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Introduction

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Windows 95 includes numerous features designed to reduce the costs of training and supporting PC users. Not the least of which is a simpler, more intuitive user interface that can reduce training requirements for novice users and enable experienced users to learn new tasks with less help. The exercises in this lab will explore those features that help to reduce training and support costs.

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Objectives
Step by Step

Objectives

By the end of this lab, you will be able to:

  • Relocate the Taskbar

  • Use the Start menu to launch a program

  • Add items to the Start menu

  • Use the Start menu to open a document

  • Use the Taskbar to switch between applications

  • Minimize a program to the Taskbar

  • Use the Find feature to locate a file

  • Use the Windows 95 Help System to set up a local printer

  • Understand the functions of the primary and secondary mouse buttons

  • Use the display's property sheet to customize the Windows 95 user interface

  • Use the My Computer object to gain access to stored information

  • Change an 8.3 file name to a (LFN) long file name

  • Use the Network Neighborhood object to gain access to information stored externally

  • Use Drag and Drop to install a new printer to your system from an exiting printer across the network

  • Use the Start menu to launch Program Manager

In this lab you will be connecting to your instructor's machine. Your instructor's machine name is:

_______________________________________

yt0b Estimated time to complete this lab: 30 minutes

Step by Step

Exercise 1: Relocating the Taskbar

In this exercise you will relocate Windows 95's new Taskbar.

The Taskbar provides a more intuitive way to quickly access active applications and information.

When you first start Windows 95 you are presented with the Windows 95 desktop. The desktop is the key to everything in Windows 95. Every action in Windows 95 normally begins with the Windows 95 desktop. One of the objects located on the desktop is the Taskbar.

Cc751431.yt1b(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

The Taskbar provides quick access to active applications and information. The Taskbar's default location is the bottom of the desktop. Windows 95 allows users to position the Taskbar on the top or sides of the desktop, as well.

To relocate the Taskbar

From the Windows 95 desktop, with the mouse pointer over the Taskbar

  1. Using the primary mouse button (usually the left button), CLICK and DRAG Windows 95's Taskbar to the top of the desktop.

  2. CLICK and DRAG Windows 95's Taskbar to the far right of the desktop.

  3. CLICK and DRAG Windows 95's Taskbar to the bottom of the desktop.

Exercise 2:

Using the Start menu to launch a program. In this exercise you will use Windows 95's new Start menu to launch Microsoft Word.

The Start menu provides users with access to 99% of their required functionality.

Located near the far left of the Taskbar, you will see the Start button.

Cc751431.yt3b(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

The Start button opens a menu that makes it easy to launch programs, open documents, and perform other common tasks. Most computer activities can be initiated from the Start button.

Experienced as well as new users will prefer the convenience of the Start menu as their main entry point into frequently used programs, documents, and utilities. The Start menu gives you immediate access to programs, documents, and key settings.

To use the Start menu to launch Microsoft Word

From the Windows 95 desktop,

  1. CLICK the Start button.

  2. CHOOSE Programs/Microsoft Office/Microsoft Word.

    Notice that you do not need to keep the mouse button depressed to navigate through the menu.

    Notice that a Microsoft Word button appears on the Taskbar.

    If the Tip of the Day dialog box appears, CLICK the OK button.

  3. KEEP the Microsoft Word window active for the following exercises.

Exercise 3: Adding items to the Start menu

In this exercise you will add the Sales worksheet and File Manager to the Start menu.

By adding items to the Start menu, applications, utilities, and files are just a click away.

You can add any number of utilities and application icons to the Start menu by clicking the Add button on the Start Menu Programs tab of the Properties dialog box for the Taskbar. There are several ways to access the Properties dialog box for the Taskbar. Using the secondary mouse button while over the Taskbar is one way and choosing Settings/Taskbar... from the Start menu is another.

To add the Sales worksheet and File Manager to the Start menu

From the Windows 95 desktop,

  1. CLICK the Start button.

  2. CHOOSE Settings/Taskbar... from the Start menu. Be sure to click the mouse button to select Taskbar... from the menu.

    The Taskbar Properties sheet appears.

    Cc751431.yt6b(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  3. SELECT the Start Menu Programs tab.

  4. CLICK the Add... button in the Customize Start Menu field.

  5. CLICK the Browse... button.

  6. DOUBLE-CLICK the Demofile folder on your C: drive to open it.

  7. From the Files of type: list box field SELECT All Files from the drop down menu options..

  8. CLICK the Sales worksheet to select it.

  9. CLICK the Open button at the bottom of the dialog box.

    By clicking the Open button, you register the Sales worksheet as an open document.

  10. CLICK the Cancel button.

  11. CLICK the Start button on the Taskbar and SELECT Documents.

    Notice that Sales has been added to the Documents list.

To add File Manager to the Start menu

  1. ACTIVATE the Taskbar Properties sheet by CLICKING it's title bar.

  2. CLICK the Add... button.

  3. CLICK the Browse... button.

  4. DOUBLE-CLICK the Windows folder on your C: drive to open it.

  5. From the Files of type: field SELECT Programs.

  6. Scroll through the list of available programs SELECT Winfile.

  7. CLICK the Open button.

  8. CLICK the Next button in the Create Shortcut window.

  9. CLICK the Start Menu folder from the list of available folders in the Select folders to Place Shortcut In list box.

  10. CLICK the Next button.

  11. CLICK the Finish button.

  12. CLICK the OK button on the Taskbar Properties sheet.

  13. CLICK the Start button on the Taskbar.

    Notice that Winfile now appears at the top of the Start menu.

    By placing frequently used items on the Start menu, they are just a mouse click away at all times.

Exercise 4: Using the Start menu to open a document

In this exercise you will use the Start menu to open the SALES document.

The Start menu gives you quick and easy access to documents, as well as applications.

The Start menu gives users access to recently and frequently used documents.

To use the Start menu to open the SALES document

From the Windows 95 desktop,

  1. CLICK the Start button.

  2. CHOOSE Documents/Sales.

    Notice that Microsoft Excel is launched and SALES.XLW is the active window.

    Notice that a Microsoft Excel button appears on the Taskbar.

Exercise 5: Using the Taskbar to switch between applications

In this exercise you will use the Taskbar to switch between Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel.

The Taskbar makes it easy for users to quickly switch between active applications.

With Windows 95's Taskbar, users can easily see when more than one window is running and switch between them with a single mouse click.

Cc751431.yt8b(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

To use the Taskbar to switch between active windows

From the Windows 95 desktop,

  1. CLICK the Microsoft Word button on the Taskbar.

    Notice that Microsoft Word becomes the active window.

  2. CLICK the Microsoft Excel button on the Taskbar.

    Notice that Microsoft Excel becomes the active window.

Exercise 6: Using the Minimize to Taskbar button to minimize a program to the Taskbar

In this exercise you will use Windows 95's new Minimize to Taskbar button to minimize a program to the Taskbar.

Windows 95 provides quick access to all minimized applications.

One thing that becomes evident about the Windows 95 work environment is that the window minimize, maximize, and close buttons are all located in the same area of the window. These buttons are conveniently located in the upper right corner of the window.

yt10b

When an application window is minimized to the Taskbar, an application button becomes active on the Taskbar. This button gives you instant access to the minimized application. Switching between minimized applications is very straight forward and simple with Windows 95. You only need to depress the application button on the Taskbar. There is no need to task switch using Alt + Tab. Although, for current Windows users, it is still available if you choose to use it.

To use the Minimize to Taskbar button to minimize Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel to the Taskbar

With Microsoft Excel the active window,

  1. CLICK the Minimize to Taskbar button located in the top right corner of the window.

    Microsoft Excel will be minimized and the Microsoft Excel button will appear "un-depressed" on the Taskbar.

    The Microsoft Word window becomes the active window.

  2. CLICK the Minimize to Taskbar button (upper right corner of the window).

    Microsoft Word will be minimized and the Microsoft Word button will appear "un-depressed" on the Taskbar.

    Note: By clicking the secondary mouse button while the mouse pointer is over the Taskbar and choosing Minimizing All Windows, all open windows will be minimized.

Exercise 7: Using the Find feature to locate a file

In this exercise you will use Windows 95's Find feature to locate a Microsoft Excel Worksheet containing the text "Eastern".

Windows 95's Find feature can be used to locate a file even if the file's location and name are not available.

Regular search utilities can be frustrating because you have to remember what the file's name is in order to find the file. This is because traditional Find utilities carry out a search based on a file name. The Windows 95 Find utility can look for what you want based on several things.

Windows 95's Find feature will perform a search using such criteria as:

  • Time parameters, including modification dates

  • Text contents

  • Type of object

  • Size

  • Regular expressions (wild cards)

This means that Find can be used to locate a file even if the file's location and name are not available.

Windows 95's Find utility is available on the Start menu.

To use the Find feature to locate a Microsoft Excel Worksheet containing the text "Eastern"

From the Start menu,

  1. CHOOSE Find/Files or Folders....

    The Find dialog box appears.

    Cc751431.yt13b(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

    This dialog box allows you to search for files by name, location, date, type, size, or for specific text.

    Make sure that the Look in: field indicates the C: drive. Leave the Named field blank for now.

  2. CLICK the Advanced tab.

    The Advanced options appear.

  3. From the Of type list box, SELECT Microsoft Excel 5.0 Worksheet.

  4. In the Containing text: field, TYPE the word Eastern.

  5. CLICK the Find Now button.

    The SALES and Sales Report worksheets appear in the bottom of the Find dialog box.

  6. CLICK yt14b , the Close button, found in the upper right corner, to close the Find window when the search is finished.

Exercise 8: Using the Windows 95 Help System to set up a printer

In this exercise you will use Windows 95's new Help System to set up a printer.

Help is now very easy to read, either by general topic, or specific subject. Windows 95 Help assists users through all or part of a solution.

Traditional Help programs attempt to assist users by describing and defining key words and ideas, but Windows 95 Help assists users through all or part of a solution by incorporating the subject or activity in question into the help process. Help is now very easy to read, either by general topic or specific subject, while providing the information you want and the tools you require to perform the task you need to accomplish.

For example, to learn how to set up a printer, just type the word printer in the search input box of the Help Index tab, select setting up from the Index scroll box, and click the Display button. The Windows 95 Help System indicates to you that there are only two tasks required to set up a printer and gives you the ability to automatically jump to the Printer Setup Wizard so that the tasks can be completed.

To use the Windows 95 Help System to set up a printer

From the Windows 95 desktop,

  1. CLICK the Start button.

  2. CHOOSE Help from the Start menu.

  3. CLICK the Index tab in the Help window.

    Cc751431.yt16b(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  4. TYPE printers in the search input box (field 1).

  5. SELECT setting up from the list of index entries (field 2).

  6. CLICK the Display button located near the bottom of the dialog box.

    The To set up a new printer Help window appears.

  7. CLICK the Jump button, yt17b , in the Help window to open the Printer Setup Wizard.

  8. CLICK the Next button to begin installing a printer.

  9. SELECT the Local Printer option button and CLICK the Next button.

    If you are not connected to a network and you try to setup a network printer, you will not be able to continue past the second step in the wizard. If you choose the local printer option and are not connected to a printer, you will not be able to test your printer.

  10. SELECT both the appropriate Manufacturer and Printer, then CLICK the Next button.

    For this exercise, any choice will do.

  11. SELECT the appropriate Port where the printer is attached, and CLICK the Next button.

    For this exercise, any choice will do.

  12. TYPE the words My Printer in the Printer Name: edit box, then SELECT the Yes option button to setup this printer as your default Windows printer.

  13. CLICK the Next button.

  14. SELECT the No option button to "Would you like to print a test page?"

    At this point in the Add Printer Wizard, you are given the option to finish the installation or cancel the installation. If you choose to finish the installation, the appropriate printer drivers will be copied from a source location and the printer will be installed.

    However, for the purpose of this exercise, CLICK the Cancel button to cancel the installation.

  15. CLOSE the Help window. (Remember the Close button is the far right button on the Title Bar.

Exercise 9: The functions of the primary and secondary mouse buttons

In this exercise you will learn the functionality of the primary and secondary mouse buttons when working with Windows 95.

The expanded features and capabilities of the Windows 95 mouse provide users with the functionality they require, when they need it.

The Windows 95 mouse has expanded features and capabilities providing users with context sensitive access to functionality and information. Both single-clicking and double-clicking are utilized with the Windows 95 mouse. Also new with the Windows 95 mouse is the fact that you are not required to hold down the mouse button while navigating menus.

To learn about the functionality of the primary and secondary mouse buttons

  1. READ the following information:

    The primary mouse button (typically the left button for right-handed users and the right button for left-handed users) is used in the traditional mouse activities of selecting, pointing, and dragging. Drag and drop functions default to the primary button.

    The secondary mouse button is the Object Menu button—the key to the object structure. Clicking an object with the secondary mouse button will present a context sensitive menu offering choices for what you can do with the object. These choices commonly include:

    • Open

    • Cut

    • Copy

    • Create Shortcut

    • Delete

    • Rename

    • Properties

Exercise 10: Using the Properties for Display sheet to customize the user interface

In this exercise you will use Windows 95's Properties for Display sheet to change the display's resolution.

Windows 95's Property sheets give users an easy way to make adjustments and change settings.

The Control Panel is a special folder containing property sheets for key system objects used in customizing the computer's configuration. The Windows 95 Control Panel icons are similar to the Windows 3.1 Control Panel icons. The Display icon in the Control Panel is one way to get access to the Properties for Display sheet. An easier way to get access to the Properties for Display sheet is through the secondary mouse button. While the mouse pointer is anywhere over the desktop clicking the right mouse button produces a short menu. By selecting Properties from this menu, the user gains instant access to the Properties for Display sheet.

The Properties for Display sheet allows the user to adjust display parameters such as; specification of the background, the current screen saver, the appearance of the display, and other display settings.

To use the Properties for Display sheet to change the display's resolution from 640x480 to 800x600

With the mouse pointer anywhere over the desktop,

  1. CLICK the secondary mouse button (typically the right button).

  2. CHOOSE Properties... from the short menu.

    The Properties for Display sheet appears.

    Cc751431.yt20b(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

  3. SELECT the Settings tab of the Properties for Display sheet.

  4. SLIDE the slide bar, in the Desktop Area field, to the right so that 800x600 is indicated.

  5. CLICK the OK button.

    This option may not be available for some displays.

    If you have not previously specified your monitor type, you will be prompted to do so. CLICK the Yes button, select the manufacturer type and model, and CLICK the OK button.

  6. CLICK the No button to cancel changes

  7. CLOSE the Properties for Display sheet.

Exercise 11: Using the My Computer icon to gain access to stored information

In this exercise you will use Windows 95's new My Computer icon to access the Demofile directory stored on your C: drive.

Windows 95's My Computer object is always present on the desktop. It provides users with instant access to information stored on their computer.

The Start button provides users access to 99 percent of the functionality they require, but Windows 95 doesn't just stop there. The Windows 95 shell provides two additional objects that provide specific access to stored information. Local information is accessed through the My Computer object and external information is accessed through the Network Neighborhood object.

The My Computer object in Windows 95 corresponds to the File Manager in previous versions of Windows. It contains each disk drive on your computer. It also contains other devices on your computer and provides access through the Control Panel and Printers folders. Everything stored on the computer can be accessed from the My Computer object.

To use the My Computer icon to access the Demofile directory stored on the C: drive

From the Windows 95 desktop,

  1. DOUBLE-CLICK the My Computer icon.

    yt22b

    The My Computer window appears.

  2. DOUBLE-CLICK the Hard disk (C:) icon.

    The Hard disk (C:) window appears.

  3. OPEN the Demofile directory by double-clicking the Demofile folder.

  4. KEEP the Demofile directory open for the next exercise.

Exercise 12: Changing an 8.3 File Name to a LFN

In this exercise you will change the WINNEWS.TXT file name to a long file name (New Sales Report).

Windows 95 allows users to create and use files with Long File Names (LFNs) making retrieval of information faster and easier.

Anyone who has used the 8.3 file name convention knows that these file names can be at times very frustrating. A longer file name (LFN) convention allows for a more user friendly file name. Easily understood file names make retrieval of information faster and easier.

Long file names are native to Windows 95. They are the default format that the system uses. A LFN may have up to 256 characters including blank spaces. Windows 95 allows the user to create new files with LFNs and to rename old files to the LFN convention.

To change the WINNEWS.TXT file name to a long file name (New Sales Report)

With the Demofile window open,

  1. POSITION the mouse pointer over the Winnews text document icon.

  2. CLICK the secondary mouse button.

    A pop-up menu appears.

  3. CHOOSE Rename from the short menu.

  4. TYPE the words New Sales Report into the name field of the document icon.

    Note: You may click the name field associated with the icon to change the file name as well.

  5. PRESS the Enter key on your keyboard to complete the change.

  6. CLICK the secondary mouse button while the mouse pointer is over the New Sales Report and CHOOSE Properties....

    The properties sheet for the file appears.

  7. NOTICE the file name and the MS-DOS name displayed in the dialog box. Notice the other types of information provided about the file.

  8. CLOSE the property sheet.

  9. CLOSE all open windows.

Exercise 13: Using the Network Neighborhood to gain access to information stored externally

yt24b

In this exercise, you will use Windows 95's new Network Neighborhood to gain access to information stored on another computer.

The Network Neighborhood object is always present on the desktop and gives users instant access to information stored externally.

Windows 95's Network Neighborhood makes access to external information fast and easy. The Network Neighborhood icon sits on the desktop with the My Computer icon. While the My Computer object allows easy access to information on the users computer, the Network Neighborhood object allows the same access to information stored externally.

The Network Neighborhood shows users network servers that they are most likely to use. Using workgroup and current server connections, Windows 95 shows the users the network in a series of stages ranging from the local workgroup to the entire global network.

To use the Network Neighborhood to access the Demofile directory stored on the Instructor's computer.

From the Windows 95 desktop,

  1. DOUBLE-CLICK the Network Neighborhood icon

    yt26b

    The Network Neighborhood window appears and displays a listing of the local machines in your same workgroup.

  2. DOUBLE-CLICK the Instructor's computer icon to see the list of shares available.

  3. DOUBLE-CLICK on the Public share.

  4. NOTICE that the Demofile folder is available.

    Note: The public folder is a shared folder that physically resides on the Instructor's computer.

  5. CLOSE the Instructor's machine window.

  6. KEEP the Network Neighborhood window open for the next exercise.

Exercise 14: Using Drag and Drop to install a new printer

yt27b

In this exercise you will install a new printer to your system by dragging and dropping an existing network printer to your desktop.

The Windows 95 Drag and Drop interface allows users to quickly and easily install new printer drives.

Windows 95 offers new capabilities that allow users to install the driver for a printer over the network automatically. To do this, the user just drags and drops the network printer icon from the server's shared resource folder to the user's printer folder. Windows 95 makes intelligent choices to install all necessary components and properly configure the print device with as little user intervention as possible.

To install a new printer to your system by dragging and dropping an existing network printer to your desktop.

From the Network Neighborhood window,

  1. DOUBLE-CLICK the Instructor's computer icon to see the list of shares available.

    You may find it necessary to use the scroll bars to bring the Instructor's machine into view.

  2. CLICK the Start button on the taskbar.

  3. CHOOSE Settings/Printers from the Start menu to open your Printers folder.

    You may need to resize the Printers window for the next step.

  4. USE the Secondary mouse button to DRAG and DROP the Instructor's Network Printer icon from the Instructor's folder to your local Printers window.

  5. CHOOSE Install from the pop-up menu that appears.

  6. REPLY No to "Do you print from MS-DOS-based programs?" in the Add Printer Wizard.

  7. CLICK the Next button.

  8. TYPE the words My New Network Printer in the Printer Name: edit box.

  9. SELECT the No option button.

  10. CLICK the Next button.

  11. SELECT the No option button to "Would you like to print a test page?" and CLICK the Finish button.

    The new printer will be installed.

  12. CLOSE all Open windows.

  13. CLICK the secondary mouse button while the pointer is over the Microsoft Excel button on the Taskbar and CHOOSE Close.

  14. CLICK the secondary mouse button while the pointer is over the Microsoft Word button on the Taskbar and CHOOSE Close.

Exercise 15: Using the Start menu to launch Program Manager

In this exercise you will use Windows 95's new Start menu to launch Program Manager.

Windows 95 is designed to allow Windows 3.1 users to transition to the new user interface at their own pace.

One of the design goals for the Windows 95 user interface is to enable an easy migration for current Windows 3.1 users. As a result, Windows 95 is designed to allow Windows 3.1 users to transition to the new user interface at their own pace. Current Windows users need not fear the transition to Windows 95. Windows 95 can be configured so that Windows 3.1 users can feel like they are in the Windows 3.1 user interface, yet take advantage of most of Windows 95's features.

Two examples of this are the Program Manager and the File Manager. Program Manager and File Manager are available in Windows 95 and function as they did in Windows 3.1, but include added features to take advantage of the power of Windows 95. For users who are familiar with using Program Manager and File Manager to work with and gain access to programs and files, these utilities can still be just a mouse click away.

To use the Start menu to launch Program Manager

From the Windows 95 desktop,

  1. CLICK the Start button.

  2. CHOOSE Run... from the Start menu.

    The Run dialog box appears.

  3. In the Open: field, TYPE the word progman (not program.)

  4. CLICK the OK button.

    Program Manager is now available.

    Notice that the familiar program group icons have been added to Windows 95 style windows.

    Note: For those Windows users who would prefer to make a gradual transition to Windows 95, the Program Manager can be added to the Start menu.

  5. CLOSE the Program Manager window.

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