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Routing and Remote Access Service

Updated: September 30, 2009

Applies To: Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vista

The Routing and Remote Access service (RRAS) in Windows Server® 2008 R2 and Windows Server® 2008 supports remote user or site-to-site connectivity by using virtual private network (VPN) or dial-up connections. RRAS consists of the following components:

  • Remote Access. By using RRAS, you can deploy VPN connections to provide end users with remote access to your organization's network. You can also create a site-to-site VPN connection between two servers at different locations.

  • Routing. RRAS is a software router and an open platform for routing and networking. It offers routing services to businesses in local area network (LAN) and wide area network (WAN) environments or over the Internet by using secure VPN connections. Routing is used for multiprotocol LAN-to-LAN, LAN-to-WAN, VPN, and network address translation (NAT) routing services.

noteNote
The content created for Windows Server 2003 can be useful for configuring Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2008. When reading this content, keep in mind the functional differences between Windows Server 2003 and later versions of Windows as documented in What's New in Routing and Remote Access in Windows Server 2008.

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2008 each include new features designed to enhance security and manageability of RRAS. This topic describes the new features and other significant changes made to RRAS, including the addition of new VPN tunneling protocols, VPN enforcement for Network Access Protection, and Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) support. For more information, see What's New in Routing and Remote Access in Windows Server 2008.

The RRAS Deployment documentation provides information about implementing a VPN remote access server. Topics include planning and configuring secure remote access; configuring routing on the VPN server and VPN clients; and connecting remote sites.

The following describe how to deploy RRAS:

The following topics are still relevant to Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2, although they were written for Windows Server 2003. The topics have not yet been updated to include new features that have been added in those newer versions of Windows.

The following describe how to configure RRAS:

The following topics are still relevant to Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2, although they were written for Windows Server 2003. The topics have not yet been updated to include new features that have been added in those newer versions of Windows.

The following provide foundational information for RRAS:

The following topics are still relevant to Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2, although they were written for Windows Server 2003. The topics have not yet been updated to include new features that have been added in those newer versions of Windows.

This reference contains troubleshooting information for events logged by RRAS. You can use this information to diagnose and resolve specific error conditions and to verify that those error conditions are no longer present.

This content is available at:

Routing and Remote Access Blog (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=82954). The RRAS team blog is an excellent source for up-to-date troubleshooting information.

After you install RRAS, product Help is available when you open the RRAS Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in and press F1. The product Help provides information about how to install and configure Routing and Remote Access as a Virtual Private Network (VPN) server and as a router.

RRAS Help content is also available at:

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