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DHCP Server Migration: Post-Migration Tasks

Updated: February 11, 2010

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

The post-migration tasks for the source server are optional, depending on your migration scenario.

Migration is complete after you have verified that the destination server, not the source server, is now serving the network. If your verification efforts demonstrate that the migration failed, see “Restoring DHCP in the event of migration failure” later in this topic.

After you have verified the migration, you can disconnect, repurpose, or retire the source server. If the source server is running other server roles, it should be left on the network. If you do not have to use this computer, you can store it as a backup in case you ever have to revert to your previous DHCP configuration.

  • If your migration scenario includes a standalone DHCP Server, then this source server was taken offline after the export file was created, as described in DHCP Server Migration: Preparing to Migrate. In this scenario, the DHCP service was interrupted from the time that it was stopped until the migration was complete on the new server, as described in DHCP Server Migration: Migrating the DHCP Server Role.

  • If your migration scenario includes more than one DHCP Server in a domain, a backup or other DHCP server continues to serve IP addresses during the migration so that services to clients are never interrupted. The migration is complete on the new server when the IP address of the source server is migrated to the destination server.

After you have confirmed that the destination server is performing the functions previously handled by the source server, you can retire or repurpose the source server, depending on your needs. Follow your organization’s policy regarding server decommissioning. For information about decommissioning a domain controller, see Decomissioning a Domain Controller (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=128290).

WarningWarning
After the source server is repurposed as a member server, otherwise repurposed or retired from service, you cannot roll that server back to its previous working state.

If the migration of DHCP Server fails, you have these options:

  • If the source server has not been repurposed, an administrator can reassign the IP configuration settings, reauthorize the server, and restart the DHCP service on the original server.

  • Use the backup files that were created on the source server, as described in DHCP Server Migration: Preparing to Migrate, to restore DHCP server on the original DHCP server.

You should be able to complete a rollback in one to two hours.

The Windows Server Migration Tools deployment log file is located at %windir%\Logs\SmigDeploy.log. Additional Windows Server Migration Tools log files are created at the following locations.

  • %windir%\Logs\ServerMigration.log

  • On Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2: %localappdata%\SvrMig\Log

  • On Windows Server 2003: %userprofile%\Local Settings\Application Data\SvrMig\Log

If migration log files cannot be created in the previous locations, ServerMigration.log and SmigDeploy.log are created in %temp%, and other logs are created in %windir%\System32.

For DHCP-specific troubleshooting tips, see Troubleshooting DHCP servers on the Windows Server TechCenter (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=128533). Although these tips are written for Windows Server 2003, they also address common issues that apply to later versions of the operating system.

If a migration cmdlet fails, and the Windows PowerShell session closes unexpectedly with an access violation error message, look for a message similar to the following example in the %localappdata%\SvrMig\Logs\setuperr.log file.FatalError [0x090001] PANTHR Exception (code 0xC0000005: ACCESS_VIOLATION) occurred at 0x000007FEEDE9E050 in C:\Windows\system32\migwiz\unbcl.dll (+000000000008E050).  Minidump attached (317793 bytes).

This failure occurs when the server cannot contact domain controllers that are associated with domain users or groups who are members of local groups, or who have rights to files or shares that are being migrated. When this happens, each domain user or group is displayed in the GUI as an unresolved security identifier (SID). An example of a SID is S-1-5-21-1579938362-1064596589-3161144252-1006.

To prevent this problem, verify that required domain controllers or global catalog servers are running, and that network connectivity allows communication between both source and destination servers and required domain controllers or global catalog servers.  Then, run the cmdlets again.

  1. Before you run Export-SmigServerSetting, Import-SmigServerSetting or Get-SmigServerFeature again, remove all unresolved domain users or groups who are members of local groups from the server on which you are running the cmdlet.

  2. Before you run Send-SmigServerData or Receive-SmigServerData again, remove all unresolved domain users or groups who have user rights to files, folders, or shares on the migration source server.

All Windows Server Migration Tools cmdlets return results as objects. You can save result objects, and query them for more information about settings and data that were migrated. You can also use result objects as input for other Windows PowerShell commands and scripts.

The Windows Server Migration Tools Import-SmigServerSetting and Export-SmigServerSetting cmdlets return results in a list of MigrationResult objects. Each MigrationResult object contains information about the data or setting that the cmdlet processes, the result of the operation, and any related error or warning messages. The following table describes the properties of a MigrationResult object.

 

Property name Type Definition

ItemType

Enum

The type of item being migrated. Values include General, WindowsFeatureInstallation, WindowsFeature, and OSSetting.

ID

String

The ID of the migrated item. Examples of values include Local User, Local Group, and DHCP.

Success

Boolean

The value True is displayed if migration was successful; otherwise, False is displayed.

DetailsList

List <MigrationResultDetails>

A list of MigrationResultDetails objects.

Send-SmigServerData and Receive-SmigServerData cmdlets return results in a list of MigrationDataResult objects. Each MigrationDataResult object contains information about the data or share that the cmdlet processes, the result of the operation, any error or warning messages, and other related information. The following table describes the properties of a MigrationDataResult object.

 

Property name Type Definition

ItemType

Enum

The type of migrated item. Values include File, Folder, Share, and Encrypted File.

SourceLocation

String

The source location of the item, shown as a path.

DestinationLocation

String

The destination location of the item, shown as a path.

Success

Boolean

The value True is displayed if migration was successful; otherwise, False is displayed.

Size

Integer

The item size, in bytes.

ErrorDetails

List <MigrationResultDetails>

A list of MigrationResultDetails objects.

Error

Enum

Errors enumeration for errors that occurred.

WarningMessageList

List <String>

A list of warning messages.

The following table describes the properties of objects within the MigrationResultDetails object that are common to both MigrationResult and MigrationDataResult objects.

 

Property name Type Definition

FeatureId

String

The name of the migration setting that is related to the item. Examples of values include IPConfig and DNS. This property is empty for data migration.

Messages

List <String>

A list of detailed event messages.

DetailCode

Integer

The error or warning code associated with each event message.

Severity

Enum

The severity of an event, if events occurred. Examples of values include Information, Error, and Warning.

Title

String

Title of the result object. Examples of values include the network adapter physical address for IP configuration, or user name for local user migration.

The following examples show how to store the list of the result objects in a variable, and then use the variable in a query to return the content of result objects after migration is complete.

  1. To run a cmdlet and save the result in variable, type a command in the following format, and then press Enter.

    $VariableName = $(Cmdlet)
    

    The following is an example.

    $ImportResult = $(Import-SmigServerSetting -FeatureId DHCP -User all -Group -Path D:\rmt\DemoStore -force -Verbose)
    

    This command runs the Import-SmigServerSetting cmdlet with several parameters specified, and then saves result objects in the variable ImportResult.

  2. After the Import-SmigServerSetting cmdlet has completed its operations, return the information that is contained in the result object by typing a command in the following format, and then pressing Enter.

    $VariableName
    

    In the following example, the variable is named ImportResult.

    $ImportResult
    

    This command returns information that was contained in the result objects that were returned by Import-SmigServerSetting in the example shown in step 1. The following is an example of the output that is displayed by calling the ImportResult variable.

               ItemType  ID                              Success  DetailsList
               --------  --                              -------  -----------
              OSSetting  Local User                         True  {Local User, Loc...
              OSSetting  Local Group                        True  {Local Group, Lo...
         WindowsFeature  DHCP                               True  {}
    
    

    Each line of the previous sample is a migration result for an item that was migrated by using the Import-SmigServerSetting cmdlet. The column heading names are properties of MigrationResult objects. You can incorporate these properties into another command to return more detail about result objects, as shown by examples in step 3 and forward.

  3. To display a specific property for all result objects in the list, type a command in the following format, and then press Enter.

    $<VariableName>| Select-Object -ExpandProperty <PropertyName>
    

    The following is an example.

    $importResult | Select-Object -ExpandProperty DetailsList
    
  4. You can run more advanced queries to analyze result objects by using Windows PowerShell cmdlets. The following are examples.

    • The following command returns only those details of result objects that use the ID Local User.

      $ImportResult | Where-Object { $_.ID -eq "Local User" } | Select-Object -ExpandProperty DetailsList
      
    • The following command returns only those details of result objects that use an ID of Local User that have a message severity equal to Warning.

      $ImportResult | Where-Object { $_.ID -eq "Local User" } | Select-Object -ExpandProperty DetailsList | ForEach-Object { if ($_.Severity -eq "Warning") {$_} }
      
    • The following command returns only the details of result objects that use an ID of Local Group that also have the title Remote Desktop Users.

      $ImportResult | Where-Object { $_.ID -eq "Local Group" } | Select-Object -ExpandProperty DetailsList | ForEach-Object { if ($_.Title -eq "Remote DesktopUsers") {$_} }
      

For more information about the cmdlets that are used in the previous examples, see the following additional resources.

  • Where-Object on the Microsoft Script Center Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=134853).

  • Select-Object on the Microsoft Script Center Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=134858).

  • ForEach-Object on the Microsoft Script Center Web site (http://www.microsoft.com/technet/scriptcenter/topics/msh/cmdlets/foreach-object.mspx)

For more information about Windows PowerShell scripting techniques, see What Can I Do With Windows PowerShell? - Scripting Techniques on the Microsoft Script Center Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=134862).

See Also

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