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Poolmon Syntax

Updated: March 28, 2003

Applies To: Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2

Poolmon Syntax

Poolmon has two separate, but related, sets of parameters. You use one parameter set at the command line when starting Poolmon; you use the other parameter set while running Poolmon.

Command-line Syntax

Poolmon uses the following syntax at the command line:

Art Image poolmon[/iTag][/xTag][/c [LocalTagFile]][/g [PoolTagFile]][/s[TSSessionID]][[/p [/p]][/e][/( | /)][/t | /a/f/d | /b/m][/l][/n [File]][/? | /h]

Parameters

/i Tag
Displays only the allocations with the specified tag. Tags are case sensitive. Do not type a space between the /i and the tag.

You can use the wildcard character (*) to represent zero or more instances of any character and the question mark character (?) to represent one instance of any character. Do not begin a tag with the wildcard character.

/x Tag
Displays all allocations except those matching the specified tag. Tags are case sensitive. Do not type a space between the /x and the tag.

You can use the wildcard character (*) to represent zero or more instances of any character and the question mark character (?) to represent one instance of any character. Do not begin a tag with the wildcard character.

/c[ LocalTagFile]
Adds a column to the display (Mapped_Driver) listing the drivers on the local computer that assign each tag.

LocalTagFile is the name and location of a formatted text file that lists the drivers on the local computer and the tag values that they assign. This file is the data source for the Mapped_Driver column when you use the /c parameter. The default is Localtag.txt.

Poolmon can generate a local tag file for you. If you use the /c parameter and do not specify an alternate local tag file, and Poolmon does not find a Localtag.txt file in the current directory, it scans the drivers on the local computer (C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\*.sys) and generates a Localtag.txt file.

Notes

  • Poolmon cannot generate a Localtag.txt file on 64-bit versions of Windows Server 2003. As a result, the /c parameter and its functionality are available only on 32-vit versions of Windows.

  • You can use the /c and /g parameters in the same command. If you do, the Mapped_Driver column displays data from both the local tag and pool tag files.

/g[ PoolTagFile]
Adds a column to the display (Mapped_Driver) listing Windows components and commonly used drivers that assign each tag.

PoolTagFile is the name and location of a formatted text file that lists the names of Windows components and commonly used drivers and the tag values they assign. This file is the data source for the Mapped_Driver column that appears when you use the /g parameter. The default is pooltag.txt, a file provided by Microsoft. Pooltag.txt is installed when you install Support Tools or a Windows kernel debugger.

Note

  • You can use the /c and /g parameters in the same command. If you do, the Mapped_Driver column displays data from both the local tag and pool tag files.

/s[ TSSessionID]
Displays allocations from the Terminal Services session pools. If you specify a Terminal Service session ID, Poolmon displays the allocations from the memory pool for that session. Do not type a space between the /s parameter and the session ID.

Note

  • The system allocates memory from Terminal Services session pools only when the computer is configured as a terminal server. For more information, see "Terminal Services Session Support" in Poolmon Remarks.

/p
Displays only allocations from the non-paged pool.

/p /p
Displays only allocations from the paged pool.

/e
Displays pool totals. The totals appear at the bottom of the display.

/(or /)
Turns on the sort-by-change mode. With /( or /), Poolmon sorts by the change in a value (allocations, frees, bytes), instead of the value. The change in each value is displayed in a parentheses after the value.

Use with /a, /f, /b or /m. For example, poolmon /a sorts the display by number of allocations, while poolmon /( /a sorts the display by the change in the number of allocations.

/t
Sorts alphabetically by tag name. /t is the default.

/a
Sorts tags by the number of allocations.

/f
Sorts tags by the number of frees.

/d
Sorts tags by size difference between allocations and frees.

/b
Sorts tags by bytes used.

/m
Sorts tags by bytes per allocation.

/l
Turns highlighting off. By default, Poolmon highlights values that have changed since the last update.

/n[ File]
Saves a snapshot of the Poolmon output to a file, instead of displaying it in a command window. You can include other command-line parameters to configure the output.

File specifies the name and location of the snapshot file. The default is poolsnap.log.

/?or /?
Displays command-line syntax.

Running Syntax

While Poolmon runs, you can use the following keys to change the display:

Art Image[p][( | )][s][TSSessionID][i][l][e][t][a][f][d][b | u][m][h | ?]

p
Toggles the display between paged allocations, non-paged allocations, and both.

(or )
Toggles display between sorting by value (allocations, frees, bytes) and sorting by change in value.

s
Toggles the display between the system pools and the Terminal Services session pools.

TSSessionID
Displays allocations from the specified Terminal Services session pool. TSSessionID represents the session ID of a Terminal Services session. It must be an integer from 0 - 9. To display all session pools or to enter session IDs greater than 9, use the i parameter.

i
Prompts you for the session ID of a Terminal Server session.

To respond to the prompt:

  • To display allocations from all Terminal Services session pools, press Enter.

  • To display allocations from a particular Terminal Services session pool, type a session ID.

l
Toggles highlighting of changed lines on and off.

e
Toggles pool totals on and off. Totals appear at the bottom of the display.

t
Sorts by tag name. t is the default.

a
Sorts by number of allocations. When used with (, a sorts by the change in allocations.

f
Sorts by number of frees. When used with (, f sorts by the change in frees.

d
Sorts by difference between allocations and frees.

bor u
Sorts by bytes used. When used with (, b and u sort by the change in bytes used.

m
Sorts by bytes per allocation. When used with (, m sorts by the change in bytes per allocations.

hor ?
Displays help including command line syntax, running syntax, and a description of the output. To close help, press the ESC key.

qor ESC
Quits Poolmon.

See Also

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