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Installing Windows 2000 Professional

Upgrading from Windows NT Workstation 4.0 and 3.51, Windows 98, and Windows 95 must be done from within the existing operating system by using Winnt32.exe. To launch Setup from within an operating system, run Winnt32.exe from the command prompt, as well as any additional command-line options you might need.

Setup detects your previous operating system, and then prompts you to upgrade to Windows 2000. During the upgrade, the Setup Wizard detects and installs Windows 2000 drivers for your devices, and then it creates a report on devices that cannot be upgraded so that you can be sure your hardware and software are compatible with Windows 2000 Professional.

The following sections give detailed descriptions of the upgrade process for Windows NT Workstation 4.0 and 3.51, as well as Windows 95 and Windows 98.

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Note

Running Winnt.exe, performing a network installation, starting from the Windows 2000 Professional operating system CD, or using the four boot floppy disks performs a clean installation and does not allow you to upgrade. You must be inside the existing operating system to upgrade.

Running Winnt32.exe from the command prompt installs or upgrades Windows 2000 Professional from a previous version of Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT Workstation 4.0 and 3.51.

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Note

In this chapter, Winnt.exe and Winnt32.exe are also referred to as Setup.

Running Setup to Upgrade an Existing Microsoft Windows Operating System

You can run the winnt32 command at a Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT Workstation 4.0 and earlier command prompt.

The syntax of the Winnt32 command is as follows:

winnt32 [/s :sourcepath] [ /tempdrive :drive_letter] [/ unattend [num]:[answer_file]] [/ copydir :folder_name] [/ copysource :folder_name] [/ cmd :command_line] [/ debug [level]:[filename]] [/ udf :id[,UDF_file]] [/ syspart :drive_letter] [/ checkupgradeonly ] [/ cmdcons ] [/ m :folder_name] [/ makelocalsource ] [/ noreboot ]

Table 4.5 describes the Winnt32.exe command switches in more detail.

Table 4.5 Winnt32.exe Command Switches

Switch

Meaning

/s: sourcepath

Specifies the location of the Windows 2000 Professional files. To simultaneously copy files from multiple servers, specify multiple /s sources. To copy files from a particular server more quickly (depending on your local hardware), specify the same source multiple times.

/tempdrive: drive_letter

Directs Setup to place temporary files on the specified drive and to install Windows 2000 on that drive.

/unattend [num] : [answer_file]

Performs a new installation in unattended mode, using an answer file for user settings, rather than using settings from the previous installation. The num variable is the number of seconds between when Setup finishes copying the files and when Setup restarts. You can use num only on a computer running Windows 2000 Professional. The answer_file variable is the name of the answer file.

/copydir: folder_name

Creates an additional folder within the folder that contains the Windows 2000 Professional files. For example, if the source folder contains a Private_drivers folder that has modifications just for your site, you can type winnt32 /copydir:Private_drivers to have Setup copy that folder to your Windows 2000 Professional folder (C:\Winnt\Private_drivers). You can use the /copydir switch to create as many folders as you like. Replaces the /r switch.

/copysource: folder_name

Temporarily creates an additional folder within the folder that contains the Windows 2000 files. For example, if the source folder contains a Private_drivers folder that has modifications just for your site, you can type winnt32 /copysource:Private_drivers
to have Setup copy that folder to your Windows 2000 Professional folder and then use its files during Setup (C:\Winnt\Private_drivers). Unlike folders created by the /copydir switch, folders created by using /copysource are deleted after Setup completes.

/cmd: command_line

Instructs Setup to carry out a specific command before the final phase of setup; that is, after your computer has restarted twice and after Setup has collected the necessary configuration information, but before setup is complete.

/debug [level] : [filename]

Creates a debug log at the specified level. The default creates a log file (C:\Winnt32.log) that has the level set to 2 (Warning).

/udf:id [,UDF_file]

Indicates an identifier (id) that Setup uses to specify how a Uniqueness Database (UDF) file modifies an answer file (see the /unattend entry). The UDF overrides values in the answer file, and the identifier determines which values in the UDF file are used. For example, /udf:RAS_user,Our_company.udb overrides settings specified for the identifier RAS_user in the Our_company.udb file. If no UDF_file is specified, Setup prompts the user to insert a disk that contains the $Unique$.udb file.

/ syspart : drive_letter

Specifies that you can copy Setup startup files to a hard disk, mark the disk as active, and then install the disk into another computer. When you start that computer, it automatically starts with the next phase of the Setup. You must always use the /tempdrive switch with the /syspart switch.
The /syspart switch for Winnt32.exe only runs from a computer that already has Windows NT 3.51, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 2000 installed on it. It cannot be run on Windows 95 or Windows 98.

/ checkupgradeonly

Checks your computer for upgrade compatibility with Windows 2000. For Windows 95 or Windows 98 upgrades, Setup creates a report named Upgrade.txt in the Windows installation folder. For Windows NT 3.51 or 4.0 upgrades, it saves the report to the Winnt32.log in the installation folder.

/cmdcons

Adds to the operating system selection screen a Recovery Console option for repairing a failed installation. It is only used post-setup.

/ m : folder_name

Specifies that Setup must copy replacement files from an alternate location. Instructs Setup to look in the alternate location first and, if files are present, use them instead of the files from the default location.

/ makelocalsource

Instructs Setup to copy all installation source files to your local hard disk. Use /makelocalsource when installing from a CD-ROM to provide installation files when the CD-ROM is not available later in the installation.

/ noreboot

Instructs Setup to not restart the computer after the file copy phase of winnt32 is completed so that you can carry out another command.

Upgrading from Windows 95 or Windows 98

Upgrading from Windows 95 or Windows 98 to Windows 2000 Professional might require additional planning because of the differences in the registry structure and differences in how software developers structure their application setup procedures.

Also, while in Windows 95 or Windows 98 you do not need an account to access the operating system, in Windows 2000 Professional you are required to have an existing account, or you need to create an account during the upgrade. In this situation, if you do not already have an account set up on the Windows 95 or Windows 98 — based computer, set up an account on the Windows 95 or Windows 98 — based computer prior to upgrading to Windows 2000 Professional. This way, the Windows 95 or Windows 98 account migrated when you upgrade to Windows 2000 Professional. Prior to upgrading from Windows 95 or Windows 98 to Windows 2000 Professional, make sure that you meet the minimum hardware requirements. See Checking Hardware Requirements earlier in this chapter.

The following steps lead you through an upgrade from Windows 95 or Windows 98 to Windows 2000.

  1. When the Windows 2000 Professional operating system CD is inserted, the Autorun.inf program runs the installation SplashScreen, and then the installation procedure is initiated. The installer detects your current operating system version and, if the version on the CD is later, it asks if you want to upgrade. If the installation version is earlier than the installed version, you must perform a clean installation, and you cannot upgrade.

  2. At this point, Setup asks whether you want to install Windows 2000 Professional to a new directory, or upgrade an existing version of Windows.
    Figure 4.2 shows the Windows 2000 Professional Setup Wizard screen. Cc977142.prbb07(en-us,TechNet.10).gif
    Figure 4.2 Windows 2000 Professional Setup Screen

  3. Next you see the Windows 2000 Professional End User License Agreement (EULA) screen, shown in Figure 4.3. If you agree with the terms provided, select I accept this agreement to continue the installation. You have Next and Back buttons to move between screens. Cc977142.prbb04(en-us,TechNet.10).gif
    Figure 4.3 Windows 2000 Professional End User License Agreement Screen

  4. After the License Agreement screen, you see the Windows 2000 Professional UpgradePreparation screen, shown in Figure 4.4. Cc977142.prbb06(en-us,TechNet.10).gif
    Figure 4.4 Upgrade Preparation Screen

  5. The next screen is the Windows 2000 Professional Product Key , shown in Figure 4.5, where you are asked to enter the product key that came with your version of Windows 2000 Professional. Cc977142.prbb11(en-us,TechNet.10).gif
    Figure 4.5 Windows 2000 Professional Product ID Screen

  6. After entering the product key, clicking Next begins the hardware-detection phase of Setup. Setup detects the hardware on your system for the upgrade report.

  7. After the hardware-detection phase has completed, the next screen prompts you to provide upgrade packs. These can be either migration DLLs or upgrade files. If you choose YES , a screen appears asking you to add the available upgrade packs. If NO , click Next .

  8. Next you are presented with the option to upgrade to the NTFS file system . The Setup screen observes that, although this option provides added file security, reliability, and more efficient use of disk space, that you should not use it if you are planning to use Windows 2000 Professional with another operating system, such as MS-DOS or Windows 95 or Windows 98. In other words, don't convert the drive to NTFS if you want to be able to have a dual-boot configuration with Windows 95 or Windows 98 or MS-DOS and want access to all partitions from both operating systems. For more information on dual booting, see Planning a Multiple-Boot Configuration earlier in this chapter. This conversion is only for FAT or FAT32 drives and only applies to the drive where the operating system files reside.

  9. On systems that have hardware components with drivers that are known to not be Windows 2000–compatible, and software programs that cause problems or failures during the upgrade, you might be halted at this point with a message that one or more devices or programs will be disabled if you continue.

  10. After you make these choices, the installer copies the necessary files to your computers hard drive. This typically takes several minutes.

  11. When it is done, the computer needs to restart. You can choose to have it restart automatically, or you can do this manually. When it restarts, a new item appears in the Boot Manager startup menu, followed by several text-mode screens.

  12. You are prompted right before the first logon to enter a password for all user accounts you had on Windows 95 or Windows 98. If you had user profiles enabled, accounts are created for all users who log on to the computer. If you did not have user profiles enabled, only the current user account and the administrator account are created. All accounts are set to the password you select. They can be changed by means of Users and Passwords in Control Panel .

Upgrading Windows NT Workstation 4.0 from CD

The following procedure describes upgrading your existing Windows NT Workstation 4.0 operating system to Windows 2000 Professional.

  1. Start your computer by running your current operating system, and then insert the Windows 2000 Professional operating system CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.

  2. If Windows NT 4.0 does not detect the CD, from the Start menu, and then click Run . At the prompt, type the following command, replacing D with the letter assigned to your CD drive:

    • D :\i386\winnt32.exe

    • and then press Enter .


    – Or –

    • Run Setup from the root of the CD-ROM.

  3. The Windows 2000 Professional Setup screen appears, asking if you want to upgrade your existing operating system or perform a clean installation of Windows 2000 Professional, as shown in Figure 4.6. Cc977142.prbb07(en-us,TechNet.10).gif
    Figure 4.6 Windows 2000 Professional Setup Screen

  4. The Licensing Agreement screen is next. If you agree with the terms, select I accept this agreement to continue. You have Next and Back buttons to navigate between screens, as shown in Figure 4.7. Cc977142.prbb04(en-us,TechNet.10).gif
    Figure 4.7 Windows 2000 Professional End User License Agreement Screen

  5. The next screen is the Windows 2000 Professional Product Key , shown in Figure 4.8, where you are asked to enter the product key that came with your version of Windows 2000 Professional. Cc977142.prbb11(en-us,TechNet.10).gif
    Figure 4.8 Windows 2000 Professional Product Key Screen

  6. After entering the product key, Setup runs a compatibility check, which checks the computer for incompatible devices and applications.

  7. Next, Setup begins copying installation files to the hard drive, as shown in Figure 4.9. Cc977142.prbb03(en-us,TechNet.10).gif
    Figure 4.9 Copying Installation Files Screen

  8. After the installation files are copied, Setup initializes your Windows 2000 configuration. The computer then restarts.

  9. After Setup restarts the computer, you see a blue text screen, and then Setup begins to load the hard-drive controller drivers, search for earlier versions of the Windows operating system, and copy the remaining Setup files to the installation folders. When this is complete, Setup restarts.

  10. After Setup restarts, the graphical user interface (GUI) mode of Setup begins. Next, the Installing devices screen appears and detects your computer hardware devices, such as the mouse and keyboard, followed by the Network Settings screen, which installs the default network components. This can take several minutes.

  11. Next, the Components screen installs and configures default components, such as Component Services Accessories and Utilities, and Fax Service.

During the final stage of the installation, Windows 2000 Setup completes the following:

  • Installs Start menu items

  • Registers components

  • Saves settings

  • Removes temporary files

At this point, Setup is complete. For further information about setting up an account, joining a workgroup, or joining a domain, see Post-Installation Tasks later in this chapter.

When the computer restarts, the Welcome to Windows screen appears, prompting you to press CTRL+ALT+DELETE to log on.

Upgrading Windows NT Workstation 3.51 From CD

To begin your upgrade from Windows NT Workstation 3.51, start your computer by running your current operating system, and then insert the Windows 2000 Professional operating system CD into your CD-ROM drive.

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Note

Make sure that you have networking installed before starting the upgrade.

  1. In Program Manager , click File , and then click Run . At the prompt, type the following command, replacing D with the letter of your CD-ROM drive:
    D : \i386\winnt32.exe

  2. Press ENTER.

  3. Follow steps 3 through 11 of the procedure, Upgrading Windows NT 4.0 Workstation from CD.

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