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Import-LocalizedData

Updated: April 21, 2010

Applies To: Windows PowerShell 2.0

Imports language-specific data into scripts and functions based on the UI culture that is selected for the operating system.

Syntax

Import-LocalizedData [-BindingVariable] <string> [[-UICulture] <string>] [-BaseDirectory <string>] [-FileName <string>] [-SupportedCommand <string[]>] [<CommonParameters>]

Description

The Import-LocalizedData cmdlet dynamically retrieves strings from a subdirectory whose name matches the UI language set for the current user of the operating system. It is designed to enable scripts to display user messages in the UI language selected by the current user.

Import-LocalizedData imports data from .psd1 files in language-specific subdirectories of the script directory and saves them in a local variable that is specified in the command. The cmdlet selects the subdirectory and file based on the value of the $PSUICulture automatic variable. When you use the local variable in the script to display a user message, the message appears in the user's UI language.

You can use the parameters of Import-LocalizedData to specify an alternate UI culture, path, and file name, to add supported commands, and to suppress the error message that appears if the .psd1 files are not found.

The Import-LocalizedData cmdlet supports script internationalization in Windows PowerShell 2.0. This initiative aims to better serve users worldwide by making it easy for scripts to display user messages in the UI language of the current user. For more information about this and about the format of the .psd1 files, see about_Script_Internationalization.

Parameters

-BaseDirectory <string>

Specifies the base directory where the .psd1 files are located. The default is the directory where the script is located. Import-LocalizedData searches for the .psd1 file for the script in a language-specific subdirectory of the base directory.

 

Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-BindingVariable <string>

Specifies a variable into which the text strings are imported. Enter a variable name without a dollar sign ($).

When using Import-LocalizedData to replace default text strings specified in the DATA section of a script, assign the DATA section to a variable and enter the name of the DATA section variable in the value of the BindingVariable parameter. Then, when Import-LocalizedData saves the imported content in the BindingVariable, the imported data will replace the default text strings. If you are not specifying default text strings, you can select any variable name.

 

Required?

true

Position?

1

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-FileName <string>

Specifies the name of the .psd1 file to be imported. Enter a file name without the .psd1 file name extension.

The default is the name of the script. For example, if the script is FindFiles.ps1, Import-LocalizedData searches for FindFiles.psd1. You can use this parameter to direct Import-LocalizedData to search for a different .psd1 file.

 

Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-SupportedCommand <string[]>

Specifies cmdlets and functions that generate only data.

Use this parameter to include cmdlets and functions that you have written or tested. For more information, see about_Script_Internationalization.

 

Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

None

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-UICulture <string>

Specifies an alternate UI culture. The default is the value of the $PsUICulture automatic variable. Enter a UI culture in "<language>-<region>" format, such as en-US, de-DE, or ar-SA.

The value of the UICulture parameter determines the language-specific subdirectory (within the base directory) from which Import-LocalizedData gets the .psd1 file for the script.

The cmdlet searches for a subdirectory with the same name as the value of the UICulture parameter or the $PsUICulture automatic variable, such as "de-DE" or "ar-SA". If it cannot find the directory, or the directory does not contain a .psd1 file for the script, it searches for a subdirectory with the name of the language code, such as "de" or "ar". If it cannot find the subdirectory or .psd1 file, the command fails and the data is displayed in the default language specified in the script.

 

Required?

false

Position?

2

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

<CommonParameters>

This command supports the common parameters: Verbose, Debug, ErrorAction, ErrorVariable, OutBuffer, OutVariable, WarningAction, and WarningVariable. For more information, see about_CommonParameters.

Inputs and Outputs

The input type is the type of the objects that you can pipe to the cmdlet. The return type is the type of the objects that the cmdlet returns.

 

Inputs

None

You cannot pipe input to this cmdlet.

Outputs

System.Collections.Hashtable

Import-LocalizedData saves the hash table in the variable that is specified by the value of the BindingVariable parameter.

Notes

Before using Import-LocalizedData, localize your user messages. Format the messages for each locale (UI culture) in a hash table of key/value pairs, and save the hash table in a file with the same name as the script and a .psd1 file name extension. Create a directory under the script directory for each supported UI culture, and then save the .psd1 file for each UI culture in the directory with the UI culture name.

For example, localize your user messages for the de-DE locale and format them in a hash table. Save the hash table in a <ScriptName>.psd1 file. Then create a de-DE subdirectory under the script directory, and save the de-DE <ScriptName>.psd1 file in the de-DE subdirectory. Repeat this method for each locale that you support.

Import-LocalizedData performs a structured search for the localized user messages for a script.

Import-LocalizedData begins the search in the directory where the script file is located (or the value of the BaseDirectory parameter). It then searches within the base directory for a subdirectory with the same name as the value of the $PsUICulture variable (or the value of the UICulture parameter), such as "de-DE" or "ar-SA". Then, it searches in that subdirectory for a .psd1 file with the same name as the script (or the value of the FileName parameter).

If Import-LocalizedData cannot find a subdirectory with the name of the UI culture, or the subdirectory does not contain a .psd1 file for the script, it searches for a .psd1 file for the script in a subdirectory with the name of the language code, such as "de" or "ar". If it cannot find the subdirectory or .psd1 file, the command fails, the data is displayed in the default language in the script, and an error message is displayed explaining that the data could not be imported. To suppress the message and fail gracefully, use the ErrorAction common parameter with a value of SilentlyContinue.

If Import-LocalizedData finds the subdirectory and the .psd1 file, it imports the hash table of user messages into the value of the BindingVariable parameter in the command. Then, when you display a message from the hash table in the variable, the localized message is displayed.

For more information, see about_Script_Internationalization.

Example 1

C:\PS>import-localizeddata -bindingVariable messages

Description

-----------

This command imports text strings into the $messages variable. It uses all of the default values for the cmdlet parameters.

If the command is included in the Archives.ps1 script in the C:\test directory, and the value of the $PsUICulture automatic variable is zh-CN, Import-LocalizedData imports the Archives.psd1 file in the C:\test\zh-CN directory.

Example 2

C:\PS>import-localizeddata -bindingVariable msgTbl -uiculture ar-SA -filename Simple -baseDirectory C:\Data\Localized

Description

-----------

This command imports text strings into the $msgTbl variable of a script.

It uses the UICulture parameter to direct the cmdlet to import data from the Simple.psd1 file in the ar-SA subdirectory of C:\Data\Localized.

Example 3

C:\PS># In C:\Test\en-US\test.psd1:

ConvertFrom-StringData @'
 # English strings
Msg1 = "The Name parameter is missing from the command."
Msg2 = "This command requires the credentials of a member of the Administrators group on the computer."
Msg3 = "Use $_ to represent the object that is being processed."
'@

# In C:\Test\Test.ps1

import-localizeddata -bindingvariable messages
write-host $messages.msg2

# In Windows PowerShell

C:\PS> .\test.ps1
This command requires the credentials of a member of the Administrators group on the computer.

Description

-----------

This example shows how to use localized data in a simple script.

The first part of the example shows the contents of the Test.psd1 file. It contains a ConvertFrom-StringData command that converts a series of named text strings into a hash table. The test.psd1 file is located in the en-US subdirectory of the C:\Test directory that contains the script.

The second part of the example shows the contents of the Test.ps1 script. It contains an Import-LocalizedData command that imports the data from the matching .psd1 file into the $Messages variable and a Write-Host command that writes one of the messages in the $Messages variable to the host program.

The last part of the example runs the script. The output shows that it displays the correct user message in the UI language set for the current user of the operating system.

Example 4

C:\PS># In TestScript.ps1

$UserMessages = DATA {
    ConvertFrom-StringData @'
    # English strings
        Msg1 = "Enter a name."
        Msg2 = "Enter your employee ID."
        Msg3 = "Enter your building number."
'@ }

Import-LocalizedData -bindingVariable UserMessages

$UserMessages.Msg1
...

Description

-----------

This example shows how to use Import-LocalizedData to replace default text strings defined in the DATA section of a script.

In this example, the DATA section of the TestScript.ps1 script contains a ConvertFrom-StringData command that converts the contents of the DATA section to a hash table and stores in the value of the $UserMessages variable.

The script also includes an Import-LocalizedData command, which imports a hash table of translated text strings from the TestScript.psd1 file in the subdirectory specified by the value of the $PsUICulture variable. If the command finds the .psd1 file, it saves the translated strings from the file in the value of the same $UserMessages variable, overwriting the hash table saved by the DATA section logic.

The third command displays the first message in the $UserMessages variable.

If the Import-LocalizedData command finds a .psd1 file for the $PsUICulture language, the value of the $UserMessages variable contains the translated text strings. If the command fails for any reason, the command displays the default text strings defined in the DATA section of the script.

Example 5

C:\PS># In Day1.ps1
Import-LocalizedData -bindingVariable Day
Day.MessageDate

# In Day2.ps1
Import-LocalizedData -bindingVariable Day -errorAction:silentlycontinue
Day.MessageDate

C:\PS> .\Day1.ps1

Import-LocalizedData : Cannot find PowerShell data file 'Day1.psd1' in directory 'C:\ps-test\fr-BE\' or any parent culture directories.
At C:\ps-test\Day1.ps1:17 char:21
+ Import-LocalizedData <<<<  Day
Today is Tuesday


C:\PS> .\Day2.ps1

Today is Tuesday

Description

-----------

This example shows how to suppress the error messages that appear when Import-LocalizedData cannot find the directories that match the user's UI culture or cannot find a .psd1 file for the script in those directories.

You can use the ErrorAction common parameter with a value of "SilentlyContinue" to suppress the error message. This is especially useful when you have provided user messages in a default or "fallback" language, and no error message is needed.

This example compares two scripts, Day1.ps1 and Day2.ps1, that include an Import-LocalizedData command. The scripts are identical, except that Day2 uses the ErrorAction common parameter with a value of SilentlyContinue.

The sample output shows the results of running both scripts when the UI culture is set to fr-BE and there are no matching files or directories for that UI culture. Day1.ps1 displays an error message and English output. Day2.ps1 just displays the English output.

See Also

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