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Event ID 1066 — Cluster Storage Functionality

Updated: November 25, 2009

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

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In a failover cluster, most clustered services or applications use at least one disk, also called a disk resource, that you assign when you configure the clustered service or application. Clients can use the clustered service or application only when the disk is functioning correctly.

Event Details

Product: Windows Operating System
ID: 1066
Source: Microsoft-Windows-FailoverClustering
Version: 6.1
Symbolic Name: RES_DISK_CORRUPT_DISK
Message: Cluster disk resource '%1' indicates corruption for volume '%2'. Chkdsk is being run to repair problems. The disk will be unavailable until Chkdsk completes. Chkdsk output will be logged to file '%3'.
Chkdsk may also write information to the Application Event Log.

Resolve

Confirm volume integrity

If Chkdsk has been started automatically, we recommend that you allow it to run so that it can correct any problems with the file system. Chkdsk output will be logged to the <systemroot>\Cluster\Reports folder. Note that file-system errors might indicate that the hardware is deteriorating. For information about other ways of gathering information about a clustered disk that appears to have file system errors, see "Using logs and the clustering validation wizard to gather information about the state of a clustered disk" and "Running a disk maintenance tool such as Chkdsk on a clustered disk."

To view or change the current setting for the triggers for running Chkdsk on a clustered disk, see "Viewing or changing the setting for the triggers that cause Chkdsk to run on a clustered disk," later in this topic.

If you do not currently have Event Viewer open, see "Opening Event Viewer and viewing events related to failover clustering."

To perform the following procedures, you must be a member of the local Administrators group on each clustered server, and the account you use must be a domain account, or you must have been delegated the equivalent authority.

Using logs and the clustering validation wizard to gather information about the state of a clustered disk

To use logs and the clustering validation wizard to gather information about the state of a clustered disk:

  1. Scan appropriate event logs for errors that are related to the disk.
  2. Check cables and any related devices on the bus.
  3. To open the failover cluster snap-in, click Start, click Administrative Tools, and then click Failover Cluster Management. If the User Account Control dialog box appears, confirm that the action it displays is what you want, and then click Continue.
  4. In the Failover Cluster Management snap-in, in the console tree, make sure Failover Cluster Management is selected and then, under Management, click Validate a Configuration.
  5. Follow the instructions in the wizard to specify the cluster you want to test.
  6. On the Testing Options page, select Run only tests I select.
  7. On the Test Selection page, clear the check boxes for Network and System Configuration. This leaves only the tests for Storage and Inventory. You can run all these tests, or you can select only the specific tests that appear relevant to your situation.

    Important   If a clustered service or application is using a disk when you start the wizard, the wizard will prompt you about whether to take that clustered service or application offline for the purposes of testing. If you choose to take a clustered service or application offline, it will remain offline until the tests finish.

  8. Follow the instructions in the wizard to run the tests.
  9. On the Summary page, click View Report.

Running a disk maintenance tool such as Chkdsk on a clustered disk

If you need to run a disk maintenance tool such as Chkdsk on a clustered disk, use maintanence mode to prevent the disk maintenance tool from triggering failover.

To run a disk maintenance tool such as Chkdsk on a clustered disk:

  1. To open the failover cluster snap-in, click Start, click Administrative Tools, and then click Failover Cluster Management. If the User Account Control dialog box appears, confirm that the action it displays is what you want, and then click Continue.
  2. In the Failover Cluster Management snap-in, if the cluster is not displayed, in the console tree, right-click Failover Cluster Management, click Manage a Cluster, and select or specify the cluster you want.
  3. If the console tree is collapsed, expand the tree under the cluster that uses the disk on which you want run a disk maintenance tool.
  4. In the console tree, click Storage.
  5. In the center pane, click the disk on which you want to run the disk maintenance tool.
  6. Under Actions, click More Actions, and then click Turn On Maintenance Mode for this disk.
  7. Run the disk maintenance tool on the disk.

    When maintenance mode is on, the disk remains online in the cluster, but the disk maintenance tool can finish running without triggering a failover.

  8. When the disk maintenance tool finishes running, with the disk still selected, under Actions, click More Actions, and then click Turn Off Maintenance Mode for this disk.

Viewing or changing the setting for the triggers that cause Chkdsk to run on a clustered disk

Disk resources in a cluster have a private property setting called DiskRunChkDsk that specifies the triggers that will cause Chkdsk to run on the disk.

To view or change the setting for the triggers that cause Chkdsk to run on a clustered disk:

  1. To open an elevated Command Prompt window, on a node in the cluster, click Start, point to All Programs, click Accessories, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator.
  2. Type:

    CLUSTER RESOURCE /STATUS

  3. In the list of resources, find the name of the disk for which you want to view the setting.
  4. Type the following command, which requests a list of the private properties of the resource:

    CLUSTER RESOURCE "DiskResourceName" /PRIV

  5. In the resulting display, find the value (from 0 through 5) for DiskRunChkDsk.
  6. Compare the value to the following list:
    • 0   The default. If a bit has been set on the disk indicating possible file system inconsistency, or a quick check equivalent to a dir command at the root returns a file system error, runs Chkdsk /f /x.
    • 1   If a bit has been set on the disk indicating possible file system inconsistency, or a check equivalent to a dir /s command at the root returns a file system error, runs Chkdsk /f /x.
    • 2   Whenever the disk is mounted, runs Chkdsk /f /x.
    • 3   When the disk is mounted, runs Chkdsk, unless a bit has been set on the disk indicating possible file system inconsistency, or a quick check equivalent to a dir command at the root returns a file system error. In the latter cases, runs Chkdsk /f /x.
    • 4   No action; Chkdsk is never triggered by the cluster software.
    • 5   Runs a check equivalent to a dir /s command at the root and if a file system error is returned, does not mount the disk. Otherwise, no action is taken.
  7. To change the setting for the disk, run a command of the following form, replacing n with the value you choose from the preceding list:

    CLUSTER RESOURCE "DiskResourceName" /PRIV DISKRUNCHKDSK=n

  8. To confirm the setting, type the following command again:

    CLUSTER RESOURCE "DiskResourceName" /PRIV

Opening Event Viewer and viewing events related to failover clustering

To open Event Viewer and view events related to failover clustering:

  1. If Server Manager is not already open, click Start, click Administrative Tools, and then click Server Manager. If the User Account Control dialog box appears, confirm that the action it displays is what you want, and then click Continue.
  2. In the console tree, expand Diagnostics, expand Event Viewer, expand Windows Logs, and then click System.
  3. To filter the events so that only events with a Source of FailoverClustering are shown, in the Actions pane, click Filter Current Log. On the Filter tab, in the Event sources box, select FailoverClustering. Select other options as appropriate, and then click OK.
  4. To sort the displayed events by date and time, in the center pane, click the Date and Time column heading.

Verify

Confirm that the disk resource can come online. If there have been recent problems with writing to the disk, it can be appropriate to monitor event logs and monitor the function of the corresponding clustered service or application, to confirm that the problems have been resolved.

To perform the following procedures, you must be a member of the local Administrators group on each clustered server, and the account you use must be a domain account, or you must have been delegated the equivalent authority.

Confirming that a disk resource can come online

To confirm that a disk resource can come online:

  1. To open the failover cluster snap-in, click Start, click Administrative Tools, and then click Failover Cluster Management. If the User Account Control dialog box appears, confirm that the action it displays is what you want, and then click Continue.
  2. In the Failover Cluster Management snap-in, if the cluster you want to manage is not displayed, in the console tree, right-click Failover Cluster Management, click Manage a Cluster, and then select or specify the cluster that you want.
  3. If the console tree is collapsed, expand the tree under the cluster you want to manage, and then expand Services and Applications.
  4. In the console tree, click a clustered service or application.
  5. In the center pane, expand the listing for the disk resource. View the status of the resource.
  6. If a disk resource is offline, to bring it online, right-click the resource and then click Bring this resource online.

To perform a quick check on the status of a resource, you can run the following command.

Using a command to check the status of a resource in a failover cluster

To use a command to check the status of a resource in a failover cluster:

  1. On a node in the cluster, click Start, point to All Programs, click Accessories, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator.
  2. Type:

    CLUSTER RESOURCE ResourceName /STATUS

    If you run the preceding command without specifying a resource name, status is displayed for all resources in the cluster.

Related Management Information

Cluster Storage Functionality

Failover Clustering

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