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Change the Site Gates for a Routing Link

Updated: June 25, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

Use this procedure to change the site gates for a routing link.

You can use this procedure to change the site gates for a routing link. A site gate is a Message Queuing server that is configured to route messages between sites on behalf of other clients. A site gate can be thought of as a bridgehead for a routing link.

A routing link can have any number of site gates or no site gate, and each site gate can be in either or both of the sites connected by it. If a routing link is associated with a pair of site gates, one in each site, only those servers are used to transfer messages on the routing link on behalf of clients. It is recommended that all sites in your organization be interconnected using routing links.

Membership in <Domain>\Domain Admins, or equivalent, is the minimum required to complete this procedure. Membership in <Domain>\Enterprise Admins, or equivalent is required to complete this procedure in a multiple domain environment.

  1. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Active Directory Sites and Services.

  2. On the View menu, click Show Services Node.

  3. In the console tree, click MsmqServices.

    Where?

    • Active Directory Sites and Services/Services/MsmqServices

  4. In the details pane, right-click the applicable routing link, and then click Properties.

  5. On the Site Gates page, do one of the following:

    • To add a Message Queuing routing server as a site gate to the routing link, in Available servers, select a server from the list, and then click Add.

    • To remove a Message Queuing routing server from the routing link, in Sitegates, select the applicable server from the list, and then click Remove.

  6. Repeat step 5 as needed.

  • A routing link defines the route for connectivity between two sites, and a site gate is a Message Queuing routing server or one of several such servers through which the message traffic between two sites is configured to pass. For more information about routing links, site gates, and how they are used to route messages, see Message Queuing Routing

  • A site gate can belong to either or both of the sites connected by a routing link. A routing link can have any number of site gates or no site gate.

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