Export (0) Print
Expand All

Test Scenarios for File Server Resource Manager

Updated: April 25, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2003 R2

Before deploying File Server Resource Manager on a production server, we recommend that you familiarize yourself with the different quota, file screening and reporting options, by performing the following scenarios on a test server.

ImportantImportant
To successfully perform some of the test scenarios presented in this guide, you must first configure the general e-mail notifications parameters. For more information, see "Configuring E-mail Notifications" earlier in this guide.

Quota Management Scenarios

By creating a quota for a volume or folder, you can limit the disk space that is allocated for that volume or folder. The Quota Management node of File Server Resource Manager includes all the necessary options to work with quotas.

There are three groups of tasks that can be tested under Quota Management:

  • Quota tasks

  • Auto quota tasks

  • Quota template tasks

noteNote
For more information about Quota Management, the different tasks available in this node, and step-by-step procedures, see "Working with Quotas" earlier in this guide.

Testing quotas

We recommend using the following two scenarios to familiarize yourself with some of the quota tasks in File Server Resource Manager.

Scenario 1: Quotas for soft monitoring

In some situations, rather than creating a hard limit on the amount of allocated space, you may want to perform soft monitoring of a volume or a folder, so that you receive notifications when predetermined usage thresholds have been exceeded. This is a very useful technique that alerts administrators before a shortage of storage space occurs.

Test setup:

Create a soft quota on one of the volumes in your server (for example, D:\ or E:\) using the following parameters:

  • Quota limit: total volume capacity

  • Quota type: soft quota

  • Notifications:

    • Limit (100%): send e-mail to administrator, send warning to the event log

    • Warning (85%): send e-mail to administrator, send warning to the event log

    • Warning (80%): send e-mail to administrator

    • Warning (50%): send e-mail to administrator

Verification:
  • Verify that it is still possible to save files to the volume.

  • Copy or generate enough data in the volume to exceed any of the notification thresholds and then verify that the notifications that you selected have been created and received.

noteNote
To generate large files you can use the fsutil command with the following parameters: fsutil file createnew file_name file_size, where file_name is the path and name of the file that you want to create and file_size is the size of the file in bytes. An example: fsutil file createnew D:\bigfile.txt 1024000. This will create a file called bigfile.txt on the root directory of volume D, with an approximate size of 1 megabyte (MB).

Scenario 2: Quotas on group shares

Several templates for working with quotas are included with File Server Resource Manager. One of these templates is the Monitor 500 MB Share, which is intended to be used when administering a shared folder on your server.

Test setup:

Using the Monitor 500 MB Share quota template, create a quota on a shared folder on your server (for example: E:\Scratch). For more information about how to create a quota from a template, see "Creating a Quota" earlier in this guide.

Verification:
  • Copy or generate enough data in the shared folder to exceed any of the notification thresholds and then verify that the selected notifications have been created and received.

Testing auto quotas

We recommend using the following two scenarios to familiarize yourself with some of the auto quota tasks in File Server Resource Manager.

Scenario 1: Auto quotas on user folders

It is common that each user in an organization has a folder hosted on a file server. Usually, all of these user folders are located under a common root and a new folder is created every time a new user is granted access to the server. Using auto quotas can simplify the creation of quotas for user folders, as well as the administration of these quotas.

Test setup:

Create a folder called Users on the root directory of a volume. Under this folder, create subfolders, one for each user. For example:

D:\Users\User001

D:\Users\User002

D:\Users\User003

D:\Users\User100

When you have finished creating all of the Users subfolders, create an auto quota on the Users folder, using the 100 MB Limit template. For more information about how to create an auto quota, see "Creating an Auto Quota" earlier in this guide.

Verification:
  • Under Quotas, in the results pane, verify that an individual quota was automatically generated for each subfolder in the Users folder.

  • Verify that no quota was generated for the Users (parent) folder.

  • Create a new subfolder in the Users folder (for example: D:\Users\User101) and verify that a new individual quota is automatically generated for the new subfolder.

  • Edit the auto quota that you just created and select to derive properties from a different quota template (for example, the 200 MB Limit Reports to User template). Choose to apply the auto quota changes to all derived quotas and then, under Quotas, verify that all of the individual quotas for the Users subfolders have now been updated with the properties of the new quota template.

Scenario 2: Auto quotas on shared folders under a common root

Auto quotas can also be applied to a volume root. This scenario is especially useful when, for example, a volume is used to directly host a number of folders shared by the organization.

Test setup:

Create several shared folders on the root directory of a volume in your server, for example:

E:\Accounting (shared as: \\Server_name\Accounting)

E:\Finance (shared as: \\Server_name\Finance)

E:\Marketing (shared as: \\Server_name\Marketing)

E:\Payroll (shared as: \\Server_name\Payroll)

E:\Sales (shared as: \\Server_name\Sales)

When you have finished creating the folders and their shares, create an auto quota on the volume root (in this example, on E:\), using the 100 MB Limit template. For more information about how to create an auto quota, see "Creating an Auto Quota" earlier in this guide.

Verification:
  • Under Quotas, in the results pane, verify that an individual quota was automatically generated for each of the folders in the volume and that a shared path is listed for it.

  • From a different server in the network, access any of the shared folders that you created, and copy or generate enough data in that shared folder to exceed the 100 MB limit. Verify that the quota limit is enforced on the shared folder.

Testing quota templates

We recommend using the following two scenarios to familiarize yourself with some of the quota template tasks in File Server Resource Manager.

Scenario 1: Creating a new template from an existing template

File Server Resource Manager has several default templates that can be easily modified to create templates that are more appropriate for your server environment.

Test setup:

Under Quota Templates, click the Create quota template action and copy the properties from the 100 MB Limit template. Then modify the following parameters:

  • Template name: 50 MB Limit

  • Quota limit: 50 MB

  • Quota type: soft quota

  • Notifications:

    • Limit (100%): send e-mail to administrator, send warning to the event log

    • Warning (85%): send e-mail to administrator, send warning to the event log

    • Warning (50%): send e-mail to administrator

When you are finished performing these changes, click OK to save the new template.

Verification:
  • Under Quota Templates, in the results pane, verify that the new 50 MB Limit template is listed.

Scenario 2: Using a quota template to update quotas

If you base your quotas and auto quotas on templates, you can automatically update all quotas that are based on a specific template simply by editing that template. This feature simplifies the process of updating quota properties by providing one central point where all changes can be made.

Test setup:

If you have not already done so, perform the first scenario for testing auto quotas ("Scenario 1: Auto quotas on user folders") and the first scenario for testing quota templates ("Scenario 1: Create a new template from an existing template").

When you have completed these two scenarios, under Auto Quotas, edit the auto quota for the Users folder and select to derive properties from the 50 MB Limit template. When prompted, choose to apply the auto quota changes to all derived quotas.

Verification:
  • Under Quotas, in the results pane, verify that all the quotas created for the user folders have now been updated with the properties of the 50 MB Limit template.

  • Next, under Quota Templates, select to edit the 50 MB Limit template and modify the following properties:

    • Quota limit: 25 MB

    • Quota type: hard quota

    When prompted, select to apply the template changes to all derived quotas. Finally, under Quotas, verify that all the individual quotas for the Users subfolders have now been updated with the new 25 MB quota limit and that the type of quota has been set to "hard."

File Screening Management Scenarios

File screens are used to block certain types of files from being saved on a volume or in a folder tree. To specify which files to screen, you assign one or more file groups to a file screen. The File Screening Management node of File Server Resource Manager includes all the necessary options to work with file screens.

There are three groups of tasks that can be tested under File Screening Management:

  • File group tasks

  • File screen tasks

  • File screen template tasks

noteNote
For more information about File Screening Management, the different tasks that are available in this node, and step-by-step procedures, see "Screening Files" earlier in this guide. For more information about file groups, see "Working with File Groups" earlier in this guide.

Testing file groups

We recommend using the following scenario to familiarize yourself with some of the file group tasks in File Server Resource Manager.

Scenario 1: Using a file group to block specific file names

File Server Resource Manager includes several default file groups for screening, which include various different file types, based on their file name pattern. But you may want to block specific files that do not follow a specific pattern.

Test setup:

Under File Groups, click the Create file group action to create a new file group with the following properties:

  • File group name: Specific Files

  • Files to include: file_name1.exe, file_name2.dll, file_name3.txt

Verification:
  • Under File Groups, in the results pane, verify that the new Specific Files file group is listed and includes the different inclusion files.

Testing file screens

We recommend using the following two scenarios to familiarize yourself with some of the file screen tasks in File Server Resource Manager.

Scenario 1: File screens on user folders

File screens can be used to block specific types of files from being saved on shared storage resources. When a file screen is applied on a specific folder, the screening properties apply to all its subfolders.

Test setup:

If you have not already done so, perform the first scenario for testing auto quotas (see "Scenario 1: Auto quotas on user folders" under "Quota Management Scenarios" earlier in this guide).

When you have completed this scenario and have created all of the user folders, create a file screen on the Users folder, using the Block Executable Files template. For more information about how to create a file screen based on a file screen template, see "Creating a File Screen" earlier in this guide.

Verification:
  • Under File Screens, in the results pane, verify that the new file screen for the Users folder is listed.

  • Verify that you cannot save a file in the Users folder with any of the extensions included in the Executable Files file group (for example, .exe, .cmd, .bat, and so on).

  • Verify that you cannot save the same type of files in any of the user folders (for example, in: D:\Users\User001).

  • Create a new subfolder inside a user folder (for example: D:\Users\User001\Temp) and verify that you cannot save the same type of files in the newly created subfolder.

Scenario 2: File screen exceptions on specific user folders

File screen exceptions expand the flexibility of the file screening capabilities in File Server Resource Manager by creating an exception to any screening rules derived from a parent folder.

Test setup:

If you have not already done so, perform the first scenario for testing file screens (see "Scenario 1: File screens on user folders" earlier in this guide).

When you have completed this scenario, apply a file screen exception on one of the users folders (for example: D:\Users\User002) by selecting the Executable Files file group to be excluded from screening. For more information about how to create a file screen exception, see "Creating a File Screen Exception" earlier in this guide.

Verification:
  • Under File Screens, in the results pane, verify that the new file screen exception is listed for the specific user folder that you selected.

  • Verify that you can now save files in this folder with any of the extensions included in the Executable Files file group (for example, .exe, .cmd, .bat, and so on).

  • Verify that you still cannot save a file in the Users folder (the parent folder of the one you selected for the file screen exception) with any of the extensions included in the Executable Files file group.

Testing file screen templates

We recommend using the following two scenarios to familiarize yourself with some of the file screen template tasks in File Server Resource Manager.

Scenario 1: A file screen to monitor executables and system files saved on a shared folder

File screens can also be used to generate notifications when specific types of files are saved on a volume or on a folder, without blocking the user from saving them.

Test setup:

Using the Monitor Executable and System Files template, create a file screen on a shared folder on your server (for example, E:\Scratch). For more information about how to create a file screen based on a file screen template, see "Creating a File Screen" earlier in this guide.

Verification:
  • Copy or generate a file in the shared folder, with any of the extensions included in the Executable Files file group (for example, .exe, .cmd, .bat, and so on) and then verify that the selected notifications have been created and received.

  • Copy or generate a file in the shared folder, with any of the extensions included in the System Files file group (for example, .dll, .sys, .vxd, and so on) and then verify that the selected notifications have been created and received.

Scenario 2: Using a file screen template to update file screens

As with quota templates, if you base your file screens on file screen templates, you can automatically update all file screens that are based on a specific template simply by editing that template.

Test setup:

If you have not already done so, perform the first scenario for testing file screens (see "Scenario 1: File screens on user folders" earlier in this guide).

When you have completed this scenario, under File Screen Templates, edit the Block Executable Files template and select to also block files in the Backup Files file group. When prompted, select to apply the template changes to all derived file screens.

Verification:
  • Under File Screens, in the results pane, verify that the file screen for the Users folder now includes Backup Files in the list of file groups to block.

  • Verify that you cannot save a file in the Users folder or in its subfolders with any of the extensions included in the Backup Files file group (for example, .old, .bak, .bck).

  • Under File Groups, select to edit the Backup Files group and add the following parameter in Files to exclude: test_file.bak

  • Finally, verify that you can now save a file called test_file.bak in the Users folder and in any of its subfolders.

Storage Reports Management Scenarios

File Server Resource Manager offers advanced reporting capabilities to help you understand how storage is used and how quota and file screening tasks are behaving. The Storage Reports Management node of File Server Resource Manager includes all the necessary options to schedule and generate storage reports.

There are two types of report tasks that can be tested under Storage Reports Management:

  • Scheduled reports tasks

  • On-demand reports tasks

noteNote
For more information about Storage Reports Management, the different tasks available in this node, and step-by-step procedures, see "Generating Storage Reports" earlier in this guide.

Testing scheduled reports

We recommend using the following two scenarios to familiarize yourself with some of the scheduled reports tasks in File Server Resource Manager.

Scenario 1: Scheduling a report to monitor quota usage

Several preconfigured reports are included with File Server Resource Manager. One of these is the Quota Usage report. This report lists all quotas that exceed a selected percentage of the quota usage (for example, 85%). You can use the Quota Usage report to continuously monitor storage resources on your server and to identify those users that may soon exceed their quota limit.

Test setup:

If you have not already done so, perform any of the scenarios for testing quotas or auto quotas (see "Quota Management Scenarios" earlier in this guide).

When you are finished applying some quotas to a volume on your server, under Storage Reports Management, click the Schedule a new report task action and create a report task with the following parameters:

  • Scope: the volume in your server where quotas have been applied (for example, D:\)

  • Report data: Quota Usage (clear all other reports)

  • Edit Parameters:

    • Minimum quota usage: 50%

  • Report formats: DHTML

  • Delivery: send the report to your e-mail address

  • Schedule:

    • Schedule Task: Once

    • Start time: 5 to 10 minutes after your current time

Verification
  • Under Storage Reports Management, in the results pane, verify that the new report task is listed and that the schedule and next run time values are those that you selected.

  • Wait for the scheduled run time and then allow a few minutes for the report to be generated and for the e-mail to be sent and received. When the e-mail has been received, scan through the report information and scroll all the way to the end of the report to see the quota usage by owner data.

Scenario 2: Adding a report to a scheduled report task

Reports can be easily added or removed from existing report tasks.

Test setup:

If you have not already done so, perform the first scenario for testing scheduled reports (see " Scenario 1: Scheduling a report to monitor quota usage" earlier in this guide).

When you have completed this previous scenario, under Storage Reports Management, click the Add or Remove reports for a report task action. Edit the parameters of the Large Files report to include files with a minimum file size of 20 MB, and then add this report to the report task of the previous scenario.

Verification
  • Under Storage Reports Management, in the results pane, verify that the report task now includes the Large Files report.

  • Right-click the report task and select Run report task now. When asked how you want to proceed, select Generate reports in the background. Wait a few minutes for the reports to be generated and for the e-mails to be sent and received. Verify that you receive two e-mails: a separate e-mail for each report in the task.

Testing on-demand reports

We recommend using the following two scenarios to familiarize yourself with some of the on-demand reports tasks in File Server Resource Manager.

Scenario 1: Running a report of all duplicate files in a volume

A very useful report to run is the Duplicate Files report. This report not only lists all duplicate files in a volume or folder but also presents statistical data related to the space these duplicate files occupy on disk. You can use the information collected in this report to quickly reclaim wasted disk space.

Test setup:

Under Storage Reports Management, click the Generate reports now action and then choose the following parameters:

  • Scope: the volume in your server where the system root is located (for example, C:\)

  • Report data: Duplicate Files (clear all other reports)

  • Edit Parameters:

    • Minimum days since file screening event occurred: change to 0 (zero)

  • Report formats: DHTML

When asked how you want to proceed, select Wait for reports to be generated and then display them.

Verification
  • Wait a few minutes for the report to be generated. When completed, it will open automatically in Internet Explorer.

  • View the report information and scroll all the way to the end of the report to see the statistical data.

Scenario 2: Running a report to monitor file screening activity

File Server Resource Manager allows you to record file screening activity in an auditing database. The File Screening Audit report is used to view the information in this database.

ImportantImportant
Before you run a File Screen Audit report, in the File Server Resource Manager Options dialog box, on the File Screen Audit tab, verify that the Record file screening activity in the auditing database check box is selected. For more information, see "Generating Storage Reports" earlier in this guide.

Test setup:

If you have not already done so, perform any of the scenarios for testing file screening (see "File Screening Management Scenarios" earlier in this guide). Make sure that you generate some file screening activity by attempting to save blocked files.

Under Storage Reports Management, click the Generate reports now action and then choose the following parameters:

  • Scope: the volume in your server where file screens have been applied (for example: D:\)

  • Report data: File Screening Audit (clear all other reports)

  • Report formats: HTML

When asked how you want to proceed, select Wait for reports to be generated and then display them.

Verification
  • Wait a few minutes for the report to be generated. When completed, it will open automatically in Internet Explorer.

  • View the report information and verify that the screening activity that you generated is listed.

Clustering Scenarios

The quota, file screening, and reporting capabilities in File Server Resource Manager are also available for clustered environments.

noteNote
You only need to perform these scenarios if you will be deploying File Server Resource Manager in a clustered environment.

Preliminary configuration guidelines

  • Quota templates, file screen templates, and file groups can be configured by connecting to any node in the cluster but not by using the virtual cluster name.

  • Quotas and file screens on a particular volume must be configured by connecting to the node that currently owns that volume.

Scenario 1: Global configuration

Test setup:

Connect to any node in the cluster and create or make changes to a quota template, a file screen template, or a file group.

Verification:
  • Connect to a different node in the cluster and verify that the changes you made have propagated to this node.

Scenario 2: Volume failover

Test setup:

Connect to any node in the cluster and create quotas and file screens on a volume owned by that node. Next, fail over that volume to a different cluster node.

Verification:
  • Connect to the node that now owns the volume and verify that the quotas and file screens that you created continue to be enforced.

Was this page helpful?
(1500 characters remaining)
Thank you for your feedback

Community Additions

ADD
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft