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File Services Migration: Preparing to Migrate

Updated: February 11, 2010

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

This guide provides you with instructions for migrating the File Services role to a server that is running Windows Server® 2008 R2.

Windows Server Migration Tools in Windows Server 2008 R2 allows an administrator to migrate some server roles, features, operating system settings, shared folders, and other data from computers that are running certain editions of Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, or Windows Server 2008 R2 to computers that are running Windows Server 2008 R2.

For complete installation, configuration, and removal instructions for Windows Server Migration Tools, see Windows Server Migration Tools Installation, Access, and Removal (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=134763) step-by-step guide on the Windows Server 2008 R2 TechCenter.

Migration documentation and tools ease the process of migrating server role settings and data from an existing server that is running a Windows server operating system to another computer. For a complete list of supported operating systems, see the File Services Migration Guide.

By using these tools to migrate roles, you can simplify migration, reduce migration time, increase accuracy of the migration process, and help eliminate conflicts that could otherwise occur during the migration process.

Cmdlets (pronounced command-lets) are built-in commands included in the Windows PowerShell™ command-line interface. They are installed by default as part of Windows Server 2008 R2.

You can obtain detailed Help about specific syntax, parameters, and usage guidelines for any installed Windows PowerShell cmdlet during a Windows PowerShell session. Type Get-Help <cmdlet_name> -full where cmdlet_name represents the name of the cmdlet for which you want help.

Although most commands for <role name> migration are Windows PowerShell cmdlets, you can run executable files in a Windows PowerShell session by adding an ampersand (&) before the executable file name. The ampersand is the call operator in Windows PowerShell. Except where specifically noted, Windows PowerShell cmdlets are not case-sensitive.

If the executable file is not in the current directory, add the fully-qualified path name, as shown in the following examples. If an executable file name contains spaces, enclose the file name in quotation marks. If you are running the executable file from the current directory, precede the file name with .\.

  • Executable file that is not in the current directory: PS C:\> & C:\Windows\System32\notepad.exe

  • Executable file that is in the current directory: PS C:\Windows\System32> &.\notepad.exe

  • Executable file name that contains a space and is in the current directory: PS C:\Windows\System32> & ".\executable test.exe"

For more information about Windows PowerShell and how cmdlets work, see Windows PowerShell on the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=122931).

The following list outlines the major steps for preparing to migrate File Services.

ImportantImportant
Before you run the Import-SmigServerSetting, Export-SmigServerSetting, or Get-SmigServerFeature cmdlets, verify that during migration, both source and destination servers can contact the domain controller that is associated with domain users or groups who are members of local groups on the source server.

Before you run the Send-SmigServerData or Receive-SmigServerData cmdlets, verify that during migration, both source and destination servers can contact the domain controller that is associated with those domain users who have rights to files or shares that are being migrated.

The following steps are necessary to prepare the destination server for migration.

Verify that the data locations for the destination server have sufficient free space to migrate the data. Ensure that the destination server hard disk drives are the same size or larger than the source server hard disk drives.

There are several software requirements that must be met to ensure a successful migration.

  • Consult the migration matrix to determine if you can migrate the version of Windows Server that you are running on the source server to Windows Server 2008 R2. For a complete list of supported operating systems, see the File Services Migration Guide.

  • Before migration, install all critical updates and service packs on the source server that were released before Windows Server 2008 R2. It is a recommended best practice that you install all current critical updates and service packs on the source server and the destination server.

Verify that the destination server can resolve the names of domain users who are members of the local group during the import operation. If source server and destination server are in different domains, the destination server must be able to contact a global catalog server for the forest in which the source domain user accounts are located.

  1. Install Windows Server 2008 R2 on the destination server.

  2. Ensure that the time and date are set correctly on the destination server, and that they are in sync with the source server.

  3. Determine the File Services that have been installed on the source server and then install the same Files Services on the destination server.

  4. Install Windows Server Migration Tools on the destination server.

    For more information about how to install Windows Server Migration Tools, see Windows Server Migration Tools Installation, Access and Removal (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=134763).

  5. Open UDP port 7000 and make sure that it is not in use by other applications. This port is used by Send-SmigServerData and Receive-SmigServerData to establish a data transfer connection.

    noteNote
    If you have changed the default behavior of Windows Firewall to block outbound traffic on computers that are running Windows Server 2008 R2, you must explicitly allow outbound traffic on UDP port 7000.

  6. Open TCP port 7000 and make sure that it is not in use by other applications. This port is used by Send-SmigServerData and Receive-SmigServerData to perform the data transfer.

    For more information about how to open UDP port 7000 and TCP port 7000, see File Services Migration: Appendix A: Optional Procedures.

    For more information about how to determine if a port is in use, see the following article on the Microsoft Web site: How To Determine Which Program Uses or Blocks Specific Transmission Control Protocol Ports in Windows Server 2003 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=149887).

  7. Verify that the destination path has sufficient disk space to migrate the data. If NTFS or FSRM quota management is enabled on the destination server disk drive, verify that the NTFS or FSRM quota limit allows for sufficient free disk space to migrate data. For more information about FSRM quota management, see one of the following.

    • Quota Management (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=154277) for Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2

    • Quota Management (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=154241) for Windows Server 2003 R2

    For more information about NTFS quota management, see one of the following.

    • Setting Disk Quotas (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=154243) for Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2

    • Enable disk quotas (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=154245) for Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2

If you are using File Server classification plug-ins from a non-Microsoft vendor, you should register the non-Microsoft plug-ins on the destination server and refer to additional instructions for migration from the non-Microsoft plug-in vendor. You should register the plug-in after File Server Resource Manager (FSRM) has been installed and started on the destination server.

Use the same drive letters for the destination server volumes as for the source server. This is required, because FSRM migration requires the drive letter to remain the same.

Do not allow users to access the destination server until migration is fully completed. This ensures data integrity and prevents failure when an open file on the destination server cannot be overwritten during migration.

Server migration tools preserve file and folder permissions during data migration. When you are planning the migration, keep in mind that if the migrated files and folder inherit permissions from their parents, during migration it is the inheritance setting that is migrated, not the inherited permissions. Therefore it is important to make sure that the parent folders on the source server and the destination server have the same permissions to maintain the permissions on migrated data that has inherited permissions.

For example:

  1. Migrate folder c:\A\C from the source server to folder c:\B\D on the destination server.

  2. Verify that on the source server, only Mary has access to folder c:\A and folder c:\A\C is specified to inherit permission from its parent.

  3. Verify that on the destination server, only John has access to folder c:\B. After c:\A\C is migrated to c:\B\D, John will have access to folder D, but Mary will not.

If you use permissions inheritance for the migrated data, ensure that the parent folder for the migrated data on the destination server has the required permission set.

The Distributed File System (DFS) Namespaces role service must be installed, and the DFS Namespace service must be running before migration. If the DFS Namespaces that you are migrating are domain-based, both source and destination servers must be in the same Active Directory® Domain Services (AD DS) domain. If the DFS Namespaces are stand-alone namespaces, AD DS membership does not matter.

The DFS Replication role service must be installed, and DFS Replication must be running before you start the migration. The destination server must be joined to the same AD DS forest as the source server.

If DFS Namespaces are being migrated, back up the source server by using a full server backup or system state backup. If the DFS Namespaces are part of an Active Directory domain, you need to back up the AD DS domain to save the AD DS configuration information for DFS Namespaces.

For each domain-based DFS namespace, you should also back up the configuration information for the namespace. Repeat the following command for each namespace and save the output filename to a safe location:

DFSUtil.exe root export <\\<DomainName>\Namespace> <Filename>
noteNote
DFSUtil.exe is available on computers that are running Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2. It is available to download for use on Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2 as part of the Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1 32-bit Support Tools (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=147453).

The following sections describe how to prepare the source server for the migration.

  • Install Windows Server Migration Tools on the source server.

    For more information about how to install Windows Server Migration Tools, see Windows Server Migration Tools Installation, Access and Removal (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=134763).

  • Verify that the time and date are set correctly on the destination server and that they are synchronized with the source server.

  • Open UDP port 7000 and make sure that is not in use by other applications. This port is used by Send-SmigServerData and Receive-SmigServerData to establish a data transfer connection.

    noteNote
    If you have changed the default behavior of Windows Firewall to block outbound traffic on computers that are running Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2, you must explicitly allow outbound traffic on UDP port 7000.

  • Open TCP port 7000 and make sure that it is not in use by other applications. This port is used by Send-SmigServerData and Receive-SmigServerData to perform the data transfer.

For more information about how to open UDP port 7000 and TCP port 7000, see File Services Migration: Appendix A: Optional Procedures.

For more information about how to determine if a port is in use, see the following article on the Microsoft Web site: How To Determine Which Program Uses or Blocks Specific Transmission Control Protocol Ports in Windows Server 2003 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=149887).

To minimize downtime and reduce impact to users, plan your data migration to occur during off-peak hours. Use the net share command to list all shared folders on the source server.

You can use this list during the verification step to verify that all the required shared folders have migrated. Reparse points and hard links will not migrate when data is copied (versus a physical migration), and the reparse points need to be migrated manually. When you migrate hard links, a separate file is created on the destination server for each link. If your migration involves copying the data to the destination server, follow the instructions for how to detect the reparse points and hard links in File Services Migration: Appendix A: Optional Procedures. Then you can remap and recreate them during migration, as instructed in the For copy data migration scenarios section.

DFS Namespaces role services must be installed, and DFS Namespace service must be running before migration.

For information about DFS Namespaces preparation, see Prepare DFS Namespaces on source server.

For information about DFS Replication preparation, see Prepare DFS replication on source server.

For domain-based namespaces with one namespace server, determine if you will add a temporary server to the namespace or if you will perform a manual inventory of the namespace permissions.

  • Option 1 (recommended):

    Add a temporary server as a namespace server to each domain-based namespace on the source server when the source server is the only namespace server.

  • Option 2:

    Inventory the permissions for managing each of the namespaces that are hosted on the source server when the source server is the only namespace server. This process can be completed by using the DFS Management MMC Snap-in.

Check the replication backlog by using the command dfsrdiag backlog to verify that the source server is synchronized with its replication partners.

For each replication partner, perform the following commands on each replicated folder:

dfsrdiag backlog /ReceivingMember:<Source Server> /SendingMember:<Replication Partner Server> /RGName:<Replication Group Name> /RFName:<Replicated Folder Name>
dfsrdiag backlog /ReceivingMember:<Replication Partner Server> /SendingMember:<Source Server> /RGName:<Replication Group Name> /RFName:<Replicated Folder Name>

Data and shared folder migration requires preparing other computers in the enterprise. Following are the steps that you should perform for copy data migration scenarios, and for physical data scenarios.

  • Notify the users that the server performance may be reduced during the first phase of data migration.

  • Ask users to stop using the server before the second phase of data migration begins (to prevent possible data loss).

  • Notify users that they cannot access their files on the server when the second phase of the migration begins until the file server migration is fully completed.

Notify the users that they cannot access the file server from the moment the storage is disconnected from the source server until the server migration is fully completed.

See Also

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