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IPv6 test lab tasks

Updated: April 13, 2011

Applies To: Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2

IPv6 test lab tasks

The following tasks are designed to take you through the common IPv6 configurations by using the test lab infrastructure configured in Setting up the IPv6 infrastructure.

  • Link-local ping

  • Creating a static routing infrastructure

  • Using name resolution

To complete these tasks, you must use the Netsh commands for Interface IPv6 at the command prompt. For information about how to use Netsh, see Netsh overview. For the complete IPv6 Netsh reference, see Netsh commands for Interface IPv6.

Note

  • The following instructions are for configuring a test lab using a minimum number of computers. Individual computers are needed to separate the services provided on the network and to clearly show the desired functionality. This configuration is neither designed to reflect best practices nor is it designed to reflect a desired or recommended configuration for a production network. The configuration, including IP addresses and all other configuration parameters, is designed only to work on a separate test lab network.

Link-local ping

To ping a host using link-local addresses and view the entries created in the neighbor and route caches, complete the following steps:

  1. On DNS1, type the command netsh interface ipv6 show address to obtain the link-local address of the interface named Local Area Connection.

  2. On CLIENT1, type the command netsh interface ipv6 show address to obtain the link-local address and interface index of the interface named Local Area Connection.

  3. On CLIENT1, type the following command to ping the link-local address of DNS1:

    pingDNS1LinkLocalAddress%InterfaceIndex

    For example, if the link-local address of DNS1 is FE80::2AA:FF:FE9D:10C5, and the interface index for the Local Area Connection interface on CLIENT1 is 3, the command is:

    ping FE80::2AA:FF:FE9D:10C5%3

  4. On CLIENT1, type the following command:

    netsh interface ipv6 show neighbors

    to view the entry in the CLIENT1 neighbor cache for DNS1. For more information, see Neighbor Discovery (ND)

  5. On CLIENT1, type the following command:

    netsh interface ipv6 show destinationcache

    to view the entry in the CLIENT1 destination cache for DNS1. For more information, see Neighbor Discovery (ND).

  6. On CLIENT1, type the following command:

    netsh interface ipv6 show routes

    to view the entries in the CLIENT1 routing table. For more information, see The IPv6 routing table

Creating a static routing infrastructure

To configure a static IPv6 routing infrastructure so that all test lab nodes are reachable by using IPv6 traffic, complete the following steps:

  1. On ROUTER1, type the netsh interface ipv6 show address command to obtain the interface indexes of the interfaces connected to Subnet 1 Connection, Subnet 2 Connection, and their link-local addresses.

  2. On ROUTER2, type the netsh interface ipv6 show address command to obtain the interface indexes of the interfaces connected to Subnet 2 Connection, Subnet 3 Connection, and their link-local addresses.

  3. On ROUTER1, type the following commands:

    netsh interface ipv6 set interface"Subnet 1 Connection"forwarding=enabledadvertise=enabled

    netsh interface ipv6 set interface"Subnet 2 Connection"forwarding=enabledadvertise=enabled

    netsh interface ipv6 add route2001:DB8:0:1::/64interface="Subnet 1 Connection"publish=yes

    netsh interface ipv6 add route2001:DB8:0:2::/64"Subnet 2 Connection"publish=yes

    netsh interface ipv6 add route::/0"Subnet 2 Connection"nexthop=ROUTER2AddressOnSubnet2publish=yes

    In the preceding command, ROUTER2AddressOnSubnet2 represents the link-local address assigned to the Subnet 2 Connection interface on ROUTER2.

    For example, if the Subnet 2 Connection interface on ROUTER2 is FE80::2AA:FF:FE87:4D5C, the last command is typed as follows:

    netsh interface ipv6 add route ::/0 "Subnet 2 Connection"nexthop=fe80::2aa:ff:fe87:4d5c publish=yes

  4. On ROUTER2, type the following commands:

    netsh interface ipv6 set interface"Subnet 2 Connection"forwarding=enabledadvertise=enabled

    netsh interface ipv6 set interface"Subnet 3 Connection"forwarding=enabledadvertise=enabled

    netsh interface ipv6 add route2001:DB8:0:2::/64"Subnet 2 Connection"publish=yes

    netsh interface ipv6 add route2001:DB8:0:3::/64"Subnet 3 Connection"publish=yes

    netsh interface ipv6 add route::/0"Subnet 2 Connection"nexthop=ROUTER1AddressOnSubnet2publish=yes

    In the preceding command, ROUTER1AddressOnSubnet2 represents the link-local address assigned to the Subnet 2 Connection interface on ROUTER1.

For example, if the link-local address of the Subnet 2 Connection interface on ROUTER1 is FE80::2AA:FF:FE9A:203F, the last command should be typed as follows:

  • netsh interface ipv6 add route ::/0 "Subnet 2 Connection" nexthop=fe80::2aa:ff:fe9a:203f publish=yes

On CLIENT1, type the command netsh interface ipv6 show address to obtain the address beginning with 2001:DB8 assigned to the interface named Local Area Connection.

On CLIENT2, type the following commands:

  • ping CLIENT1Address

  • tracert -d CLIENT1Address

Using name resolution

To view DNS AAAA (quad-A) records and test the use of DNS with IPv6, do the following:

  1. On DNS1, open the DNS console. Under the server DNS1, click Forward Lookup Zones. In the right pane, open testlab.microsoft.com. In the right pane, you can view both IPv4 A records and IPv6 AAAA records. To view the quad-A record properties for one of the clients on your network, double-click the quad-A record.

    For example, for the CLIENT2 address of 2001:DB8::3:260:8FF:FE52:F9D8, the contents of the AAAA resource record are:

    Name: client2.testlab.microsoft.com

    Address: 2001:DB8::3:260:8FF:FE52:F9D8

  2. On CLIENT1, type the following command:

    ping -6 client2.testlab.microsoft.com

    The name client2.testlab.microsoft.com is resolved to its address by sending a DNS query to DNS1.

  3. On CLIENT2, create the following entry in the Hosts file (located in the systemroot\System32\Drivers\Etc folder):

    client1Client1Address

  4. On CLIENT2, type the following command:

    ping -6 client1

    The name client1.testlab.microsoft.com is resolved to its address by using the local Hosts file.

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