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Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 Installation and Deployment Guide

Updated: February 19, 2009

Applies To: Windows Server 2003 with SP2

This guide is for system administrators who are installing Microsoft® Windows Server® 2003 operating systems with Service Pack 2 (SP2). It includes technical information, procedures, and recommendations for installing SP2 on multiple computers in a small business or corporate environment. Although this guide includes some basic operating system information, it assumes that you have a working knowledge of Windows Server 2003.

This guide does not explain:

Obtain the installation files

You can install SP2 from the SP2 CD or from the Web. To order an SP2 CD, see the Microsoft TechNet Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=78087). To download the installation files, see the Microsoft Download Center (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=78088).

Because downloading SP2 installation files takes a substantial amount of time, we recommend that you save the files on your computer. This way, you can reinstall or repair the installation without downloading the file again. You should ensure that there is enough disk space on your hard disk drive before starting the download.

The installation file is named one of the following. XXX stands for the type of operating system (for example x86) and LLL stands for the language (for example ENU).

  • WindowsServer2003-KB914961-SP2-XXX-LLL.exe

  • WindowsServer2003.WindowsXP-KB914961-SP2-XXX-LLL.exe

Plan your deployment

This section includes information about how to plan your SP2 deployment, including pre-deployment tasks, testing the deployment, and additional resources.

Pre-deployment tasks

Before you install SP2, do the following:

  • Review the following documentation.

  • Check the disc space requirements. See article 926029 in the Microsoft Knowledge Base (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=74454).

  • Back up your servers. Your backup should include all data and configuration information that is necessary for that server to function. It is important to perform a backup of configuration information for servers, especially those that provide network infrastructure, such as Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). When you perform the backup, be sure to include the boot and system partitions and the system state. Another way to back up configuration information is to create a backup set for Automated System Recovery.

  • Disconnect UPS devices. If you have an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) connected to your destination computer, disconnect the connecting serial cable before running Setup. Setup automatically attempts to detect devices connected to serial ports, and UPS equipment can cause problems with the detection process.

  • Disable your antivirus software. If you are not connected to a network or the Internet and you want to minimize the installation time, you can disable your antivirus software. The time that it takes for the antivirus software to scan each file can add significant time to the installation (an hour or more on slower computers). Be sure to enable the antivirus software after you install SP2.

  • Uninstall prerelease versions of SP2. Unless you have a supplementary support agreement with Microsoft, you must uninstall any prerelease versions of SP2 before you proceed. Microsoft does not support upgrading to this version from any prerelease version.

  • Close all open programs.

Testing the deployment

We recommend that you test SP2 in your computing environment before you deploy it to all of your servers. If you are installing Windows Server 2003 for the first time, you should set up a pilot group to test your deployment and verify that the deployment works as expected. For more detailed information about testing your deployment and creating a pilot program, see the Windows Server 2003 Deployment Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=44319). To test the deployment, do the following:

  1. Create a test environment. Make sure that the test computers contain the operating systems, software, and the hardware devices that are used in your organization.

  2. Install the service pack on each test computer. As needed, test the following scenarios:

    • Update computers that are running Windows Server 2003.

    • Update computers that are running Windows Server 2003 with SP1.

    • Update computers that are running Windows Server 2003 R2.

    • Upgrade test computers that are running Windows NT® Server 4.0 and Windows 2000 Server.

    • Perform a clean installation—that is, install Windows Server 2003 with SP2 onto computers that do not have an operating system.

  3. Verify that the software and hardware perform as expected in each scenario.

Additional resources

The following resources contain detailed information that can help you plan your deployment.

  • Windows Server 2003 Deployment Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=44319).

  • Article 926028 in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: "Updated System Preparation Tool for Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2." This article contains instructions on how to use the Sysprep tool to deploy system images (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=78090).

  • Deploy.cab and Support.cab. These are compressed files that contain a collection of tools and online Help. Technical support personnel and network administrators can use these updated support tools to manage networks and troubleshoot problems. These files are located on the SP2 CD in the \Support\Tools folder and on the Microsoft Download Center.

  • Article 926027 in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: “Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 Support Tools” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=78091).

  • Qfecheck.exe.Qfecheck.exe is a command-line tool that gives network administrators increased ability to track and verify installed hotfixes. For more information about the Qfecheck.exe program, see article 282784 in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: "Qfecheck.exe Verifies the Installation of Windows 2000 and Windows XP Updates" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=44323). Although this article was written for other operating systems, it also applies to Windows Server 2003.

Installation options

You have two installation options:

  • Standalone installation. Deploys SP2 to servers that are already running Windows Server 2003.

  • Integrated installation. Integrates SP2 into Windows Server 2003, and then installs the operating system and SP2 simultaneously. You can use the integrated installation to upgrade servers and to perform clean installations on servers that do not have an operating system. For more information about creating an integrated version, see "Installing and Deploying Updates with Microsoft Windows Server 2003" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=64779).

To perform these installations, first copy the installation files to a network share. Then extract the SP2 source files either to either each computer locally or to a network share (to save disk space on each computer).

When you extract the files to a network share, it is called a UNC install. For UNC installs, each computer uses the files on the network share to install the software. UNC installs are only suitable for computers that are permanently connected to the network because the service pack source files are stored remotely. For example, you should not use this method for updating laptop computers because if connectivity is lost during the installation, the computer may be left in an unusable state. In addition, you must use a network share that was created specifically for SP2 so that the source files are always available for computers. If you need to move a shared distribution folder, see article 271484 in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: "Files and Folders Are Added to Your System After Service Pack Is Installed" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=9273).

The standalone installation

In a standalone installation, you install the service pack on computers that already have an operating system. The service pack installation is not complete until the computer is restarted. When you run a standalone installation, Update.exe creates a log file named Svcpack.log in the %systemroot% directory.

There are four scenarios for installing the standalone service pack:

Scenario 1: Installing SP2 using local source files

First set up a shared distribution folder for the service pack installation file. Then to install the service pack, save the installation files locally on each computer.

To install SP2 using installation files that are saved locally on each computer
  1. Connect to the network or computer where you want to create the distribution folder.

  2. In the shared folder, create a distribution folder for the service pack. For example, to create a distribution folder named WS2003SP2, type mkdir Drive:\WS2003SP2 at the command prompt(Drive: represents the drive where you want to store the distribution folder).

  3. Copy WindowsServer2003-KB914961-SP2-XXX-LLL.exe into the distribution folder.

  4. To verify that you have assigned appropriate permissions to users who are installing the service pack:

    1. Navigate to the appropriate folder, right-click it, and then click Properties.

    2. Click the Sharing tab, and then click Share This Folder.

    3. In Share Name, type a name for the folder.

    4. Click Permissions, and then assign permissions that allow users to install the service pack from this folder.

    5. If you are using an NTFS file system partition, click the Security tab, confirm that the permissions listed there do not conflict with those on the Sharing tab, and then click OK.

  5. To install the service pack at the command prompt, type the following using the desired command-line options:

    \\ServerName\WS2003SP2\WindowsServer2003-KB914961-SP2-XXX-LLL.exe

  6. Follow the instructions in the Setup Wizard.

  7. After the installation is complete, if you want to install additional updates, install them before you restart your computer.

  8. Restart the computer and then restart the antivirus software if you disabled it.

Scenario 2: Installing SP2 using source files that are located on a network share

To install SP2 from the network, first extract the installation files to a shared distribution folder. Then install SP2 on each computer using these files.

To install the service pack using a network share
  1. Connect to the network or computer where you want to create the distribution folder.

  2. In the shared folder, create a distribution folder. For example, to create a distribution folder named WS2003SP2, type mkdir Drive:\WS2003SP2 at the command prompt (Drive: represents the drive where you want to store the distribution folder).

  3. To extract the files to the distribution folder, type the following at the command prompt, where Path is the location of the distribution folder:

    WindowsServer2003-KB914961-SP2-XXX-LLL.exe /X:Path

  4. For each computer that you plan to update, back up the files and close programs before you continue (unless you plan to force programs to close during the installation).

  5. To install the service pack from the shared distribution folder, run Update.exe. For example, to install from a distribution folder named WS2003SP2, type the following at the command prompt using the desired command-line options:

    Drive:\WS2003SP2\i386\Update\Update.exe

  6. Follow the instructions in the Setup Wizard.

  7. After Update.exe has completed, restart the computer to complete the installation. SP2 will not be fully installed until you restart your computer.

  8. If you disabled your antivirus software, enable it after you restart the computer.

Scenario 3: Installing SP2 using Systems Management Server (SMS)

This scenario explains how to use Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS) to install the service pack from a shared folder. You can use this method to install the service pack on SMS servers that are already running Windows Server 2003.

This scenario assumes that you have an understanding of SMS and a working knowledge of software distribution. For more information about deploying SP2 using SMS, see article 926030 in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: "How to Install Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 (SP2) by Using Systems Management Server" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=78092).

To use SMS to install the service pack
  1. Ensure that your computer is running SMS 2003 with Service Pack 1 or Service Pack 2.

  2. Create the SMS package by importing the package definition file for the service pack. In the package, provide the path to the source files for the service pack.

  3. Distribute the SMS package to the distribution points.

  4. Create the advertisement to notify SMS servers that the service pack is available.

Scenario 4: Installing SP2 using Windows Installer (Update.msi) and Group Policy

This scenario explains how to install SP2 from a shared folder using the Windows Installer package file (Update.msi). You can use this method to install the service pack on servers that are already running an operating system.

Update.msi contains all of the required information to install or remove the service pack. This file defines the relationships between service pack binary files. It also contains an installation database where you can view a summary of the properties that the installation program uses. To view this summary, right-click the installation database, and then click Properties. You must use the machine-assigned distribution method with Update.msi.

Before you begin, please note:

  • To use this method, you should have a thorough understanding of Windows Installer and a working knowledge of Group Policy and Active Directory. For more information about Windows Installer, Group Policy, and Active Directory, see the Windows Server 2003 Deployment Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=44319).

  • For general information about how to apply your software deployment policy to users who are outside the boundaries of organization units, see article 324750 in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: "How To Assign Software to a Specific Group By Using a Group Policy in the Windows Server 2003 Family" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43972).

  • We recommend that you use the SP2 installation file (for example, WindowsServer2003-KB914961-SP2-XXX-LLL.exe) when deploying SP2 at the command prompt. If you use Update.msi to distribute service packs, you must use a server-based ("machine-assigned") Group Policy object (GPO) only. User-based Group Policy deployments are not supported with Update.msi. For more information, see article 278503 in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: "Best Practices for Using Update.msi to Deploy Service Packs" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=28711).

#Assigning Service Pack 2 to servers using Group Policy

This procedure explains how to assign the service pack to servers that are managed by a Group Policy object (GPO). For your installation, you might want to associate the GPO with a new Active Directory container. Only a network administrator or someone who is logged on to a local server as an administrator can remove the assigned software.

To use Group Policy to assign SP2
  1. Ensure that the server you want to update is joined to the same domain as the server where Update.msi resides.

  2. Create a shared network distribution folder.

  3. Create a GPO for SP2 deployments.

  4. Deploy Update.msi from the shared distribution folder as "machine-assigned." Do not deploy it as a user deployment.

  5. Restart each server. When you restart each server, it is updated to SP2. You should check the properties of each server to ensure that the update has completed. You might need to restart each server more than once to complete the update.

The integrated installation

You should perform the integrated installation if you want to install SP2 and Windows Server 2003 at the same time. To perform this type of installation, first use the /integrateoption to update Windows Server 2003 with the SP2 installation files. To do this, you need to use a computer that is already running a Windows Server 2003 or Windows XP operating system.

After you have the integrated version, you can run Windows Server 2003 Setup. The Update.exe program creates a log file (named Spslpsrm.log) for integrated installations. This log file is created in the %systemroot% directory. If you plan to update more than one operating system from this computer, rename the Svcpack.log file after you update each version. Otherwise Update.exe will overwrite this file.

This section describes three scenarios for installing the integrated installation.

Scenario 1: Creating an integrated installation

This section contains instructions for creating integrated installations of SP2 with Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2.

For Windows Server 2003
To create an integrated installation of Windows Server 2003 with SP2
  1. Connect to the network or computer where you want to create the distribution folder.

  2. Create the shared folder and ensure that only system administrators have full access to this folder. (Other users should have only Read and Execute permissions.)

  3. In the shared folder, create a distribution folder for the Windows Server 2003 installation files. For example, to create a distribution folder named WS2003\x86, type:

    mkdir Drive:\WS2003\x86

  4. To verify that you have assigned appropriate permissions to users who are installing the service pack:

    1. Navigate to the appropriate folder, right-click it, and then click Properties.

    2. Click the Sharing tab, and then click Share This Folder.

    3. In Share Name, type a name for the folder.

    4. Click Permissions, and then assign permissions that allow users to install the service pack from this folder.

    5. If you are using an NTFS file system partition, click the Security tab, confirm that the permissions listed there do not conflict with those on the Sharing tab, and then click OK.

  5. Insert your Windows Server 2003 product disc into the CD-ROM drive and copy the contents to the distribution folder. For example, to copy the contents in the CD-ROM drive (D:) to the distribution folder named WS2003\x86 on the E: drive, type:

    xcopy /E D:\ E:\WS2003\x86

  6. Remove the Windows Server 2003 product disc, and insert the SP2 CD.

  7. Apply the source files for the service pack to the installation files. For example, for a 32-bit version of Windows Server 2003, in the folder named WS2003\x86, type:

    WindowsServer2003-KB914961-SP2-XXX-LLL.exe /integrate:Drive:\WS2003\x86

  8. Service pack files are extracted and then applied to the operating system files to update your shared distribution folder. You can either use the files from this folder to make a CD (32-bit versions only) to upgrade your servers, or you can customize Setup for Windows Server 2003 as necessary. For more information about how to customize Setup, view Help by typing i386\winnt32.exe /? at the command prompt in theshared distribution folder.

  9. You can now deploy Windows Server 2003 with SP2 to your computers from the shared folder in either attended or unattended Setup mode.

For Windows Server 2003 R2

This section applies only if you have the first release of Windows Server 2003 R2 where disc 1 contains Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 1. If the product discs that you have do not specify which service pack is included, the discs contain Windows Server 2003 with SP1. If you have the second release of Windows Server 2003 R2 where disc 1 contains Windows Server 2003 with SP2, you do not need to integrate disc 1 and SP2 because disc 1 already contains SP2.

To create an integrated installation of Windows Server 2003 R2 and SP2
  1. Connect to the network or computer where you want to create the distribution folder.

  2. Create the shared folder and ensure that only system administrators have full access to this folder. (Other users should have only Read and Execute permissions.)

  3. In the shared folder, create a distribution folder for the Windows Server 2003 R2 disc 1 installation files. For example, to create a distribution folder named WS2003\x86\CD1, type:

    mkdir Drive:\WS2003\x86\CD1

  4. To verify that you have assigned appropriate permissions to users who are installing the service pack:

    1. Navigate to the appropriate folder, right-click it, and then click Properties.

    2. Click the Sharing tab, and then click Share This Folder.

    3. In Share Name, type a name for the folder.

    4. Click Permissions, and then assign permissions that allow users to install the service pack from this folder.

    5. If you are using an NTFS file system partition, click the Security tab, confirm that the permissions listed there do not conflict with those on the Sharing tab, and then click OK.

  5. Insert disc 1 into the CD-ROM drive, and copy the contents to the distribution folder. For example, to copy the contents in the CD-ROM drive (D:) to the distribution folder named WS2003\x86\CD1 on the E: drive, type:

    xcopy /E D:\ E:\WS2003\x86\CD1

  6. Remove the Windows Server 2003 R2 disc 1, and insert the SP2 CD.

  7. Apply the source files for the service pack to the installation files. For example, for a 32-bit version of Windows Server 2003 in the folder named WS2003\x86\CD1, type:

    WindowsServer2003-KB914961-SP2-XXX-LLL.exe /integrate:Drive:\WS2003\x86\CD1

  8. Service pack files are extracted and then applied to the operating system files to update your shared distribution folder. You can either use the files from this folder to make a CD (32-bit versions only) to upgrade your servers, or you can customize Setup for Windows Server 2003 as necessary. For more information about how to customize Setup, view Help by typing i386\winnt32.exe /? at the command prompt in theshared distribution folder.

  9. Insert your Windows Server 2003 R2 disc 2 into the CD-ROM drive, and copy the contents to the distribution folder. For example, to copy the contents in the CD-ROM drive (D:) to the distribution folder named WS2003\x86\CD2 on the E: drive, type:

    xcopy /E D:\ E:\WS2003\x86\CD2

  10. Apply the source files for the service pack to the installation files. For example, for a 32-bit version of Windows Server 2003 in the folder named WS2003\x86\CD2, type:

    WindowsServer2003-KB914961-SP2-XXX-LLL.exe /integrate:Drive:\WS2003\x86\CD2

  11. You can now deploy the integrated version of disc 1 and the installation files for disc 2 to your computers from the shared folder in either attended or unattended Setup mode.

Scenario 2: Using RIS to install an integrated installation

This section explains how to use Remote Installation Services (RIS) to install an integrated version of Windows Server 2003 with SP2. However, this section does not explain how to set up RIS. For more information about RIS, see Remote Installation Services (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=36940).

RIS supports two types of operating system images:

  • CD-based images (images created by using RISetup)

  • Remote Installation Preparation (RIPrep) images.

The CD-based option is similar to setting up a server operating system directly from the Windows Server 2003 product CD, except that the source files reside on a RIS server. You can create a RIPrep image from a server that is running Windows Server 2003 with SP2, and you can then deploy this image to other similar servers that are connected to the network.

Creating a CD-based (RISetup) image to add to a RIS server

After you install RIS, perform the following steps to create the image and then add the image to your RIS server.

To create an image of Windows Server 2003 with SP2 and add it to your RIS server
  1. Create an integrated version of the operating system with SP2. For more information, see Scenario 1.

  2. To create an image, click Start, click Run, and then type:

    risetup.exe /add

  3. The Remote Installation Services Setup Wizard appears. Follow the instructions in the wizard. When the Installation Source Files Location page prompts you for the image source, enter the path to the shared folder that contains the integrated version that you created in Step 1.

  4. A box appears showing the progress of the installation. After the RISetup image is complete, you can install the image on each server as described in Remote Installation Services on the Microsoft TechCenter Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=36940).

Creating a Remote Installation Preparation (RIPrep) image to deploy to other servers

If you want to add additional programs or settings to your integrated installation image, you must have a CD–based image of Windows Server 2003 with SP2 on your RIS server. Note that you cannot use the /integrate option to integrate SP2 directly into an existing CD-based image or a RIPrep image.

To update existing RIPrep images
  1. Use RIS to install the RISetup image on your computer.

  2. Add the additional programs and settings that you want to include in the image.

  3. Run RIPrep to create an image on the RIS server. For instructions on how to run RIPrep on RIS servers running Windows Server 2003, see:

  4. You can now deploy your RIPrep image to other servers.

Scenario 3: Using Windows Deployment Services to install an integrated installation

This section explains how to use Windows Deployment Services to install an integrated version of Windows Server 2003 with SP2. However, this section does not explain how to set up Windows Deployment Services. For more information, see the documentation that is included with the tool and the Windows Deployment Services Update Step-by-Step Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=66145).

You can also deploy SP2 by using RIS functionality from a Windows Deployment Services Server. For example, first ensure that the server is in either Legacy or Mixed mode. Then follow the procedures in Scenario 2 to deploy SP2. To check the operating mode that you are in, run WDSUTIL /get-server /show:config. The output will contain a line with the mode that you are in. For example, "WDS operational mode: Mixed."

To add an image of Windows Server 2003 with SP2 to your Windows Deployment Services server, you must first create a .wim install image. Install images are built from reference installations of the Windows operating system and are deployed when Windows Deployment Services is used to install Windows. A reference installation may be a standard Windows installation or may be configured for a specific environment or use prior to creating the image.

To create an install image
  1. Create a reference computer that contains Windows Server 2003, SP2, and any programs and settings that you want to include in the image.

  2. Download the updated deployment tools (Deploy.cab). To do this, search the Microsoft Download Center for “Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 Deployment Tools” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=78088).

  3. From a command prompt on the reference computer, change directories to the directory that contains the updated version of Sysprep.exe (which is included in Deploy.cab). For more information about using this tool, see article 926028 in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: "Updated System Preparation Tool for Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=78090).

  4. Type sysprep.exe /reseal /reboot.

  5. When the reference computer reboots, press F12.

  6. In Windows Boot Manager, choose to boot to the appropriate capture image.

  7. On the Image Capture Wizard welcome page, click Next.

  8. On the Image Capture Source page, use the Volume to Capture drop-down menu to choose the appropriate volume, and then provide a name and description for the image. Click Next to continue.

  9. On the Image Capture Destination page, click Browse and browse to the location where you want to store the captured image.

  10. In the Filename text box, type a name for the image using the .WIM file name extension, and then click Save.

  11. Click Upload image to WDS server.

  12. Type the name of the Windows Deployment Services server and click Connect.

  13. If prompted for credentials, provide a user name and password for an account with sufficient privilege to connect to the Windows Deployment Services server.

  14. Using the drop-down Image Group menu, choose an image group in which to store the image.

  15. Click Finish.

Command-line options

You can use the following options to define the way SP2 is installed. You can use the following options through Update.exe or when you run the installation file (for example, WindowsServer2003-KB914961-SP2-XXX-LLL.exe). You can precede the following options with a forward slash (/) or a hyphen (-). The options are not case-sensitive.

noteNote
You can also use the /Log and /Verbose options. For more information, see "The Package Installer (Formerly Called Update.exe) for Microsoft Windows Operating Systems and Windows Components" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=42759).

 

Command-line option Description

/D:Path

Backs up the files that are required to remove the service pack to Path. Any location that you specify must be on the local drive. If you back up files but do not specify a folder, the default location is:

$ntservicepackuninstall$

/ER

Enables extended codes that return a detailed error message if the update installation fails. For more information, see "The Package Installer (Formerly Called Update.exe) for Microsoft Windows Operating Systems and Windows Components" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=42759).

/F

or

/Forceappsclose

Forces other applications to close after you install the update package and before the computer is restarted. You cannot use this option with /integrate, /L, and /Z.

/Forcerestart

Restarts the computer after the installation is complete, even if a restart is not required to complete the installation. This option does not force applications to close.

/Integrate:Path

Integrates the SP2 source files into the path you specify. Be sure to provide the absolute path to your operating system source files. This option is the same as the /S option that was used by previous installers.

/L

Lists installed updates.

/N

or

/Nobackup

Does not create backup files during setup. We do not recommend this option because backup files allow you to remove SP2 in the future. An entry for SP2 does not appear in Add or Remove Programs if you use this option.

/O

or

/Overwriteoem

Overwrites OEM files without prompting.

/Promptrestart

If a restart is required, a dialog box notifies the user that a restart is required to complete setup. Intended for use with /Quiet.

/Q

or

/Quiet

Uses quiet mode. This mode shows no user interface during the installation of the updates. This is the same as unattended mode, except that the user interface is hidden. No prompts will appear during the installation process.

/U

or

/Passive

Installs the service pack in unattended mode. Only critical error prompts and a progress bar will appear during the installation. By default, the program invokes the /Warnrestart option.

/Warnrestart:[Seconds]

If a restart is required, a dialog box notifies the user that the computer will restart in the specified seconds. The user can click Cancel or Restart Now. The default is 60 seconds.

/X

or

/Extract

Extracts service pack files without starting Update.exe. You are prompted to provide the path for the folder in which you want the extracted service pack installation files to be placed. For more information, see "The Package Installer (Formerly Called Update.exe) for Microsoft Windows Operating Systems and Windows Components" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=42759).

/Z

or

/Norestart

Does not restart the computer after the installation is complete, even if a restart is required to complete the installation.

/?

or

/Help

Displays Help.

Uninstalling SP2

It is possible to uninstall SP2 only if it was installed as an update to an existing operating system. It is not possible to remove only SP2 if you installed it as part of an integrated installation. In addition, you can only uninstall the last service pack that you installed. For example, if you install SP1 and then you install SP2, you can only uninstall SP2.

By default, backup files are created during the installation so you can remove SP2. Unless you specified the /nobackup option when installing SP2, then you can remove SP2 using Add or Remove Programs or the command prompt.

If you remove SP2, a dialog box displays a list of the applications that you installed after you installed SP2. If you continue, these applications might not work correctly. Multiple descriptions of some applications might appear instead of a single generic description. You can ignore these additional descriptions.

To remove SP2 using a command prompt
  1. Open a command prompt, type the following, and then press ENTER (Option can be any option listed in the following table):

    %systemroot%\$NtServicePackUninstall$\spuninst\Spuninst.exe /Option

  2. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.

 

Option Description

/F

or

/Forceappsclose

Forces applications to close when the computer restarts.

/Q

or

/Quiet

Removes SP2 in quiet mode, which is the same as unattended mode except that the user interface is hidden and no prompts appear.

/U

or

/Passive

Removes the service pack in unattended mode. Only critical error prompts appear while SP2 is being uninstalled.

/Z

or

/Norestart

Does not restart the computer after the process of uninstalling SP2 is complete.

/?

or

/Help

Displays Help.

Debugging symbols

If you want to debug the operating system, first download and install the symbols for debugging Windows Server 2003, and then add the symbols for debugging SP2 to the same folder. When you install SP2, the current versions of the symbol files overwrite any previous versions that are in the symbol installation folder. For more information, see Debugging Tools for Windows—Overview (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=30565).

You can download symbols for debugging SP2 from one of the following locations:

  • The Download Windows Symbol Packages page on the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=30539).

  • On demand from the Internet Symbol Server. For more information about using the Internet Symbol Server, see "Debugging Tools and Symbols: Getting Started" on the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=30524).

  • The English version of the SP2 CD. This CD contains the symbols package (Symbols.cab) in the \Support\Symbols folder. This package is language-independent and can be downloaded for debugging any Windows Server 2003 locale.

Additional resources

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