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Using Proxy Selection and Proxy Bypass Lists

Using a proxy server can allow the administrator to limit access to the Internet. You can specify the proxy server in the Internet Explorer 6 Customization Wizard, in the IEAK Profile Manager, and through the browser. You can also restrict the ability of the user to change the proxy settings using either the Policies and Restrictions page in the Internet Explorer 6 Customization Wizard or the Profile Manager.

For detailed instructions on configuring the proxy selection and proxy bypass settings using the IEAK, see Automatic Configuration and Proxy Settings screens in Stage 4 of the Internet Explorer 6 Customization Wizard.

Note Note 

  • The proxy bypass feature may eliminate the need for using JavaScript or JScript to select a proxy.

To configure the proxy selection and proxy bypass settings in Internet Explorer

  1. Click the Tools menu in Internet Explorer, and then click Internet Options.

  2. Click the Connections tab, and then click LAN Settings.

  3. In the Proxy Server area, select the Use a proxy server check box.

  4. Click Advanced, and then fill in the proxy location and port number for each Internet protocol that is supported.

    Note Note

    • In most cases, only a single proxy is used for all protocols. In those cases, enter the proxy location and port number for the HTTP setting, and then select the Use the same proxy server for all protocols check box.

    • The proxy locations that do not begin with a protocol (such as "http://" or "ftp://") are assumed to be a CERN-type HTTP proxy. For example, the entry "proxy" would be treated the same as the entry "http://proxy." For FTP gateways, such as the TIS FTP gateway and the WinGate Win95 Modem FTP proxy, the proxy should be listed with the protocol "ftp://" in front of the proxy name. For example, you would enter an FTP gateway "ftpproxy" as "ftp://ftpproxy."

  5. To bypass more complex addresses, type the addresses in the Do not use proxy server for addresses beginning with: box.

    A proxy bypass entry can begin with a protocol type, such as http://, https://, ftp://, or gopher://. If a protocol type is used, the exception entry applies only to requests for that protocol. Note that the protocol value is not case sensitive. Multiple entries should be separated by a semicolon (;).

    Next, an Internet address, an IP address, or domain name must be entered. If no protocol is specified, any request using the address is bypassed. If a protocol is specified, requests with the address are bypassed only if they are of the indicated protocol type. As with the protocol type, address entries are not case sensitive.

    Finally, a port number can be added. If it is used, the request is processed only if all previous requirements are met and the request uses the specified port number.

    The exception dialog box allows a wildcard character ( * ) to be used in the place of zero or more characters.

Examples of Wildcard Characters

You can use wildcards in the following situations:

  • Enter a wildcard at the beginning of an Internet address, IP address, or domain name to bypass servers with a common ending. For example, use "*.example.com" to bypass any entries ending in ".example.com" (such as "some.example.com" and "www.example.com").

  • Enter a wildcard in the middle of an Internet address, IP address, or domain name to bypass servers with a common beginning and ending. For example, the entry "www.*.com" matches any entry that starts with "www" and ends with "com" (such as "www.example.com," "www.department.example.com," and so on).

  • Enter a wildcard at the ending of an Internet address, IP address, or domain name to bypass servers with a common beginning. For example, use "www.example.*" to bypass any entries that begin with "www.example." (such as "www.example.com," "www.example.org," and "www.example.microsoft.com").

  • Use multiple wildcards to bypass addresses with similar patterns. For example, use "123.1*.66.*" to bypass addresses such as "123.144.66.12," "123.133.66.15," and "123.187.66.13."

Note Note 

  • Although wildcards are powerful, they must be used carefully. For example the entry "www.*.com," will cause Internet Explorer to bypass the proxy for most Web sites.

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