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Chapter 22 - Managing The File Server

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You use User Manager to establish user accounts (including Macintosh user accounts), and you use Server Manager to set security options for the server and do other server-level tasks. When Services for Macintosh (SFM) is started, you use the MacFile menu in Server Manager to view the Macintosh users of the server and the Macintosh-accessible volumes. You can also send messages to Macintosh users of Windows NT Server, among other tasks.

Many tasks you perform from Server Manager are available from the MacFile icon in Control Panel. Individual volume options are available in the MacFile menu in File Manager and are described in Chapter 21, "Working with Macintosh-Accessible Volumes."

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The File Server For Macintosh (MacFile) is available from different locations in Windows NT Server. 

Setting Logon Security for Macintosh Users

To set security options for Macintosh users of SFM, use the Properties command on the MacFile menu in Server Manager. The commands available from the MacFile menu apply to Macintosh-accessible volumes on the computer running Windows NT Server and are described in the following procedure.

(For information on setting security for shared directories—which make files available to PC users—refer to the Windows NT Server Concepts and Planning Guide.)

To set security options for all Macintosh-accessible volumes 

  1. In the Start menu, from the Administrative Tools folder, choose Server Manager. 

  2. From the MacFile menu, choose Properties

    The MacFile Properties dialog box appears. 

  3. Click Attributes. 

    The MacFile Attributes dialog box appears. 

    Cc751481.xns_v03(en-us,TechNet.10).gif 

  4. From the Security box, make the following selections as you prefer. 

    Cc751481.xns_v08(en-us,TechNet.10).gif 

  5. Click OK.

The security options available from the Attributes dialog box apply to all Macintosh-accessible volumes on the computer running Windows NT Server. (The individual volume permissions available in File Manager from the MacFile menu are explained in Chapter 21, "Working with Macintosh-Accessible Volumes.") For an explanation of Windows NT Server security issues, refer to the Windows NT Server Concepts and Planning Guide.

Changing the Server Name, Logon Message, and Session Limits

You can change the name of the server (the name that Macintosh users will see). You can also create a message that Macintosh users (of System 7.1) see when they log on to the computer running Windows NT Server. And you can specify the number of Macintosh clients that can simultaneously connect to the File Server For Macintosh on the computer running Windows NT Server.

To change the name of the computer running Windows NT Server 

  1. From the MacFile menu in Server Manager, choose Properties

    The MacFile Properties dialog box appears. 

  2. Click Attributes. 

    The MacFile Attributes dialog box appears. 

  3. Click Change. 

  4. In the Server Name For AppleTalk Workstations dialog box, type a new name for the server. 

  5. Click OK

  6. In the Services icon in Control Panel, stop and restart File Server For Macintosh. 

To create a logon message for 7.1 System users 

  1. From the MacFile menu, choose Properties

    The MacFile Properties dialog box appears. 

  2. Click Attributes

    The MacFile Attributes dialog box appears. 

  3. In the Logon Message box, type a message that you want Macintosh users to see when they sign on to the computer running Windows NT Server. 

    You can type four lines of text (the AppleTalk limit). 

  4. Click OK

To set session limits 

  1. From the MacFile menu in Server Manager, choose Properties

    The MacFile Properties dialog box appears. 

  2. Click Attributes

    The MacFile Attributes dialog box appears. 

  3. In the Session box, choose unlimited or specify a client limit by entering the number you want. 

    The number you specify is the number of clients that can simultaneously gain access to the File Server For Macintosh. If you choose unlimited, the number of connections is limited only by the capabilities of the network media. However, performance improves when you limit the number of sessions. 

  4. Click OK

Setting Up User Accounts for Macintosh Users

User accounts are created for Macintosh users just as they are created for other Windows NT Server users. A guest account is automatically created when you install Windows NT Server and, by default, both local guests and guests accessing the server through a client on the network (including a Macintosh) are allowed. This means that if users log on without a regular user account and password, they will be logged on as a guest.

Guests have some access to shared resources. Guests can do everything that those with a user account can do, except keep a local profile on their computers, lock their computers, and create, delete, and modify local groups on their computers.

The guest account cannot be deleted, but it can be disabled on Windows NT computers. If it is disabled, no network users, including Macintosh users, will be able to log on without a user account and password. To disable only Macintosh guests from the computer running Windows NT Server, follow the instructions in "Setting Logon Security for Macintosh Users," earlier in this chapter. For more information about the guest account, refer to the Windows NT Server Concepts and Planning Guide.

Stopping and Pausing Services

When you set up SFM, two services are automatically started: File Server For Macintosh and Print Server For Macintosh. (The AppleTalk Protocol is started as well.) At times, you might need to stop these services, as shown in the following table:

Service

Reason

Print Server For Macintosh (MacPrint)

Stop it to install another printer driver or to configure a printer; or to immediately see the result of deleting, creating, or changing a printer.
Stop it to remove the Print Server for Macintosh service.

File Server For Macintosh (MacFile)

Stop it to change the server name that Macintosh users will see and to remove the MacFile Service.
Pause it when you want to make changes to the server attributes but want to allow current users to continue working. If this service is paused, no new Macintosh users can log on to the computer running Windows NT Server.

AppleTalk Protocol

Stop it to change router parameters and the default networking zone, and to remove it (which automatically stops the file and print servers).

Use the Services command on the Computer menu in Server Manager to control the file and print servers. (You can use the Services icon in Control Panel to stop or start Print Server For Macintosh and to stop, start, pause, or continue File Server For Macintosh.)

Use the Devices icon in Control Panel to stop the AppleTalk Protocol and, consequently, both the file and print servers.

To stop, start, pause, or continue services 

  1. From Server Manager, select the Computer menu. 

  2. Choose the Services command. 

  3. In the Services dialog box, find the service you want to change, and check its status. 

  4. Select either the File Server For Macintosh or Print Server For Macintosh. 

    You cannot pause and continue the Print Server For Macintosh. 

  5. Click Start, Stop, Pause, or Continue as appropriate. 

    To change the startup options (for example, to specify manual startup), click Startup. For a thorough explanation of this dialog box, refer to online Help. 

  6. Click Close. 

Checking the Event Log

To check events on the computer running Windows NT Server, use Event Viewer, which is available in the Administrative Tools folder. If SFM is running, you can see events that involved the File or Print Server For Macintosh or the AppleTalk Protocol.

To check AppleTalk and MacFile events 

  1. From the Administrative Tools folder, choose Event Viewer. 

  2. Review the Source list and look for MacFile, MacSrv, or AppleTalk events you want to monitor. 

    Use the Event Viewer options for these services just as you would for other Windows NT Server events. For example, to see specific events, choose Filter Events from the View menu. (The Browser service must be started.) 

To check printing events 

  • From the Log menu, choose Application.

    You will see a list of events, including those generated by the AppleTalk Print Monitor and MacPrint.

Use the Event Viewer options for these services just as you would for other Windows NT Server events.

For more information about Event Viewer, refer to the Windows NT Server Concepts and Planning Guide.

Viewing a List of Macintosh-Accessible Volumes

Use the MacFile menu in Server Manager to view a list of all volumes available to Macintosh users on the computer running Windows NT Server. The Volumes command lists all directories that have been designated as Macintosh-accessible volumes and allows you to create and remove individual volumes, just as you can from the MacFile menu in File Manager.

The Volumes button, which is available when you choose Properties from the MacFile menu, allows you to see which users are connected to individual volumes and to disconnect them. For more information, refer to "Disconnecting Macintosh Users and Volumes," later in this chapter.

To view a list of Macintosh-accessible volumes 

  1. From the Administrative Tools folder, choose Server Manager. 

  2. From the View menu, choose MacFile

    This choice limits the list of servers so that you can easily choose the computer running Windows NT Server and SFM. 

  3. From the MacFile menu, choose Volumes

    The Macintosh-Accessible Volumes dialog box appears. 

    Cc751481.xns_v04(en-us,TechNet.10).gif 

    This dialog box displays a list of Macintosh-accessible volumes on the computer running Windows NT Server. You can create or delete volumes here, or change the properties and permissions of the volumes. (Properties and permissions for volumes are explained in Chapter 21, "Working with Macintosh-Accessible Volumes.") 

You can also view other information about the Macintosh-accessible volumes on the computer running Windows NT Server, including their paths and the names of users connected to them.

To see volume information 

  1. From the Administrative Tools folder, choose Server Manager. 

  2. From the MacFile menu, choose Properties

    The MacFile Properties dialog box appears. 

  3. Choose the Volumes button. 

    The Macintosh-Accessible Volumes dialog box appears. 

    Cc751481.xns_v05(en-us,TechNet.10).gif 

  4. Select a Macintosh-accessible volume. 

    You can see how many times the volume has been mounted by Macintosh users as well as the volume's directory path on the computer running Windows NT Server. You can also see how long users have been connected to the volume and whether there are open files on the volume. 

  5. Click Close

Viewing Current Users of Volumes

You can see the current list of users connected to selected Macintosh-accessible volumes.

To view connected users 

  1. From the Administrative Tools folder, choose Server Manager. 

  2. From the MacFile menu, choose Properties

    The MacFile Properties dialog box appears. 

  3. Choose the Users button. 

    The Macintosh Users dialog box appears. 

    Cc751481.xns_v06(en-us,TechNet.10).gif 

  4. Select a user. 

    You see the Macintosh-accessible volumes that the user has mounted, the name of the Macintosh computer, how many volume file forks are open, and the amount of time that the user has been connected to the computer running Windows NT Server in hours and minutes. For more information about file forks, refer to the next section. 

    Use the Disconnect and Disconnect All buttons to disconnect a user from all connected volumes or all users from all connected volumes. For more information, refer to "Disconnecting Macintosh Users and Volumes," later in this chapter. 

  5. Click Close

Viewing Open File Forks

At times, you might want to view the resources (file forks) that Macintosh clients are using. (Remember that data is kept in a data fork and system information is kept in a resource fork.) By viewing open file forks, you can tell who has what forks open before you stop the File Server For Macintosh or disconnect a user.

To view open file forks 

  1. From the Administrative Tools folder, choose Server Manager. 

  2. From the MacFile menu, choose Properties

    The MacFile Properties dialog box appears. 

  3. From the MacFile Properties dialog box, click Files

    The Files Opened by Macintosh Users dialog box appears. 

    Cc751481.xns_v07(en-us,TechNet.10).gif 

    This dialog box lists all the resource and data forks that are open on Macintosh clients connected to the computer running Windows NT Server. A summary of the options in this dialog box follows: 

    Cc751481.xns_v09(en-us,TechNet.10).gif 

  4. Choose one of the buttons described in the previous table. 

  5. Click Close

Disconnecting Macintosh Users and Volumes

To disconnect users from volumes, choose Properties from the MacFile menu in Server Manager or choose the MacFile icon in Control Panel. The following instructions describe Server Manager approach, but you can use the basic instructions with the MacFile icon in Control Panel as well.

Note It's a good idea to send a message to users before disconnecting them or the volumes that they are using. Otherwise, they might lose data. Refer to the next section for more information.

To disconnect users from Macintosh-accessible volumes 

  1. From the Administrative Tools folder, choose Server Manager. 

  2. From the MacFile menu, choose Properties

    The MacFile Properties dialog box appears. 

  3. Use the following table to determine what you want to disconnect: 

    Cc751481.xns_v10(en-us,TechNet.10).gif 

  4. Click Users or Volumes

  5. Select the user or volume you want to disconnect from the respective dialog boxes. 

  6. Click Disconnect or Disconnect All, as appropriate. 

  7. From the confirmation box that appears, click Yes

Caution If you disconnect users or volumes, you could cause the loss of data. It's a good idea to send users a message before disconnecting.

Sending Messages to Connected Macintosh Users

SFM enables you to send messages to Macintosh clients that are connected to the computer running Windows NT Server. You can send messages to Macintosh users from two places:

  • MacFile icon in Control Panel (choose the Users button). 

  • MacFile menu in Server Manager 

The following instructions describe the MacFile menu approach; however, the basic instructions apply for the MacFile icon in Control Panel as well.

To send a message to all connected Macintosh users 

  1. From the Administrative Tools folder, choose Server Manager. 

  2. From the list of computers, select a server that is running SFM. 

  3. From the MacFile menu, choose Send Message

    The Send Message dialog box appears. 

  4. In the Message box, type the message you want to send to Macintosh users. 

    You can type up to four lines, the AppleTalk limit, for example, "The server is going to be shut down in 10 minutes." 

  5. Click OK

To send a message to individual Macintosh users of the computer running Windows NT Server 

  1. From the MacFile menu, choose Properties

  2. Click Users. The Macintosh Users dialog box appears. 

  3. From the Connected Users box, select the user to whom you want to send the message. 

  4. Click Send Message

  5. Click Selected MacFile

  6. In the Message box, type the message you want to send.

    You can type up to four lines. 

  7. Click OK

Setting Extension-Type Associations

With extension-type associations, users of both the PC and the Macintosh version of an application can easily work on the same data file. The extension-type associations provided with SFM tell the Finder which MS-DOS filename extensions correspond with which Macintosh file types and file creators. When a file on the server has a filename extension associated with a Macintosh file type and file creator, the Finder displays the appropriate icon for that file when a Macintosh user browses the files available on the server. And if a Macintosh user chooses the file, the appropriate application starts and opens the file.

The extension-type associations that follow are already defined. Others can be added to SFM. Refer to the Association command in the MacFile menu (from File Manager) to see a comprehensive list.

PC application/file format

Macintosh application

MS-DOS extension

Macintosh type

Macintoshcreator

Adobe® Encapsulated PostScript

Adobe Illustrator® '88

EPS

EPSF

ARTZ

Aldus® PageMaker® for Windows version 2.0, Aldus PageMaker for OS/2 version 2.0

Aldus PageMaker for Macintosh version 2.0

PUB

PUBF

ALD2

Aldus PageMaker for Windows version 3.0
Publication
Template
Template
Template
TIFF graphics file

Aldus PageMaker for Macintosh version 3.0
Publication
Template
Template
Template
TIFF graphics file

 PM3
PT3
TEM
TPL
TIF

 ALB3
ALT3
ALT3
ALT3
TIFF

 ALD3
ALD3
ALD3
ALD3
ALD3

Aldus PageMaker for Windows version 4.0
Publication
Template
Template
Template
TIFF graphics file

Aldus PageMaker for Macintosh version 4.0
Publication
Template
Template
Template
TIFF graphics file

 PM4
PT4
TEM
TPL
TIF

 ALB4
ALT4
ALT4
ALT4
TIFF

 ALD4
ALD4
ALD4
ALD4
ALD4

Borland® dBASE®

Microsoft FoxBASE®/FoxBASE+® for Macintosh

DBF

F+DB

FOX+

Lotus® 1-2-3® for Windows version 2.0

Lotus 1-2-3 for Macintosh version 1.1

WK3

LWK3

L123

Microsoft Excel for Windows version 3.0, Microsoft Excel for OS/2 version 3.0
Chart
Spreadsheet
Macro sheet
Workspace
Add-in macro file
Template file

Microsoft Excel for Macintosh version 3.0
Chart
Spreadsheet
Macro sheet
Workspace
Add-in macro file
Template file

 XLC
XLS
XLM
XLW
LA
XLT

 XLC3
XLS3
XLM3
XLW3
XLA
SLM3

 XCEL
XCEL
XCEL
XCEL
XCEL
XCEL

Microsoft Excel for Windows version 4.0,Microsoft Excel for OS/2 version 4.0
Chart
Spreadsheet
Macro sheet
Workspace
Add-in macro file
Template file

Microsoft Excel for Macintosh version 4.0
Chart
Spreadsheet
Macro sheet
Workspace
Add-in macro file
Template file

 XLC
XLS
XLM
XLW
XLA
XLT

 XLC4
XLS4
XLM4
XLW4
XLA
SLM3

 XCEL
XCEL
XCEL
XCEL
XCEL
XCEL

Microsoft Multiplan®/SYLK

Microsoft Excel for Macintosh version 3.0

SLK

TEXT

XCEL

Microsoft PowerPoint® version 2.0
Slides

Microsoft PowerPoint for Macintosh version 2.0

 PPT

 SLD2

 PPT2

Microsoft PowerPoint version 3.0
Slides

Microsoft PowerPoint for Macintosh version 3.0

 PPT

 SLD3

 PPT3

Microsoft Project for Windows version 1.x
Projects
Exchange format
Calendars
Views
Workspaces

Microsoft Project for Macintosh version 1.x
Projects
Exchange format
Calendars
Views
Workspaces

 MPP
MPX
MPC
MPV
MPW

 MSPF
MSPJ
MSPJ
MSPJ
MSPF

 MSPJ
MSPJ
MSPJ
MSPJ
MSPJ

Microsoft Word for Windows version 2.0
Document
Text Document
Rich Text
Style sheet
Glossary

Microsoft Word for Macintosh version 5.1
Document
Document
Rich Text
N/A
N/A

 DOC
WRD
RTF
STY
GLY

 WDBN
TEXT
TEXT
TEXT
TEXT

 MSWD
MSWD
MSWD
MSWD
MSWD

N.A./Comma-Separated Values

Microsoft Excel for Macintosh version 4.0

CSV

TEXT

XCEL

N.A./SIT files

Alladin Stuffit

SIT

SIT!

SIT!

N.A./Text (TXT files)

Teachtext

TXT

TEXT

TTXT

 

 

 

 

 

PC Program

N.A.

EXE
COM
CMD
BAT

DEXE
DEXE
DEXE
DEXE

LMAN
LMAN
LMAN
LMAN

Symantec Ready!

Symantec MORE

RDY

TEXT

MORE

Unknown File

N.A.

All others

TEXT

LMAN

Visicalc (DIF)

Microsoft Excel for Macintosh version 4.0

DIF

TEXT

XCEL

You can also add extension-type associations. You can add new associations for an application not listed in the preceding table, or you can add extra associations for any of the listed applications. For example, if your company has a custom of saving Microsoft Word documents with a .WRD extension, you could add the following extension:

MS-DOS extension

Macintosh file type

Macintosh file creator

.WRD

WDBN

MSWD

When you add a new extension-type association, it affects only files that are subsequently created on the server, not currently existing files. Moreover, you can associate multiple extensions with a Macintosh file type and creator. However, the reverse is not true. Only one file type and creator can be associated with an extension.

Note The WKS and WK1 formats allow a single data file to be used by users of Microsoft Excel, Lotus 1-2-3, and Informix® Wingz®. However, you can set up an extension for only one Macintosh application for this format. For example, if you map the WKS and WK1 extensions to the file type and file creator values for Microsoft Excel for Macintosh and then a Macintosh user double-clicks the file's icon, the file will be loaded into Microsoft Excel for Macintosh.

To make new extension-type associations

  1. In File Manager, from the MacFile menu, choose Associate

  2. In the Files with MS-DOS Extension box, type an extension, or select one from the list. 

    If the extension is already associated with a file type and file creator, it will be highlighted in the Creator list. 

  3. In the Creator box, select a creator and type to which you want to associate this extension. 

  4. Click Associate

    The new association is added to the Creator list in the Extension-Type Association dialog box. 

To add file creators and types 

  1. Click Add

  2. In the Add Document Type dialog box, type the file creator and type and, optionally, a description. 

  3. Click OK.

    You'll see the new creator in the Creator list. When you're ready to associate it with an extension, follow the previous instructions for creating an extension-type association.

Note File creator and type are case-sensitive on the Macintosh and thus must be entered exactly as they appear on the Macintosh.

To edit a description of a file type

  1. In the Creator box, select a file creator and type. 

  2. Click Edit

  3. In the Edit Document Type dialog box, type the new description. 

  4. Click OK. 

    The new description will appear in the Creator list. 

To remove a file type and associations 

  1. In the Creator box, select a file creator and type. 

  2. Click Delete

  3. Click Yes to confirm that you want to remove the selected file type and associated extensions. 

Backing Up Files on the Server

Following the Windows NT Server backup procedure will also back up Macintosh-accessible volumes. First, however, it is a good idea to stop the File Server for Macintosh service by using the Services icon in Control Panel. Stopping the service ensures that all files are backed up. You must stop the File Server for Macintosh before restoring a volume. The use of the Backup tool, which is available in the Windows NT Server Administrative Tools folder, is described in the Windows NT Server Concepts and Planning Guide.

You can also back up and restore volumes from the Macintosh client, using Macintosh backup software, such as FastBack™, RetroSpect, or Norton Utilities®.

To back up or restore Macintosh-accessible volumes from the Macintosh 

  1. Make sure all the Macintosh-accessible volumes you want to back up are not in use by other Macintoshes. 

  2. Mount the Macintosh-accessible volumes you want to back up on the Macintosh desktop. 

  3. Start a Macintosh backup and restore program from the Macintosh.

    Follow the instructions given by your backup software program. 

Getting Help

Help specific to SFM is available in Server Manager and in the MacFile Properties dialog box, which appears when you choose the MacFile icon in Control Panel.

To get Services for Macintosh Help in Server Manager 

  • From the Help menu, choose MacFile

To get Help when using the MacFile icon in Control Panel 

  1. Choose the MacFile icon. 

    The MacFile Properties dialog box appears. 

  2. Click Help

Using Macfile to Administer the Services for Macintosh Server

You can accomplish all of the server configurations discussed in this chapter (and volume, file, and directory management) using the macfile command at the command prompt. The macfile command allows administrators to automate SFM volume, directory, file, and server management by using batch programs.

For syntax of the macfile command, type macfile /? at the command prompt. For a complete reference to the macfile command, choose Help from the MacFile menu in File Manager.

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