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MSMQ Service

Updated: January 31, 2008

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

The MSMQ Service is the core service that makes it possible for you to perform basic Message Queuing functions, such as creating and managing queues, sending and receiving messages, and so on.

Aspects

The following is a list of all aspects that are part of this managed entity:

Name Description

Active Directory Integration Configuration

Directory Service Integration enables Message Queuing to function in domain mode. This makes possible the publication of queue properties to Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) (for public queues), out-of-the-box authentication, encryption of messages using certificates that are registered in AD DS, and routing of messages across Message Queuing sites.

The health of the initial Active Directory integration configuration process is important for Message Queuing. Integration with AD DS is required so that Message Queuing can use the features that the Message Queuing domain mode operation supports.

Message Queuing Active Directory Operation

Message Queuing must integrate successfully with Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) to function properly in domain mode. The integration of the Active Directory interface, configuration, and other related issues can affect Message Queuing.

Message Queuing Clustering

Clustering makes it possible for Message Queuing to operate as one instance across multiple operating systems so that Message Queuing can fail-over from one computer to another and provide high availability.

Message Queuing Connectivity

Message Queuing relies on network connectivity for much of its functionality. If network connectivity is lost or compromised, messages may not be sent or delivered.

Message Queuing Functioning in Domain Mode

Directory Service Integration enables Message Queuing to function in domain mode. This feature makes possible the publishing of queue properties to Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) (for public queues), out-of-the-box authentication, encryption of messages using certificates that are registered in AD DS, and routing of messages across Message Queuing sites. This feature becomes operational only when the computer joins a domain. Message Queuing must be able to join the domain and operate in domain mode.

Message Queuing Logging and Checkpoint Events

To provide transaction consistency, Message Queuing logs transaction status changes and incoming messages to a log file (QMLog), and then creates a checkpoint that is written to a separate file. The checkpoint file contains version information, and the QMLog is updated to refer to that version of the checkpoint file as being the current checkpoint.

During initialization of the MSMQ Service, there is a recovery phase for transactional messages where the QMLog file is read. It contains the version information for the most current checkpoint entry in the checkpoint files and then uses the current checkpoint file to perform recovery of transactional messages.

If there is a failure between the time that the checkpoint file was created and when the QMLog was updated with the new version, the QMLog file refers to the earliest checkpoint file version and recovery fails.

Message Queuing uses several checkpoint files to maintain consistency. These checkpoint files are used to perform recovery of transactional messages.

 

Message Queuing Mapping Operation

Message Queuing uses mapping files to redirect messages to the proper queue.

Message Queuing MSDTC Operation

The Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator service (MSDTC) is a Windows service that provides a transaction infrastructure for distributed systems.

Message Queuing Operation

Message Queuing operation provides message authentication, message encryption, dead-letter queues, security settings, and other basic features. If Message Queuing has problems with any of these features, proper Message Queuing operation may suffer.

Message Queuing Resources

One of the primary functions of Message Queuing is to facilitate asynchronous messaging. Therefore, Message Queuing resources provide storage for messages until the appropriate applications or clients can receive the messages. Because Message Queuing is not designed to be used as a database or as long-term RAM, if too many messages accumulate in individual queues in Message Queuing, the volume of messages may have an adverse effect on system performance.

Message Queuing System Resources

Disk, memory, and system resources are assigned to Message Queuing. If these resources become limited, Message Queuing may not function as expected.

MSMQ Service Initialization

Microsoft Message Queuing (MSMQ) Service Initialization prepares the MSMQ Service for startup. Problems during initialization may prevent Message Queuing as a whole from starting up or may prevent a feature or subset of features from functioning properly.

Related Management Information

Message Queuing

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