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VT-UTF8, VT100+, and VT100 conventions

Updated: January 21, 2005

Applies To: Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2

VT-UTF8, VT100+, and VT100 conventions

Industry terminal definition conventions provide a smooth way for you to send commands from the remote management console--usually Special Administration Console (SAC)-- to the server. These terminal definition conventions ensure a consistent mechanism for managing systems in all states of operation and failure. Windows Server 2003 operating systems use the commands, which are described later in this topic. The firmware, service processors and client terminal software should also use these commands.

The VT100 Terminal Definition is the standard convention used to configure and conduct emergency management tasks with UNIX-based servers. VT100 does not support all keys on the standard PC 101-key layout, however. The VT-UTF8 convention makes available additional keys that are not provided by VT100 for the PC 101 keyboard. With VT-UTF8, you can also use colors and some standardized escape sequences that are commonly used for management tasks. With VT-UTF8, output sent to the serial port can be localized while UNIX interoperability for English is sustained.

For more information about viewing non-English output from Emergency Management Services, see Selecting client terminal software for Emergency Management Services.

VT100+ is a subset of VT-UTF8 that handles only VT100-compatible characters--that is, American National Standards Institute (ANSI) characters 0 through 127. VT-UTF8 is the preferred terminal type for viewing Emergency Management Services output using a terminal emulator, such as HyperTerminal, and for firmware or service processor output. In either case, if VT-UTF8 is not available, your next best choices are to try VT100+ and then VT100, in that order.

VT-UTF8 and VT100+ keyboard-to-escape-sequence mappings

If you plan to use a VT100, VT100+, or VT-UTF8 terminal emulator to communicate with Emergency Management Services or some other management console, the key mappings provided later in this topic should occur automatically when you press the associated key.

For example, to send an F2 keystroke to a remotely administered server from a terminal using the VT100+ or VT-UTF8 terminal definition, press F2. If you use VT100 emulation software or a terminal emulator that does not support all the key mappings or management escape sequences, however, you can type the escape sequences directly into the terminal. For example, to send an F2 from a VT100 terminal, type <ESC>, and then type 2.

The following table defines these VT100+ and VT-UTF8 key mappings.

 

VT100+ key Escape sequence sent

HOME

<ESC> h

END

<ESC> k

INSERT

<ESC> +

DELETE

<ESC> -

PAGE UP

<ESC> ?

PAGE DOWN

<ESC> /

ALT

<ESC>^A

CTRL

<ESC>^C

F1

<ESC> 1

F2

<ESC> 2

F3

<ESC> 3

F4

<ESC> 4

F5

<ESC> 5

F6

<ESC> 6

F7

<ESC> 7

F8

<ESC> 8

F9

<ESC> 9

F10

<ESC> 0

F11

<ESC> !

F12

<ESC> @

Note

  • PC function keys are not equivalent to the VT100 terminal function keys.

The following table lists VT-UTF8 escape sequences used to send special commands:

 

Action Escape sequence

Start firmware setup utility

^F

Reset

The computer will reset without shutting down Windows. This command requires either service processor support, or a power switch or uninterruptible power supply (UPS) with remote computer management capabilities.

<ESC>R<ESC>r<ESC>R

Invoke service processor

The service processor monitors the serial traffic for this escape sequence. When it detects the sequence, the service processor assumes control of the out-of-band port and immediately sends an acknowledgement sequence (defined later in this table). You cannot use Emergency Management Services until you exit the service processor. This command requires service processor support.

<ESC>(

Invoke power switch or UPS

The power switch or UPS monitors the serial traffic for this escape sequence. When it detects the sequence, the power switch assumes control of the out-of-band port and immediately sends an acknowledgement sequence (defined later in this table). You cannot use Emergency Management Services until you exit the power switch. This command requires a power switch or UPS with remote computer management capabilities.

<ESC>)

Power switch, UPS, or service processor acknowledgement

After taking control of the out-of-band port, the power switch, UPS, or service processor sends this escape sequence. This indicates that the power switch, UPS, or service processor has assumed control of the port and is ready for interaction. This command requires either service processor support, or a power switch or UPS with remote computer management capabilities.

<ESC>*

Exit power switch, UPS, or service processor; display a user interface (UI)

The power switch, UPS, or service processor releases control of the out-of-band port. Before it does so, it might display a user interface message. For example, it might display a warning message such as: "Do you want to save setting and exit? [y/n]." This command requires either service processor support, or a power switch or UPS with remote computer management capabilities.

Q

Exit power switch, UPS, or service processor; do not display a UI

The power switch, UPS, or service processor releases control of the out-of-band port without displaying a user interface (UI).

<ESC>Q

For more information, see Selecting the terminal definition setting.

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