in "Using Security with Dial-Up Networking" later in this chapter.

You can use system policies and other methods to disable dial-in access so users cannot dial in to a particular desktop computer. For information, see "Disabling Dial-Up Server Support" later in this chapter. If the user chooses to dial in to a host system such as Windows NT, Shiva NetModem or LanRover, or NetWare Connect, Windows 95 offers full connectivity.

Dial-Up Networking uses the Windows 95 communications architecture to communicate through a modem to a network. It initializes the modem, determines device status, and dials the phone number by using TAPI and the Unimodem driver. For more information, see Chapter 24, "Introduction to Windows 95 Communications." For more information, "HowDial-Up Networking Works" later in this chapter.

A Windows 95 Dial-Up Networking configuration includes these components, as described in the following sections:

  • Dial-Up clients and servers

  • Connection Protocols

  • Network (LAN) protocols and network servers

  • Security options

Dial-Up Clients and Servers

With Dial-Up Networking, you can configure a remote computer running Windows 95 as a dial-up client to dial in to a Windows 95 dial-up server or other remote access servers. A dial-up client, running the appropriate connection protocol, can connect to many types of remote access servers, including the following:

  • Windows 95 dial-up server

  • Windows NT Workstation

  • Windows NT 3.1 or later

  • Windows for Workgroups 3.11

  • NetWare Connect

  • Shiva LanRover and other dial-up routers

  • Any UNIX® server that runs SLIP or PPP

Connection Protocols

Connection protocols control the transmission of data over the wide-area network (WAN). A Windows 95 dial-up client can use the following connection protocols to connect to a remote access server:

  • Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)

  • Novell NetWare Connect

  • Windows NT 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups RAS (Asynchronous NetBEUI)

  • Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP)

The type of connection protocol you choose depends on the server you are connecting to. Some connection protocols support a subset of the common network protocols. For example, PPP allows you to connect to a network server or a computer running Windows 95 with TCP/IP, IPX/SPX-compatible, or NetBEUI network protocols.

The following is a summary of connection protocols.

Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP).

PPP has become the standard for remote access. Microsoft recommends that you use PPP because of its flexibility and its role as an industry standard, and for future flexibility with client and server hardware and software. If a dial-up client is running PPP, it can connect to a network running IPX, TCP/IP, or NetBEUI protocols. PPP is the default protocol for the Microsoft Dial-Up adapter. For more information, see "PPP Dial-Up Sequence" later in this chapter.

Novell NetWare Connect.

NetWare Connect is a proprietary connection protocol. It allows a computer running Windows 95 to directly connect to a NetWare Connect server and, if running a NetWare-compatible network client, connect to NetWare servers. Windows 95 can only act as a client for connecting to a NetWare Connect server. NetWare Connect clients themselves cannot connect to a Windows 95 dial-up server directly through dial-up.

RAS for Windows NT 3.1 and Windows for Workgroups 3.11 (Asynchronous NetBEUI).

This protocol is used to connect computers running Windows 95 to remote access servers running Windows NT 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups 3.11, or to connect computers running Windows for Workgroups 3.11 or Windows NT 3.1 to a Windows 95 dial-up server. The remote access server must be running NetBEUI.

Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP).

SLIP is an older remote access standard that is typically used by UNIX remote access servers. Use SLIP only if your site has a UNIX system configured as a SLIP server for Internet connections. The remote access server must be running TCP/IP.

Windows 95 does not provide SLIP server capabilities; SLIP is for dial-out only. Support for SLIP can be found on the Windows 95 compact disc.

Local Area Network Protocols

Windows 95 makes it easy to configure dial-up clients and servers to access a network. When you install Dial-Up Networking, any protocols already installed on the computer are automatically enabled for Dial-Up Networking. Windows 95 includes support for TCP/IP, IPX/SPX, and NetBEUI network protocols. To configure the Windows 95 dial-up server to act as a gateway to a network, you must ensure that it and the dial-up client are running the same network (LAN) protocol as your existing network. A Windows 95 dial-up server can act as a gateway only to a network running IPX/SPX and NetBEUI protocols.

The following table presents the combinations of protocols you can use to run either Windows Sockets or NetBIOS applications on a network.

Connection protocols

Network protocols (APIs)

NetWare Connect

IPX/SPX (Windows Sockets/NETBIOS)

PPP

TCP/IP (Windows Sockets/NetBIOS)
IPX/SPX (Windows Sockets/NetBIOS)
NetBEUI (NetBIOS)

RAS for Windows NT 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups 3.11

NetBEUI (NetBIOS)

SLIP

TCP/IP (Windows Sockets/NetBIOS)

Note: You do not need to install any network protocols when you install Dial-Up Networking; NetBEUI and the IPX/SPX-compatible protocol are automatically installed and bound to the Microsoft Dial-Up adapter. You can add protocols by using the Network option in Control Panel.

A Windows 95 dial-up server cannot act as a gateway to SLIP, TCP/IP, or IPX (without NetBEUI) networks, as shown in the following graphic.

Cc751107.rk28_51(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

A Windows 95 dial-up server configured with TCP/IP over PPP cannot act as a gateway to a TCP/IP network.

Note: If a Windows 95 dial-up server is running TCP/IP and NetBIOS over TCP/IP, then the dial-up client can access NetBIOS and TCP/IP resource on the network.

Installing Dial-Up Networking

When you install Dial-Up Networking, you are installing all the components you need to connect to a network. For example, installing Dial-Up Networking also installs the Microsoft Dial-Up adapter, and connection and network protocols.

Before you dial up a remote connection using a modem and Dial-Up Networking, you need to make sure all the appropriate network protocols are bound to the Microsoft Dial-Up adapter or a network adapter. The easiest way to install Dial-Up Networking is during installation of Windows 95. If you didn't choose it during Setup, you can install it afterward.

Note: If you are currently using Windows for Workgroups 3.11 with RAS, Dial-Up Networking will automatically be installed when you upgrade to Windows 95.

To install Dial-Up Networking after you run Setup

  1. In the Add/Remove Programs Option in Control Panel, click the Windows Setup tab.

  2. In the Components list, click Communications, and then click the Details button.

  3. In the Communications dialog box, click Dial-Up Networking, and then click OK.

After it is installed a folder for Dial-Up Networking appears in My Computer. To run Dial-Up Networking, double-click the folder.

Configuring Dial-Up Networking Clients and Servers

Configuring computers as Dial-Up Networking clients or servers consists of four tasks:

  • Installing the appropriate network protocols and making sure they are bound to the Microsoft Dial-Up adapter. All network protocols installed before you install Dial-Up Networking are automatically bound to the Microsoft Dial-Up adapter when you install Dial-Up Networking.

  • Running the Make New Connection wizard in Dial-Up Networking to set up a connection to a remote access server for the dial-up client. If you have not yet installed a modem, the wizard guides you through installing one.

  • Configuring the dial-up client in Dial-Up Networking by selecting the remote access server type it will connect to, and by choosing whether to log on to the network after connecting to the remote access server. Selecting the server type automatically enables the correct connection protocol, such as PPP or SLIP.

  • Optionally, installing dial-up server capabilities and configuring a computer running Windows 95 as a dial-up server in the Dial-Up Server menu in Dial-Up Networking.

Installing Protocols

Windows 95 automatically binds the default network protocols to the Microsoft Dial-Up adapter when you install Dial-Up Networking. For most networks, these typically are the IPX/SPX-compatible and NetBEUI protocols. You can install other network protocols, such as TCP/IP, by using the Networks option in Control Panel. For information about adding protocols, see Chapter 12, "Network Technical Discussion."

To make sure the correct protocols are bound to the Microsoft Dial Up adapter or other network adapter

  • In the Network option in Control Panel, each protocol (in the Components list box) that is bound to the Microsoft Dial-Up adapter will show an arrow pointing to the adapter.

Defining a Dial-Up Networking Connection

Windows 95 guides you through making a new remote connection when you first run Dial-Up Networking. Before creating a new Dial-Up Networking connection, you should install a modem. The Make New Connection wizard prompts you to do so, or you can install it separately by using the Install New Modem wizard in the Modems option in Control Panel. For information, see Chapter 25, "Modems and Communications Tools."

To create a Dial-Up Networking connection using the Make New Connection wizard

  1. From My Computer, double-click the Dial-Up Networking folder.

  2. In the Dial-Up Networking window, double-click the Make New Connection icon.

  3. The Make New Connection wizard prompts you for the information needed to define a connection, including a name for the computer you are dialing, modem type, area code, telephone number, and country code.

    The new icon for your connection appears in the Dial-Up Networking window. You need to provide this information only once for each connection you define.

Note: You can adjust the dialing string in Dialing Properties, which is accessible from the Connect To dialog box that appears when you double-click a connection icon.

When a user connects to a remote server, a terminal window can be displayed to support an interactive logon session with the server. After a connection is established, remote network access becomes transparent to the user.

To make sure a network connection has been established

  • Double-click Network Neighborhood, click Map Network Drive, and then type a path name to a network server.

To display a terminal window before or after dialing

  1. Click a connection icon, click the File menu, and then click Properties.

  2. In General properties, click the Configure button, and then click the Options tab.

  3. In the Options dialog box, click the option named Bring Up Terminal Window Before Dialing or the option named Bring Up Terminal Window After Dialing.

Tip for Using Dialing Properties to Change Location Information

Dial-Up Networking is a TAPI-enabled application. This means that Dial-Up Networking can offload the work of matching the correct phone dialing string from the location to the TAPI components designed for that role. When you attempt a Dial-Up Networking connection, you can choose to edit your calling location by using Dialing Properties.

With Dialing Properties, you can specify area code, special numbers needed to reach an outside line, and calling card information you may need for the connection number. The Windows 95 TAPI services will then automatically adjust the dial string it sends to your modem. For more information, see Chapter 25, "Modems and Communications Tools."

The configurations you set up for each connection are stored in the Registry under

Hkey_Current_User \RemoteAccess \AddressesMy Connection 

You can predefine Dial-Up Networking connections for users by including them as part of system policies. If you enable user profile, different users sharing the same computer can use separate dialing configurations. For more information, see Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

Configuring a Windows 95 Dial-Up Client

You configure the Windows 95 dial-up client for each dial-in connection you define in Dial-Up Networking. Configuration consists of selecting the remote access server type to connect to and choosing whether to access the network after connecting to the remote access server. In addition, you can require an encrypted password to connect to a remote access server and check to see if the correct network protocols are installed on the dial-up client. Windows 95 automatically selects the appropriate connection protocol when you select the remote access server type for each Dial-Up Networking connection.

Windows 95 supports only SLIP as a client. The SLIP client software is provided on the Windows 95 compact disc.

To install SLIP

  1. In Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel, click the Windows Setup tab, and then click the Have Disk button.

  2. In the Install From Disk dialog box, click the Browse button, and then type the path name to \ADMIN\APPTOOLS\SLIP\RNAPLUS.INF.

  3. In the Have Disk dialog box, click UNIX Connection For Dial-Up Networking, and then click Install.

To configure the Windows 95 dial-up client

  1. In Dial-Up Networking, right-click a connection icon, and then click Properties.

  2. In General properties, click the Server Type button.

    rk28_29

  3. In the Server Types dialog box, select the correct remote access server type.

    This server type

    Connects to

    PPP: Windows 95, Windows NT 3.5, Internet

    This is the default; selecting this allows Windows 95 to automatically detect and connect to other remote access servers that are running TCP/IP, NetBEUI, or IPX/SPX over PPP

    NRN: NetWare Connect

    Novell NetWare Connect running IPX/SPX over NetWare Connect

    Windows for Workgroups and Windows NT 3.1

    Windows 95 dial-up server; Windows NT version 3.1 or 3.5; Windows for Workgroups version 3.11 running NetBEUI over RAS

    SLIP: UNIX Connection

    Any SLIP server over TCP/IP

    CSLIP: UNIX Connection with IP Header Compression

    Any SLIP server over TCP/IP that supports IP header compression

  4. Optionally, click the option named Log On To Network to allow access to the network after connecting to the remote access server. Notice that this option is selected by default.

    If you choose this option, Dial-Up Networking attempts to log you on to the network using the user name and password you typed when you logged on to Windows 95. The logon prompt differs depending on whether the computer is running Client for Microsoft Networks or Client for NetWare Networks, and whether your password for the network is the same as your Windows 95 password. For more information, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

  5. Optionally, click the option named Enable Software Compression to compress information before sending it.

  6. Optionally, click the option named Require Encrypted Password to require the user to type in an encrypted password before accessing the dial-up server. For more information, see "Using Security with Dial-Up Networking" later in this chapter.

    Tip If users are having trouble making remote access connections, check to see if a specific server type was selected. When a specific connection type is selected, Windows 95 will not attempt to connect using any other server type.

  7. Optionally, click TCP/IP settings if you are configuring a connection to the Internet. For information, see Chapter 30, "Internet Access"

Making a Dial-Up Networking Connection

After you have defined a remote connection by using the Make New Connection wizard, you can make a connection in two ways:

  • Double-click a connection icon in Dial-Up Networking.

  • Connect to a remote network resource when you are working in an application other than Dial-Up Networking. If you cannot find the resource on the current network, Windows 95 responds by automatically activating Dial-Up Networking.

After you establish or end a connection, you do not need to restart the computer or restart Windows 95. When you attempt to perform the following tasks, Windows 95 starts Dial-Up Networking:

  • When you try to access a network resource and your computer is not connected to any network

  • When your application specifies a UNC name (which uses the form \\servername\sharename) that can't be accessed by using the local area network

    When you double-click a link that points to a remote network object; for example:

    • When an application attempts to connect to a file on a network server

    • When you reconnect to a remote OLE object

When you choose a remote connection, Windows 95 retrieves the server information from the addresses stored in the Registry. If the information is not available, you are asked to select a server from the connection icons in Dial-Up Networking, or to type a new server name.

If Dial-Up Networking cannot find the network resource, it displays a net error message. If the connection is successful, Windows 95 remembers the connection for future use.

You can disable the prompt that asks if you want to use Dial-Up Networking when you are attempting to connect to a network resource.

To disable the Dial-Up Networking prompt

  1. In Dial-Up Networking, click the Connection menu, and then click Settings.

  2. Click the option named Don't Prompt To Use Dial-Up Networking.

Configuring a Windows 95 Dial-Up Server

With Dial-Up Networking, you can configure a computer running Windows 95 to be a remote access server for dial-up clients running Windows 95, Windows for Workgroups, or Windows 3.1. The Windows 95 dial-up server can act as a gateway to an IPX/SPX or NetBEUI network, or as a server to the client, sharing its file and printing resources with one dial-up client at a time.

Note: Dial-up server capabilities are only available if you purchase the Microsoft Plus! for Windows 95. For information, please contact your Microsoft sales representative.

A Windows 95 dial-up server differs from the Windows NT 3.5 dial up server in the following ways:

  • Windows NT 3.5 Server can act as an IP router, and Windows 95 cannot. IP router capabilities permit accessing a TCP/IP network, such as the global Internet. Windows 95 provides all the protocols you need to connect to the Internet, but cannot act as an IP router. Consequently, you need to connect a computer running Windows 95 to a server with IP router capabilities in order to connect to the Internet.

  • Windows NT 3.5 supports 256 remote connections, whereas Windows 95 provides one remote connection.

  • Windows NT 3.5 allows you to remotely administer the remote access server, whereas Windows 95 requires you to use system policies to remotely administer the server. For more information about system policies, see Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

The Windows 95 dial-up server supports the following remote access clients:

  • Windows 95 dial-up client

  • Windows for Workgroups

  • Windows 3.1 RAS client

  • Clients running PPP

A Windows 95 dial-up server with the appropriate network protocols installed can act as a NetBIOS gateway, as illustrated in the following graphic.

Cc751107.rk28_47(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

For more information about connectivity options of a Windows 95 dial-up server, see "Overview of Dial-Up Networking" earlier in this chapter.

Configuring a computer running Windows 95 to be a dial-up server consists of the following steps:

  • Enabling File and Printer Sharing services for either Microsoft or NetWare networks on the dial-up server. For information, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

  • Enabling user-level or share-level security on the dial-up server. For information, see "Using Security with Dial-Up Networking" later in this chapter.

  • Configuring dial-up server capabilities in Dial-Up Networking. For information, see the following procedure.

To configure a computer as a dial-up server

  1. From the Connections menu in the Dial-Up Networking, click the Connections menu, and then click Dial-Up Server.

  2. In the Dial-Up Server dialog box, click Allow Caller Access. This dialog box will look different depending on whether you have enabled user-level or share-level security for the computer.

  3. Optionally, click Change Password to define a call-in password for Dial-Up Networking clients, and then click OK.

    – Or –

    If you are using user-level security for peer resource sharing, select the users who have access to this dial-up server. Then click OK.

  4. Click the Server Type button and then select the server type.

    If you select the Default server type, the dial-up server will automatically start in PPP mode for incoming calls and switch to RAS for Windows NT 3.1 and Windows for Workgroups mode if the PPP negotiation fails. For information on PPP negotiation, see "PPP Dial-Up Sequence" later in this chapter.

  5. Click OK, and the dial-up server will be ready to answer incoming calls.

Notice that changes to the server type do not apply to a connection that is currently open. Changes will apply to any future connections made to this computer.

To disconnect any users who are currently connected to this computer through Dial-Up Networking

  • In the Dial-Up Server dialog box, click the Disconnect User button.

Note: The Windows 95 Dial-Up Server can use only one modem at a time. You can enable caller access on multiple modems at any one time, but only one modem can be connected.

Disabling Dial-Up Server Support

You can prevent users from remotely accessing computers even if a remote connection has been previously established. You can restrict access by making direct changes to a computer's dial-up support capabilities or by using System Policy Editor to create a policy file.

To disable the Dial-Up Server on a single computer

  1. From the Connections menu in the Dial-Up Networking window, click Dial-Up Server.

  2. In the Dial-Up Server dialog box, click the option named No Caller Access.

You can disable dial-up support on each computer or on a system-wide basis by using System Policy Editor to change a single computer's Registry or to define policies that can be shared by multiple computers.

To disable dial-up support by using System Policy Editor, and enable the option named Disable Dial-in.

The Dial-Up Server menu option still appears on the Connections menu after dial-up support has been disabled, but no dialog box for setting up the dial-up server will appear. For more information, see Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

Using Security with Dial-Up Networking

Dial-Up Networking gives you the option of requiring a password to connect to the remote access server, depending on whether the Windows 95 dial-up server is protected with share-level or user-level security.

  • Share-level security assigns a password to the Windows 95 dial-up server. When users dial in, they must provide the password before they can gain access to the server. After the connection is established, users can browse the resources on the dial-up server, subject to whatever level of security has been applied to them. Users can also log on to the network after connecting to the dial-up server if logging on to the network is enabled on the dial-up client. Because users can distribute passwords, this method is less secure than user-level security.

  • User-level security restricts access to a network resource until a security provider, such as a Windows NT domain controller or a NetWare server, authenticates the request. You can require that a user's logon password to a remote access server be the same as the network and Windows 95 logon passwords. For more information, see Chapter 14, "Security."

  • With user-level security, when the user accesses shared resources on the dial-up server, Windows 95 controls what rights a user has to the shared resources, such as whether the user has read-only access or full access to files. Access rights are specified in the sharing properties for each resource protected by user-level security. For more information, see Chapter 14, "Security."

To configure the dial-up server to use user-level security

  1. In the Network option in Control Panel, enable File and Printer Sharing services for Microsoft or NetWare networks and enable user-level security in Access Control properties. For more information, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing."

  2. In Dial-Up Networking, click the Connections menu, and then click Dial-Up Server.

  3. In the Dial-Up Server properties, click the option named Allow Caller Access, and then click Add.

  4. In the Add Users dialog box, specify the users who will have permission to access the dial-up server, and then click OK.

  5. In the Dial-Up Server properties, click the Server Type button, and make sure Require Encrypted Password is checked if your Dial-Up client supports encrypted passwords.

    Clicking the Require Encrypted Password option requires the client to send an encrypted as opposed to a text password. Some clients support only text passwords; however, encrypted passwords are preferred. Clearing this option doesn't disable password protection.

To configure the dial-up server to use share-level security

  1. Disable user-level security, if it is enabled, by clicking the Access Control tab in the Network option in Control Panel, or by using System Policy Editor to edit the Registry. For information, see Chapter 15, "User Profiles and System Policies."

  2. In the Network option in Control Panel, enable File and Printer Sharing services for Microsoft Networks and enable share-level security by clicking the Access Control tab. For information, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing." Notice that share-level security is not available on NetWare networks.

  3. From the Connections menu in Dial-Up Networking, click Dial-Up Server.

  4. In the Dial-Up Server dialog box, click Allow Caller Access, and then click Change Password to provide password protection for the Dial-Up server.

  5. Optionally, to require password encryption, click the Server Type buttion.

  6. In the Server Types dialog box, make sure Require Encrypted Password is checked, and then click OK.

Using Software and Hardware Compression to Transfer Data

To improve the throughput and transfer times when you use Dial-Up Networking, Windows 95 supports dynamic compression of information when you are connected to another computer that also understands compression — for example, a computer running Windows 95 or Windows NT.

You can choose to use either software compression (specified through the Dial-Up Server dialog box) or hardware compression. Software compression is performed by the remote access software; hardware compression is performed by the modem.

Choosing software compression specifies that your computer will try to compress information before sending it. Compression will occur only if the computer you are connecting to is using a compatible compression program.

Note: Software compression is supported only in PPP mode, not in RAS, NetWare Connect, or SLIP modes. Software compression is enabled by default in PPP mode and is preferred over hardware compression because it reduces the amount of information that needs to be transmitted to the modem.

To choose software compression

  1. From the Dial-Up Networking Connections menu, click Dial-Up Server.

  2. In the Dial-Up Server dialog box, click the Server Type button.

  3. In the Server Types dialog box, make sure the Enable Software Compression is checked.

Note: The software compression option is not available when you are connecting to a Windows NT 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups 3.1 remote access server.

Hardware compression is available on most newer modems at higher connection speeds. For example, V.42bis is an industry standard that allows modems to do data compression on all the data sent through them.

To choose hardware compression

  1. In the Modems option in Control Panel, click the Properties button, and then click the Connection tab.

  2. In the Connection dialog box, click the Advanced button and then click use Error Control, and Compress Data.

You should leave both software and hardware compression enabled unless you are certain that the server supports software compression. When you use either type of compression on data that is already compressed, you won't see any transfer time improvement. If the computer you are connecting to doesn't support compression, these settings are ignored and data is sent uncompressed over the wire.

Connecting to a Windows NT Remote Access Server

Connecting to a Windows NT remote access server is the same as connecting to a Windows 95 Dial-Up Networking server. All you need is the phone number of the Windows NT server when creating a connection. Dial-Up Networking negotiates the proper protocols and server connection type. You don't need to specify a default server type.

Windows NT 3.5 Server supports PPP, RAS, and SLIP clients. PPP is the recommended protocol. Windows NT 3.5 supports IPX/SPX, NetBEUI, and TCP/IP network protocols and can function as a NETBIOS gateway, IPX router, and IP router simultaneously. Windows NT 3.5 is not a SLIP server.

Note: Windows NT 3.1 supports only the RAS protocol, which is a proprietary protocol that supports only NetBEUI. It is a fast connection type, but does not allow for multiple protocols over the connection. RAS in Windows NT 3.1 cannot support the IPX/SPX or TCP/IP protocols.

Microsoft recommends that you upgrade from Windows NT Remote Access Server to Windows NT Server 3.5, which provides many additional benefits, including PPP support.

A Windows NT 3.1 or 3.5 remote access server provides several features that a Dial-Up Networking server does not. For an explanation of these differences, see "Configuring a Windows 95 Dial-Up Server" earlier in this chapter.

Configuring a Windows NT Server for Windows 95 Dial-Up Clients

To configure a Windows NT 3.5 Server so that Windows 95 dial-up clients can remotely access it, you need to install and configure RAS.

You must be logged on as a member of the Administrators group to install and configure RAS. It can be installed during Custom Setup of Windows NT or afterward. During Express Setup, if there is not a network card in a computer, the user is given the option to install RAS.

RAS installation varies slightly depending on which network protocols are installed. If you use TCP/IP or IPX/SPX protocol with RAS, you should install the protocol before you install RAS, although selecting a protocol that is not installed causes that protocol to be installed at the conclusion of RAS Setup. For information about installing either protocol, see the Windows NT Installation Guide.

To install RAS on a computer running Windows NT 3.5 Server

  1. In the Network option in Control Panel in Windows NT 3.5, click the Network Settings dialog box, and then click Add Software.

  2. In the Network Software drop-down list, click Remote Access Service, and then click the Continue button.

  3. Type the path name to the distribution files, and click OK.

    RAS files are copied to the computer.

  4. In the Add Port dialog box, click the port you intend to use for remote access, and then click OK.

    If you have successfully installed a multiport adapter, ISDN card, X.25 card, or other device, it should appear in this list.

  5. In the RAS Auto Detection dialog box, click OK to allow RAS to automatically detect the modem connected to the port, or click Cancel to manually select a modem.

    Occasionally, when attempting to detect a modem, a dialog box appears, prompting you to select a modem from a short list. This occurs only when RAS Setup cannot distinguish between two or more modems.

  6. In the Configure Port dialog box, click a modem if RAS did not detect one, and then click OK. Only supported modems are listed.

    If you are adding a port after initial RAS installation, you can use the Detect button to automatically detect the modem connected to the new port.

  7. In the Port Usage box, you define whether the port will be for dial-out or dial-in use. Clicking the Dial Out Only option configures the computer as a RAS client. Clicking the Receive Calls Only option configures the computer as a RAS server. Clicking both options allows the computer to be a dial-out client and dial-out server; however, the computer cannot be both at the same time.

  8. To configure settings specific to the device attached to the port, click the device, and then click the Settings button. The default settings are usually ideal. Click OK.

  9. In the Remote Access Setup dialog box, configure RAS network settings by clicking the Network button. You can also reconfigure the port, if necessary, by clicking it, and then clicking buttons at the bottom of the port dialog box.

Before users can use RAS to remotely connect to Windows NT, you must grant them remote access permissions.

To grant Remote Access permission to users

  1. Double-click the Remote Access Admin icon to start the Administrators utility.

  2. Set the focus on the server or domain on which you want to set permissions. To set the focus, see the Remote Access Admin online Help.

  3. From the Users menu, click Permissions.

  4. In the Remote Access Permissions dialog box, click the Help button for further instructions.

Note: Microsoft does not recommend granting guest accounts dial-in permission. If you do, be sure to assign a password to the guest account.

Connecting to a Novell NetWare Connect Server

Windows 95 Dial-Up Networking supports connecting to Novell NetWare resources in two ways:

  • Connecting directly to a Novell NetWare Connect server

  • Using a computer running Windows 95 or Windows NT 3.5 as a gateway into a local area network, where NetWare servers are connected

NetWare Connect allows a Windows 95 client to dial in to a NetWare server running NetWare Connect 1.0.

Note: Windows 95 can act only as a client for connecting to a NetWare Connect server. NetWare Connect clients themselves cannot dial up a Windows 95 Dial-Up Server.

The NetWare Connect connection type allows a Windows 95 client to connect directly to a NetWare Connect server and to connect to NetWare servers on the connected local area network.

To use Dial-Up Networking to connect to a NetWare Connect server, you must specify NetWare Connect as the server type in the properties for a Dial-Up Networking connection. You also need to use the Network option in Control Panel to make sure the following are enabled on a Windows 95 dial-up client or server:

  • Microsoft Client for NetWare Networks

  • IPX/SPX-compatible protocol bound to the Microsoft Dial-Up adapter driver

If you use Dial-Up Networking to access NetWare Connect servers, you can access data remotely, but you cannot control a computer remotely as you can with the NetWare Connect client software supplied by Novell.

Connecting to Shiva Remote Access Servers

You can connect a dial-up client to the Shiva LanRover or NetModem/E families of remote access servers without specially configuring Dial-Up Networking.

With a Windows 95 dial-up client, you can dial in to a Shiva remote access server and connect to IPX, NetBEUI, and TCP/IP services on a network. A dial-up client connected to a Shiva server can access any network resources that a computer on the local area network can, including all other computers running Windows 95, NetWare servers, electronic mail, client-server applications, and the Internet.

In addition to supporting all the capabilities of the Windows 95 dial-up client, Shiva remote access servers offer the following capabilities:

  • Data compression

  • Dial back

  • Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) support for IP address assignments during TCP/IP dial-in

  • Support for Security Dynamics ACE/Server and TACACS centralized authentication

  • Integrated ISDN support

  • NetWare Bindery information

Configuring a Shiva Server for Windows 95 Dial-Up Clients

If you have a Shiva remote access server running on your network, you do not need to make any configuration changes to enable dial-up clients. Shiva remote access servers running release 3.5 and above are fully compatible with Windows 95 dial-up clients.

If you are installing a new Shiva remote access server, there are a few steps to configure it to support dial-up clients. You can configure all dial-up parameters for a Shiva remote access server with the Shiva Net Manager for a Windows-based application on a computer running Windows, Windows for Workgroups, or Windows 95, or with the Shiva Net Manager for Macintosh application. Shiva Net Manager for Windows 95 will be available shortly after the release of Windows 95.

Before configuring the Shiva remote access server for Windows 95 dial-up clients, you need to do the following:

  • Ensure that you have properly installed the Shiva remote access server and connected it to an Ethernet or token ring network.

  • Connect your modem to the serial port of your LanRover and to the telephone line, or connect the telephone line directly to the LanRover/PLUS or NetModem/E with integrated modem.

  • Install Shiva Net Manager for Windows on a computer that is attached to the Ethernet or token ring network. Shiva Net Manager for Windows requires either IPX or TCP/IP on the personal computer.

  • Make sure that dial-in access for a particular protocol or protocols is enabled.

To configure the Shiva remote access server with Shiva Net Manager for Windows 95

  1. Run Shiva Net Manager by double-clicking the SNM icon, and then double-click the name of the Shiva remote access server you want to configure in the Shiva Net Manager Device List dialog box.

  2. In the Shiva remote access server Configuration dialog box, click the General configuration page from the Configure menu.

  3. Check the Dial-In function to enable it, and then check the protocols that you want to enable for Windows 95 Dial-Up Networking: IP, NetBEUI, or IPX.

    Cc751107.rk28_36(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  4. In the Configuration dialog box, click the Ports configuration page, and then check that all ports with modems are enabled and properly configured with modem strings.

  5. If you are enabling TCP/IP dial-in, click the IP configuration page from the Configure menu, and then type the IP address of the Shiva remote access server.

    Cc751107.rk28_37(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  6. If you are enabling NetBEUI dial-in on a token ring network, click the Bridging configuration page from the Configure menu, and then type the ring numbers required for source routing.

  7. To save your configuration, select the Set Configuration command from the Actions menu.

You will need to create a user name and password for each dial-up user.

To store user names and password using the internal user list of the Shiva remote access server

  1. In the Shiva Net Manager Device List dialog box, click the name of the Shiva remote access server for which you want to create a dial-up user list.

  2. In the Security menu, click the Get User List command.

    Cc751107.rk28_38(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  3. In the User List dialog box, click the Add button.

  4. Type a user name and password for each dial-up user. Make sure that dial-up access is enabled for the user, and click OK.

  5. Save the user list for the Shiva remote access server from the Security menu's Set User List command.

Assigning TCP/IP Address to Dial-Up Clients With Shiva Remote Access

To connect a dial-up client to TCP/IP network services, the client must have an IP address. Shiva remote access servers provide different ways to assign IP addresses to dial-up clients:

  • You can assign a unique IP address to each Shiva remote access server port. Every time a user dials in to a Shiva remote access server port, the dial-up client determines the IP address of the port by using the Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (RARP).

  • You can assign an IP address to every dial-up client. When a user dials in, the Shiva remote access server assigns the IP address based on the user name.

  • A centralized Windows NT Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server can tell the Shiva remote access server which IP address to assign to the dial-up client.

  • You can assign an IP address to every dial-up client. When a user dials in, the Shiva remote access server assigns the IP address based on the user name.

  • The remote user can tell the Shiva remote access server which IP address to use for the dial-up client. If a user tries to obtain an illegal IP address, the Shiva remote access server allows it, but the connection fails.

If you want the Shiva remote access server to assign IP addresses to dial-up clients, see the documentation for the server.

Security Options with Shiva Remote Access Servers

Shiva remote access servers provide several security options that prevent unauthorized access to your corporate network. You can choose the method, or combination of methods, that works best for your organization — from passwords to security devices from other vendors. Here are some of the methods that Shiva uses to provide a high level of security:

  • User lists. Shiva remote access servers can store user names and passwords for controlling dial-up access to the remote access server. When you add users to the Shiva remote access server user list, they can dial in to the network, but they still need the appropriate access privileges to access any server or host on that network.

  • NetWare bindery. If your organization uses NetWare bindery security features from Novell, you may not want to maintain an additional user list for a remote access server. You can use the NetWare bindery account database to provide centralized authentication services for dial-up access.

  • Security devices from other vendors. You may use additional security devices to protect sensitive data on your corporate networks. Shiva remote access servers are compatible with most popular security devices, so you can evaluate and choose the security method that is appropriate for your organization.

  • Security Dynamics ACE/Server. This security solution uses a UNIX server to maintain the centralized database of dial-up user privileges. Shiva remote access servers support ACE/Server authentication.

  • TACACS. This is a centralized security solution that uses a UNIX server to maintain the centralized database of user privileges. Shiva remote access servers support authentication of dial-in users using TACACS.

Technical Notes On Dial-Up Networking

The Dial-up Networking client connects to a broad set of networks because support is included for IPX/SPX, NetBEUI, and TCP/IP network protocols, using PPP, NetWare Connect, or RAS for Windows NT or Windows for Workgroups over a modem, or SLIP over a modem to older UNIX networks.

Notes: Because the Microsoft Dial-Up adapter driver is primarily an NDIS 3.1 network driver, it is important to note which protocols are bound to the Dial-Up driver (PPPMAC.VXD). Different protocols, when used in combination with other Dial-Up Networking connection choices, affect which features you can use.

When Dial-Up Networking tries to establish a connection, it first tries to use PPP by default, because PPP provides more flexibility than other connection protocols. Unlike SLIP, PPP provides the following:

  • A method for encapsulating datagrams over serial links, based on the ISO High-level Data-Link Control (HDLC) protocol.

  • A Link Control Protocol (LCP) for establishing, configuring, authenticating, and testing the data-link connection.

  • A family of Network Control Protocols for establishing and configuring different Network Layer protocols.

rk28_20

PPP is designed to work with a variety of hardware, including any asynchronous or synchronous, dedicated or dial-up, full-duplex bit-serial circuit. It can employ any common serial communications protocol, including EIA-232-E (formerly, RS-232-C), EIA-422, EIA423, EIA-530, and CCITT V.24 and V. 35. PPP does not place any particular restriction on the type of signaling, type of transmission speed, or use of modem control signals.

PPP Dial-Up Sequence

When a user dials in to a PPP-compatible server, three things happen:

  1. The Data Link Control Layer (HDLC) defines how data is encapsulated before transmission on the WAN. By providing a standard framing format, PPP ensures that various vendors' remote access solutions can communicate and distinguish data packets from each other. PPP uses HDLC framing for serial, ISDN, and X.25 data transfer.

    The PPP Data Link Control layer is a slightly modified version of the HDLC layer. The HDLC format, extensively used by IBM and others for synchronous data transfer, was modified by adding a 16-bit protocol field that allows PPP to multiplex traffic for several Network Control Protocol layers. This encapsulation frame has a 16-bit checksum, but the size of this field can be negotiated.

  2. Link Control Protocol (LCP) establishes, configures, and tests the integrity of the data-link connection. LCP also negotiates authentication and determines whether compression is enabled and which IP addresses will be used. When LCP negotiates authentication of protocols, it determines what level of security validation the remote access server can perform and what the server requires.

    LCP can negotiate with any of these authentication protocols:

    • Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) uses a two-way handshake for the peer to establish its identity. This handshake occurs only when the link is initially established. Using PAP, passwords are sent over the circuit in text format, which offers no protection from playback.

    • Shiva Password Authentication Protocol (SPAP) offers encryption of PAP passwords and Novell NetWare bindery access for user account information. When Windows 95 is set up for user-level security using a NetWare server account list, this is the security type used for remote access clients.

    • Challenge-Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) periodically verifies the identity of the peer, using a three-way handshake. The authenticator sends a challenge message to the peer, which responds with a value using a one-way encryption. The authenticator then checks this response and, if the values match, the authentication is acknowledged; otherwise, the connection is ended. CHAP provides protection against playback attack, because the challenge value changes in every message. Because the password is never sent over the link, it is virtually impossible to learn it. CHAP allows different types of encryption algorithms to be used, such as DES (MS-CHAP) and MD5 (MD5-CHAP). Windows 95 doesn't support ongoing challenges with CHAP, but does implement MS-CHAP, as does Windows NT.

    Network Control Protocols establish and configure different network protocol parameters. The type of Network Control Protocol that PPP selects depends on which protocol (NetBEUI, TCP/IP, or IPX) is being used to establish the Dial-Up Networking connection. Windows 95 supports the following:

    • NetBIOS Frames Control Protocol (NBF CP) is used to configure, enable, and disable the NetBEUI protocol modules on both ends of the link. NBF CP is a Microsoft-proposed protocol for NetBEUI configuration. NBF CP is currently in "draft" status with the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Windows 95 provides implementations for the current draft of NBF CP (as of March 1994).

    • Internet Protocol Control Protocol (IPCP), defined in RFC 1332, is used to configure, enable, and disable IP Protocol modules at both ends of the link.

    • Internet Packet eXchange Control Protocol (IPXCP), defined in RFC 1552, is used to configure, enable, and disable IPX protocol modules on both ends of the link. IPXCP is widely implemented by PPP vendors.

PPP Log File

You can record how the PPP layers process a call by enabling the PPPLOG file. This file contains some of the basic layers and points of any Dial-Up Networking session, and is especially useful for monitoring PPP sessions. It is recorded and stored in the Windows directory.

To enable PPP logging

  1. In the Network option in Control Panel, double-click Microsoft Dial-Up Adapter in the list of installed network components.

  2. Click the Advanced tab. In the Property list, click the option named Record A Log File, and in the Value list, click Yes. Then click OK.

  3. Shut down and restart a computer for this option to take effect.

The following is sample content of a PPPLOG.TXT file:

Sample PPPLOG.TXT

09-01-1994 18:14:22  - Remote access driver log opened.
09-01-1994 18:14:22  - Server type is  PPP (Point to Point Protocol).
09-01-1994 18:14:22  - CCP : Layer initialized.
09-01-1994 18:14:22  - NBFCP : Layer initialized.
09-01-1994 18:14:22  - FSA : Control protocol 2180 will not be 
                  negotiated.
09-01-1994 18:14:22  - IPXCP : Layer initialized.
09-01-1994 18:14:22  - FSA : Encrypted Password required.
09-01-1994 18:14:22  - LCP : Layer initialized.
09-01-1994 18:14:22  - LCP : Will try to negotiate callback.
09-01-1994 18:14:22  - LCP : Layer started.
09-01-1994 18:14:22  - LCP : Received and accepted ACCM of 0.

Overview of Windows 95 Mobile Computing Features

Windows 95 eliminates many of the hardware and software configuration steps previously required when switching to or from a portable computer. Windows 95 uses hardware profiles to determine which drivers to load if the system hardware changes when you move to a new site. For more information, see Chapter 19, "Devices."

Users can be productive away from the office by using the following Windows 95 mobile computing tools:

  • Briefcase allows users to update documents on a portable computer with source documents on a desktop computer or network as described later in this chapter.

  • Microsoft Exchange provides remote access to electronic mail. For information, see Chapter 26, "Electronic Mail and Microsoft Exchange."

  • Microsoft Fax allows users to remotely send and receive faxes. For more information, see Chapter 27, "Microsoft Fax."

  • Deferred printing allows users to generate print jobs when a physical printer is not available. For more information, see Chapter 23, "Printing and Fonts."

  • Direct Cable Connection allows users to connect a portable computer to a desktop computer to synchronize files and share other resources as described earlier in this chapter.

Other mobile computing tools, such as the following, help users manage a portable computer's limited battery power and disk space:

  • With Advanced Power Management, users can use the battery indicator on the taskbar and a Suspend command on the Start menu to save power without turning off computer.

  • With DriveSpace, users can free space on their portable computer's hard disk drive and floppy disks by compressing them. For more information, see Chapter 20, "Disks and File Systems."

  • With Microsoft Exchange, users can view the headers of mail messages before deciding whether to download, preventing unnecessary messages from taking up disk space. For more information, see Chapter 26, "Electronic Mail and Microsoft Exchange."

  • With Quick View, users can view the contents of a file in Windows Explorer by right-clicking a file icon. For information, see Chapter 22, "Application Support."

Direct Cable Connection

With Direct Cable Connection, you can establish a direct serial or parallel cable connection between two computers in order to share the resources of the computer designated as the host. If the host is connected to a network, the guest computer can also access the network. For example, if you have a portable computer, you can use a cable to connect it to your work computer and network. To establish a local connection between two computers, you need a compatible serial or null-modem parallel cable.

Before you can transfer files from the host to the guest computer, the files must be in a shared directory, and File and Printer Sharing services for either Microsoft or NetWare networks must be enabled in the Network option in Control Panel. You can also apply share-level security to the shared files. For information, see Chapter 11, "Logon, Browsing, and Resource Sharing" and Chapter 14, "Security."

Note: This capability is similar to that available with Interlink for MS-DOS 6.x, which allowed users to transfer data through the serial port between two personal computers.

Before you install and configure Direct Cable Connection, you need to decide:

  • What remote access and network protocols do you need to install on the guest and host computers? They must both be running at least one common network protocol in order to connect. The host computer can act as a gateway to an IPX/SPX or NetBEUI network, but not to a TCP/IP network.

  • What kind of cable do you need? Direct Cable Connection works with serial and parallel cables. For details, see "Direct Cable Connection" earlier in this chapter.

  • Do you want to assign a password to the host computer? If you assign a password on the host, all users connecting from the guest computer will be prompted for it. After connecting, the guest can access resources on the host computer according to the type of security applied to it, that is, user-level or share-level security. For more information, see Chapter 14, "Security."

Note: After the host connects to the network, it can access shared resources on the guest computer.

Installing and Configuring Direct Cable Connection

To install Direct Cable Connection during Windows 95 Setup, you must choose Custom or Portable as the Setup type. You can also install it after installing Windows 95.

To install Direct Cable Connection after Windows 95 installation

  1. In the Add/Remove Programs icon in Control Panel, click the Windows Setup tab.

  2. In the Components list, click Communications, and then click the Details button.

  3. In the Communications dialog box, click Direct Cable Connection, and then click OK.

Windows 95 provides a Direct Cable Connection wizard for establishing the connection between two computers. The wizard runs when you open Direct Cable Connection for the first time. It allows you to designate one computer as the guest and the other as a host. Before you run the wizard, you need to install Direct Cable Connection on each computer and connect them with a null-modem serial or parallel cable.

For more information about setting up Direct Cable Connection, see online Help.

Cables Compatible with Direct Cable Connection

Windows 95 supports a serial null-modem standard (RS-232) cable and the following parallel cables:

  • Standard or Basic 4-bit cable, including LapLink and InterLink cables available before 1992.

  • Extended Capabilities Port (ECP) cable. This type of cable works on a computer with ECP-enabled parallel ports, which must be enabled in BIOS. This kind of parallel cable allows data to be transferred more quickly than a standard cable.

  • Universal Cable Module (UCM) cable. This cable supports connecting different types of parallel ports. Using this cable between two ECP-enabled ports allows the fastest possible data transfer between two computers.

Parallel cables transmit data simultaneously over multiple lines, making it the faster of the two connection methods. Serial cables transmit data sequentially over one pair of wires, and are slower than parallel cables. Use a serial cable only if a parallel port is unavailable.

Using Briefcase for File Synchronization

If you can use a portable computer and a desktop computer, or you are connected to a network, you must constantly work to keep the files synchronized. Windows 95 Briefcase minimizes this task by keeping track of the relationships between files on two or more computers.

With Briefcase, you can do the following:

  • Create a Briefcase folder

  • Add files to Briefcase

  • Check the status of files in Briefcase and their related files

  • Update related files, either individually or all at once

  • Split related files to maintain them separately

Windows 95 provides a set of OLE interfaces that allow applications to bind reconciliation handlers to it, track the contents of Briefcase, and define the outcome of any reconciliation on a class-by-class basis. For example, when both the file in Briefcase and its synchronized copy outside have changed, Windows 95 calls the appropriate reconciliation handler to merge the two files. This could be handy when several users are simultaneously updating one large document.

Creating and Configuring a Briefcase

Windows 95 automatically configures Briefcase and installs it on your Windows 95 desktop if you choose it during Custom Setup of Windows 95, or if you choose the Portable Setup Type. If you do not choose either of these Setup options, you can install Briefcase afterward in the Add/Remove Programs option in Control Panel.

To install Briefcase after Windows 95 installation

  1. In Control Panel, double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.

  2. Click the Windows Setup tab, and in the Components list click Accessories, and then click the Details button.

  3. In the Accessories dialog box, click Briefcase, and then click OK.

If you install Briefcase, it appears as an icon on your Windows 95 desktop. To run Briefcase, double-click its icon.

Tip You can use Briefcase to synchronize files between a portable computer running Windows 95 and a desktop computer running Windows NT 3.5.

Updating Files with Briefcase

When you update files by using Briefcase, Windows 95 automatically replaces unmodified files with modified files. If both files have changed, Windows 95 calls the appropriate application (if available) to merge the disparate files. Before you leave the office, you can copy files from your desktop to Briefcase, and then load Briefcase onto your portable computer. When you return, Briefcase will automatically update files when you dock your portable computer if you are using a Plug and Play BIOS docking station.

For information about updating files using Briefcase and a floppy disk, see Windows 95 online Help.

Tip For faster editing, you can move Briefcase files to a hard disk on a second computer; to do this, drag the files from the floppy disk to the second computer's hard disk. When you have finished editing the files on the desktop computer, choose Update All from Briefcase on the floppy disk. When you return to the original computer, choose Update again to replace the unmodified files on this first computer.

Instead of using a floppy disk with Briefcase, you can use Direct Cable Connection to connect two computers running Windows 95, and then use Briefcase to synchronize their files. For example, you can connect your portable computer to your home or office computer with Direct Cable Connection, and then update the desktop computer files to match the portable files.

For more information about Direct Cable Connection, see "Direct Cable Connection" earlier in this chapter.

To update files using Briefcase and two connected computers

  1. Copy to Briefcase any files or folders you want to work on.

  2. Make changes to the files either in their original location or in Briefcase.

  3. Connect the computers by using Direct Cable Connection, and then double-click My Briefcase.

  4. Click the files you want to update.

  5. On the Briefcase menu, click Update All or Update Selection.

Note: You can also use Briefcase to synchronize files between a portable computer and a network if the portable computer has a network connection.

When you open the Briefcase folder, you can check the status of any file in Briefcase to find out if it has been synchronized with its original. You can also split files from their originals if you decide to maintain them separately. For more information on these topics, see online Help.

Tip To find the copy of a file that is outside Briefcase, click Find Original in the Update Status dialog box.

Troubleshooting Dial-Up Networking

This section describes problems which you may encounter in using Dial-Up Networking and how to resolve them. Windows 95 provides a troubleshooter for Dial-Up Networking in online Help. Try using this troubleshooter before trying the troubleshooting steps included in this section.

You can monitor any Dial-Up Networking session for possible problems by enabling the Record a Log File option. This produces a PPPLOG.TXT file in the Windows directory, which you can reference to find out the cause of a problem. For more information, see "PPP Log File" earlier in this chapter.

You cannot access the Dial-Up Networking Server because user name is not valid.

To set Dial-Up Networking Server to allow caller access options

  1. In Dial-Up Networking, click the Connections menu, and then click Dial Up Server.

  2. In the the Dial-Up Server properties, click Allow Caller Access, if this is not already selected, and then view the User name list to ensure the user's name appears.

    The User name list appears only if you have chosen user-level security for the dial-up server. The type of security is selected in the Network option in Control Panel.

If the dial-up client is also running File and Printer Services for NetWare Networks, the File and Printer Sharing service automatically becomes the default server, but it cannot receive the information needed to find the remote servers.

You cannot access remote NetWare servers when making a dial-up connection.

  • Disable File and Printer Sharing Service for NetWare Networks when you make the dial-up connection.

Software compression does not work.

To verify Dial-Up Server and compression options in Dial Up Networking

  1. In the Connections menu, click the Dial-Up Server.

  2. Click the Server Type button and verify that the correct type of dial-up server is selected.

  3. Check that Enable Software Compression is selected. Compression will occur only if the dial-up client and server have enabled it.

The modem is dialing but not connecting.

  • Check the modem configuration; change the configuration if necessary.

  • Verify all parameters, such as access codes, area code, and country code.

  • Try choosing the driver for Generic Modem Drivers.

  • If you are using an external modem, check the cable and verify that it is connected correctly.

  • Check the COM port configuration in Device Manager.

For more information, see the troubleshooting section in Chapter 25, "Modems and Communications Tools."

Dial-Up Networking Server is not answering incoming calls.

  • Disable Allow Caller Access and shut down the computer. Turn off the computer to reset the COM port. If the modem is external, turn off the modem. Turn the computer back on and reconfigure the Dial-Up Networking server, and then try again.

  • If these steps fail, disable Allow Caller Access and see if any modem software can manually answer the incoming call.

  • If you are using an external modem, check the cable and verify that it is connected correctly.

  • If you are using an internal modem with a nonstandard IRQ selection, use Device Manager to check the IRQ setting for the COM port and change it if necessary.

  • Try choosing the Generic Modem Drivers on the dial-up server.

The password for the Dial-Up Networking server is stored in the RNA.PWL file. However, simply deleting this file or removing and reinstalling Dial-Up Networking may not remove the password. If you set the Dial-Up Networking server to monitor for calls, then delete the RNA.PWL file, the password is not removed because it is stored in memory. If you shut down Windows 95 at this point, the RNA.PWL file is recreated with the password in memory.

To replace a forgotten password in a Dial-Up Networking Server

  1. Disable Allow Caller Access, and then shut down and restart Windows 95.

  2. Delete the RNA.PWL file, and then restart the Dial-Up Networking.

Note: When you first connect to the Dial-Up Networking server, an error message states that the password file is missing or corrupt for every modem device you have installed. If you have any null modem devices installed (for example, when you run Direct Cable Connection it installs a modem device for every COM and LPT port you have), this error message is also displayed.

Was this page helpful?
(1500 characters remaining)
Thank you for your feedback
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft