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Bindiff Syntax

Updated: March 28, 2003

Applies To: Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2

BinDiff Syntax

BinDiff uses the following syntax:

Art Image bindiff [/b] [/c] [/d[Bytes]] [/s] [/v] [FileSpec1 FileSpec2]

Parameters

/b
Performs a straight binary compare. This parameter will not mask any time stamp or version information.

/c
Displays differing byte counts and summary information for the files specified in FileSpec1 and FileSpec2.

/d[ Bytes]
Displays the byte differences between the files specified in FileSpec1 and FileSpec2. Optionally specifies the number of non-differing bytes to show on each side of the differing regions in the files. The default value of Bytes is 8 bytes. Set Bytes to 0 to show only the differing bytes, or to -1 to dump both entire files.

/s
Compares all files in the subdirectory specified in FileSpec1 to the files in the subdirectory specified in FileSpec2.

/v
Excludes all version information in the executable files when performing the compare. This allows two executable files to be marked as "Near Identical" when the files are truly identical, differing only in build time or version number information. This parameter is ignored if used in conjunction with /b.

FileSpec1
Specifies the directory and name of a file, the name of a file, or a subdirectory to be compared to the specification listed in FileSpec2. The name can use the Universal Naming Convention (UNC) format ("\\myserver") or reference a local drive. If the file is located in the current directory FileSpec1 can also be the name of the file.

Note

  • The type of information listed in FileSpec1 must be the same type of information listed in FileSpec2. For example, if FileSpec1 is set to c:\myfile.dll, then FileSpec2 must also contain the name of a file, and not the name of a subdirectory (c:\new\myfile.dll, not c:\new\).

FileSpec2
Specifies the directory and name of a file, the name of a file, or a subdirectory to be compared to the specification listed in FileSpec1. The name can use the Universal Naming Convention (UNC) format ("\\myserver") or reference a local drive. If the file is located in the current directory FileSpec2 can also be the name of the file.

Note

  • The type of information listed in FileSpec2 must be the same type of information listed in FileSpec1. For example, if FileSpec2 is set to c:\myfile.dll, then FileSpec1 must also contain the name of a file, and not the name of a subdirectory (c:\new\myfile.dll, not c:\new\).

/?
Displays command-line usage.

Examples

See Also

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