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Windows 98 FAQs from Support Online

Archived content. No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

The following Microsoft Knowledge Base articles on Windows 98 were compiled from the Microsoft Support Online Web site (http://support.microsoft.com/support ). The articles below provide answers to some of the questions frequently accessed by visitors to the Support Online site. Click on an issue of interest in the table below to jump to the answer.

Issue

Symptom/Description

How to Install Windows 98: Helpful Tips and Suggestions

Provides general information about installing Windows 98 that can help you avoid problems during the installation process.

Troubleshooting Windows 98 Startup Problems and Error Messages

Describes troubleshooting steps that may help you solve problems starting Windows 98.

Why Do I Receive a "Could not decode this setup (.CAB) file" Error Message When I Try to Access Files on My Windows CD-ROM?

When you try to install Windows 95 or Windows 98, or install a component that requires copying files from the original Windows disks or CD-ROM, you may receive an error message.

Dial-Up Networking Password Is Not Saved

When you try to save your password when you are making a Dial-Up Networking connection by clicking the Save Password check box, your password may not be saved.

Why am I Unable to Access My Modem or Prompted to Install One Even Though One is Already Installed?

A 32-bit TAPI program may not be able to access installed modems.

Modem Attempts to Dial When Windows Starts

When you start Windows, your modem may attempt to connect to your Internet service provider (ISP).

How to Convert a Drive to FAT32 Using Drive Converter

Describes how to convert a hard disk that uses the File Allocation Table (FAT or FAT16) file system to the FAT32 file system using Drive Converter.

How Can I Prevent Getting "Not enough memory to convert the drive to FAT32," When I Try to Convert My Hard Drive?

When you attempt to convert your hard disk to the FAT32 file system, your computer may stop responding (hang) before the conversion is complete or you may receive an error message.

How to Install New Hardware in Windows

Describes how to install new hardware for use in Windows, including manufacturer-supplied drivers, installing modems, installing printers, and troubleshooting problems.

Why Do I Receive "Error 745: An essential file is missing" When I Try to Use Dial-Up Networking?

When you attempt to connect to a remote computer using Dial-Up Networking, you may receive an error message.

How to Install Windows 98: Helpful Tips and Suggestions

Last reviewed: July 24, 1998

Article ID: 188881

The information in this article applies to:

  • Microsoft Windows 98

Summary

This article provides general information about installing Windows 98. This information can help you avoid problems that may arise during the installation process and help make the installation process as smooth as possible. The following topics are discussed:

  • Before purchasing Windows 98

  • Before installing Windows 98

  • Installing Windows 98

  • Common Windows 98 Setup Issues

  • How to obtain assistance with Windows 98

More Information

Before Purchasing Windows 98

Before you purchase Windows 98, you should make sure that your computer meets the minimum hardware requirements for running Windows 98. The minimum hardware requirements include:

  • 486DX 66 MHz or faster processor (Pentium recommended)

  • 16 megabytes (MB) of memory (24 MB recommended)

  • 120 MB of free hard disk space (typical installation requires approximately 195 MB of free hard disk space, but the required space may vary from 120 MB to 295 MB, depending on your computer's configuration and the options you choose to install)

  • CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive

  • 3.5-inch high-density floppy disk drive

  • Display adapter and monitor that support VGA or higher resolution.

  • Microsoft Mouse or compatible pointing device

For additional information about the minimum hardware requirements for Windows 98, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 182751: Minimum Hardware Requirements for Windows 98 Installation

Although Windows 98 includes more than 1,200 new drivers, not all third- party manufacturers have had a chance to update their hardware drivers. Some existing computers or devices may require an updated BIOS or device driver to fully support Windows 98.

For information about compatibility with specific hardware or software, please contact the manufacturer of your specific hardware or software, or see the following articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 136660: Windows Software Compatibility List

  • 131900: Windows Hardware Compatibility List

Note: The Software Compatibility List contains a list of programs that bear the Windows logo and have been tested and found to run on Windows. The Hardware Compatibility List contains a list of computer systems and peripherals that have been tested and found to run Windows.

For additional information about your specific computer or device, or to identify known incompatibilities or possible workarounds, please check with the manufacturer of your PC or device.

You can use the Windows 98 Upgrade package to upgrade Windows version 3.1x, Windows for Workgroups version 3.1x, or Windows 95 or later to Windows 98. If Windows 3.1x, Windows for Workgroups 3.1x, or Windows 95 is not currently installed, the Windows 98 Upgrade Setup program will allow you to install Windows 98 if you can provide the disks or CD-ROM from a previous version of Windows to confirm your eligibility for the upgrade. Because the Windows 98 Upgrade package does not include a bootable floppy disk, you must be able to boot from the computer's hard disk to install the Windows 98 Upgrade.

To install the non-upgrade version of Windows 98, you do not need a previous version of Windows, Windows for Workgroups, or MS-DOS. Because the non-upgrade version of Windows 98 includes a bootable floppy disk, you do not need to be able to boot from the computer's hard disk.

Before Installing Windows 98

Before you upgrade your existing version of Windows to Windows 98, you should perform the following steps:

  • Read the Setup.txt file in the Win98 folder on the Windows 98 CD-ROM, and perform any additional preinstall steps as suggested. To read the Setup.txt file online, please see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:

    179756: Windows 98 Setup.txt File

  • Make sure that your computer is not infected with a virus. To do so, run an anti-virus program with the latest virus signatures and allow the program to remove any viruses that it finds.

  • Disable any programs that run automatically, including anti-virus programs, screen savers, or system utilities.

  • Uninstall any utilities or tools that protect or encrypt the Master Boot Record (MBR) or partition table (for example, uninstall Bootlock included with Symantec Norton Your Eyes Only).

  • Back up all critical data on your hard disk. While it is unlikely that you will encounter a serious problem installing Windows 98, it is always a good idea to perform a complete system backup before installing a new operating system. When you upgrade your computer's operating system, it is possible that an error could occur (such as a problem due to incompatible hardware or a power failure) that could temporarily or permanently prevent access to the data on your hard disk.

Installing Windows 98

If you are upgrading Windows 95, start Windows 95 and then insert the Windows 98 CD-ROM. Follow the instructions on your screen to install Windows 98.

If you are not upgrading Windows 95, see the appropriate section of the Setup.txt file for specific installation instructions.

To read the Setup.txt file online, please see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:

  • 179756: Windows 98 Setup.txt File

Note: When Setup prompts you to make a new Startup disk for Windows 98, be sure to do so. See the Setup.txt file for additional information about creating a Windows 98 Startup disk.

Common Windows 98 Setup Issues

For information about known Setup issues, please view the Setup.txt file, or see the following articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 140901: Err Msg: Could Not Decode This Setup (.cab) File

  • 128730: Error Message "Invalid System Disk" After Setup Reboots

How to Obtain Assistance with Windows 98

For information about how to get support for Windows 98, please visit the following Microsoft Web site: http://www.microsoft.com/Windows98/support/contact/default.asp.

Troubleshooting Windows 98 Startup Problems and Error Messages

Last reviewed: September 21, 1998

Article ID: 188867

The information in this article applies to:

  • Microsoft Windows 98

This article describes troubleshooting steps that may help you solve problems starting Windows 98. This information is also available in our Windows 98 Startup and Shutdown Troubleshooting Wizard. We recommend using this wizard, but we have also created this text-based article for your convenience. The Windows 98 Startup and Shutdown Troubleshooting Wizard is located on the following Microsoft Web page: http://support.microsoft.com/support/tshoot/default.asp

Summary

This article lists troubleshooting steps you can use if your computer stops responding (hangs), or you receive an error message, such as a fatal exception error message or an invalid VxD error message.

More Information

Start Windows 98 in Safe Mode

If Windows 98 does not start normally, try to start it in Safe mode. To start Windows 98 in Safe mode, restart your computer, press and hold down the CTRL key until the Windows 98 Startup menu appears, and then choose Safe Mode.

If Windows 98 does not start in Safe mode, see the "Windows 98 Does Not Start in Safe Mode" section later in this article. If Windows 98 does start in Safe mode, see the "Windows 98 Starts in Safe Mode" section later in this article.

Windows 98 Does Not Start in Safe Mode

Any of the following conditions can cause Windows 98 not to start in Safe mode:

  • Your computer is infected with a virus. For additional information about computer viruses, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    129972: Description of Computer Viruses

  • Your computer's CMOS settings are not correct. Check your computer's CMOS settings to make sure they are correct. Note that you may need to contact the computer manufacturer to verify these settings.

  • There is a hardware conflict. These conflicts can include, but are not limited to, PCI BIOS settings, IRQ conflicts, redundant COM ports (for example, two COM1 ports, or an internal modem set to the same COM port as an existing serial port), and defective RAM chips.

  • A setting in the Msdos.sys file needs to be changed (for example, the Logo setting should be set to zero). For additional information about the Msdos.sys file, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    118579: Contents of the Windows Msdos.sys File

You have a compressed drive that is unable to mount a compressed volume (CVF) file. For more information about how to troubleshoot DriveSpace issues, please see the following articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 130018: Computer Caught in Reboot Loop After Using DriveSpace

  • 133175: Troubleshooting DriveSpace in Windows 95

If you are still unable to start Windows 98 in Safe mode, run the Windows Registry Checker (Scanreg.exe) tool as there may be a problem with the system registry. To start Windows Registry Checker, click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, click System Information, and then click Registry Checker on the Tools menu.

For information about Windows Registry Checker, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 183887: Description of the Windows Registry Checker Tool (Scanreg.exe)

If you are still unable to start Windows 98 in Safe mode after using Windows Registry Checker, install Windows 98 into a new, empty folder. This step helps to establish whether the problem is related to a remnant of the previous operating system (such as a configuration setting) or a hardware problem.

Windows 98 Starts in Safe Mode

If Windows 98 starts in Safe mode, step through the startup process to see if any devices do not load properly. To do so, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type "msconfig" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.

  2. Click Selective Startup.

  3. Try different boot options. The following table lists several startup options. The options are labeled Boot A, Boot B, Boot C. To use a boot option, click the appropriate check boxes to select or clear them. Follow the instructions below the table to determine the cause of your problem.

    Boot A

    Boot B

    Boot C

    Process Config.sys file

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    Process Autoexec.bat file

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    Process Winstart.bat (if available)

    Yes

    Yes

    No

    Process System.ini file

    No

    Yes

    Yes

    Process Win.ini file

    No

    Yes

    Yes

    Load Startup Group items

    Yes

    Yes

    No

    Note: The Msconfig tool cannot disable a file that has the read-only attribute, although it behaves as though it can. To determine if the Msconfig tool has replaced the file you are attempting to disable with a copy of the file, text similar to the following text should appear at the beginning of the file:

    rem
     rem   *** DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE! ***
     rem
     rem   This file was created by the System Configuration Utility as
     rem   a placeholder for your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. Your actual
     rem   AUTOEXEC.BAT file has been saved under the name AUTOEXEC.TSH.
     rem
    

    Note: If Windows 98 does not start normally under any of the following scenarios, see the "Troubleshooting Protected-Mode Driver Problems" section later in this article.

    First, try the Boot A option. If Windows 98 does not start normally under these conditions, try the Boot B option. If Windows 98 does start normally using the Boot A option, there is a problem in the System.ini or Win.ini file. To find which line in the System.ini or Win.ini file is causing the problem, follow these steps:

    a. Click Start, click Run, type "msconfig" (without quotation marks) in the Open box type, and then click OK.

    b. Click the Win.ini tab.

    c. Double-click the Windows folder.

    d. Click the load= and run= check boxes to remove the check marks.

    e. Click OK.

    f. When you are prompted to restart your computer, click Yes.

    If Windows 98 starts normally using the Boot B option, there is a problem with a driver or terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR) program being loaded from the Config.sys or Autoexec.bat file. See the "Troubleshooting TSR Problems" section later in this article.

    If Windows 98 does not start normally with the Boot A or Boot B options, try the Boot C option. If Windows 98 starts normally using the Boot C option, there is a problem with a program that is run during startup. See the "Troubleshooting StartUp Folder Problems" section later in this article.

    If you are still unable to start Windows 98 normally, use the System File Checker tool to check for damaged or replaced system files. To start System File Checker, click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, click System Information, and then click System File Checker on the Tools menu.

    For information about how to use System File Checker to extract a file, please see the "System File Checker Tool" section of the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    129605: How to Extract Original Compressed Windows Files

    For more information about System File Checker, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    185836: Description of the System File Checker Tool (Sfc.exe)

If you are still unable to start Windows 98 normally, see the "Troubleshooting Protected-Mode Driver Problems" section later in this article.

Troubleshooting StartUp Folder Problems:

The problem may be a result of a program that is run during startup. To determine which program is causing the problem, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type "msconfig" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.

  2. Click the Startup tab, and then click each check box to clear it.

  3. Click OK, and then restart your computer when you are prompted to do so.

If the problem is resolved, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type "msconfig" (without the quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.

  2. On the Startup tab, click the first check box in the list to select it.

  3. Click OK. and then restart your computer when you are prompted to do so.

If the problem is still resolved, repeat steps 1-3, but click the next check box in the list to select it. When the problem returns, the last check box you selected is loading a program that is preventing Windows 98 to start normally. Contact the program's manufacturer for further assistance.

There may also be a problem with a TSR being loaded in the Winstart.bat file (if the Winstart.bat file exists). If the Process Winstart.bat File check box is available on the General tab in System Configuration Utility, click the check box to clear it, click OK, and then restart your computer.

The Winstart.bat file is usually located in the Windows folder, and is used to load TSRs that are required only by Windows-based programs.

Troubleshooting TSR Problems:

The problem may be a driver or TSR being loaded from the Config.sys or Autoexec.bat file. To determine if this is the case, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type "msconfig" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.

  2. Click Selective Startup, and then click the Process Autoexec.bat File check box to clear it.

  3. Click OK, and then restart your computer when you are prompted to do so.

If the problem is resolved, the problem driver or TSR is being loaded from the Autoexec.bat file. If the problem is not resolved, the problem driver or TSR is being loaded from the Config.sys file. To determine which line in the Autoexec.bat or Config.sys file is loading the driver or TSR, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type "msconfig" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.

  2. Click the Autoexec.bat or Config.sys tab, and then click the check boxes for all non-essential drivers and programs to clear them.

  3. Click OK, and then restart your computer when you are prompted to do so.

If the problem is resolved, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type "msconfig" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.

  2. On the Autoexec.bat or Config.sys tab, click the first check box in the list to select it.

  3. Click OK, and then restart your computer when you are prompted to do so.

If the problem is still resolved, repeat steps 1-3, but click the next check box in the list to select it. When the problem returns, the last check box you selected is loading the driver or TSR that is causing the problem. Contact the manufacturer of the program for further assistance.

If the problem is not resolved, run the Windows Registry Checker as there may be a problem with the system registry. To start Windows Registry Checker, click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, click System Information, and then click Registry Checker on the Tools menu.

Troubleshooting Protected-Mode Driver Problems:

The problem may be a Windows 98 protected-mode driver. To determine if this is the case, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type "msconfig" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.

  2. On the General Tab, click Advanced.

  3. Under Settings, click a check box to select it.

  4. Click OK, click OK again, and then restart your computer.

If the problem is not resolved, repeat steps 1-4, but click a different check box to select it in step 3. When the problem is resolved, the last check box you selected is causing the problem. For more information about advanced settings, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 181966: System Configuration Utility Advanced Troubleshooting Settings

If the problem is not resolved, disable PCI bus IRQ steering in Windows. To do so, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 182628: How to Disable PCI Bus IRQ Steering in Windows

If the problem is not resolved, follow these steps to disable devices in Device Manager:

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.

  2. Double-click System.

    On the Device Manager tab, disable all devices under the following branches:

    • Display adapters

    • Hard disk controllers

    • Mouse

    • PCMCIA socket

    • SCSI controllers

    • Floppy disk controllers

    • Keyboard

    • Network adapters

    • Ports

    • Sound, video, and game controllers

    To disable a device in Device Manager, follow these steps:

    a. Double-click the branch containing the device you want, click the device, and then click Properties.

    b. On the General tab, click the Disable In This Hardware Profile check box to select it, and then click OK.

    c. Restart your computer.

    If the problem is resolved, enable the devices you disabled in step 3, and then verify that no devices are conflicting. Enable devices in the following order:

    • COM ports

    • Hard disk controllers

    • Floppy disk controllers

    • Other devices

    To enable a device and check for possible conflicts, follow these steps:

    a. Double-click the branch containing the device you want, click the device, and then click Properties.

    b. On the General tab, click the Disable In This Hardware Profile check box to clear it.

    c. Click the Resources tab and verify that there are no conflicts listed under Conflicting Device List. Note that the Resources tab does not appear for each device.

    d. Click OK, and then restart your computer.

If the problem is not resolved, run the Automatic Skip Driver Agent tool to enable any device that has been disabled. To start Automatic Skip Driver Agent, click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, click System Information, and then click Automatic Skip Driver Agent on the Tools menu.

For information about how to use Automatic Skip Driver Agent, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 186588: Description of Description of the Automatic Skip Driver Agent (Asd.exe) Tool

If the problem is not resolved, check for a damaged static virtual device driver (VxD) by following these steps:

  1. Restart your computer, press and hold down the CTRL key until the Windows 98 Startup menu appears, and then choose Step-By-Step Confirmation.

  2. Press Y at each prompt up to and including the "Load all Windows drivers?" prompt, and then press N to everything else. Note that you should make a list of all the items trying to load after this point. This prevents VxDs from loading and VxDs in the Windows\System\Vmm32 folder from overriding Windows internal VxDs (VxDs built into the Vmm32.vxd file).

Additional Notes

For information about known hardware issues, view the Hardware.txt file in the Windows folder.

For additional troubleshooting assistance, view the Bootlog.txt file in the root folder. The Bootlog.txt file lists the loading status of all real- mode and protected-mode drivers. If Windows 98 does not start properly, the Bootlog.txt file lists the last driver that loaded successfully, and lists a "LoadFail" entry for each driver that failed to load before the problem occurred.

Note: Some "LoadFail" entries in the Bootlog.txt file are normal entries. For a listing of normal "LoadFail" entries in the Bootlog.txt file, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

127970: Load Failures Listed in the Bootlog.txt File

If the problem is not resolved, contact Microsoft Technical Support.

Why Do I Receive a "Could not decode this setup (.CAB) file" Error Message When I Try to Access Files on My Windows CD-ROM?

Last reviewed: October 19, 1998

Article ID: 140901

The information in this article applies to:

  • Microsoft Windows 98

  • Microsoft Windows 95

Symptoms

When you try to install Windows 95 or Windows 98, or install a component that requires copying files from the original Windows disks or CD-ROM, you may receive an error message similar to one of the following messages:

  • Setup has detected the following decoding error: "Could not decode this setup (.CAB) file." Setup will attempt to recover from this situation, click OK to continue.

  • Setup (.cab) file error Setup has detected the following decoding error: Setup has detected a corrupt setup (.cab) file. Setup will attempt to recover from this situation.

When you click OK, Setup either proceeds or generates the same error message again.

Cause

This behavior can occur for any of the following reasons:

  • Your CD-ROM drive is not functioning properly. The CD-ROM may vibrate too much for the laser to accurately read the data. With the higher spin rates of modern CD-ROM drives, slight damage to a CD-ROM can affect the CD-ROM drive's ability to read a CD-ROM properly.

  • Your computer is over-clocked. Extracting files from the Windows 95/98 cabinet files is memory intensive. If your computer is over-clocked beyond the default settings, it can contribute to decoding errors. Computers that are not over-clocked but are having a cooling problem can also experience decoding errors.

  • Your computer has bad or mismatched RAM or cache. Even if Windows seems to be running without problems, the additional stress of extracting files and accessing the disk may contribute to decoding errors.

  • Your computer has Bus Mastering or Ultra DMA enabled in the BIOS and in Device Manager. The data may be moving too quickly for the system to keep up.

  • You are using a third-party memory manager.

  • There is a virus on your computer.

  • Your Windows 95/98 CD-ROM or disks are damaged.

Resolution

To resolve this error message, follow these steps. If one step does not resolve the problem, try the next step.

  1. Remove the CD-ROM from the CD-ROM drive, rotate it one-quarter to one- half a turn, reinsert the CD-ROM into the drive, and then click OK.

  2. Use real-mode CD-ROM drivers. If you are unable to locate the real-mode CD-ROM drivers for your CD-ROM drive, try using the CD-ROM drivers on the Windows 98 Startup Disk. The Windows 98 Startup disk provides support for most types of CD-ROM drives, including integrated device electronics (IDE) and small computer system interface (SCSI) CD-ROM drives. Run Windows Setup from MS-DOS.

  3. Try to slow down your computer. To slow down your computer, use any or all of the following methods:

    Change your computer's CMOS settings. Bus mastering, external/internal cache, RAM settings/timings, and other settings contribute to the speed at which your computer runs. For information about how to change these settings, consult the documentation that is included with your computer.

  4. Copy the contents of the Win95 or Win98 folder on the CD-ROM to an empty folder on your hard disk, and then run Windows Setup from that folder. If you are unable to copy the Win95 or Win98 folder on the CD-ROM to you hard disk, the CD-ROM may be damaged.

  5. Restart your computer. For Windows 95, press the F8 key when you see the "Starting Windows 95" message, and then choose Step-By-Step Confirmation from the Startup menu.

    For Windows 98, press and hold down the CTRL key after your computer completes the Power On Self Test (POST), and then choose Step-by-Step Confirmation from the Startup menu. For more information about Windows 98 startup, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    178548: No "Starting Windows 98" Message at Startup

    Press Y at each prompt except the following prompts:

    • Process your startup device drivers (CONFIG.SYS)?

    • Process your startup command file (AUTOEXEC.BAT)?

    If this resolves the issue, isolate the conflict with a terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR) program or real-mode device driver using the Step-by-Step Confirmation function.

  6. Check your computer for a virus using virus-detection software.

  7. Run Windows 98 Setup using the following command:

    setup /c

    This switch bypasses running SMARTDrive.

  8. Using an MS-DOS based text editor (such as EDIT.COM), view the contents of SETUPLOG.TXT (located in the root of your boot drive). Look for the line which refers to the cabinet file (.CAB) that was accessed and manually extract all the files from that cabinet file to an empty folder on the hard drive, then copy any remaining files from the Win98 folder on the CD-ROM to the same folder on the hard drive.

    Usually, there are many duplicate entries in SETUPLOG.TXT that may resemble the following:

    CAB-Ben->CloseCabinet on ERROR 11

    SUMB:Setup (.CAB) File Error:Setup has detected the following
    decoding error 'Setup has detected a corrupt Setup (.CAB) file.'.
    Setup will attempt to recover from this situation. Click OK to
    continue.:OK
    DCE:C:\WIN95\SYSTEM\PRECOPY\\BASE5.CAB=2
    DCE:remaining=0

    CAB-Ben->CloseCabinet on ERROR 8

    SUMB:Setup (.CAB) File Error:Setup has detected the following
    decoding error 'Setup has detected a corrupt Setup (.CAB) file.'.
    Setup will attempt to recover from this situation. Click OK to
    continue.:OK
    DCE:F:\WIN98\\WIN98_37.CAB=13
    DCE:remaining=0

  9. If you are still receiving a decoding error in Windows 98, you can manually extract all the Windows 98 files from the Windows 98 cabinet files on the CD-ROM to your hard disk, and then run Windows 98 Setup from the hard disk. It requires approximately 300 MB of hard disk space to extract the Windows 98 files. You can use the Ext.exe utility to extract the Windows 98 files. This utility is located on the Windows 98 startup disk and in the \Oldmsdos folder on the Windows 98 CD-ROM. To manually extract the Windows 98 files, follow these steps:

    a. Insert your Windows 98 Startup disk in the floppy disk drive, and then restart your computer.

    Note: If you do not have a Windows 98 Startup disk, you need to obtain one from any Windows 98-based computer. To create a Windows 98 Startup disk on a functional Windows 98-based computer, follow these steps:

    1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Add/Remove Programs.

    2. On the Startup Disk tab, click Create Disk, and then follow the instructions on the screen.

    b. At the command prompt, type "ext" (without quotation marks).

    c. When you are prompted for the location of the cabinet files, type the path to the folder that you created in step 4.

    d. When you are prompted for the files to extract, type "*.*" (without quotation marks) to extract all files.

    e. When you are prompted for the location to which the files are to be extracted, type in the path to the folder you created in step 3. Setup is designed to look for the existence of a file before it is extracted from the cabinet file.

    Note that this does not extract the files in the Precopy1.cab and Precopy2.cab cabinet files.

    f. After all the files have been extracted, run Setup from MS-DOS in the folder that contains the setup files.

More Information

Windows 98 Setup attempts to recover from the decoding error by re-seeking the CD-ROM and attempting to extract the files to a different location. Setup tries up to 128 times to re-seek on a random location on the CD-ROM to start the file copy process again. This is logged in the Setuplog.txt file and you may notice CD-ROM and hard disk activity, but very little progress during Setup. If Setup is unable to extract the files after 128 retries, the decoding error message is displayed again.

Dial-Up Networking Password Is Not Saved

Last reviewed: October 2, 1998

Article ID: 148925

The information in this article applies to:

  • Microsoft Windows 95

  • Microsoft Windows 98

Important: This article contains information about editing the registry. Before you edit the registry, make sure you understand how to restore it if a problem occurs. For information about how to do this, view the "Restoring the Registry" Help topic in Regedit.exe or the "Restoring a Registry Key" Help topic in Regedt32.exe.

Symptoms

When you try to save your password when you are making a Dial-Up Networking connection by clicking the Save Password check box, your password may not be saved. This problem can occur even when you successfully connect to the server, and when your password has not changed.

Cause

This problem can be caused by any of the following situations:

  • Password caching is disabled.

  • One or more of the files associated with Dial-Up Networking is missing or damaged.

  • Your password list (.pwl) file is damaged.

  • The Rna.pwl file (if it exists) is damaged.

  • Automatic logon is enabled.

Note: This problem has been known to occur after installing the Windows 95 Password List Update that is included with Microsoft Windows 95 Service Pack 1. For more information about this update, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

143003: Description of Microsoft Windows 95 Service Pack 1 Updates

Resolution

Warning: Using Registry Editor incorrectly can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems resulting from the incorrect use of Registry Editor can be solved. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.

For information about how to edit the registry, view the "Changing Keys And Values" Help topic in Registry Editor (Regedit.exe) or the "Add and Delete Information in the Registry" and "Edit Registry Data" Help topics in Regedt32.exe. Note that you should back up the registry before you edit it.

  1. Verify that password caching is enabled. To do so, use Registry Editor to view the DisablePwdCaching string value in the following registry key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \Software \Microsoft \Windows \CurrentVersion \Policies \Network

    If password caching is disabled, the DisablePwdCaching string value has a value data of 1. To enable password caching, change the value data to "0" (without quotation marks).

  2. Remove Dial-Up Networking, and then reinstall it. To do so, follow these steps:

    a. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Add/Remove Programs.

    b. Click the Windows Setup tab.

    c. Click Communications, and then click Details.

    d. Click the Dial-Up Networking check box to clear it, click OK, and then restart your computer if you are prompted to do so.

    e. Repeat steps A-C.

    f. Click the Dial-Up Networking check box to select it, and then click OK.

    g. If you are using MSN, The Microsoft Network version 2.51, reinstall this program. For information about how to do so, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    179604: How to Manually Install MSN Components from the MSN 2.51 CD-ROM

  3. Rename your .pwl file. To do so, type the following line at a command prompt, and then press ENTER

    ren c:\<windows>\<username>.pwl <username>.xxx
    

    where <windows> is the name of your Windows folder and <username> is the user name you use to log on to Windows 95. After renaming your .pwl file, restart your computer.

    When the Enter Network Password or Welcome To Windows dialog box appears, type the password that you normally use, and then click OK. When you are prompted to confirm the password that you entered, type the password again in the Confirm New Password box, and then click OK.

    Note: If there are no .pwl files present on the drive (for example, the user pressed the ESC key when prompted for a password as Windows 95 starts) password caching will not be enabled. The user must first log on to the network in order to create a .pwl file.

  4. Rename the Rna.pwl file in the Windows folder. To do so, type the following line at a command prompt, and then press ENTER:

    ren c:\<windows>\rna.pwl rna.xxx
    

    where <windows> is the name of your Windows folder. After renaming the Rna.pwl file, restart your computer.

    Note: The Rna.pwl file may not exist on your computer. This file is not required in some configurations.

  5. Disable automatic logon. To do so, delete the AutoLogon string value from the following registry key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \Software \Microsoft \Windows \CurrentVersion
     Network\Real Mode Net
    

More Information

For additional information about this issue, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 141858: No Windows or Network Logon Dialog Box at Startup

For additional information about problems that may occur when you attempt to save passwords in Windows 95, please see the following articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 135197: Damaged Password List File Does Not Save Passwords

  • 137361: Save Password Check Box Is Unavailable

  • 141858: No Windows or Network Logon Dialog Box at Startup

Why am I Unable to Access My Modem or Prompted to Install One Even Though One is Already Installed?

Last reviewed: July 31, 1998

Article ID: 150619

The information in this article applies to:

  • Microsoft Windows 95

  • Microsoft Windows 98

Symptoms

A 32-bit TAPI program may not be able to access installed modems. Even though there is a modem installed, the program may start the Install New Modem Wizard, or may not allow you to select a modem.

For example, when you start the Make New Connection wizard in Dial-Up Networking, the Install New Modem wizard may start even though a modem is already installed.

Cause

This behavior can occur if the Unimodem TAPI Service Provider file (Unimdm.tsp) is missing or damaged.

Resolution

Extract a new copy of the Unimdm.tsp file from your original Windows disks or CD-ROM to the Windows\System folder. For Windows 95, the Unimdm.tsp file is located in the Win95_03.cab cabinet file. For Windows 98, the Unimdm.tsp file is located in the Win98_63.cab cabinet file.

For information about using the Extract tool, type "extract" (without quotation marks) at a command prompt or see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 129605: How to Extract Original Compressed Windows Files

More Information

Unimdm.tsp is the upper part of the layer of the communications sub- system that interfaces TAPI components to *VCOMM. In conjunction with Unimodem.vxd, this layer is responsible for placing calls made by telephony-aware programs. If Unimdm.tsp is not present, TAPI programs expecting to use a modem react as if one is not installed.

Modem Attempts to Dial When Windows Starts

Last reviewed: October 27, 1998

Article ID: 175312

The information in this article applies to:

  • Microsoft Windows 95

  • Microsoft Windows 98

Important: This article contains information about editing the registry. Before you edit the registry, make sure you understand how to restore it if a problem occurs. For information about how to do this, view the "Restoring the Registry" Help topic in Regedit.exe or the "Restoring a Registry Key" Help topic in Regedt32.exe.

Symptoms

When you start Windows, your modem may attempt to connect to your Internet service provider (ISP).

Cause

This behavior can occur for any of the following reasons:

  • You use a program that automatically checks for updated components or Web pages.

  • A program that dials your ISP is located in the StartUp folder.

  • Your computer is infected with a Trojan horse virus such as System32.exe that starts when you start your computer. Note that most anti-virus programs do not currently detect or remove Trojan horse viruses.

  • Symantec WinFax is installed on your computer.

Resolution

Warning: Using Registry Editor incorrectly can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems resulting from the incorrect use of Registry Editor can be solved. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.

For information about how to edit the registry, view the "Changing Keys And Values" Help topic in Registry Editor (Regedit.exe) or the "Add and Delete Information in the Registry" and "Edit Registry Data" Help topics in Regedt32.exe. Note that you should back up the registry before you edit it.

To resolve this behavior, use one of the following methods:

Configure Program That Dials ISP Not to Start Automatically

Configure the program that automatically checks for updated components or Web pages so that it does not start when Windows 95/98 starts. To do so, refer to the documentation included with the program.

Remove Program That Dials ISP from the StartUp Folder

  1. Remove the program that automatically checks for updated components or Web pages from the StartUp folder. To do so, follow these steps:

  2. Right-click Start, and then click Open.

  3. Double-click the Programs folder.

  4. Double-click the Startup folder.

Drag the program that automatically checks for updated components or Web pages from the Startup folder to another folder. This prevents the program from starting when Windows 95/98 starts. To start the program once you move it from the Startup folder, locate and click the program on the Start menu.

Remove System32.exe Trojan Horse Virus

  1. Delete or rename the System32.exe file in the Windows\System folder.

  2. Use Registry Editor to remove the SystemHandler value from the following registry key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \Software \Microsoft \Windows \CurrentVersion \Run
    

Modify Symantec WinFax

  1. Close WinFax and the Controller.

  2. Start Registry Editor, and then click Export Registry File on the Registry menu.

  3. In the Save In box, click C:\.

  4. In the File Name box, type "Regold" (without quotation marks), and then click OK.

  5. Change the following registry keys to "N":

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \Software \Microsoft \OLE \EnableDCOM
     HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \Software \Microsoft \OLE \EnableRemoteConnect
    
  6. Reconfigure your modem in WinFax.

More Information

This behavior can also occur if you are using a Lexmark printer. The Lexmark printer software may add Lexstart.exe to the Run key in the registry to handle print commands that you send to the printer. This can cause Dial-Up Networking to prompt you to dial your ISP. To work around this issue, back up your registry and then remove the Lexstart.exe value from the following registry key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \SOFTWARE \Microsoft \Windows \CurrentVersion \Run

If you are using Microsoft Personal Web Server 4.0, the Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator (MSDTC) service may be being loaded from the StartUp folder. If you do not want to remove the MSDTC service from the StartUp folder, configure Internet Explorer to connect to your ISP using a local area network (LAN). When you want to connect to the Internet, first connect to your ISP using Dial-Up Networking, and then start Internet Explorer. To configure Internet Explorer to use a LAN, follow these steps:

  1. Right-click the Internet Explorer icon on the desktop, and then click Properties.

  2. Click the Connection tab, click "Connect to the Internet using a local area network," and then click OK.

    Note: If the MSDTC service is not being loaded from the StartUp folder, remove the Msdtc value from the following registry key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \SOFTWARE \Microsoft \Windows \CurrentVersion \RunServices
    

The MSDTC service is installed by Personal Web Server 4.0, and provides cross-server transaction capabilities. MSDTC addresses the challenges of processing transactions over a distributed set of software components that exist on a single computer or network.

The third-party products discussed in this article are manufactured by vendors independent of Microsoft; we make no warranty, implied or otherwise, regarding these products' performance or reliability.

How to Convert a Drive to FAT32 Using Drive Converter

Last reviewed: July 15, 1998

Article ID: 180134

The information in this article applies to:

  • Microsoft Windows 98

Summary

This article describes how to convert a hard disk that uses the File Allocation Table (FAT or FAT16) file system to the FAT32 file system using Drive Converter.

Note: After you convert your hard disk to FAT32, you are unable to convert it back to the original FAT system.

More Information

To convert a drive to the FAT32 file system, use the following steps.

Note: Before you convert to the FAT32 file system, uninstall any utilities or tools that protect or encrypt the Master Boot Record (MBR) or partition table (for example, uninstall Bootlock included with Symantec Norton Your Eyes Only).

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, click Drive Converter (FAT32), and then click Next.

  2. In the Drives box, click the drive you want to convert to the FAT32 file system.

  3. Click Next, and then click OK.

  4. Click Next, click Next, and then click Next.

  5. When the conversion is complete, click Finish.

For more information about the FAT32 file system, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 154997: Description of FAT32 File System

Note: A drive must be at least 512 megabytes (MB) in size to be converted to the FAT32 file system.

How Can I Prevent Getting "Not enough memory to convert the drive to FAT32" When I Try to Convert My Hard Drive?

Last reviewed: October 14, 1998

Article ID: 188561

The information in this article applies to:

  • Microsoft Windows 98

Symptoms

When you attempt to convert your hard disk to the FAT32 file system, your computer may stop responding (hang) before the conversion is complete, or you may receive the following error message:

  • Not enough memory to convert the drive to FAT32. To free up memory, REM all statements in the Autoexec.bat and the Config.sys files.

Cause

This behavior can occur for either of the following reasons:

  • There is not enough free conventional memory.

  • The directory structure is too large on the drive being converted to a FAT32 file system.

Resolution

To resolve this behavior, try increasing the amount of free conventional memory, and then convert your hard disk to the FAT32 file system in real mode. For information about how to increase the amount of free conventional memory, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 134399: How to Increase Conventional Memory for MS-DOS-Based Programs

To continue to increase the amount of free conventional memory, and then convert your hard disk to the FAT32 file system in real mode, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Information.

  2. On the Tools menu, click System Configuration Utility.

  3. On the Autoexec.bat tab, click the check boxes of all non-essential drivers and programs to clear them.

  4. On the Config.sys tab, click the check boxes of all non-essential drivers and programs to clear them.

  5. Click New, and then type the following lines (note that you must click New before adding each line)

    device=c:\<windows>\himem.sys
     device=c:\<windows>\emm386.exe /noems
     dos=high,umb
    

    where <windows> is the folder in which Windows 98 is installed.

    Note: If any of these lines already exist, select the line and then click Edit to change it.

  6. Using the Find tool, check for the existence of the Dblspace.ini or Drvspace.ini file in the root folder of your physical boot drive (drive C or the host for drive C).

    Note: The Dblspace.ini and Drvspace.ini files are hidden files. To view hidden files, click Folder Options on the View menu in Windows Explorer, click the View tab, click Show All Files, and then click OK.

    If either file exists, follow these steps:

    a. Using a text editor (such as Notepad), open the Dblspace.ini or Drvspace.ini file.

    b. Search for the "ActivateDrive=" line.

    c. If the line exists, close the Dblspace.ini or Drvspace.ini file, and then add the following line to the Config.sys file:

    devicehigh=c:\<windows>\command\drvspace.sys /move
    

    If the line does not exist, close and then rename the Dblspace.ini or Drvspace.ini file to a different name (such as Dblspace.xxx or Drvspace.xxx).

    For information about renaming files in Windows 98, click Start, click Help, click the Index tab, type "renaming" (without quotation marks), and then double-click the "Renaming Files" topic.

  7. Click OK, and then click Yes when you are prompted to restart your computer.

  8. Click Start, point to Find, and then click Files And Folders.

  9. Type "exit to dos.pif" (including quotation marks), and then click Find Now.

  10. In the list of found files, right-click the Exit To Dos.pif file, and then click Rename.

  11. Type "old exit to dos" (without quotation marks), and then press ENTER.

  12. In the Named box, type "dosstart.bat" (without quotation marks), and then click Find Now.

  13. In the list of found files, right-click the Dosstart.bat file, and then click Rename.

  14. Type "old dosstart.bat" (without quotation marks), and then press ENTER.

  15. Run the Drive Converter (FAT32) tool and try to convert your drive to the FAT32 file system again. If your drive is converted successfully, do not proceed with step 16. If the problem persists, try increasing the amount of free conventional memory, and then convert your hard disk to the FAT32 file system in real mode. To do so, continue with step 16:

  16. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.

  17. Double-click Add/Remove Programs, and then click the Install/Uninstall tab.

  18. In the list of installed programs, click Delete Windows 98 Uninstall Information if it appears in the list, and then click Add/Remove.

  19. Click Yes to delete the uninstall information, click OK, and then restart your computer.

  20. While your computer is restarting, press and hold down the CTRL key until the Windows 98 Startup menu appears, and then choose Command Prompt Only.

  21. At the command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after each line

    <drive>:
     attrib suhdlog.dat -h -r
     del suhdlog.dat
    

    where <drive> is the drive letter of your physical boot drive (drive C or the host for drive C).

    Note: Steps 8-13 are required to remove the Windows 98 uninstall information. The Drive Converter (FAT32) tool automatically removes Windows 98 uninstall information when it is started in Windows, but not when it is started in real mode (step 14). Windows 98 cannot be uninstalled if your hard disk is converted to the FAT32 file system after you install Windows 98.

  22. At the command prompt, type the following line, and then press ENTER

    CVT <drive>: /CVT32
    

    where <drive> is the letter of the drive you are converting to the FAT32 file system.

  23. Follow the instructions on your screen to convert your hard disk to the FAT32 file system.

    Note: If the conversion still does not complete successfully, the directory structure may be too large on the drive you are trying to convert. To work around this behavior, move some folders and files to another drive and then repeat steps 14-15.

  24. After your drive is converted to the FAT32 file system, Windows 98 starts. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Information.

  25. On the Tools menu, click System Configuration Utility.

  26. On the Autoexec.bat tab, click all of the check boxes to select them.

  27. On the Config.sys tab, click all of the check boxes to select them.

  28. Click the check boxes of the lines you typed in step 5 to clear them, and then click OK. Click No when you are prompted to restart your computer.

  29. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Disk Defragmenter.

  30. Select the drive you converted to the FAT32 file system, and then click OK. Follow the instructions on your screen to defragment your drive, and then restart your computer.

More Information

For additional information about the FAT32 file system, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 154997: Description of FAT32 File System

How to Install New Hardware in Windows

Last reviewed: June 23, 1998

Article ID: 142984

The information in this article applies to:

  • Microsoft Windows 95

  • Microsoft Windows 98

Summary

This article describes how to install new hardware for use in Windows. This article addresses the following topics:

  • Manufacturer-supplied drivers

  • Installing modems

  • Installing printers

  • Troubleshooting problems with the Add New Hardware Wizard

More Information

Manufacturer-Supplied Drivers

  1. To install a manufacturer-supplied driver, follow these steps:

  2. In Control Panel, double-click Add New Hardware.

    In Windows 95, click Next, click No, and then click Next.

    In Windows 98, click Next, and then click Next again to search for plug and play devices. If the device you are installing is not found, click "No, the device isn't in the list," click Next, click "No, I want to select the hardware from a list," and then click Next.

    Note: If Windows 98 finds your hardware when it searches for plug and play devices, click "Yes, the device is in the list," click the device in the list, click Next, and then click Finish. You do not have to provide a manufacturer-supplied driver.

  3. Click the type of hardware for which you are installing the driver, and then click Next.

  4. Click Have Disk.

  5. Type the path for the driver you are installing and click OK, or click Browse and locate the driver. You must type the path for or locate the Oemsetup.inf file from the manufacturer.

  6. In the dialog box listing the .inf file, click OK. Click OK to continue.

  7. Click the correct driver and then click OK.

  8. Click Finish.

Note: If the new hardware is Plug and Play-compatible, you will need to click Next and then click Finish.

Installing Modems

To install a new modem, follow these steps:

  1. In Control Panel, double-click Modems.

  2. If this is to be the first modem installed in the computer, the Install New Modem Wizard starts automatically. If not, click Add.

  3. If you want Windows to detect your modem, click Next. If not, click the "Don't detect my modem..." check box to select it, and then click Next.

  4. If you chose to have Windows detect your modem, Windows queries the serial ports on your computer looking for a modem. If Windows detects an incorrect modem, click Change, and select the appropriate manufacturer and model. Click Next, and then continue with step 7.

  5. If you chose to select your modem manually, click the appropriate manufacturer and model, and then click Next.

  6. Click the appropriate communications port, and then click Next.

  7. Click Finish.

Installing Printers

To install a new printer, follow these steps:

  1. Click the Start button, point to Settings, and then click Printers.

  2. Double-click Add Printer, and then click Next.

  3. Click Local Printer or Network Printer as appropriate, and then click Next.

    If you click Network Printer, you are prompted for the network path for the printer. If you do not know the correct path, click Browse, or check with your network administrator. Click either Yes or No in the "Do you print from MS-DOS-based programs?" area, and then click Next.

  4. Click the appropriate manufacturer and model for your printer, and then click Next.

  5. If you chose to install a local printer, click the correct port and then click Next.

  6. Type a name for the printer (or accept the default name), and then click either Yes or No in the "Do you want your Windows-based programs to use this printer as the default printer?" area. Click Next.

  7. To print a test page, click Yes. Click Finish.

Troubleshooting Problems with the Add New Hardware Wizard

You may receive the following error message while installing new hardware:

The specified location does not contain information about your hardware.

This error can occur if you select an incorrect hardware type or the driver is not Windows 95 or Windows 98-compatible.

If the driver is not Windows 95 or Windows 98-compatible, refer to the manufacturer's instructions for installing the driver, or contact the manufacturer for assistance.

References

For additional information about .inf files and installing drivers, please consult the Windows Help system, or see the following articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

  • 132946: How to install Windows 3.1 drivers in Windows 95.

  • 137377: Removing Windows 3.1 drivers from Wizard hardware list.

Why Do I Receive "Error 745: An essential file is missing" When I Try to Use Dial-Up Networking?

Last reviewed: August 11, 1998

Article ID: 174579

The information in this article applies to:

  • Microsoft Windows 95

  • Microsoft Windows 95 OEM Service Release version 2

  • Microsoft Windows 98

IMPORTANT This article contains information about editing the registry. Before you edit the registry, you should first make a backup copy of the registry files (System.dat and User.dat). Both are hidden files in the Windows folder.

Symptoms

When you attempt to connect to a remote computer using Dial-Up Networking, you may receive the following error message:

Error 745: An essential file is missing.

Re-install Dial-Up Networking.

Cause

This error message can occur when a Dial-Up Networking dynamic-link library (DLL) file is missing or damaged.

Resolution

WARNING Using Registry Editor incorrectly can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall Windows 95/98. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems resulting from the incorrect use of Registry Editor can be solved. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.

For information about how to edit the registry, view the Changing Keys And Values online Help topic in Registry Editor (Regedit.exe). Note that you should make a backup copy of the registry files (System.dat and User.dat) before you edit the registry.

To resolve this issue, remove and reinstall Dial-Up Networking. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.

  2. Double-click Add/Remove Programs.

  3. Click the Windows Setup tab, click Communications, and then click Details.

  4. Click the Dial-Up Networking check box to clear it, click OK, and then click OK again.

  5. Click Start, click Shut Down, click Restart Your Computer, and then click Yes.

  6. Click Start, point to Programs, and then click Windows Explorer.

  7. If it exists, rename the Rasapi32.dll file located in the Windows\System folder.

    For information about how to rename a file, click Start, click Help, click the Index tab, type "renaming" (without quotation marks), and then double-click the "Renaming files" topic.

  8. Extract a new copy of the Rasapi32.dll file from your original Windows 95/98 CD-ROM or floppy disks into the Windows\System folder. To do this, use the appropriate method:

    Extracting Rasapi32.dll from the Windows 95 CD-ROM:

    a. Click Start, point to Programs, and then click MS-DOS Prompt.

    b. Type "cd\" (without quotation marks), and then press ENTER.

    c. Insert the Windows 95 CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive, and then close the Windows 95 screen if it appears.

    d. Type the following line at the command prompt, and then press ENTER

    extract /a <drive>:\win95\win95_02.cab rasapi32.dll /l
     c:\<windows>\system
    

    where <drive> is the drive letter assigned to your CD-ROM drive, and where <windows> is the name of the folder in which Windows is installed.

    e. Type "exit" (without quotation marks), and then press ENTER to return to windows.

    Extracting Rasapi32.dll from the Windows 95 Floppy Disks:

    a. Click Start, point to Programs, and then click MS-DOS Prompt.

    b. Type "cd\" (without quotation marks), and then press ENTER.

    c. Insert disk 10 of the Windows 95 disks into the floppy disk drive.

    d. Type the following line at the command prompt, and then press ENTER

    extract /a <drive>:\Win95_10.cab rasapi32.dll /l
     c:\<windows>\system
    

    where <drive> is the drive letter assigned to the floppy disk drive the Windows 95 floppy disk is located in, and where <windows> is the name of the folder in which Windows is installed.

    e. Type "exit" (without quotation marks), and then press ENTER to return to windows.

    Extracting Rasapi32.dll in Windows 98:

    Extract a new copy of the Rasapi32.dll file from your original Windows 98 CD-ROM into the Windows\System folder using the System File Checker tool. To start the System File Checker tool, click Start, click Run, type "sfc.exe" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.

    For more information about using the Extract tool, click the Start button, point to Programs, click MS-DOS prompt, type "extract" (without quotation marks), and then press ENTER. For more information about using the Extract tool or System File Checker, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    129605: How to Extract Original Compressed Windows Files

  9. Use Registry Editor to delete the SMM_Files key under the following registry key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \System \CurrentControlSet \Services
     RemoteAccess\Authentication
    
  10. Click Start, click Settings, and then click Control Panel.

  11. Double-click Add/Remove Programs.

  12. Click the Windows Setup tab, click Communications, and then click Details.

  13. Click the Dial-Up Networking check box to select it, click OK, and then click OK again.

  14. When you are prompted to restart your computer, click Yes.

  15. If you had previously installed Dial-Up Scripting in Windows 95, rename the Smmscrpt.dll file in the Windows\System folder, and then reinstall Dial-Up Scripting.

    For information about installing Dial-Up Scripting, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    153038: How to Automate Dial-Up Networking Connections

More Information

To determine the DLL file used by Dial-Up Networking, view the Path value under the following registry key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \System \CurrentControlSet \Services \RemoteAccess

Authentication\SMM_Files\PPP

The default value is "Rasapi32.dll." If Dial-Up Scripting is installed in Windows 95, this value may be "Smmscrpt.dll."

CompuServe's WOW! software, which is included with Windows 95 OEM Service Release 2 (OSR2), changes the Path value to "Smmcctb.dll" and adds "CISPPP: PPP connection using CompuServenetworks" to the available server types in the Dial-Up Networking connection properties.

The CompuServe WOW! software should no longer be necessary because CompuServe discontinued the WOW! service as of January 31, 1997.

THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THE MICROSOFT KNOWLEDGE BASE IS PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND. MICROSOFT DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL MICROSOFT CORPORATION OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER INCLUDING DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, LOSS OF BUSINESS PROFITS OR SPECIAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF MICROSOFT CORPORATION OR ITS SUPPLIERS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF LIABILITY FOR CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES SO THE FOREGOING LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY.

Microsoft TechNet

December 1998
Volume 6, Issue 12

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