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Chapter 14 - Migration Tool For NetWare

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The Windows NT Server Migration Tool for NetWare enables you to migrate NetWare servers to computers running Windows NT Server. The Migration Tool transfers user and group accounts, volumes, folders, and files. In addition, if the server you are migrating to runs File and Print Services for NetWare (FPNW), you can transfer users' logon scripts. (FPNW is a separate product that enables Windows NT Server to provide file and print sharing directly to NetWare clients.)

The Migration Tool enables you to

  • Preserve most user account information. 

  • Control the transfer of user and group names. 

  • Set passwords for transferred accounts. 

  • Control the transfer of account restrictions and administrative rights. 

  • Select the folders and files to transfer. 

  • Select a destination for transferred folders and files. 

  • Preserve effective rights (the NetWare equivalent of permissions) on folders and files. 

  • Perform trial migrations, to test how current settings will actually transfer information. 

  • Generate comprehensive log files, detailing what happened during migration. 

Software Requirements

  • The Migration Tool can be used to migrate information only to computers that run Windows NT Server and function as primary domain controllers or backup domain controllers. 

  • You can run the Migration Tool from the server to which you are migrating, or remotely from another computer running Windows NT Server or Windows NT Workstation. (To copy the Migration Tool to a workstation, copy the nwconv.exe, nwconv.hlp, logview.exe, and logview.hlp files from a server's systemroot\SYSTEM32 folder. 

  • Both NetWare Link IPX/SPX Compatible Transport (NWLink) and Gateway Service for NetWare must be installed on the server used to run the Migration Tool and on servers being migrated to. 

  • It is best to migrate to servers that have the Windows NT file system (NTFS) installed. Only files and folders transferred to NTFS can preserve permissions (trustee rights) from the NetWare server.

Planning a Migration

Before performing a migration, become familiar with the differences between Windows NT Server and NetWare, and plan the migration.

When planning a migration, consider the following issues:

  • How current NetWare clients access computers running Windows NT Server 

  • How servers should be organized into domains 

  • Which order to migrate NetWare servers in (if you are migrating more than one) 

By running a trial migration you can make informed migration decisions. In a trial, the Migration Tool creates a set of log files that reflect how users and groups and volumes will be transferred. By reviewing the log files, you can adjust migration options as desired. For more information, see "Running a Trial," later in this chapter.

Providing Access to Windows NT Server

If you plan to add Windows NT Server to provide file and print services, and if existing workstations on your network are running NetWare client software, you must decide how to provide connectivity to Windows NT Server:

  • To take full advantage of Windows NT Server features, upgrade workstations to Microsoft client software such as Windows NT Workstation or Windows 95. Such software preserves a workstation's connectivity to NetWare servers at the same time it supports all through Windows NT Server features. 

  • Alternatively, install FPNW on the computer you are migrating to. This enables the server to provide file and printer sharing directly to NetWare clients, with no changes necessary at the clients. 

Organizing Servers Into Domains

If you plan to migrate many NetWare servers to Windows NT Server in several departments, consider how to best organize the network using one or more domains. The domain organization offered by Windows NT Server provides users complete access to the network with a single logon. It also eases the chore of account management because all accounts can be located centrally and each user needs only one account for complete network access. For more information on Windows NT domains, see "Comparing Network Models," later in this chapter and the Windows NT Server Concepts and Planning Guide.

To decide how computers running Windows NT Server should be organized, inventory your current network resources and how they are used. Consider both servers and client workstations. (A simple chart showing both the existing organization and the organization to which you are moving might prove helpful.)

For example, suppose a department relies on several servers that users in other departments rarely access, and that all clients in the department are running Windows 3.1. The best course might be to upgrade all clients to Windows 95, migrate the servers to Windows NT Server, and organize them as a single domain.

Planning the Order of Server Migration

When you have determined which NetWare servers to transfer, plan the order in which to migrate them.

When you transfer accounts from multiple NetWare servers to a Windows NT Server domain, you consolidate user and group accounts. It's usually easiest to first migrate the server that contains the greatest number of user and group accounts. Then, as you migrate additional servers, use the Migration Tool to control how duplicate user and group accounts are handled.

Similarly, if volumes on NetWare servers have the same name and you are transferring the volumes to a single Windows NT Server computer, you should plan how you want the volumes organized on the Windows NT Server computer. By default, the Migration Tool merges all volumes of the same name as a single shared folder, but you can also transfer each volume to a different share, or transfer each volume to a different folder of the share.

Comparing Network Models

On Windows NT Server networks, servers can share account information when they are organized into one or more domains. (A domain is a collection of servers that share a common user account database and security policy.) In a domain, one server—the primary domain controller (PDC)—stores all accounts and replicates changes to the backup domain controllers in the domain.

Domain organization allows a group of computers to behave as though they were a single server. Users can reach all domain resources with a single username and password. Account administration on a domain is easy because changes are made only once, and they affect all servers in the domain. For the purposes of migration planning, you can think of a domain as an expansion of the NetWare bindery to a larger organizational unit.

When you transfer user and group accounts from a NetWare server to a computer running Windows NT Server, the Migration Tool automatically creates the accounts on the PDC of the server's domain. At the end of the migration process, accounts are replicated automatically to the backup domain controllers in the domain.

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For larger networks, you can link domains by establishing trust relationships between them. Once linked by trust, accounts in one domain can be used in another. For centralized administration, you can create a master domain, a single domain where all user accounts and global group accounts are stored. You can then use trust relationships to link each of the domains on the network to the master domain. When users log on and are authenticated by the master domain, resources throughout the network are available to them, yet all account information remains centralized for easy administration.

So that you can transfer user and group accounts from a NetWare server to a Windows NT Server master domain, the Migration Tool allows you to specify the domain to which accounts are transferred.

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For more information on network security and domains in Windows NT networking, see the Windows NT Server Concepts and Planning Guide.

Comparing User Accounts

User accounts on NetWare and Windows NT Server contain the same basic information: a username, a password, and the user's full name. Accounts also perform the same function: They establish a user's identity on the network. Both network operating systems support a range of restrictions that allow you to control user accounts and enable you to put user accounts into groups.

Account Restrictions

On NetWare, most default account restrictions are set using the Supervisor Options and can be changed for individual user accounts. On Windows NT Server, some account restrictions are set individually for each user account, whereas others—called account policies—have a single setting that is enforced for all accounts in the domain.

When the Migration Tool transfers user accounts, restrictions that can be modified for each Windows NT Server user account are transferred individually from each NetWare user account. For setting Windows NT Server account policies, you have two options:

  • To transfer these settings from the NetWare server's Supervisor account (the default).

  • To not transfer these settings from the NetWare server and, instead, use the Windows NT Server existing account policies. 

The following tables summarizes NetWare account restrictions, their Windows NT Server equivalents, and how they are transferred. The first table is for migrations to Windows NT Server computers that do not run FPNW, and the second shows the additional account restrictions migrated to servers that do run FPNW.

NetWare Account Restriction

Windows NT Equivalent

How Transferred

Expiration Date

Expiration Date

By individual user account

Account Disabled

Account Disabled

By individual user account

Limit Concurrent Connections

None

Not transferred

Require Password

Permit Blank Password

As policy for all accounts

Minimum Password Length

Minimum Password Length

As policy for all accounts

Force Periodic Password Changes

Password Never Expires

By individual user account

NetWare Account Restriction

Windows NT Equivalent

How Transferred

Days Between Forced Changes

Maximum Password Age

As policy for all accounts

Grace Logins

None

Not transferred

Allow User to Change Password

User Cannot Change Password

By individual user account

Require Unique Passwords

Password Uniqueness

As policy for all accounts

Station Restrictions

None

Not transferred

Time Restrictions

Logon Hours

By individual user account

Intruder Detection/Lockout

Account Lockout

As policy for all accounts

User Disk Volume Restrictions

None

Not transferred

NetWare Account Restriction

Windows NT (With FPNW) Equivalent

How Transferred

Limit Concurrent Connections

Limit Concurrent Connections

By individual user account

Grace Logins

Grace Logins

By individual user account

Station Restrictions

Station Restrictions

Not transferred

Login Scripts

Login Scripts

By individual user account

The following sections provide further details on how some account restrictions are transferred and describes the defaults, if any, on each system.

Expiration Date Both NetWare and Windows NT Server support expiration dates after which the account cannot log on. Note that the User Manager for Domains tool in Windows NT Server shows the last day an account is valid, whereas NetWare utilities show the first day the account is expired. Note In this release, NetWare accounts with expiration dates later than January 1, 2000, are given expiration dates of February 6, 2006 when migrated to Windows NT Server. Accounts with no expiration dates, or with expiration dates of December 31, 1999 or earlier, are not affected. Limit Concurrent Connections NetWare supports limiting a user's concurrent network connections. Windows NT Server itself does not support this restriction, so this information is transferred only if the server being migrated to runs FPNW. Require Password On Windows NT Server, a password is not required when the account policy allows blank passwords Minimum Password Length The NetWare default is 5 characters; the Windows NT Server default is 6. Force Periodic Password Changes The NetWare default is 40 days; the Windows NT Server default is 42 days. Grace Logins The number of times a user can log on after his or her password has expired. Windows NT Server itself does not support this feature, so this information is transferred only if the server being migrated to runs FPNW. Require Unique Passwords The number of different passwords required before the system allows reuse of one. NetWare requires 8 different passwords. The Windows NT Server default is 5 and can be set from 1 to 8. Station Restrictions Station restrictions limit the NetWare client computers from which a user can log in. Computers are specified according to their network and node addresses. Windows NT Server itself does not support these NetWare client restrictions. FPNW provides a way for you to set station restrictions on users, but existing station restrictions are not transferred by the Migration Tool. Windows NT Server supports a similar feature for restricting users to certain Microsoft client computers. Time Restrictions Time restrictions specify the hours during which a user can log in to the network. On NetWare, time restrictions are set in half-hour blocks. On Windows NT Server, they are set in hour blocks. The Migration Tool adjusts blocks set at the half hour to the whole hour when transferring time restrictions. For example, if the NetWare restriction allows a user to log on between 7:30 A.M. and 7:30 P.M., the user will be able to log on between 7:00 P.M. and 8:00 P.M. on Windows NT Server. Intruder Detection/Lockout When intruder detection and lockout is in effect, the specified number of unsuccessful logon attempts are allowed before the account is locked for the specified amount of time. By default, NetWare allows 7 attempts before locking the account; Windows NT Server (if intruder lockout is enabled) allows 5 attempts.

Comparing Administrative Accounts

On a NetWare network, the Supervisor account has complete control over the network, and you can grant limited administrative privileges to other users and groups by adding them to the lists of managers and operators. Similarly, on a Windows NT Server network, the administrator and members of the Administrators group have complete control of the network, and you can grant limited administrative privileges to users and groups by adding them to other built-in administrative groups.

For more information on the use of administrative groups in Windows NT Server, see the Windows NT Server Concepts and Planning Guide.

Supervisor

On a computer running Windows NT Server, members of the Administrators group are functionally similar to the NetWare Supervisor. To grant a user full administrative privileges, add the user to the Administrators group.

By default, when transferring user accounts, the Migration Tool does not add accounts that have Supervisor rights to the Administrators group. However, you can choose to do so.

Workgroup Manager and User Account Manager

Because user account administration is centralized on a Windows NT Server domain, there is no need to delegate account administration to individual users who have administrative power on a particular server. When transferring accounts, the Migration Tool does not grant any kind of Windows NT Server administrative rights to accounts that were Workgroup or User Account Managers.

The closest Windows NT Server equivalent to the NetWare Workgroup Manager and User Account Manager is the Account Operators group. Account Operators can create, delete, and manage user and group accounts (except administrative accounts and groups).

File Server Console Operator

The closest Windows NT Server equivalent to the NetWare Console Operator is the Server Operators group. However, because Server Operators have greater power than Console Operators, the Migration Tool does not transfer NetWare Console Operators to the Windows NT Server Operators group.

In addition to being able to shut down the server, broadcast messages, see connection information, and set the system date and time, Server Operators can also back up and restore files and folders, lock and unlock the server, and share and stop sharing folders. Unlike Console Operators, whose control can be restricted to a single server, Server Operators have abilities on every server in the domain.

Print Server Operator and Print Queue Operator

The NetWare Print Server and Print Queue Operators are equivalent to the Windows NT Server Print Operators group. On a Windows NT Server network, the functionality represented by NetWare printers and print queues is integrated and administered from the Printers folder. Windows NT Server Print Operators can perform all of the tasks of NetWare Print Server and Print Queue Operators, including the ability to change queues and printer forms as well as manipulate the jobs within a queue.

The Migration Tool automatically adds users and groups who are Print Server Operators to the Windows NT Server Print Operators group. However, because adding Print Queue Operators to the Windows NT Server Print Operators group would grant them more authority than they currently have, the Migration Tool does not transfer users who are only Print Queue Operators to any Windows NT Server group.

Comparing Folder and File Security

When you use the Migration Tool to transfer folders and files from a NetWare server to a Windows NT Server computer, their effective rights are translated to the equivalent Windows NT Server permissions. Windows NT Server security is supported through the NTFS file system. To preserve security, you must transfer files to an NTFS volume.

Supervisors on NetWare and Administrators on Windows NT Server have complete access to all folders and files; note, however, the Administrator does not automatically have immediate access. The owner of a folder or file (most often the user who created the folder or file) controls its use. The owner can set permissions that deny access to the Administrator. However, an Administrator always has the right to take ownership: This protects the system.Transferred ownership cannot be returned; users who check the ownership of their folders and files can see whether an administrator has taken control of them.

For more information on Windows NT Server folder and file security, see the Windows NT Server Concepts and Planning Guide.

Folder Rights

The effective rights for folders are mapped to the following Windows NT Server permissions:

NetWare Folder Rights

Windows NT Server Folder Permissions

Supervisory (S)

(All) (All)

Read (R)

(RX) (RX)

Write (W)

(RWXD) (RWXD)

Create (C)

(WX) (not specified)

Erase (E)

(RWXD) (RWXD)

Modify (M)

(RWXD) (RWXD)

File Scan (F)

(RX) (not specified)

Access Control (A)

(P) (P)

File Rights

Windows NT Server does not support the Create (C) and File Scan (F) rights for files. These rights are ignored when files are transferred.

After being transferred from NetWare to Windows NT Server, a file is owned by the Windows NT Server group Administrators.

The effective rights for files are mapped to the following Windows NT Server permissions:

NetWare File Rights

Windows NT Server File Permissions

Supervisory (S)

(All)

Read (R)

(RX)

Write (W)

(RWXD)

Erase (E)

(RWXD)

Modify (M)

(RWXD)

File Scan (R)

Does not map.

Access Control (A)

(P)

Comparing File Attributes

The Migration Tool maps NetWare file attributes to their Windows NT Server equivalents when transferring files. Note that the following NetWare file attributes are not supported by Windows NT Server and are ignored: Copy Inhibit (C), Delete Inhibit (D), Execute Only (X), Indexed (I), Purge (P), Rename Inhibit (R), Read Audit (Ra), Shareable (Sh), Transactional (T), and Write Audit (Wa). The following table shows how the supported NetWare file attributes map to Windows NT Server file attributes:

NetWare File Attributes

Windows NT Server File Attributes

Read Only (Ro)

Read Only (R)

Archive Needed (A)

Archive (A)

System (SY)

System (S)

Hidden (H)

Hidden (H)

Read Write (Rw)

None — files without the R attribute can be read and written to.

Performing a Migration

To migrate a NetWare server to a computer running Windows NT Server, follow these general steps. The following sections of this manual provide more general information about these steps and the use of the Migration Tool.

For more detailed step-by-step procedures, see Running a Migration in the online Help.

  1. After starting the Migration Tool, select the NetWare server(s) you want to migrate from and the computer(s) running Windows NT Server to migrate to. 

  2. Click User Options to specify how users and groups will be transferred from the NetWare server to Windows NT Server. 

  3. Click File Options to specify which volumes (if any) on the NetWare server to transfer files and folders from. For each volume you migrate, you can select which folders and files to actually transfer to Windows NT Server. 

  4. Click Trial Migration to generate log files that show exactly how the NetWare server(s) would be migrated, given the current settings. Examine these logs to make sure that the computer running Windows NT Server will receive the users, groups, files, and other information in the way you expect. 

  5. If necessary, adjust some settings in User Options and File Options, then click Trial Migration again until the logs show the information you want. 

  6. Click Start Migration to perform the migration. 

You do not have to complete all these steps at one time. All settings—including the list of servers and the migration options specified for groups, users, folders, and files—are saved when you exit the Migration Tool before running a migration. The next time you start the utility, the Migration Tool restores settings. You can also save a list of servers and migration options in a configuration file (with a .cnf extension).

Starting the Migration Tool

When you start the Migration Tool for the first time, the Select Servers For Migration dialog box appears. From it, choose the NetWare servers and Windows NT Server computers you want to use. Migration options for users, groups, folders, and files are set to their defaults.

To select a NetWare server to migrate, you must have Supervisor rights on the server. You should not have any drive mappings to the NetWare server from the computer you are running the Migration Tool from. To transfer data to a computer running Windows NT Server, you must be a member of the server's Administrators group.

If you quit the Migration Tool before running a migration, the current list of servers and the migration settings are saved until the next time you start the utility.

Note To run the Migration Tool and to access NetWare servers, the Windows NT Server computer must be running the NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport and the Gateway Service for NetWare.

To start the Migration Tool 

  1. From the Start menu, click Run.

  2. In the Open box, type nwconv, and click OK.

    If this is the first time you have started the Migration Tool since running a migration, the Select Servers For Migration dialog box appears. From it, select the servers you want to migrate. To see the Migration Tool's main window, either select a pair of servers or cancel the Select Servers For Migration dialog box.

    Cc751473.xns_n01(en-us,TechNet.10).gif 

Selecting Servers for Migration

You can select one or more NetWare servers to migrate and one or more Windows NT Server computers to accept the data from the NetWare servers. For example, you might want to reproduce the configuration of a single NetWare server by transferring the data from it to a similarly configured Windows NT Server computer, or you might want to replace more than one NetWare server with a single Windows NT Server computer.

Selecting servers is a two-step process:

  1. Click Add to add server names to the list in the Migration Tool main window. 

  2. For each specific migration, select a pair of a NetWare server and a computer running Windows NT Server in the Servers For Migration area of the Migration Tool main window. The migration you perform applies only to the servers selected in this area. 

Note To select a NetWare server to migrate, you must be logged on to the server as a Supervisor. To transfer data to a Windows NT Server computer, you must be a member of the Administrators group.

Specifying How to Migrate Users and Groups

This table summarizes the available migration options, which are described more fully in the text following the table.

Default options

Other options

Transfer groups and users

Transfer folders and files only

Assign null passwords to transferred accounts, allowing them to log on without a password

Set password for each account to the account's username
Set password for all accounts to a specified password
Use a mapping file to specify a password for each account

Allow transferred users continued use of the password assigned to them

Force users to change the password when they log in

Do not overwrite existing Windows NT Server user accounts when there is a name conflict, but log the conflict

Do not overwrite existing user accounts and do not log conflicts
Overwrite existing user accounts and log conflicts
Create a new user account when there is a conflict by adding a prefix to the username and log the conflict
Use a mapping file to transfer conflicting accounts to new user accounts

Do not overwrite existing group accounts and do not log conflicts

Do not overwrite existing group accounts and log conflicts
Create a new group account when there is a conflict by adding a prefix to the group name and log the conflict
Use a mapping file to transfer conflicting accounts to new group accounts

Transfer NetWare account restrictions for passwords and intruder lockout

Use Windows NT Server account restrictions

Do not transfer accounts with Supervisor rights to the Windows NT Server Administrators group

Transfer accounts with Supervisor rights to the Windows NT Server Administrators group

Transfer user and group accounts to the domain of the selected Windows NT Server computer

Transfer user and group accounts to a trusted master domain

Setting Password Options

Because passwords from a NetWare server are encrypted, they cannot be transferred. (The Migration Tool cannot read them.) To set the new passwords, use one of the following methods:

  • Assign all accounts a null password (users will be able to log on without specifying a password). 

  • Set each account's password to be the same as its user name. 

  • Specify a single password to assign to all transferred accounts. 

  • Use a mapping file, which lists each account being migrated and specifies the new password for each account. For more information on creating and using a mapping file, see "Mapping Accounts," later in this chapter. 

You also specify whether migrated users must change their passwords the next time they log on. (By default, they must.)

Handling Username Conflicts

By default, when you transfer users from NetWare to Windows NT Server, users with names that already exist on the Windows NT Server domain are not transferred. This ensures that existing Windows NT Server accounts are not changed. Conflicts are recorded in the Error.log file.

Instead of using the default, you can choose one of the following responses to conflicts:

  • Transfer no account information. (If you have transferred accounts from one of several NetWare servers having identical accounts, you might want to select this option when you are transferring accounts from the additional servers.) 

  • Overwrite existing Windows NT Server account information. (If you choose this option, remember that passwords and other account information for current users on the Windows NT Server domain will be changed.)

  • Create a new account on the Windows NT server or domain by adding a prefix to the current username.

If you want complete control over transferring usernames, you can also use a mapping file. For more information, see "Mapping Accounts," later in this chapter.

Handling Group Name Conflicts

Because both NetWare and Windows NT Server groups are used primarily to organize user accounts, no information needs to be transferred with the group name. Consequently, by default, when the Migration Tool transfers a group name that already exists on the Windows NT Server domain, it simply adds the listed user accounts from the NetWare server to the existing Windows NT Server group and does not log an error.

Instead of using the default, you can handle group name conflicts in the following ways:

  • Record them in the Error.log file (and still add the users from the NetWare group to the existing Windows NT Server group).

  • Add a prefix to the current group name, thereby creating a new group name on the Windows NT Server domain. User accounts from the NetWare group are added to the new group.

    Use this option when you are transferring groups from multiple NetWare servers to a single Windows NT Server domain and there are identical group names on the NetWare servers whose accounts you do not want to merge into one group. For example, if you are migrating all servers in the Sales department to a single domain and the servers use identical group names for different groups of users, you can specify a different prefix for group name conflicts for each server you migrate. You could specify NAT- when migrating the server used by National Sales and INTER- when migrating the server used by International Sales, creating new groups on the Windows NT Server domain called NAT-SALES and INTER-SALES.

If you want complete control over transferring group names, you can also use a mapping file. For more information, see "Mapping Accounts," later in this chapter.

Transferring Account Restrictions

By default, when you transfer user accounts from NetWare to Windows NT Server, the account restrictions of the NetWare Supervisor account are transferred and become the security policy on the Windows NT Server domain. Alternatively, you can choose not to transfer account restrictions and instead, retain the existing policy settings of the domain.

The following NetWare account policy settings are affected:

  • Require Password

  • Minimum Password Length

  • Require Password Change

  • Password Reuse

  • Intruder Lockout

Transferring Administrative Rights

By default, groups and users with Supervisor rights are transferred to Windows NT Server without administrative privileges. Alternatively, you can add them to the Administrators group on Windows NT Server. Such users have power equivalent to NetWare Supervisors.

For more information on Windows NT Server and NetWare administrative accounts, see "Comparing Administrative Accounts," earlier in this chapter.

Mapping Accounts

Rather than setting general options for names and passwords in the User and Group Options dialog box, you can use a mapping file to specify how account information is transferred to a server running Windows NT Server.

You can either create a mapping file before you start a migration, or you can use the Migration Tool to create the mapping file while setting migration options. Using the Migration Tool to create the file is easier; the required section headings and the names of all user and group accounts from the NetWare server are automatically put into the file. After you use the Migration Tool to create the mapping file, you can edit the file.

To create a mapping file using Migration Tool, click Create in the User and Group Options dialog box. You can then edit the file you have created, specifying a new name and password for each user you are transferring and a new name for each group. Entries not getting a new name are transferred without change. The Migration Tool prompts you to edit the file as soon as it has been created; however, you can edit it at any time using a text editor such as Notepad.

The mapping file format consists of two sections, headed by [users] and [groups] lines. Each user or group being moved has one line. Each line in the user section has the following format:

old_username , new_username, [password] 

The old_username is the current username of the user on the NetWare server. The new_username is the user's new name, and password is the new password to assign to the user. If you omit a password, the user's new password will be set to null.

For example, to migrate the user account currently named Patricia, rename it to PSmith, and give it a password of Orange, you would put the following line in the [users] section of the mapping file:

patricia, psmith, orange

To keep the current username of Patricia, you would use

patricia, patricia, orange 

Within the group section, each line lists only the old and new group name:

old_groupname , new_groupname 

To not propagate a user and group to the domain, simply remove that name from the mapping file.

Remember, usernames must be unique on the server and within the server's domain. Usernames can be up to 20 characters in length and can contain any upper or lowercase characters except the following:

" / \ [ ] : ; | = , + ? < >

Passwords can be up to 14 characters in length. Windows NT Server distinguishes between uppercase and lowercase characters in passwords.

Transferring Accounts to a Windows NT Server Master Domain

Suppose you have a Windows NT Server network where all user accounts are kept in a single master domain, and other domains on the network contain only resources. When you migrate a server running NetWare to Windows NT Server on this network, you can transfer user accounts and groups to the domain controller of the master domain, and transfer folders and files to a server in another domain. (This server would be the one listed in the Servers For Migration list in the Migration Tool.)

When you transfer groups to a master domain, they are created as global groups in the master domain and again as local groups on the server specified in the Servers For Migration list. The local group on the server contains the global group from the master domain. This allows you to easily add other global groups to the local group later.

Folders and files transferred to Windows NT Server are secured by setting permissions for the transferred users and local groups.

For more information on domains, and local and global groups, see the Windows NT Server Concepts and Planning Guide.

Migration Options for Folders and Files

The following table summarizes the options you can set for the transfer of volumes, folders, and files from the NetWare server to Windows NT Server. The following sections provide more details about these options.

Default options

Other options

Transfer files and folders

Transfer groups and users only

Transfer all NetWare volumes

Select volumes to transfer

Transfer to default destination shares

Change destination shares

Transfer all files and folders except NetWare system folders and files

Select folders and files to transfer

Do not transfer system files

Transfer system files in selected folders

Do not transfer hidden files

Transfer hidden files in selected folders

Selecting Volumes to Transfer

By default, all NetWare volumes are transferred. Alternatively, you can select specific NetWare volumes to transfer.

If you create a new volume on a NetWare server after you have selected which volumes, folders, and files to transfer, you must add it to the list manually.

Specifying a Destination Share

The Migration Tool transfers the contents of each NetWare volume to a Windows NT Server shared folder with the same name. Alternatively, you can specify a different shared folder as a destination. If the shared folder you specify does not exist, the Migration Tool creates it during migration.

Important Before you migrate folders and files to Windows NT Server, set the permissions for the Windows NT Server folder to which you are migrating. These permissions will be set on every level of folder that is transferred from the NetWare server. If you are migrating to an existing folder, set the permissions on that folder. Otherwise, set the permissions on the root of the volume.

When you transfer the contents of multiple NetWare servers to a single computer running Windows NT Server, the various NetWare servers might use the same volume names. In such a case you might want to specify a destination other than the default so that the files and folders from the various servers are not all merged into a single folder on the computer running Windows NT Server. For example, if all the servers contain a folder called PUBLIC, by default, all the files and folders from the PUBLIC folders are transferred to a single PUBLIC share. Instead, you can transfer each PUBLIC volume to a different share or to a different folder below the PUBLIC share.

Selecting Folders and Files to Transfer

By default, all files are transferred except files located on the NetWare administrative volumes (\SYSTEM, \LOGIN, \MAIL, and \ETC), and hidden and system files. Alternatively, you can select which folders and files to transfer.

If files are added to a NetWare volume after you have finished selecting folders and files, they will be transferred only if all the files in that folder are selected for transfer. In other cases, you must add them to the list of files for transfer.

Only as much of the folder structure as necessary is transferred. If, for example, you have not selected any first level folders for transfer, the first level of the folder structure is not transferred.

Transferring Hidden and System Files

By default, files with the Hidden (H) and System (SY) attributes are not transferred. Alternatively, you can select individual hidden and system files to transfer, or you can transfer all hidden and system files.

Migrating Logon Scripts

If you are migrating to a server that runs FPNW, use the Migration Tool to migrate users' logon scripts. Be sure to transfer files and folders, and include the NetWare server's MAIL folder in the list of folders being migrated.

The next time the user logs on to the server from a NetWare client, the logon script runs as the user's personal logon script. A system logon script is also available; it is the file Net$dat.log in the SYSVOL/PUBLIC folder.

Note Even if you transfer the contents of the MAIL folder to a server that does not run FPNW, the logon script files will be transferred. However, FPNW is required to preserve the user account information that calls the appropriate logon script.

Running a Trial Migration

Before running an actual migration, run a trial migration to make sure that users, groups, folders, and files will be transferred as desired. The Migration Tool tracks trial events as though an actual conversion were in progress, generating a set of log files that contain migration information. (Use the logview.exe utility to view and print them.)

Each time you run a trial or a migration, the Migration Tool creates a new set of files with a .LOG extension. The previous .LOG files are renamed using a number for the filename extension.

  • Logfile.log contains information on users, groups, and files, including the information that currently exists on the NetWare server. 

  • Summary.log presents an overview including the names of servers that were migrated and the number of users, groups, and files that were transferred.

  • Error.log shows information that the Migration Tool could not transfer, as well as information on system failures that prevented the migration (for example, a lack of disk space).

Review these files to see what information is on the server you are migrating and what trouble spots might affect the migration. Then, before running the migration, you can change options for users, groups, folders, and files so that information is transferred the way you want.

Reviewing the Log File

Logfile.log provides a complete record of the migration that includes both what was successfully transferred and what failed because of an error, including

  • Transfer Options 

    A record of the settings for user, group, and file transfer options. 

  • Supervisor Defaults 

    A record of the defaults for the NetWare Supervisor account.

  • Group Information 

    A record of the NetWare groups added to Windows NT Server.

  • User Information 

    By default, the Migration Tool records account information first for the original NetWare account and then for the new Windows NT Server account. For NetWare accounts, this includes information on password and account restrictions as well as additional information such as allowed login times. A similar set of information is recorded for new Windows NT Server accounts.

    To show allowed login times, the log file presents a chart like the one below where asterisks indicate the blocks of time during which a user can log in:

    Cc751473.xns_n04(en-us,TechNet.10).gif 

  • File Information 

    By default, the Migration Tool lists the volumes copied and the number of files copied. You can also record a complete list of files and folders copied that includes information such as file size and date.

Reviewing the Summary File

Summary.log provides statistics for the migration, including

  • Names of migrated servers 

  • Total running time for the migration 

    (Note that the running time for a trial migration will be shorter than that for an actual migration, particularly when files are transferred.) 

  • Total number of users transferred per server 

  • Total number of groups transferred per server 

  • Total number of files transferred per server 

  • Total number of name conflicts

  • Total number of errors

Reviewing the Error File

Error.log provides a list of any errors that occurred, including

  • Names of user and group accounts that were not transferred successfully 

  • Network errors, such as the failure to access a server

  • System errors, such as a lack of disk space for file transfers

Running a Migration

Before running a migration, run a trial migration as described in the previous section. This enables you to see and correct problems such as username conflicts before actually migrating servers.

Important Before running a migration, make sure that all other users have logged off the servers you are migrating and that files on the servers are closed.

To run the migration, click Start Migration. When the migration is complete, the Migration Tool displays the log files for review. If you have transferred user and group accounts to a domain, the domain's PDC replicates user and group account information to the backup domain controllers in the domain.

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